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From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Terumah

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this edition of Here’s My Story for Parsha Terumah.

Rabbi Mendel Lipskar is the executive director of Chabad of South Africa. He also serves as the rabbi of the Shul at Hyde Pak in Johannesburg. He was interviewed in our recent My Encounter trip to South Africa in August of 2014.
 
Click here for the story. 

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Yisro

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story.


Dovber Klein, a teacher at the Chinuch N’Orim Talmud Torah and Chabad youth leader, has just published a book, Sea Traveler, on Chassidic meditation during prayer. He was interviewed in Manchester in March of 2015. 

Click  
here for the story.

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Beshalach

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story
Mr. Ron Nachman (1942-2013) served as mayor of Ariel, Israel, for 28 years – from 1985 until his passing. He was interviewed in January of 2001. 
Click  
here for the story.

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Bo

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story
Rabbi Fishel Jacobs is a speaker, author and the head responder for numerous websites dealing with issues of family purity. He has previously served as an officer in the Israeli army and a rabbi in the prison service. He was interviewed in May of 2014. Click  here for the story.

For a video of Rabbi Jacobs recounting his experience with the Rebbe, as well as a recording of his yechidus (private audience), click here .

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Va'eira

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story. Mrs. Chaya Hecht (1931-2017) lived in Brooklyn, New York and worked as a preschool teacher for over fifty years. She was interviewed in February of 2015.

Click here for the story: 
http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/262.-Vaeira-5778-EMAIL.pdf 

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

Alta Rebbe's Yahrzeit - 24 Tevet

But Rabbi, Are We Destined to a Life of Struggle!?

It was a very stimulating group of students. I was their Tanya teacher for over a period of three years, when they were ages 14 to 17. I was a no-nonsense teacher. They had to memorize the chapters of Tanya. When I see them, even today 20 years later, I ask them to say a few lines of Tanya for me. They smile as they say a few lines from memory. These young ladies are living all over the world, serving as leaders in their communities and raising beautiful families.

I remember vividly, in discussing the struggle of the “Beinoni” (the intermediate level) between the two forces found in each individual – the G-dly Soul and the Animal Soul, and that this was a life-long struggle, one of the young students raised their hand and said, “But Rabbi, Are we destined to a life of struggle?”

Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia

This coming week, Thursday, January 11th is the 24th of Tevet, the Yahrtzeit of the Alta Rebbe, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Laidi, the first Rebbe of Chabad. From Ha Yom Yom: “He leaves Laidi on the eye of Shabbat Mevarchim Elul 57572 (1812). After wandering with his family and many Chassidism, he arrives in the village of Piena, Kursk Province, on 12 Tevet 5583 (1812). There, after Shabbat ends, the eve of Sunday, 24 Tevet, he passes away. He is interred in Haditz, Poltava Province.”

The reason the Rebbe decided to leave the city of Laidi was to avoid Napoleon’s advancing armies. Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812 as part of his plan to bring all of Europe under his hegemony. The Rebbe was fiercely opposed to Napoleon’s grand designs. Supporting the Czar of Russia, the Rebbe was escorted by a troop of soldiers by express order of the Czar.

For more information on this history between The Rebbe and Napoleon: https://goo.gl/G9Beyd

Beinoni

“Rabbi Shneur Zalman was a brilliant Talmudist and an original thinker of the highest order. He composed a famous and authoritative halachic work, Shulchan Aruch Harav that ranks among the classic works of Torah law. His magnum opus, however, was a book of philosophical and Kabbalistic treatment of the basic ideas of Chassidus. Entitled Likkutei Amarim, but popularly known as Tanya (after his first word), this work was first published in 1796 and became one of the basic texts of Chassidus.”

