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Newsletter

Newsletter

Shemini Atzereth – Simchat Torah | Tishrei 20-29, 5778

HOSHANA RABA WED OCT 11th  /PREPARE EREV TAVSHILIN/
Shacharis 7 am /WITH GRAND HOSHANOS/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 6:09 pm/Meal in CSTL Sukkah & Hakafos/Remember Yartzeit Candle

SHEMINI AZERETZ THU OCT 12th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /YIZKOR
Mincha 6:20 pm 
Maariv/Candles after 7:05 pm /from existing flame/ IN SHUL SEUDA & GRAND HAKAFOS

SIMCHAT TORAH FRI OCT 13th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /KIDDUSH LUNCH 10 AM
Hakafot and Dancing, Torah, Musaf, Mincha 11 am 
Candles /light Shabbos candles from existing flame before 6:06 pm/
Maariv 6:55 pm

SHABBOS BERESHIT- SAT OCT 14th /MEVARCHIM MAR CHESHVAN
Tehilim for Mevarchim Mar Cheshvan 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 am  
Mincha 6:06 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:02 pm

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Thu 7 am
Fri 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH MAR CHESHVAN 
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:00 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:51 pm/

Tot Groups on Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah from 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Tot Groups (upstairs room) will have supervised play on Shemini Atzeret, Simchat Torah and Shabbat. 3-5 years old: Drop Off. 2 years old and under: accompanied by a parent. Limit of 10 children, light snacks provided. Tots (ages 0-5) are also welcome to join the children's Hakkafot program downstairs at 12:00 PM on Simchat Torah. 
We are currently recruiting parent volunteers to help run this program! If you're interested in participating, please email Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

KIDDUSHES AND MEALS AT CSTL – SHEMINI ATZERET AND SIMCHAT TORAH
The following meals will be provided by CSTL for Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah:   1) Dinner Shemini Atzeret (Wed Oct 11) in the Sukka 2) Dinner Simchat Torah (Thu Oct 12) in the Social Hall, and 3) Lunch Simchat Torah (Fri Oct 13) in the Social Hall.  We are looking for Sponsors for this exciting time at CSTL!! Please contact Ivan or Rabbi Kavka.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SHMENI ATZERTH
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. The blessing can be found in the siddur.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

4th Annual Great Big Challah Bake Thu Oct 26, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Stroum Jewish Community Center. More info: 
www.sjcc.org

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity. 
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEMINI ATZERETH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518311/jewish/Hoshaana-Rabbah-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. There are aspects of Hosha’ana Rabbah, such as the recital of “tikkun,” that have nothing to do with joy. Nevertheless, Simchas Bais Hashoeva — Celebration of the Water Drawing — is present on every night of Sukkos, as explicitly stated in Mishnah (Sukkah8:1): “The flute playing (at the water drawing) took place sometimes on five days and sometimes on six.” That is, it took place on every day of Chol HaMoed. (The flute was not played on Shabbos or Yom Tov. Thus, when Yom Tov falls on Shabbos, there are six days of flute playing; when it falls on weekday, there are only five days). And thus Simchas Bais Hashoeva is present also on Hosha’ana Rabbah, the last day of Chol HaMoed.

Indeed, Simchas Bais Hashoeva on Hosha’ana Rabbah is loftier than on the other days of Sukkos for several reasons:

1) Torah commands to “increase in sanctity,” and thus each successive night of Sukkos must see an increase in joy. Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is the last night, its joy, which follows the successively increasing joy of the previous nights, is the greatest of all.

2) Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is the last night, it is the conclusion and “seal” of Simchas Bais Hashoeva — and “everything follows the conclusion.”

3) Simchas Bais Hashoeva is connected to the joy of Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah. Although separate concepts, there is an interrelation between them simply because they both share the same theme: joy. This is particularly emphasized on Hosha’ana Rabbah, for it is erev Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.

We see, then, that not only must one be joyous on Hosha’ana Rabbah, but the celebration of Simchas Bais Hashoeva then is of the loftiest degree. And although the concepts unique to Hosha’ana Rabbah (e.g. the recital of “tikkun”) take up much time, one can still engage in both types of activities (Simchas Bais Hashoeva and the recital of tikkun), for, says G‑d, “I do not ask of them according to My abilities, but according to their (Jews’) abilities.”

This idea is present on the other nights of Sukkos too, on each of which two different concepts are present: Simchas Bais Hashoeva, and the idea of the “guests” which visit every night. Although the latter is associated with the former, they are basically separate concepts, to the extent that they take place at different times: The “guests” visit during the meal, whereas Simchas Bais Hashoeva takes place when the water is drawn. Nevertheless, Jews devote time to both these concepts on each night of Sukkos. Indeed, not only are they not contradictory, but they complement one another.

So too with the night of Hosha’ana Rabbah. Although its other activities necessitate much time, a Jew can still devote attention to both them and to Simchas Bais Hashoeva. All its concepts can be done perfectly. Moreover, joy is even loftier than “perfection,” for joy breaks through all limits — even the limit of perfection. And, as noted in the case of the other nights of Sukkos, not only are the different concepts not contradictory, but they complement one another. The recital of “tikkun,” the “guests,” and the daily portion of Chumash all add to the joy of Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

2. Hosha’ana Rabbah’s “guests” are King David (of those enumerated in the Zohar: Avraham, Yitzchok, Ya’akov, Moshe, Aharon, Yosef and David) and the Rebbe Rashab (of the “Chassidic guests” enumerated by the previous Rebbe: Baal Shem Tov, Maggid, Alter Rebbe, Mitteler Rebbe, Tzemach Tzedek, Rebbe Maharash and Rebbe Rashab). The common theme of tonight’s “guests” is that both are associated with the idea of “kesser” — “crown.”

In regard to King David, a “crown” is one of the main objects in a monarchy, to the extent that the king’s splendor depends on it — as stated, “Your eyes shall see the king in his splendor.” This is particularly true of the Davidic kings, as our Sages have said: “It was a testimony to the house of David that whoever was eligible for the kingship, the crown fitted him, but it would not fit anyone who was not eligible.” Moreover, David is the “Sweet Singer of Israel” — i.e. author of Tehillim. Tehillim begins with the word “Ashrei,” which word appears twenty times in Tehillim — and the number twenty corresponds to “kesser” — crown.

In regard to the Rebbe Rashab, he was born in the year 5621, which in Hebrew is “Kesser-Aleph.” Further, his birthdate is the twentieth of MarCheshvan — and “twenty” in Hebrew is “chof” — again, the idea of “kesser.” The connection between this and Hosha’ana Rabbah is that Hosha’ana Rabbah is the end of Sukkos and Simchas Bais Hashoeva; and according to the rule that “the end is rooted in the beginning,” Hosha’ana Rabbah is rooted in the beginning of all the worlds — the level of “kesser.”

How does the idea of “kesser” add to joy? “Kesser” has the meaning “makif,” “surrounding” or “encompassing.” Joy associated with “kesser” therefore surrounds the whole person, encompassing his total existence. Simultaneously, this joy permeates a person in his inner aspects — just as a crown adds to a king’s splendor.

This teaches how Hosha’ana Rabbah should be celebrated. A person must serve G‑d with joy all year round; Yom Tov contributes additional joy; Sukkos, the “Season of our Rejoicing, yet more joy; Simchas Bais Hashoevah contributes an extra element of joy, a successively greater amount each night, culminating in Hosha’ana Rabbah. In addition to all of the above, the idea of “kesser,” “makif,” lends a unique aspect to the joy of Hosha’ana Rabbah. This “makif” encompasses the joy of Hosha’ana Rabbah and its other aspects: although individual concepts in their own right, they are encompassed together by the level of kesser.

In slightly different words: While all aspects of Hosha’ana Rabbah are permeated with the joy that stems from the level of kesser, these aspects still retain their individuality. Such a service — to retain all the concepts as individual entities, while simultaneously encompassed together by and within joy — is an extremely difficult one, for since joy “breaks through all barriers,” it is the antithesis of orderly service when each concept retains its proper place. It can be done however, for we find differing levels in joy (makif) itself — although joy in general is the idea of breaking all barriers.

Another theme common to tonight’s guests is that both emphasize the idea of smallness and descent — through which one eventually reaches the ultimate in ascents, the level of “kesser.” Of King David it is stated that “David is the small one,” analogous to the moon which is the “small luminary.” Likewise, the concept of “kesser” associated with the Rebbe Rashab is connected to the days of the month (the 20th of MarCheshvan) — again, the idea of the moon, the “small luminary.” It is specifically through descent and self-nullification (the waning of the moon) that one reaches the highest level, “kesser” — for “descent is for the purpose of ascent.”

In further clarification: The sun and moon were at first created equal, “the two great luminaries.” Afterwards, the moon was reduced; it experienced a descent. This descent is for the purpose of ascent — for in the future, the moon’s light will be like the sun’s: it will also be a “great luminary.” Indeed, it will be even greater than before the descent, greater than the sun — ”descent for the purpose of ascent.”

The above is particularly emphasized this year, a leap year. A leap year, by adding an extra month, makes up the number of days in a lunar year that are less than a solar year. And, not only is the deficiency made up, but the year then becomes longer than a solar year.

The idea that “descent is for the purpose of ascent” is emphasized not just by today’s “guests” (that both are “small”), but also by the fact that Hosha’ana Rabbah is “erev” Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.