“His Sefer HaTanya is likely the seminal work of Chassidic/Kabbalistic philosophy.”
(Above quoted from Triumph of Survival: The Story of the Jews in the Modern Era 1650-1990, by Rabbi Berel Wein)

Tanya, chapter 12:
“The Beinoni (the “inbetweener”) is a person whose evil never gains enough momentum to conquer “the small city” to influence the body to sin. This means that the three garments of the animal soul, which are thought, speech, and action, of Kelipah never overcome the divine soul within him, so as to become “dressed” in his body, brain, mouth or the other anatomical parts which total 248 (Mishna Oholos 1:8) causing them to sin and be defiled, G-d forbid.”

“Only the three garments of the divine soul, they alone influence the body. Namely the thought, speech, and action of the Torah 613 mitvahs, and once he has reached the level of beinoni it is as if he has never committed any transgressions in his life (because any trace of prior sins has been wiped away through repentance – Notes onTanya).”

“However, in the case of the beinoni, the divine soul’s deep core, which is its ten powers of intellect and emotion, are not the only forces attempting to direct and dominate “the small city”.”

Comments in Tanya, Chapter 12:
“…The war between the Divine and Animal Souls initially acts itself out in the heart. The Divine Soul, whose influence emerges on the right side of the heart, wants its feelings for G-d to overflow into the left side of the heart, where the Animal Soul’s emotions of self-gratification emerge. Each soul desires to saturate the heart completely.

In the case of a tzadik, the Divine Soul’s goal has been achieved, and the Animal Soul has been silenced completely.

But with the Beinoni, the conflict remains. At an emotional level, the beinoni is still torn between love of G-d and the desire for self-gratification, though he has achieved enough self-mastery not to allow these feelings to surface behaviorally in any way.

While externally the tzadik and beinoni appear identical, their inner life is likely to be quite different. The tzadikexists in a state of inner peace, his whole being singularly devoted to G-d. For him, worship is innate and natural. The beinoni, on the other hand, lives a life of inner tension, with his heart tugged by strong forces in opposing directions. For him, worship remains a strongly disciplined practice, to contain his inner negativity and selfish drives, preventing them from surfacing at any moment.”

 

The Brain Rules Over the Heart

 

Comments Continued:
“There are times, however, when the beinoni does enjoy inner peace and the urges of the Animal Soul are temporarily quieted.”

Tanya, continuing chapter 12:
“Except on particular occasions, such as when performing the Mitzvah of reading the Shema or when at prayer.”

Comments Continued:
“The focused meditations of the Shema and of prayer can temporarily generate such emotion from the Divine Soul, on the right side of the heart, that the beinoni’s Animal Soul, on the left side, is totally overwhelmed.”

Tanya, continuing chapter 12:
“However, after prayer, when the expanded consciousness of the Blessed Infinite light of G-d departs, the beinoniloses the external assistance in focusing his mind and heart, and consequently the evil in the left chamber of his heart reemerges and awakens, leaving him to have a desire for the temptations of this world and its pleasures.

Only since this force, in the left side of the heart, is not the only ruling power prevailing over “the small city” the negative energy is unable to bring its desire to fruition to influence the body’s parts in action or speech - or in substantive thought.

From allowing his thoughts to dwell on the pleasures of this world, how to satisfy his heart’s desire. Since, inherently, in its natural capacity, the brain rules over the heart (as stated in the Zohar, portion of Pinchas 3, 224a), for that is how man is formed at birth.

This means that any person can, with the will-power of his brain, restrain himself and take control of his heart’s urges, so as to prevent his heart’s desires from being enacted, spoken or contemplated, to divert his attention away from his heart’s urges entirely, to something completely different.”

Feelings of Success

It was midnight, after a long day, and I stood looking at the chocolate chip cookies left out on the table (I love chocolate!). I had a tremendous urge to take a cookie. I then said to myself, “would this be a rational decision – a person my age – at midnight – chocolate?” I appealed to my rational soul (which is a whole separate discussion). I overcame the desire, walked away and felt great (I’m not always so successful against chocolate). The feelings engendered when you walk out victorious in the struggle discussed in the Tanya are profound.