The three festivals of Pesach, Shavuos and Sukkos correspond to Avraham, Yitzchok and Ya’akov respectively. Shemini Atzeres corresponds to Yosef. Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is erev (and the preparation to) Shemini Atzeres, it follows that Yosef is also associated with Hosha’ana Rabbah. And the idea of “descent for the purpose of ascent” is highly emphasized in the case of Yosef.

Scripture (Bereishis 39:1) states that “Yosef was brought down to Egypt.” In Egypt itself, Yosef experienced a further descent — imprisonment. Yet it was precisely through this descent that Yosef was elevated to the highest position in Egypt. And his physical experiences were paralleled by his spiritual life. The lower the descent, the higher the following ascent — and therefore Yosef’s double descent (into Egypt and then into prison) resulted in a correspondingly high ascent.

We find the same phenomenon with the previous Rebbe, whose name is Yosef. After his descent into prison, the dissemination of Judaism and Chassidus was greatly expanded.

This theme (descent leading to ascent) is also found in today’s portion of Chumash, the fourth section of parshas Berachah. It states (Devorim 33:18): “To Zevulun he said: Rejoice Zevulun in your going out, and Yissachar in your tents.” Rashi comments that “Zevulun and Yissachar made a partnership: Zevulun went out to business ... made profit and gave thereof to Yissachar who sat and engaged in Torah. Therefore [Scripture] placed Zevulun before Yissachar, for Yissachar’s Torah came about through Zevulun.”

The difference between Zevulun and Yissachar parallels that between Torah and mitzvos. “Yissachar” refers to those whose principal service is Torah study (“Yissachar in your tents”). Zevulun’s service lies principally in good deeds, fulfillment of mitzvos. More generally, Zevulun’s service is to refine and elevate the world (“Zevulun in your going out”).

The same applies to Torah and mitzvos: The world is refined mainly through actual performance of mitzvos, which are enclothed in physical objects — and not as much through Torah study, which is intellectual comprehension.

That today’s portion of Chumash places Zevulun before Yissachar emphasizes the greatness of mitzvos and its accompanying refinement of the world vis-a-vis Torah study. Thus the idea of descent — into the world to engage in worldly matters — which results in an ascent, is emphasized by today’s portion of Chumash.

The same concept is further emphasized by the continuation of today’s portion of Chumash (33:20): “To Gad he said ... He dwells at peace like a dead lion, tearing the head at one stroke with the arm.” This verse is associated with the mitzvah of tefillin — for Jewish warriors are able to “tear the head at one stroke with the arm” through the merit of putting tefillin on the arm and head.

Tefillin emphasizes the idea of refining the world. Part of the mitzvah of tefillin is to subjugate one’s brain and heart to G‑d: the tefillin on the hand corresponds to the subjugation of one’s actions, including one’s “portion in the world;” tefillin on the head corresponds to subjugation of one’s brain to G‑d. Moreover, say our Sages (Kiddushin 35a), “The entire Torah is compared to tefillin.” This refers to all the mitzvos of the Torah, and, as noted above, the idea of mitzvos (compared to Torah) is to refine the world. Thus Gad emphasizes the distinction of performing mitzvos and refining the world.

3. In addition to all of the above, there is another concept peculiar to Hosha’ana Rabbah that is not found in any of the other days of Sukkos. Besides the mitzvah of taking the four kinds and reciting Hosha’anos, which exist on all the days of Sukkos, on Hosha’ana Rabbah we take five aravahs (willow branches) and strike them on the ground.

This, although only a custom of the prophets, possesses an element not found in the mitzvah of the four kinds. Although the latter is a mitzvah from the Torah, if the first day of Yom Tov falls on Shabbos, we do not perform this mitzvah then. In regard to striking the aravah, however, the calendar is so fixed that Hosha’ana Rabbah can never fall on Shabbos — allowing this custom to be performed every year without fail. This shows the greatness of a “custom.” The very fact that it is not a mitzvah in the Written Torah shows that it stems from a source so high that it cannot be explicitly revealed in the Torah. And this is why it was made sure that Hosha’ana Rabbah should never fall on Shabbos, allowing us to strike the aravah.

We can draw inferences from this for Simchas Bais Hashoevah. The Rambam makes no explicit mention of Simchas Bais Hashoeva, although he elaborates in great detail on the lofty joy of Sukkos. A Jew may therefore think that it is not a very important thing — that it is only a custom. The striking of the aravah teaches the lofty nature of a Jewish custom, to the extent that special measures were taken to ensure it could not be deferred because of Shabbos.

The custom to strike the aravah emphasizes the idea that through a descent, one reaches the highest levels. The aravah is the plainest of the four kinds, for it has no smell or taste. Yet only it is called “achvinah” — because it grows “in “achvah” — “in friendship” (i.e. willows grow closely together).

Although each of the four kinds express the idea of unity, nevertheless, the qualities of the other three kinds (taste, smell or both) overshadow the aspect of unity they possess. The aravah, in contrast, has no special qualities, and therefore its unity is revealed. That is why the element of unity possessed by the other three is explained in Chassidus (the esoteric of Torah) only, whereas that of the aravah is explicitly recorded in the exoteric aspect of Torah (“achvinah”).

In man’s service to G‑d, “aravah” corresponds to plain people without special qualities (no taste or smell). It is specifically in them that the idea of unity is emphasized, extending to unity with G‑d.

Furthermore, the aravah used on Hosha’ana Rabbah is not the one used in the mitzvah of the four kinds; a separate aravah must be used. For if the one used in the mitzvah of the four kinds was used, the very fact that it was used for a mitzvah gives it a special distinction — which somewhat obscures its totally plain nature. A new aravah, never used for a mitzvah, emphasizes its pure plain nature.

Now we can understand why the custom of striking the aravah emphasizes the idea of ascent following descent. Through the lowly aravah — a new one, without any redeeming qualities — we perform the unique service of Hosha’ana Rabbah, the “custom of the prophets,” which, we explained previously, is of the highest level.

The above is expressed in the result that follows the fulfillment of this custom. The text of the prayer that follows the beating of the aravah says that through the striking “there shall be five ‘sweetened’ severities.” Chassidus explains that sweetening of the severities (which leads to the strengthening of kindness) — is greater than just drawing down kindness. This is the idea noted above: that specifically through a descent do we reach the highest levels.

The first severity to be sweetened is the exile, the greatest of all descents. The greater the descent, the greater the following ascent. After the great descent of exile, we reach the ultimate heights, through which the severities are sweetened. In the future, Jews will say “I give thanks to You, G‑d, that You were angry with me” — meaning that Jews will thank G‑d for the exile, for then they will see the greatness that resulted from it.

However, even with this explanation, the idea that Jews will thank G‑d for the exile will be a matter of faith. For G‑d, Who is omnipotent, can effect the loftiest levels (sweetening the severities) without first having the severities, the exile. This is particularly so when the severities in this case are not just spiritual ones, but physical ones, the persecutions and tragedies of the exile. Thus intellectually, the necessity of the exile is impossible to understand. Why need the Shechinah (Divine Presence) be in exile, Moshiachin exile, every Jew in exile — and getting worse every day?! We can only take it on faith that in the future we will thank G‑d for the exile.

G‑d concealed the reason for the exile so that a Jew should sincerely beseech G‑d that He should “speedily cause the scion of David Your servant to flourish.” If there would be even the tiniest amount of understanding that there is some good in exile — one would not ask for the end of exile in total sincerely.

There is thus a paradox: On the one hand, Jews must believe with perfect faith that in the future they will give thanks to G‑d for the exile. On the other hand, they must cry out with all their might that they want to leave exile!

The time for the true and complete redemption has certainly arrived, when the promise that “You shall on that day say ‘I thank you, G‑d, that You were angry with me” will be fulfilled. And, as noted above, this is emphasized in the striking of the aravah, which is the idea of sweetening the severities.

Because “deed is paramount,” all the above must be translated into actual deed. We must tonight utilize the time that is not dedicated to the recital of tikkun, to celebrate Simchas Bais Hashoeva. It must not be a fake joy, but a true one. For although there are things that prevent joy (the exile, etc.), we can put aside these considerations for the moment, and truly be joyous. Moreover, it is through joy that we abolish the exile — for joy breaks through all barriers.

4. A further point: One of the things which bring the redemption closer is tzedakah, as our Sages say (B. Basra 10a): “Great is tzedakah for it brings near the redemption.” It emphasizes the idea of refining the world, as the Alter Rebbe writes (Tanya, ch. 37): “You can find no mitzvah in which the vital soul is clothed to the same extent as in the mitzvah of tzedakah: for in all the other commandments only one faculty of the vital soul is clothed ... while in the case of tzedakah, which a man gives out of the toil of his hands, all the strength of his vital soul is embodied in his work ... thus when he gives it for charity, his whole vital soul ascends to G‑d.” And through this, his portion in the world, and the entire world, is elevated and refined. This is especially so when tzedakah is combined with joy, for then, because joy breaks through all barriers, the world is elevated in a loftier manner.

It is thus proper to now increase in tzedakah. We will therefore give dollars to be distributed to those here — so that these dollars can be given to tzedakah during the day.

May it be G‑d’s will that from the celebration of Simchas Bais Hashoeva we proceed to the principal joy — when all Jews will leave exile with joy and a good heart, “with our youth and our elders, with our sons and our daughters.”

Sukkot 5778 – Simchas Bais haShoeva | Tishrei 14-23, 5778

Erev Succos, Wed Oct 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv: 6:23 pm /Eruv Tavshilin: before lighting candles/

Succos- First Day, Thu Oct 5th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema: 10:05 am/
Mincha: 6:23 pm
Ma'ariv/Candles after: 7:19 pm /light from existing flame/

Succos- Second Day, Fri Oct 6th 
Shacharis: 9 am
Mincha/Maariv/Shabbos Candle Lighting (before): 6:19 pm light from existing flame/

Shabbos Succos- Sat Oct 7th 
Shacharis: 9 am /SPECIAL KIDDUSH LUNCH
Mincha 6:19 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:15 pm

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Wed 7 am /with L’Dovid /
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:15 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:05 pm/

HOSHANA RABA WED OCT 11th  /PREPARE EREV TAVSHILIN/
Shacharis 7 am /WITH GRAND HAKOFOS/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 6:09 pm /Meal in Sukkah & Hakafos/Remember Yartzeit Candle

SHEMINI AZERETZ THU OCT 12th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /YIZKOR
Mincha 6:20 pm 
Maariv/Candles after 7:05 pm /from existing flame/ Meal in Sukkah & GRAND HAKAFOS

SIMCHAT TORAH FRI OCT 13th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /KIDDUSH LUNCH 10 AM
Hakafot and Dancing, Torah, Musaf, Mincha from 11 am 
Candles/Maariv 6:06 pm /light Shabbos candles from existing flame before/

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SUKKOT AND BEFORE SHMENI ATZERTH
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. The blessing can be found in siddur.

KIDDUSHES AND MEALS AT CSTL – SHEMINI ATZERET AND SIMCHAT TORAH
The following meals will be provided by CSTL for Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah:   1) Dinner Shemini Atzeret (Wed Oct 11) in the Sukka 2) Dinner Simchat Torah (Thu Oct 12) in the Social Hall, and 3) Lunch Simchat Torah (Fri Oct 13) in the Social Hall.  We are looking for Sponsors for this exciting time at CSTL!! Please contact Ivan or Rabbi Kavka.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YAHRZEIT OF THE REBBE MAHARASH - WED OCT 4th 5 PM
Please join us for a Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah.  In honor of the Yahrzeit (Tishrei 13th) of the fourth Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch, Rabbi Shmuel Schneersohn, known as "Maharash" (a Hebrew acronym for "our master Rabbi Shmuel") , the author of more than a thousand ma’amarim.  
www.Chabad.org/calendar

KIDDUSH SHABBOS CHOL haMOED SUKKOS Sat Oct 7th
S
habbos Chol Hamoed Sukkus  there will be a full sit-down Kiddish meal in the Shul Sukkah sponsored by Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shmuel haLavi Levitin ZT”L.  The whole community is invited.

FARBRENGEN ALERT - SIMCHAS BEIS HA’SHOEVA SUN OCT 8th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L. 

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Feature film showing ”Fill The Void”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP
MHerbstman@gmail.com

PARKING ALERT – PLEASE DON’T BLOCK OUR NEIGHBORS
As a courtesy, please do not park within 6 feet from any of our neighbors driveways.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

SUKKOS MELAVA MALKA- Rebbe Nachman's Yartzeit Sat Oc. 7th 8:30 - 10:30pm
Music and Learning in Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld’s Sukka- 5240 38th Ave. NE

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity.
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

 SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SUKKOS 
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518304/jewish/1st-Night-of-Sukkos-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

 1. Man is by nature more interested in something new, as Torah commands: “Every day it (Torah) should be as new in your eyes,” (and even further, not just “as new,” but actually “new”). For, as Rashi notes (Devorim 6:6), “nobody notices an antiquated ordinance,” whereas a new one, “everyone hastens towards it.” Thus, in our case, preference should be given to speaking of those matters of Sukkos which are peculiar to this year, for they contain new elements compared to Sukkos of every year. However, it is still necessary to first review (at least briefly) the basic themes of Sukkos, which are present every year.

The first basic concept is that it is Yomtov, which, as it name indicates, is a day which is totally good. All things in this world have elements of bad; Yomtov, however, is only good, as seen from the fact that even the eating and drinking done on Yomtov is a mitzvah — i.e., even its physical aspects are all good. Moreover, although it is also a mitzvah to eat on Shabbos, we see that it is a Jewish custom (which is Torah) to eat more on Yomtov than on Shabbos.

This difference between Shabbos and Yomtov is also expressed in the respective sacrifices offered on these days. On Yomtov, part of the sacrifices were eaten by its owners; on Shabbos, no part was eaten by the owners. And because everything of Yomtov is completely good, it produces great joy.

Among Yomim Tovim themselves, all of which are festivals of rejoicing, Sukkos has a special place, as indicated by its name, “the Season of our Rejoicing.” Moreover, there is an additional distinction accruing from Simchas Bais Hashoeva, which is celebrated at night. Although the joy of Yomtov in general is associated with the sacrifices which were offered during the day, the water used for the water-libation was drawn at night, and this was done with great joy — “You shall draw water with joy.” Moreover, of the Simchas Bais Hashoeva, our Sages said (Sukkos 51b): “Whoever did not see the Simchas Bais Hashoeva, has not seen joy in his life.”

Although in the times of the Bais Hamikdosh they celebrated the Simchas Bais Hashoeva on Motzoei Yomtov of Sukkos (and not on Yomtov itself), nevertheless, outside Eretz Yisroel, and particularly in exile, Simchas Bais Hashoevah is present also on the night of Yomtov.

“The Season of our Rejoicing,” including Simchas Bais Hashoevah, is for seven days, as stated: “You shall rejoice before the L‑rd your G‑d for seven days.” In these seven days themselves, the first day (and night) of Sukkos has a special place. It is a rule that “all beginnings are difficult,” whereas afterwards, once the initial breakthrough has been made, it is easier to continue. In our case, the idea of joy begins on the first day of Sukkos — to breakthrough and tread the path so that all Jews can celebrate the Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

Because the first day signals the start, it is the most difficult day on which to achieve great joy. As we see, it is particularly difficult to celebrate on the first night, because everyone is tired and weary from preparing for the festival. More weariness is induced on erev Sukkos then on erev Rosh Hashanah, erev Yom Kippur, erev Shabbos or erev Pesach, for although more toil is needed to prepare for Pesach, there is more time to prepare (30 days), and therefore most things are done before the actual eve of the festival. On Sukkos, however, it is the custom to make all the preparations — the sukkah and the four kinds — in the four days between Yom Kippur and Sukkos. Because there are only four days, some things get left for the last moment — and therefore Jews are busy to the last moment in preparing for Sukkos.

Yet, despite one’s weariness, a Jew must then begin to rejoice in Simchas Bais Hashoeva! How is this possible? A Jew has a G‑dly soul, and when G‑d commands him to do something, he immediately does it without thinking. Moreover, not only does the body follow the soul, but, because G‑d chose a Jew’s physical body, the body of itself also fulfills G‑d’s commands.

Thus, on the first night of Sukkos, the joy that is produced despite the difficulties involved, is lofty indeed.

2. All of the above applies to Sukkos of every year. In addition, there are special lessons to be derived from the calendar of this year, the new element compared to all other years. This lesson must be comprehensible to all Jews, even the simplest, for they too participate in Simchas Bais Hashoeva. On the other hand, there is a directive even for the loftiest category of Jews, a directive in which they are equal to the simple folk.

Sukkos this year begins on Thursday, whereas as last year, for example, Sukkos began on Shabbos. There are therefore two lessons to be learned from this: 1) the distinction that accrues from Sukkos beginning on a weekday and not on Shabbos; 2) the distinction accruing from Sukkos beginning specifically on Thursday, and not on other weekdays (Monday or Tuesday — for Sukkos can never begin on Sunday, Wednesday or Friday).

When Sukkos falls on Shabbos, one is prohibited to cook food, and the festival’s needs must be prepared beforehand. When Sukkos is in the middle of the week, one is allowed to cook food for Yomtov. Food prepared on the same day is tastier than that cooked beforehand — which adds to the joy of Yomtov. The importance of freshly cooked food is underscored by the fact that the Torah permitted cooking on Yomtov to allow greater enjoyment from the food. Moreover, as further proof that freshness is important, a special miracle happened with the “lechem haponim” (show-bread) in the Mishkan and Bais Hamikdosh, that it remained as fresh as the time it was baked.

The joy produced through tasty food is experienced also by simple Jews. The higher category of Jews also feel this — but in a different way. A Jew is hungry or thirsty for food and water because his soul is hungry for the G‑dly spark which is within the food. Fresh food means its G‑dly spark is a new one, and therefore a person doesn’t need the command that Torah “should be in your eyes as new” to elevate that spark — since it really is a new spark.

As noted above, within weekdays themselves, Sukkos can be on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday. The Baal Shem Tov taught that everything happens by Divine Providence, and thus the fact that Sukkos this year is on Thursday must have special importance.

When Sukkos is on Thursday, we make an “eiruv tavshilin,” which means that a person, already on erev Yomtov, prepares food for the Shabbos which follows the first two days of Yomtov. This emphasizes that G‑d provides a person’s needs — already on erev Yomtov — for the first day of Yomtov, the second day of Yomtov, and for the following Shabbos.

Although G‑d provides for everyone, it is not always in such a fashion that it is prepared ready on the table. An “eiruv tavshilin” shows that on erev Yomtov G‑d has provided — on the table — not just for the two days of Yomtov, but also for Shabbos. On Shabbos itself, the provision is until its conclusion, for the “eiruv tavshilin” is eaten at the third meal of Shabbos. Moreover, the “eiruv tavshilin” should be an “esteemed cooked food,” such as meat or fish, showing that G‑d provides not just an ordinary dish, but an esteemed one.