Have a Good Shabbos.

To Be Continued.

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Vayechi

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this particularly interesting edition of Here’s My Story
Rabbi Moshe Tzur, an Israeli Air Force veteran, now lives with his family in Jerusalem, Israel. After his service in the Air Force, he went on to found a number of yeshivot and other non-profit organizations. He was interviewed in December of 2015.

Click here for the story: http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/243.-Ki-Teitzei-5777.pdf 

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Vayigash

Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this particularly touching edition of Here’s My Story

Mrs. Paula Burg initially came into contact with Chabad in the 1970s. She made Aliyah in 2005 and now lives with her family in Beit Shemesh, Israel, where she was interviewed in 2016.

Click here for the story: 
http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/237.-Matos-Maasei.pdf

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Mikeitz

40 Years Ago

I am honored to present to you this powerful interview with Dr. Yitzchok Block, OBM (1930-2017) which was publicized in this week’s edition of Here’s My Story. He was a scholar in residence here in Seattle for Chabad 40 years ago on the 19th of Kislev / Erev Chanukah 5378.

Dr.Yitzchok Block.jpgThe late Dr. Yitzchok Block (Yitzchok Leib Ben Chaim Aaron, OBM) was a professor of philosophy and Chabad campus emissary at the University of Western Ontario, in London, Canada. He was interviewed in February of 2008. 

May his memory serve as an inspiration to all of us.


Click for the story:
http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/258.-Mikeitz-5778.pdf


Have a good Shabbos and a freilichen Chanukah. 

Warmly,
Rabbi S.B. Levitin


In memory of Shmuel ben Nisan O.B.M.- Samuel Stroum - Yartzeit March 9, 2001 / 14 Adar 5761  

The 19th Day of Kislev 5778 | Parsha Vayeishev

Tanya

Rabbi Shneur Zalman.jpg “In the late summer 1798, a complaint against Chassidim in general, and Rabbi Shneur Zalman in particular, was sent to the Russian authorities. Among the alleged crimes was the collecting of money for the purpose of sending it to a foreign country (the Land of Israel, then under Turkish rule), which was a serious crime in Czarist Russia. In October 1798, Rabbi Shneur Zalman was imprisoned in the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. Rabbi Shneur Zalman was interrogated there by a high official – according to the Chassidic tradition, it was the Czar himself disguised as a prison officer – who became convinced of his innocence and released him on November 27, 1798 –the19th day of Kislev.”

“Rabbi Shneur Zalman was a brilliant Talmudist and an original thinker of the highest order. He composed a famous and authoritative halachic work, Shulchan Aruch Harav that ranks among the classic works of Torah law. His magnum opus, however, was a book of philosophical and Kabbalistic treatment of the basic ideas of Chassidus. Entitled Likkutei Amarim, but popularly known as Tanya (after his first word), this work was first published in 1796 and became one of the basic texts of Chassidus.”

“His Sefer HaTanya is likely the seminal work of Chassidic/Kabbalistic philosophy.”

(Above quoted from Triumph of Survival: The Story of the Jews in the Modern Era 1650-1990, by Rabbi Berel Wein)

Today, December 7, 2017 is the 19th of Kislev

From the intro of the Holy Tanya – Author Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, who was the founder and first Rebbe of Chabad::

“To you, O men, I call. Listen to me, you who pursue righteousness and who seek G-d – And G-d will listen to you from the greatest to the smallest all members of our community, in our land and its environs – each of whom “shall go to their place in peace” with “the blessings of everlasting life” forever and ever, selah – Amen, may it be G-d’s will.”

(After this formal introduction, typical at the opening of a pastoral letter, Rabbi Shneur Zalman turns immediately to the community’s concern: Can a spiritual manual replace a personal meeting?)

“Now, “this thing is known – that throughout our community, it’s common for people to say that you can’t compare hearing spiritual guidance from a living teacher, in flesh and blood to seeing and reading it in books.”

(Before stating his view that a book can sometimes be an effective source for personal spiritual mentorship, Rabbi Shneur Zalman will first spend some time validating the community’s concern that it cannot.)

“The reason why, generally speaking, a book can not provide personal, spiritual guidance is because the reader of a book inevitably reads subjectively, through the lens of his own understanding, and according to the ability and grasp of his mind, “at the place where he is found”, and that subjectivity or limited comprehension might prevent him from absorbing the author’s intended message.”

(Another concern is that, besides plain misinterpretation, the reader’s own spiritual standing might be so inadequate and he is incapable of applying the teachings found in a spiritual manual to his life situation.)

“And if the reader’s mind and opinions are confused, and, when it comes to worship G-d, “he wanders about in darkness” – then only with difficulty will he “see the light that’s good” that’s hidden in the sacred books, even though the content of these sacred book is “sweet light to the eyes”, and healing for the soul.

(Even a well=crafted spiritual manual won’t be helpful to a person who’s not in a fit state to appreciate the message. The book may be “sweet light to the eyes”, but if you are “wandering through the darkness” you will miss its inspirational message.”)

The Alter Rebbe continues in this vain of why personal guidance is necessary from a spiritual mentor. Then the question remains, how can this work of the Tanya address and supplement personal one-on-one guidance.

The Alta Rebbe responds –

“But “I am speaking to those who know me and recognize me” to every single person in our community, found in this country and its environs, since there have already been intimate conversations between us in private meetings, and you have revealed to me everything in the depths of your hearts and minds, connected with the worship of G-d, which depends on the heart, to you “my speech streams” and “my tongue is like the pen of a scribe”.

(The advice of the Tanya was not written in a vacuum and did not result merely from detached, theoretical speculation; it was the cumulation of advice delivered by the author in practical counseling sessions with his disciples for over a decade. Rabbi Shneur Zalman had witnessed the same issues arise repeatedly and, based on the wisdom of his teachers and classical Jewish texts, he had developed a system that was effective for his audience. The format of a book might normally tend to be aloof and impersonal, but when a book is written by someone you know and is based on discussions that have already taken place, the communication gap is significantly bridged.

The Tanya was written for disciples whom Rabbi Shneur Zalman new intimately; they had already “revealed to me everything in the depths of their hearts and minds”. That is why the author could confidently offer them advice in written form that would be acutely relevant to their inner struggles.

However, after it was first published in 1796, the Tanya rapidly outgrew its initial core audience. Of the sixty-eight Chasidic books that were published from the movements beginnings until the end of 1815, the Tanya was reprinted the most (eleven times). Today, over 200 years after its initial publication, the Tanya is studied by tens of thousands across the globe - readers who live very different lives than the Tanya’s 19th century audiences. It appears that the author achieved the very feat which he argued could not be done:  to write a one-size-fits-all spiritual manual for a broad readership, regardless of time and place! In fact, the Tanya has enjoyed such universal appeal that it has been coined the “Bible” (Torah Shebiksav) of Chasidic thought.

How has the Tanya appealed so strongly to those who do not “know and recognize” the author, a relationship which this introduction stresses as so important?

What we can sense from all of the above discussion is that Rabbi Shneur Zalman was acutely aware of the detached nature of a book, and he strove to overcome it. He understood that the personal views of a single author (“text based on human reasoning”) would have limited appeal; even the received wisdom of classical Jewish texts needed a very practical articulation to shift the hearts and minds of ordinary people. Over the course of decades of personal counseling, he incubated the ideas which would eventually become the Tanya, carefully testing their effectiveness. In these “intimate conversations” with both scholars and working people of average learning, Rabbi Shneur Zalman developed a deep understanding of human nature, of people who wanted to be good, but were all too often swayed by their inner demons. This enabled him to construct an effective and powerful bridge between the esoteric, Chasidic wisdom he had received from his masters and the harsh realities of everyday life.