Thus, when a Jew realizes that G‑d, Who fills the whole earth, has devoted His attention to give him the Torah and its mitzvos and customs, including the “eiruv tavshilin” — a great joy results.

From all the above, we see the great joy of Sukkos this year deriving from many aspects. First of all, the joy of a regular day, in which one’s service must be performed with joy. Then, the joy of the Yomtov, particularly the extra happiness of the “Season of our Rejoicing” — Sukkos. In addition, Simchas Bais Hashoeva adds to the joy. Further, because Yomtov is on a weekday, when one eats freshly cooked food, extra joy accrues. And finally, there is the joy deriving from Yomtov being on Thursday, when an “eiruv tavshilin” is made.

3. In addition, there are lessons to be derived from the daily portion of Chumash, and from today’s “guests.” The guest of today, the first day of Sukkos, is Avraham, and the Chassidic guest is the Baal Shem Tov.

Of Avraham it is said that “Avraham was one” — the first Jew, the progenitor of the Jewish people. Because both the “guests” of a particular day share a common theme, we find the same idea in regard to the Baal Shem Tov. Before he became revealed, he used to travel around arousing the Jewish identity that is within each Jew, by inspiring them to say “Blessed be G‑d,” “with G‑d’s help,” etc. The difference between them is that Avraham’s service, although directed primarily to Jews, also encompassed the whole world, for it took place before Mattan Torah. The entire service of the Baal Shem Tov, however, was directed towards Jews.

There is a further common theme between Avraham’s service and that of the Baal Shem Tov. Avraham revealed G‑dliness in the world, as Rashi writes (Chayeh Sarah 24:7): “Now He is the G‑d of heaven and the G‑d of the creations. But when I was taken from my father’s house. He was only G‑d of the heavens and not G‑d of the earth, for the world’s inhabitants did not recognize Him, and His name was not usual on the earth.” In other words, Avraham revealed to the world that the whole world is nothing but G‑dliness.

So too with the Baal Shem Tov: He urged that people say “Blessed be G‑d,” etc. even in regard to physical, mundane things. This is the same idea as Avraham’s work of making G‑d, “G‑d of the earth” — that G‑dliness should permeate even “earth” things — physical, mundane things. For when a Jew would answer “Blessed be G‑d” to the Baal Shem Tov’s question of how his livelihood was, it meant that he blessed G‑d while engaged in “earth” things.

This is associated with today’s portion of Chumash, the fifth section of parshas V’Zos HaBerachah. It speaks of Moshe’s blessing to the tribe of Don, who was the “gatherer of all the camps.” Rashi interprets this to mean that “whoever would lose something, it (the camp of Don) would restore it to him.” Thus, although Don travelled last, it was specifically Don who was the “gatherer” of all the camps,” able to restore a article lost even of those who travelled first.

Our generation, too, is the “gatherer of all the camps.” It concludes and seals the service of all Jews of all the generations, and through it the true and complete redemption comes. We are as a dwarf atop a giant. Although a dwarf in comparison to previous generations, we, through standing on the giant’s shoulders, can reach the highest places.

What does the “gatherer of all the camps” mean in man’s spiritual service? A loss of a physical object is the result of the loss of a spiritual object. Because a Jewish soul is a “part of G‑d Above,” G‑d does not allow a spiritual loss to remain forever. This is achieved through the level of Don in every Jewish soul, whose task is to restore a lost article to its owner.

Don’s service, then, is to ensure that nothing of a Jew remains lost. In general, it means that everything of a Jew should be whole and perfect — that all his physical matters are connected to G‑dliness. And this is the idea of today’s guests, which, we explained previously, was that both Avraham and the Baal Shem Tov endeavored to introduce G‑dliness even into physical, mundane things.

The above can be viewed in a different aspect, one which is associated with Moshe’s blessings to the Jews. If a Jew, of any tribe, should “lose” one of Moshe’s blessings, Don’s task is to retrieve it and restore it to its owner. And this is done in the manner of “This is the blessing which Moshe blessed,” the word “this” being used for something substantial and revealed, something to which the finger can be pointed and say “This is the blessing.”

Because Don returned the lost articles to all the tribes, it follows that Moshe’s blessings to Don, written in today’s portion of Chumash, encompass all Moshe’s blessings to all the Jews.

This is also alluded to in the continuation of today’s portion (33:25): “Iron and brass are your locks, and as your (younger) days, (so shall be) your old age.” Rashi explains on this verse that “now he speaks in reference to all of Israel” — the continuation of Don’s blessings which also encompass all the blessings of all the tribes.

The verse continues “There is none like G‑d, Yeshurun, Who rides upon the heavens in your help and has His excellency in the skies.” These verses, too, are related to Simchas Bais Hashoeva: If a Jew should think that he cannot have the proper joy in exile, he is told “Iron and brass are your locks.” G‑d encloses a Jew with bars and locks of iron and brass, not allowing anyone or anything to disrupt a Jew’s bond with G‑d — and therefore Simchas Bais Hashoeva can be celebrated properly, with full joy.

The verse then continues “There is none like G‑d ... and has His excellency in the skies,” upon which Rashi comments: “Know for yourself, Yeshurun, that there is none like G‑d among all the gods of the nations, and that not as your Rock is their rock. Who rides upon the heavens — He is that G‑d Who is “your help,” and in His excellency, He rides upon the skies.” In other words, G‑d, in the same fashion as He “rides upon the heavens,” and “has His excellency in the skies,” is likewise below — to be the help of every Jew in every place and in every time.

It therefore follows that, when a Jew occupies himself in Torah, all creation listens to him; not only is no opposition exhibited, but help is extended. As emphasized in today’s portion of Chu-mash — “as your (younger) days, (so shall be) your old age (“do’vecho”)” — on which Rashi says: “All the lands will cause to flow (“do’ovos”) silver and gold to the land of Israel,” similar to the idea of “kings shall be your foster-fathers and their princes your foster-mothers.”

This applies even in exile, as the Talmud relates (Zevachim 19a), that an important non-Jewish monarch arose from his place, and, unasked, assisted a Jew to fix his belt!

From thinking of the matters learned from the daily portion of Chumash — that even in exile, we are protected by “iron and brass, to the extent that non-Jews help us in all matters — we see that great distinction accrues to Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

The previous Rebbe said that everything is given to a Jew; he need only need do something to receive it — “Stand prepared all of you.” That “something” is to be joyous and dance! Then, very soon, we will be joyous and dance with our righteous Moshiach in the true and complete redemption.

Yom Kippur – Sukkot | 5778 Tishrei 9-17, 5778

Erev Yom Kippur – Fri Sept 29th 
Shacharit: 7:00 AM /with Kapparot Chickens!/
Mincha 3:00 pm /followed by Seuda ha’Mafsekes at home/
Candle Lighting 6:33/Fast Starts  6:51 pm /Light Yartzeit Candle/
Kol Nidre  6:45 pm
Maariv 7:20 pm

Yom Kippur – Sat Sept 30th 
Shacharit: 9:00 AM /YIZKOR/
Mincha 5:00 PM followed by Neilah
Maariv/Havdala  7:29 PM /Havdalah on candle, wine, and spices (Shabbos)/

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Wed 7 am /with L’Dovid /
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:30 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:04 pm/

Erev Succos, Wed Oct 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv: 6:23 pm /Eruv Tavshilin: before lighting candles/

Succos- First Day, Thu Oct 5th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema: 9:57 am/
Mincha: 6:23 pm
Ma'ariv/Candles after: 7:19 pm /light from existing flame/

Succos- Second Day, Fri Oct 6th 
Shacharis: 9 am
Mincha/Maariv/Shabbos Candle Lighting (before): 6:19 pm light from existing flame/

Shabbos Succos- Sat Oct 7th 
Shacharis: 9 am /SPECIAL KIDDUSH LUNCH
Mincha 6:19 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:15 pm

WOMEN’S MIKVAH TIMES FOR EREV YOM KIPPUR FRI SEP 29th  10:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Contact Chana Plotke 206-898-5879 for more info. Please bring towels.

KAPPOROS AT CSTL FRI SEPT 29th 6:20 to 7 am and 8 am – 9 am 
Thank you to Rabbi Yosef Truxton from Chabad of Bellingham for facilitating the mitzvah of Kapparot at CSTL.  –Cost is: $18/person , $26/couple , $36/family CASH ONLY- make plans to bring the cash you need; please bring exact change.  Wishing you a Gmar Chatima Tova and a year of only revealed and abundant good!

MEN’S MIKVAH TIMES FOR EREV YOM KIPPUR FRI SEP 29th 6am – 9:30 am and 2pm – 6 pm
You must pay Men’s Mikvah membership or arrange a payment plan before use. Please bring towels

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazal tov to Kalanit and Mychael Lagbas on the birth of their baby boy on September 24! May they merit to raise their son to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Sari Weiss and the Weiss family on the Bar Mitzvah of Matan Shalom ben Avraham (Max Weiss) .  May he merit to grow to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

TOT GROUPS UPSTAIRS ON YOM KIPPUR 10:30 AM - 1 PM.
In Rabbi Levitin’s Study (upstairs). 3-5 years old: Drop Off .2 years old and under: accompanied by a parent. Limit of 10 children, light snacks provided. If you're interested in volunteering with tot groups, please email Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CHILDRENS PROGRAM UPSTAIRS ON YOM KIPPUR
Tova would like everyone to register again for the Yom Kippur downstairs kids' program this Shabbos. It will be from 10:30 to 2, ages 4 and up, light snacks but no lunch will be served.  Please reach out to Tova with any questions or if you'd like to make a donation to the CSTL Kids' Program! Please sign up at this link: 
https://goo.gl/forms/wG1SgEuIjfOYkO523 For Succos, there will only be a regular program on Shabbos, not on the days of Chag.