While he lived a long time ago, in a place far away, through reading this book you will develop your own “intimate conversation” with the author. Perhaps, like so many whose lives have been transformed by the Tanya,  you will come to “know and recognize” Rabbi Shneur Zalman as a personal mentor of your own.)

(Commentary by Chaim Miller, The Practical Tanya, pp 21-22, Gutnick Library of Jewish Classics)

Final Thought

With the Rebbe’s words “you have revealed to me everything in the depths of your hearts and minds”, the Rebbe shares with us a deep dimension of the nature of the relationship between a Chosid and Rebbe. A Chosid feels the love and concern of the Rebbe in a very personal way and responds in kind by being comfortable and honest in revealing the depth of his heart and mind “connected with the worship of G-d, which depends on the heart”.

Have a Beautiful Shabbos, a Happy Chanukah, L’Chaim.

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin

 Dedicated to all the lives lost in the attack at Pearl Harbor, December 7th, 1941. 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Vayeitzei

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Dear Friends, 
We are pleased to send you this particularly touching edition of Here’s My Story
Professor Reuven Feuerstein (1921-2014) was an Israeli developmental cognitive psychologist and founder of the International Center for the Enhancement of Learning Potential based in Jerusalem. His world-renowned applied systems of structural cognitive modifiability have been implemented in over 80 countries across the globe. He was interviewed in June of 2011.
Click here for the story: 
http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/247.-Yom-Kippur-5778.pdf

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Vayeitzei

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Dear Friend, 

I am pleased to send you a particularly interesting edition of Here’s My Story.

Mr. Avraham Infeld is the founder of Melitz, one of the early architects of Birthright Israel, and past chairman of Israel Forum and Areivim. From 2003 to 2005, he served as the president of Hillel International. He was interviewed in September of 2014.
 
Click here for the story:

 

http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/248.-Chol-Hamoed-Sukkos-5778.pdf

Warmly,

Rabbi Levitin 

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Toldot

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Hello Friend,

We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story

For the past fifteen years, Mrs. Sarah Karmely has served as the director of Sha’arei Tovah Talmud Torah. She is co-editor of Shalom Magazine, a bi-lingual outreach publication, and the author of Words to Hear with Your Heart. She was interviewed in June of 2012.

Click here for the story: 
http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/254.-Toldot-5778-Email.pdf

Warmly,
Rabbi Levitin 

Does the Apple Fall Far From the Tree?

He was our Doctor. He delivered seven of our children. He was one of the leaders of the Jewish community in Seattle when we arrived in 1972. His name was Dr. Charles Fine, OBM. He was a true intellectual and was one of the only people I encountered at that time who had a clear grasp on what Chabad was all about. He had tremendous respect for our Holy Rebbe, OBM. When Chabad brought out the renowned, Elie Weisel, for a huge event downtown, Dr. Fine was honored in introducing him to the crowd. Mr. Weisel later commented how in all his travels he had never been so powerfully introduced as he was that evening. In addition to being my wife Chanie’s OB/GYN, he was a very dear friend, and we put on Tefillin every couple weeks.

Viewing me as a young, Chassidisher Rabbi, coming from a very insular environment in Brooklyn, New York, he made it his business to try and “broaden me” by providing me with various books and periodicals on contemporary Jewish topics. Once, sitting in his office, he looked at me and said, “Rabbi, remember - the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. On occasion, you can find those who rise above their upbringing and environment, but that is very rare.”

From Harlem to Harvard

In the late 1960’s, I remember reading about a young man by the name of Jack, who was born and raised in the then called “Ghetto” of Harlem. His parents were drug abusers and his surroundings reflected all that was the Ghetto reality. Somehow, he was able to leave that environment, make a success of himself, and he was accepted at Harvard University. He became one of the top students in his class. A lot was written about this young man. Folks tried to find what it was about him that catapulted him out of his environment and transcended him into an entirely different reality. 