KIDDUSH CHOL haMOED SUKKOS Sat Oct 7th
Shabbos Chol Hamoed Sukkus  there will be a full sit-down Kiddish meal in the Shul Sukkah sponsored by Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L.  The whole community is invited.

LULAV /ESROG AND S’CHACH PICKUP AT CSTL Sun Oct 1st 3 PM – 8 PM
Questions? Call Rabbi Kavka 206-730-2775, rabbikavka@gmail.com

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SUKKOT
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. We then say the following blessing on Erev Yom Tov.
www.ezrabessaroth.net

FARBRENGEN ALERT - SIMCHAS BEIS HA’SHOEVA SUN OCT 8th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L. 

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

PARKING ALERT – PLEASE DON’T BLOCK OUR NEIGHBORS
As a courtesy, please do not park within 6 feet from any of our neighbors driveways.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.


COMMUNITY NEWS

SUKKOS MELAVA MALKA- Rebbe Nachman's Yartzeit Sat Oct. 7th 8:30 - 10:30pm
Music and Learning in Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld’s Sukka- 5240 38th Ave. NE

JUDAICA FOR SALE
Looking to purchase a new talet, tefillin or mezuzah?  Jeff Amon has been given the opportunity to continue selling a large variety of items from Israel which Hazzan Yogev Nuna was previously offering. There is a large selection of products.  Jeff is also able to order items he doesn't  currently have but which you may like. Please contact him to inquire about items you want and he'll will try his best to get it for you.  Jeff Amon, 206-271-6662

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR YOM KIPPUR 
http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/chassidic-dimension-festivals-1/11.htm © SichosInEnglish.org 

The Rambam states[70] that "Yom Kippur is the time of teshuvah for all.... Therefore all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur."

What does the Rambam mean with his statement that "Yom Kippur is the time of teshuvah for all," when the Rambam states in a previous paragraph that the entire ten-day period between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur is a propitious time for repentance, not only the day of Yom Kippur?

Additionally, teshuvah is not a time-bound commandment; as soon as an individual sins, he is obliged to repent.[71] The fact that the ten-day period between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur is an auspicious time for teshuvah in no way implies that the obligation to repent is greater then than during the rest of the year. Rather, these ten days are more favorable for repentance, and moreover, the teshuvah accomplished then is "immediately accepted."[72]

The special aspect of Yom Kippur lies in the fact that "Yom Kippur is a time for teshuvah ... therefore all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur." In other words, the very time frame, and not a specific sin, per se, obligates teshuvah. Thus Yom Kippur not only makes teshuvah easier, loftier, and so on, but the very day obligates one to repent.

Truly, this must be understood. If a person has sinned, he is obligated to repent during the entire year, not only on Yom Kippur. If, on the other hand, the individual is free of sin, then it would seem that he need not repent, even on Yom Kippur. Moreover, as he is sinless, what is he going to repent for?

During the rest of the year, it is a person's personal status as a sinner that obligates him to repent. On Yom Kippur, however, the time frame itself brings an obligation to do teshuvah, regardless of his status. Thus, the obligation extends to all, for it is not the person's actions but the day itself that necessitates teshuvah.

But the original question seems to remain: How can it be said that the obligation to repent on Yom Kippur extends to all, when - in its simple sense - teshuvah involves repenting for sins, and certain individuals may be free from sin?

The Rambam addresses this point when he states:[73] "Those sins for which a person has confessed during a previous Yom Kippur are to be confessed again during the following Yom Kippur. This is so even though his state of teshuvah remains steadfast. For the verse states:[74] 'For I know my iniquities, and my sins are constantly before me.'"

Since "there exists no righteous person in the land who [only] does good and never sinned,"[75] the possibility of teshuvah exists for all inasmuch as one's sins "are constantly before me."

There is only one difference. During the rest of the year, when the reason for teshuvah is the sin itself, then if a person did not sin in the first place, or has since repented, there is no obligation to again repent for the same sin.

Comes Yom Kippur, however, when the time itself obligates teshuvah, if there was ever during the person's lifetime something for which he had to repent, the individual is obligated to repent once again on Yom Kippur, since "my sins are constantly before me." Thus, "all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur," as "there exists no righteous person in the land who [only] does good and never sinned."

This will be even better understood in light of that which the Alter Rebbe explains in Tanya[76] with regard to the verse "my sins are constantly before me." The Alter Rebbe explains that although a person may have done "a proper teshuvah" for a particular sin, nevertheless, when he is elevated to a higher level of Divine service, a loftier level of repentance is required.

Since the sanctity of Yom Kippur is such that all Jews are elevated on this day, then even those sins for which one has repented previously are to be repented for again, with a loftier manner of teshuvah - a Yom Kippur manner of teshuvah.

Rosh haShana – Shabbos Shuva/Haazinu | 29 Elul – 9 Tishrei 5777

EREV ROSH HASHANA, WED SEPT 20th //EREV TAVSHILIN & HATARAS NEDARIM/
Selichos/Shacharis/Hataras Nedarim 6:15 am
Mincha/Maariv/Candles – 6:52 pm

ROSH HASHANA DAY 1, THU SEPT 21st  
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Tashlich 5:40 pm
Maariv/Candles after 7:47 pm /from existing flame/

ROSH HASHANA DAY 2, FRI SEPT 22nd 
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Farbrengen 5:40 pm
Candles BEFORE 6:48 pm /from existing flame/
Maariv 7:37 pm

Sat Sept 23rd Shabbos Shuva/Ha’azinu
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema 9:59 am
Mincha  6:30 pm /SHABBOS SHUVA DRASHA/ 
Maariv/Havdalah 7:43 pm

FAST OF GEDALIA, SUN SEPT 24th
Fast Begins 5:21 am
Shacharit 9 am
Mincha  6:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 7:33 pm

Weekdays /3 KEPITLACH/L’DOVID HASHEM ORI/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 6:45 pm

KIDDUSH SHABBOS SHUVA/HAAZINU
Kiddush Lite with Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent. No Seuda Slishit at Shul

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Shain Rose-Heisler and Rabbi Yitzi Heisler on the birth of their new daughter!  Mazel Tov to proud grandparents Valerie and Rabbi Simcha Brandeis!  May they merit to raise her to Torah Chupa and Maasim Tovim!

Mazel Tov to Rabbi Mordechai and Rochie Farkash and to the Levitin, New, and Farkash families on the engagement of Mina New and Levi Farkash!!! May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel!

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA –
Order online or print a form:  
http://seattleesrogim.com  Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

TZOM GEDALIAH – SUN SEPT 24th  
Tzom Gedaliah (Fast of Gedalia) is an annual fast day instituted by the Jewish Sages to commemorate the assassination of Gedalia Ben Achikam, the Governor of Israel during the days of Nebuchadnetzar King of Babylonia (580's BCE). As a result of Gedalia's death the final vestiges of Jewish national autonomy after the Babylonian conquest were destroyed, many thousands of Jews were slain, and the remaining Jews were driven into exile. (
www.ezrabessaroth.net)

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE THE HOLIDAY
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  Before Yom Tov, set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. Say “Eruv Tavshilin” blessing found in the Chabad Siddur.

RABBI LEVITIN’S ANNUAL SHABBOS SHUVA DRASHA – SHABBOS AT 6:30 PM
Please join us for Rabbi Levitin’s annual Shabbos Shuva Drasha.   Men, women, and children are encouraged to attend. The first Shabbos in the new year is traditionally known as Shabbos Shuva. As this Shabbos occurs during the Ten Days of Repentance, the Haftora read, which begins “Shuva Yisroel,” “Return Israel,” concerns repentance. Additionally, there is a custom that the Rabbi of each synagogue gives a special congregational lecture on this Shabbos on the topic of repentance and preparation for Yom Kippur. The Sfas Emes writes that one should strengthen their observance of mitzvos and performance of good deeds specifically on this Shabbos.   © Torah.org
http://torah.org/learning/yomtov-yomkippur-vol3no17/

DONATE TO CSTL – PLEASE
http://www.cstlseattle.org/3182565

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ROSH HASHANA KIDS PROGRAM – PRE REGISTRATION REQUIRED
This Rosh Hashana, there will be a downstairs kids' program on both days, from 10:30 am until 2:30 pm, for children 4 and up. There will be a light snack, but no lunch, so please plan accordingly. Due to the limited space we have, this program will be capped at 20 children and will require a reservation.  Please fill out the following form, one for each child attending: 
http://tinyurl.com/yd23qgul Please note: in order to ensure the safety of each child in this program, if your child leaves the room without permission, they will not be allowed back in and will need to be with their parents. L'shana Tova U'metuka Happy, healthy, sweet new year!

CSTL ROSH haSHANA TOTS PROGRAM
Children ages 3-5 can be dropped off. Children 2 and under should be accompanied by a parent. First Day of Rosh Hashana (Thurs): 10:30 AM-12:30 PM 
Second Day of Rosh Hashana (Fri): 10:30 AM - 2 PM
Groups will include free play, singing, and snack. There will be no groups on Shabbat, 9/23, and the upstairs room will be closed. 
If you are interested in volunteering with Tot Groups, please contact Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.