The Couple

Their father/grandfather and mother/grandmother were idol worshipers. He trafficked in idols. The world was slowly descending into a state of total idolatry. They had no teacher, nor were there anyone to inform them. The environment they were raised in was morally bankrupt and spiritually desolate.

“Thus these practices spread throughout the world. People would serve images with strange practices – one more distorted than the other – offer sacrifices to them, and bow down to them. As the years passed, (G-d’s) glorious and awesome name was forgotten by the entire population. (It was no longer part of) their speech or thought, and they no longer knew Him. Thus, all the common people, the women, and the children would know only the image of wood or stone and the temples of stone to which they were trained from their childhood to bow down and serve, and in whose name they swore.

The wise men among them would think that there is no G-d other than the stars and spheres for whose sake, and in resemblance of which, they had made those images. The Eternal Rock was not recognized or known by anyone in the world, with the exception of a (few) individuals: for example, Chanoch, Metushelach, Noach, Shem, and Ever. The world continued in this fashion until the pillar of the world – the Patriarch Abraham – was born.”(Quote taken from Rambam (Maimonities), Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Avodat Kochavim, Chapter 1)

Yet, as the Rambam continues, Avraham Avinu (Father Abraham) came to recognize the one G-d and began to spread this message to all of mankind.

Bereishis/Genesis 12/5:

“Abram took his wife Sarai (as they were then called) and Lot, his brother’s son, and all their possessions that they had amassed and the souls that that they made in Haran…”

Rashi – on the verse:

“That they made in Haran. They are said to have made the souls – for they took them in under the wings of the Divine Presence. Abraham would convert the men, and Sarah would convert the women. Scriptures considers them as if they made them.” (Talmud Sanhedrin 99b)

Avraham and Sarah began, and were effective, in a massive transformation of mankind’s recognition of the Creator.

The Revolution

Torah records:

“When Abram was ninety-nine years old, Hashem appeared to Abram and said to him, “I am El Shaddai; walk before Me and be perfect. I will set My covenant between Me and you, and I will increase you most exceedingly.” Abram fell upon his face, and G-d spoke with him saying, “As for Me, this is my Covemant with you: You shall be a father of a multitude of nations; your name shall no longer be Abram, but your name shall be Abraham, for I have made you the father of amultitude of nations…” (Genesis 17/1-4)

Rashi – on verse two:

I will set my covenant – “A covenant of love – and a covenant of the land of Israel, to pass it on as an inheritance to you – through the fulfillment of this commandment.” (Right of circumcision)

Rashi – on verse five:

I have made you the father of a multitude of nations.  “- because he was a father to no other nation but Aram, which is his homeland, and now he is the father of the whole world.” (Talmud Berachos 13a)

Sarah

This week’s Parsha begins, “Sarah’s lifetime was one hundred years, and twenty years, and seven years; the years of Sarah’s life”

Rashi – on the verse:

“This is why the word “years” was written to each category – to say to you that each one is expounded on its own; to teach you that when she was a hundred years old, she was like twenty years old with respect to sin; just as one who is twenty years old is considered as if she has not sinned, for she is not liable to punishment, so too, when Sarah was a hundred years old she was without sin. And when she was twenty years old she was like seven years old with regard to beauty.” (Bereishis Rabbah 58:1)

The powerful couple of Avraham Avinu and Sarah Emanu, the founders of our people, is a model for all of us.

So, yes, the apple does, on occasion, fall far from the tree. We all have the capability to rise above inbred limitations from within and from without if we so desire to harness the “energy” to do it.

Have a beautiful Shabbos,
Rabbi Levitin

From the Desk of Rabbi Levitin | Parsha Vayera

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Dear Friend, 

We are pleased to send you this week’s edition of Here’s My Story

Dr. Naftali (Tali) Loewenthal presently directs the Chabad Research Unit, while lecturing at the University College on the subject of Jewish spirituality. He resides in London and was interviewed in December of 2010.

Click here for the story:

http://myencounterblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/252.-Vayera-5778.pdf

 

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