CSTL YAHOO GROUP and eNEWS REMINDER
This is a reminder that the CSTL Yahoo Group and eNews is an independent listserve, moderated by Dr. Joseph Greenberg for the benefit of the listserve’s members.  The CSTL Yahoo Group is not directly affiliated with CSTL or Chabad, and the opinions expressed in the CSTL eNews, and in posts by listserve members are not necessarily similar to those of the CSTL Board or Chabad Shluchim. To post a message, email 
cstl@yahoogroups.com .  The message will be distributed to the group iff approved by the moderator.  If there is an unusual delay in posting, phone Yossi directly. To subscribe to this listserve, email cstl-subscribe@yahoogroups.com To unsubscribe from this listserve, send an email to: cstl-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com  To visit the CSTL listserve on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cstl/ To change settings online go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cstl/join (Yahoo! ID required). To change to a single weekly message via email:  cstl-digest@yahoogroups.com  Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to: https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Rabbi Frand Annual Derasha Video Wednesday, September 27, 7:45 pm at the Kollel,. 
More info: https://www.seattlekolle.com/rabbi-frand-teshua-video

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR ROSH haSHANA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507862/jewish/The-Blessing-Delivered-by-the-Rebbe-upon-Receiving-the-Pan-Klali-Erev-Rosh-HaShanah-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

Because of the constraints of time upon the community, this is not the appropriate time to read the Pan. Before G‑d, all the particular requests mentioned here are revealed. He who hears the blessings of His nation Israel will surely fulfill the prayers of His people from His full, open, holy, and generous hand. In this manner, all the particular requests of the Jewish people will be fulfilled in regard to material and spiritual matters, fusing the material and the spiritual together.

May it be a year of light , a year of blessing, a year of redemption, a year of joy, a year of glory and splendor, a year of good company, a year of great merits, a year of good and long life, a year of great and revealed good, a year of good promises, a year of sustenance, a year of learning with outstanding success, a year when the desires of each one’s heart will be fulfilled together with those of the entire Jewish people thus endowing them with the power of the community, a year of great miracles of both an individual and communal nature, a year of help from above in all matters both material and spiritual, a year of strength for each Jew, that his Judaism can be expressed with more strength and power, a year of redemption, a year of tzedakah, a year of holiness, a year of walking upright, a year of exaltation, a year of happiness and rejoicing, a year of Torah, a year of tefillah (prayer), and a year of teshuvah.

A year when G‑d will fulfill the desires of each Jew and the entire Jewish people in a generous and abundant manner including the most fundamental desire for which we are constantly waiting, the coming of the ultimate and complete Messianic redemption. Then, we will proceed, “with our youth and with our elders, with our sons and with our daughters,” all those who gave in a Pan and go together with their families and their students to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, to the Beis HaMikdash, and to the Holy of Holies.

Then, the entire Jewish people will celebrate Rosh HaShanah in Eretz Yisrael. Even there, Rosh HaShanah could be celebrated for two days depending on when the witnesses come. However, the two days are considered as one continuum. This will lead to continuous life, the era when, “those that lie in the dust will arise and sing,” and with the Previous Rebbe among us, we will proceed to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d established by Your hands.” May it be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Netzavim-Vayelech - Selichos | 24 Elul – 2 Tishrei 5777

Fri- Sept 15th   Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:02 pm

Sat Sept 16th   Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:55 am
Mincha  7:02 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapters 5&6/
Maariv/Havdalah 7:58 pm /SELICHOS 1:02 AM

Weekdays / SHOFAR FRI-SUN-MON-TUE/3 KEPITLACH/L’DOVID HASHEM ORI/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Wed Selichos/Shacharis  6:30 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:00 pm

Selichot –Motzei Shabbos  at 1:02 am
The series of Selichot ("supplication") prayers recited in preparation for the "Days of Awe" of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur begin this Saturday night, after midnight (after the Ashkenazic custom; the Sephardic community begins on the 1st of Elul). On subsequent days, the custom is to recite the Selichot in the early morning hours, before the morning prayers, each morning up to and including Elul 29, the eve of Rosh Hashanah. 
www.chabad.org

EREV ROSH HASHANA, WED SEPT 20th //EREV TAVSHILIN/
Selichos/Shacharis/Hataras Nedarim 6:30 am
Mincha/Maariv/Candles – 6:52 pm

ROSH HASHANA DAY 1, THU SEPT 21st  
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Tashlich 5:30 pm
Maariv/Candles after 7:53 pm /from existing flame/

ROSH HASHANA DAY 2, FRI SEPT 22nd 
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Farbrengen 5:40 pm
Candles BEFORE 6:48 pm /from existing flame/
Maariv 7:37 pm

FAST OF GEDALIA, SUN SEPT 24th  
Fast Begins 5:26 am
Shacharit 9 am
Mincha  6:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 7:33 pm
 

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush is sponsored by Ronda Stark. We will also have Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent, sponsored by Shmulie/Rosie Tennenhaus. Seuda Slishit

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA – DEADLINE MON SEPT 18th 
Order online or print a form:  
http://seattleesrogim.com  Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PRE-SELICHOS FARBRENGEN FRI SEPT 16th  11:00 pm to 1 am
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in preparation for Selichos. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 6:00 PM
Final 5777 opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with Rabbi Mendy!

DONATE TO CSTL – PLEASE
http://www.cstlseattle.org/3182565  .

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ROSH HASHANA KIDS PROGRAM – PRE REGISTRATION REQUIRED
This Rosh Hashana, there will be a downstairs kids' program on both days, from 10:30 am until 2:30 pm, for children 4 and up. There will be a light snack, but no lunch, so please plan accordingly. Due to the limited space we have, this program will be capped at 20 children and will require a reservation.  Please fill out the following form, one for each child attending: 
http://tinyurl.com/yd23qgul Please note: in order to ensure the safety of each child in this program, if your child leaves the room without permission, they will not be allowed back in and will need to be with their parents. L'shana Tova U'metuka Happy, healthy, sweet new year!

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

The Shofar Factory at Eastside Torah Center Sun Sept 17th 
Come and see how a shofar is made! Participate in its construction.Learn many new details about the shofar and Rosh Hashanah. Enter a raffle to win a shofar of your very own! Enjoy delicious apple and honey tasting! Two Sessions - Divided by age 10:00 AM Ages babies to 7 years. 11:30 AM Ages 8-13 years. Cost: $5 per child pay at the door in the ETC Social Hall

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Rabbi Frand Annual Derasha Video Wednesday, September 27, 7:45 pm at the Kollel,. 
More info: https://www.seattlekolle.com/rabbi-frand-teshua-video

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS NETZAVIM/VAYELECH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507861/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Nitzavim-Vayeilech-25th-Day-of-Elul-5750-1990.htm ©SichosInEnglish.org

1. Parshas Nitzavim is always read before Rosh HaShanah. This year, this reading is enhanced by the addition of Parshas Vayeilech and thus, the two are fused together into a single Torah portion.

The Previous Rebbe communicated a unique teaching which reflects the uniqueness of this Shabbos and explains why although this is the Shabbos before Rosh HaShanah, we do not bless the month of Tishrei in contrast to all the other months of the year which are blessed on the Shabbos preceding them:

The Alter Rebbe related: When I was in Mezritch,1 I heard from my teacher and master, the Maggid, who heard from his teacher and master, the Baal Shem Tov: The seventh month is the first of the months of the year. The Holy One, blessed be He, blesses it on the Shabbos of blessing (Shabbos Mevarchim) ... and with the power of this blessing, the Jews bless the other eleven months of the year.

There is a problematic element regarding this teaching. Why does it mention the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid, and the Alter Rebbe? We find that generally, although most of the Alter Rebbe’s teachings were based on the teachings of the Maggid and the Baal Shem,2 he did not mention them explicitly when relating those teachings. We find a similar incident in the Talmud. Rabbi Eliezar the Great explained that he did not mention the name of his teacher, Rabbi Yochanan, when relating a teaching because, “he never related anything which he did not hear from his teacher.” Thus, we must understand: Why did the Alter Rebbe mention the Maggid and the Baal Shem when relating this particular teaching?

It is possible to resolve this difficulty based on another Talmudic passage. Our Sages relate that, in the Beis HaMikdash, the priests would announce that the time for the morning sacrifices had arrived by proclaiming: “In the east, it is shining until Chebron.”3 Why did they mention Chebron each and every day? To allude to the Patriarchs who are buried there.

We find a similar concept in our prayer service (which was instituted in place of the sacrifices). Every day, during the week, on Shabbos, and even on Yom Kippur, we follow a similar pattern and begin the Shemoneh Esreh by praising G‑d, as “the G‑d of Avraham, the G‑d of Yitzchok, the G‑d of Yaakov.”4

Similarly, in regard to the teaching mentioned by the Alter Rebbe — which also contains an aspect of prayer, that G‑d grants abundant blessings in the new year which comes — the “patriarchs” of the Chassidic movement are mentioned. Mentioning their names brings about a more powerful revelation than merely having them in mind on the level of thought.

There is a further connection to the morning sacrifice. On one hand, the morning sacrifice was the same each day. Every day of the year, the same rites were observed. Conversely, however, each day the intention of the sacrifice was different, appropriate to the uniqueness of that day. (For this reason, it was necessary to offer a new sacrifice each day.)

A similar concept applies in regard to each new year. The root of the Hebrew word for year, שנה, is also related to the words meaning “change” and “repetition.” Thus, our Sages have explained that each year is a complete cycle which includes the entire series of changes and developments which transpire and the year that follows is merely a repetition.

Nevertheless, each year is also a new development. As the Alter Rebbe writes in Tanya, “each year a new light which has never shone before descends and shines.” A higher light than shone during the period of the Beis HaMikdash and even in Gan Eden is revealed this year.

The Alter Rebbe’s teaching continues:

The blessing is contained in the Torah reading: “You are standing all together today.” The word “today” refers to Rosh HaShanah, the day of judgment... You are standing, victorious in judgment. Therefore, on the Shabbos before Rosh HaShanah we read5 the parshah: Atem Nitzavim. This is G‑d’s blessing [conveyed] on the Shabbos which blesses the seventh month which is a month of abundance and the source of abundant blessings for all of Israel for the entire year to come.

“You” refers to each and every Jew. “Are standing” implies a powerful and firm stance. Indeed, we find the root of the Hebrew word for “standing,” nitzav used in relation to a king. This implies that a Jew stands with the power of a king. Our Sages declare: “When the king speaks, mountains are moved.” “Mountains” refer to our material concerns. They are not destroyed, but rather “moved,” transferred and transformed into holiness.

The portion continues, “today,” the day of Rosh HaShanah, “the day of great judgment.” Although from one perspective, judgment is associated with limitation, from a deeper view, it is through judgment that “overwhelming energy”6 is conveyed. This energy will be expressed in the service of the Jews in Torah and mitzvos and which will ultimately permeate through and effect the material nature of the world, unifying existence in this material world with its source in G‑d’s True Existence.

Afterwards, the portion continues, “all together,” that the Jews stand as a single communal entity. This brings them, “before the L‑rd, your G‑d,” and causes them to be “victorious in judgment.”

The above is enhanced by the influence of Parshas Vayeilech which indicates that, from the powerful stance of Nitzavim, a Jew must “proceed from strength to strength.” This is further enhanced by the mitzvah of Hakhel mentioned in this portion. In Hakhel, the Jews are fused together as a single entity and they are inspired by the king’s reading of the Torah.

This leads to the conclusion of the portion, “And Moshe spoke the words of this song so that all the community of Israel would hear until its end.” The Hebrew for “until its end” (on,), can also be interpreted “until they became perfect” (תמים).

This prepares them for Parshas Haazinu which, as our Sages explain, reflects a situation when one is “close to heaven and far removed from the earth.” Although this level was achieved by Moshe alone, each Jew has a spark of Moshe in his midst. Hence, this is relevant to him as well.

This prepares us to enter the year 5751, a year when “I will show you wonders,” including the greatest wonder, the Messianic redemption which will be considered wondrous even in comparison to the miracles of the exodus from Egypt.

* * *

2. This is the final Shabbos of the “Seven Shabbasos of Consolation” which begin with a two-fold measure of comfort, “Comfort you, Comfort you, My people.” Based on the principle, “Advance in holy matters,” we can assume that from Shabbos to Shabbos, particularly on this, the final and concluding Shabbos, this consolation increases and grows.

This leads us to the Ten Days of Repentance. These ten days can be seen as a summation of the Seven Shabbasos of Consolation and the Three Shabbasos which preceded them.

This Shabbos is also the last Shabbos of the month of Elul, the “month of mercy,” when “the King is in the field.”7 This is reflected in the fact that, although usually on the Shabbos when a new month is blessed, the passage Av HaRachamim8 (“All-Merciful Father”) is not recited, on this Shabbos, when G‑d blesses the coming month, it is customarily said. This reflects the all-encompassing influence of Divine mercy.

This leads to the prayer, “Happy are those who dwell in Your House” (א שרי), in the Beis HaMikdash and then to the conclusion of the prayers, “The upright will dwell in Your presence.” The word “Your presence” can also mean “Your inner dimension,” for G‑d’s inner dimension is related to the inner dimension of the Jews.

This, in turn, gives the Jews the power to declare, “Give ear heavens...listen earth,” i.e., a Jew reveals how he has control over the heavens and the earth.

* * *

3. It is customary to conclude with directives for action. As mentioned several times this year, efforts should be made to gather Jews together on Shabbos in synagogues to study Torah and discuss directives for action. When a Jew enters a synagogue, he feels he is “in the presence of the King.” If many Jews come together, then, “Among the multitude of people is the glory of the King.” Even a child who enters a synagogue sees the ark and the Torah scrolls and is impressed.

At present, it is important to concentrate on efforts to provide all the needy with their holiday needs and thus, “they can “eat succulent foods and drink sweet beverages” on Rosh HaShanah. This need is further emphasized by the fact that Shabbos follows directly after Rosh HaShanah and thus there are three consecutive days where holiday meals must be served. This applies in both Eretz Yisrael and in the Diaspora.9

There is another unique aspect to the present year. Since Shabbos follows Rosh HaShanah, the Fast of Gedaliah is pushed off another day. This is significant because, at the outset, the Fast of Gedaliah is not held on the day of Gedaliah’s murder. He was slain on the second day of Rosh HaShanah and because of the festive nature of the day, the fast was postponed. This year it is postponed still another day, giving the potential for it to be pushed off completely and, indeed, turned into a day of celebration with the coming of the Messianic age when the fast days will be transformed into festivals.

The fact that the Shabbos after Rosh HaShanah is being held on a date which normally would be a fast is a further indication of the need to provide people with the potential to celebrate it in a full matter. This will lead to the holidays of Sukkos and Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah when (in the Diaspora), there will also be three consecutive festive days.

* * *

4. According to the Chabad custom of studying Pirkei Avos throughout the entire summer, on this Shabbos, we study the fifth and sixth chapters.

Both these chapters are connected with the present date, the 25th of Elul, the day on which the world was created. The fifth chapter begins, “The world was created with ten utterances,” and the sixth chapter concludes, “Everything which the Holy One, blessed be He, created in His world, He created only for His glory.” This reflects the state of the creation on the first day. Then, the entire host of the heavens and earth were brought into being, but they were still united with G‑d. This is implied by the Torah’s description of the first day of creation as יום אחד, “one day.” Structurally, the expression יום ראשון, “the first day,” would have been more appropriate. The Torah, however, calls it יום אחד, to imply that it was a day of oneness. “G‑d was one with His world.” It was openly evident how “Everything was created for His glory.”

May we be able to stand with the power and firmness of Atem Nitzavim, the power of a king, and, as implied by Parshas Vayeilech, “proceed from strength to strength,” until “we appear before G‑d in Zion.”

Shabbos Ki Savo | 17-24 Elul 5777

Fri- Sept 8th   Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:16 pm

Sat Sept 2nd  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:53 am
Mincha  7:16 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapters 3&4/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:13 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:10 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush Lite. Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent is sponsored by Shmulie/Rosie Tennenhaus. Seuda Slishit

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Mushka Rosler-Naparstek and Velvil Rosler on the birth of their new daughter. May they merit to raise her to Torah, Chupa, and Maasim Tovim!

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA – WEB SITE AVAILABLE MON SEPT 11th 
Order online or print a form: 
http://seattleesrogim.com Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

CHECK YOUR MAZUZOT IN LYNNWOOD SUN SEPT 10th
Reb Moshe Liberow from Colorado Springs will BeH be spending  Sunday Sept 10th in Lynnwood checking Mezuzos. The website to reserve a spot is JewishSnohomish.com/Scribe.  Ksiva Vachasima Toiva, Rabbi Berel Paltiel 425-286-7465 
Rabbi@JewishSnohomish.com 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

ELUL 18th  FARBRENGEN - THE BAAL SHEM TOV’S YAHRZEIT - FRI SEPT 8th  5:00 pm
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in front of the Men’s Mikvah
in honor of the Baal Shev Tov’s Yahrzeit. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 6:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE STARTS SUN SEPT 10th 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Mercaz Bee Garden Tour Sun Sept 10th 10:30am
http://www.westseattlebeegarden.com/ All ages! Afterward play at a park (weather depending) $5 per family, $2 per individual

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS KI SAVO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507858/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Savo-Chai-Elul-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. There are two significant sayings with which the Previous Rebbe described Chai Elul: a) “Chai Elul introduces chayos (life-energy) into the service of the month of Elul,” or more particularly, “Chai Elul introduces chayos (life-energy) into the service of ‘I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.”‘ b) Each of the last twelve days of the year correspond to one of the twelve months. In these days, we are granted the potential to compensate for any deficiencies and elevate our conduct of those months. In this context, Chai Elul corresponds to the month of Tishrei.

From these statements, we see that Chai Elul is of general significance adding chayos to Elul and also, effecting the entire year. On the surface, however, it is difficult to understand: Elul as a whole is the month of stock-taking and teshuvah for the year at large. If so, what is the nature of the addition brought about by Chai Elul.

From the Previous Rebbe’s statement, it appears that the addition is one of chayos (“life-energy”). Chai Elul generates the potential for the service of Elul to be infused with energy and vitality. This, however, is also problematic. Since “we can assume that each Jew conducts himself in a proper manner,” surely the entire Jewish people have carried out the service of Elul with energy, vitality, and joy for these are fundamental principles in the service of G‑d.

Accordingly, it would appear that the Previous Rebbe’s statement indicates that from Chai Elul, a new phase of service is begun. Although Elul as a whole is a month of stock-taking, from Chai Elul onward begins the “Elul of Elul.” This, in turn, relates to the new life energy which Chai Elul introduces. This new energy, not only adds vitality to the previous service, it initiates a new phase of service.

To explain: The month of Elul is a month of general significance which includes the entire year1 and grants the potential to compensate for any deficiencies in our conduct of the previous year and elevate it to a higher rung. Similarly, it is the month of preparation for the new year.2 Accordingly, the service carried out in Elul is of a general nature.

This is emphasized by the fact that the name Elul serves as an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” which emphasize the bond of love between G‑d and the Jewish people. This bond characterizes the totality of this relationship and thus, is relevant in all times and places. Similarly, the fact that the name of Elul serves as an acronym for verses reflecting “The three pillars on which the world stands: Torah, service (prayer), and deeds of kindness,” and similarly, services of a general nature, teshuvah and redemption,3 further emphasizes the all-encompassing nature of the month.

In truth, this concept applies to the totality of Torah and mitzvos.There is an interrelation between general principles and their particular application. Indeed, every particular element is a reflection of the most general concepts. Since, “the world was created for the Torah,” this concept is also reflected in the world at large. Each point of time or space includes within itself time and space in its totality.

This concept is reinforced by the Baal Shem Tov’s teaching that at each moment, the creation is renewed. When G‑d brought existence into being from total and absolute naught, the first moment of existence that He created included within it every moment that would follow.4 Similarly, at every moment, as G‑d brings into being the totality of existence anew, every moment includes all previous and all subsequent moments of existence just as the first moment of creation included all time.

This concept clarifies a fundamental concept in regard to teshuvah.It is explained that, in one moment, a person can compensate for inadequacies in his behavior over many years.5 How is that possible? Because each moment contains within it the totality of time and can thus alter the nature of the events which occurred previously. This concept, although true at all times, receives greater emphasis during the month of Elul which is, as explained above, a month of general consequence.

To the above, Chai Elul contributes the dimension of chayos — life-energy. Chayos is not a particular element of one’s existence which one can point to like one of the limbs of the body. On the contrary, it is, by nature, entirely above the body. Nevertheless, it enclothes itself within the body, changing the nature of the body to the extent that the body itself becomes alive.

The relationship between the body and its life-energy is different from that of a particular element and the general category in which it is included. In the latter instance, there is an interrelation between the two. Indeed, as explained above, the entire general category can be reflected in a particular element. This is, however, no more than a reflection and there remains a difference between the particular entity and the general category in its totality.

In contrast, the relationship between the body and its life-energy is very different. On one hand, abstractly, there is no relation between the two. The life-energy of the soul is of a totally different nature than the body. Nevertheless, the soul descends and enclothes itself within the body to the extent that the body’s nature changes and not only the soul, but also the body, lives.

The reason for this change is because the soul’s life-energy emanates from the essence. An essential quality permeates through everything and exists equally in all places and thus, every aspect of a person’s being is affected by his life-energy.6

On this basis, we can understand the uniqueness of Chai Elul. As explained above, Elul is a month of general significance which includes all the service of the Jewish people. Chai Elul emphasizes the chayos — “life-energy” — of that service, the bond between the Jews and G‑d.

For this reason, the twelve final days of the year beginning on Chai Elul represent a new phase of service. The aspect of stock-taking which began on Rosh Chodesh Elul focused on the particulars of one’s service in the three general services of Torah, prayer, and deeds of kindness, reviewing one’s thought, speech, and action. In contrast, the stock-taking which begins on Chai Elul focuses on the essence of a Jew’s connection to G‑dliness and its expression within his behavior. We are not as concerned with the particular elements of service, but rather with the connection in its totality, the life-energy of our service.

This amplifies the explanation of how one moment of teshuvah can effect one’s entire past. Since here, we are focusing on the essence of the connection, its life-energy, and as explained above, an essential quality exists equally in every place, each moment is connected with the essence and thus, has an effect on one’s existence in its totality.

The above enhances the significance of Chai Elul for it corresponds to the month of Tishrei. The Hebrew letters for Tishrei (תשרי) can be rearranged to form the word reishis (רשית), which means “the head of.” Chassidic thought explains that Rosh HaShanah is called “the head of the year,” to emphasize how, just as the head includes the life-energy for the entire body, Rosh HaShanah includes the life-energy for the entire year. Similarly, Tishrei as a whole is a month which includes the life-energy for the entire year. Chai Elul, which compensates for and elevates the service of Tishrei, is thus intrinsically connected with the life-energy for the year in its totality.

The chayos of Elul — the love relationship with G‑d as expressed by the verse, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine” — is expressed in the service of prayer which represents a process of connection with G‑d. Indeed, this connection relates to G‑d’s essence as our Sages commented, “Pray to Him and not to His attributes.” In contrast, deeds of kindness relates to G‑d’s attribute of kindness,7 and Torah study relates to G‑d’s intellectual attributes. Thus, it is through an increase in prayer, which connects us to G‑d’s essence that — to quote the second version of the Previous Rebbe’s adage — Chai Elul adds life to the service of “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.” For this reason, it is customary even for Torah scholars8 to place greater emphasis on the service of prayer in this month.

All of the above is enhanced this year when Chai Elul falls on Shabbos for Shabbos also emphasizes the inner bond between the Jews and G‑d.9 This generates even greater potential to “infuse chayos in Elul,” and in the service of “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.”

2. The above concepts are also connected to this week’s Torah portion which begins by mentioning the mitzvah of Bikkurim, the first fruits. Our Sages explain that the first fruits refer to the Jewish people, G‑d’s first fruits, as it were. G‑d’s conception of the Jewish people existed before the world, preceding even the Torah itself.10

Offering Bikkurim represents developing a connection with that level, the source of the souls of the Jewish people, which in turn, brings about a connection with G‑d. Thus, Bikkurim are related to the service of prayer.11 Thus, there is a connection to the concepts explained above in relation to Chai Elul.

The mitzvah of Bikkurim is to be fulfilled, “When you come into the land... take it as an inheritance, and settle within,” alluding to the service of the Jewish people in refining the world at large. The epitome of this service is the transformation12 of the land of the seven13 Canaanite nations into Eretz Yisrael. This service will be completed in the Messianic age when, in addition to the lands of these seven nations, we will be granted the lands of the Keni, Kniziand Kadmoni.14

The chayos introduced by Chai Elul is also reflected in the parshiyos read in the weeks that follow. Nitzavim (“You are standing”)15 describes how the entire Jewish people, from the most elevated until the most simple, are standing “all together,” “unified and at one,” because they are one with G‑d, establishing a covenant with Him.

This leads to Vayeilech [(“And he went”) which is read together with Nitzavim this year] which grants the Jews the potential to “proceed from strength to strength.” Since G‑d is totally unlimited, there is no limit to the bonds which a Jew can establish with Him and we can — and should — continue to ascend level after level.

This leads to Parshas Haazinu which according to our Sages describes a state in which one is “close to the heavens and removed from the earth.” Although even the prophet Yeshayahucould not reach that level,16 nevertheless, each Jew who realizes the essential connection he shares with G‑d, can be “close to the heavens.”

From this we proceed to Parshas Berachah, “This is the blessing which Moshe... blessed the children of Israel,” extending (for the word berachah can mean both “blessing” and “extension”) the influence of Moshe to all the Jewish people.

This generates the potential for Bereishis. A Jew “becomes a partner with G‑d in the work of creation,” drawing down G‑dliness into the world, revealing how the entire world depends on His creative potential. This refines the world and transforms it into a dwelling for G‑d.

* * *

3. This Shabbos, we study the third and fourth chapters of Pirkei Avos. Not only are the chapters numbered three and four, they begin with teachings that emphasize these two numbers: Chapter Three begins: “Reflect upon three things...”17 and Chapter Four begins by mentioning four categories that reflect the epitome of developed character traits.

The numbers three and four are of general significance for the Jewish people. We have three Patriarchs and four Matriarchs. Furthermore, three and four equal seven, the number of branches which existed in the Menorah, which are representative of the seven paths of service of G‑d. In particular, the numbers three and four are connected with the service of the intellect. We possess three intellectual potentials (Chochmah, Binah, and Daas) and at times, we speak of four potentials because Daas is counted as two, since it serves as the source for both the two general emotional categories, Chessed and Gevurah.18

As a preface to both these chapters,19 we study the teaching, “All Israel have a portion in the World to Come as it is written, ‘Your nation are all righteous...’ ” This teaching emphasizes the essential connection G‑d shares with every Jew. It is because of this essential bond that “All Israel have a portion in the World to Come.”20 Similarly, it is this essential connection which gives rise to the seven services alluded to in Chapters Three and Four.

The above concepts must influence our behavior on the level of deed. From Chai Elul onward, the new life-energy drawn down in Elul must bring about an increase in all aspects of the service of Elul, allowing for a deeper dimension of correction and completion to be contributed to the service of the previous year.

In particular, it calls for an increase in the service of prayer, for it is through this service that the essential connection mentioned above is expressed. Similarly, there should be an increase in Torah study. In particular, focus should be made on the laws pertaining to Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkos, and likewise, the inner dimensions of the service of these holidays.

Also, in preparation for the coming festive season, efforts must be undertaken to ensure that every Jew is given his holiday needs so that the holidays can be celebrated in a manner of “eat succulent foods and drink sweet beverages.” In particular, this is relevant this year when Shabbos comes directly after Rosh HaShanah (in the Diaspora as well as in Eretz Yisrael), and thus, there are three consecutive days when festive meals must be served. (Similarly, in the Diaspora, this phenomenon is repeated for the holidays of Sukkos and Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.)

May the good resolutions made regarding the above lead to the fulfillment of the promise made at the beginning of the Torah reading, “When you will enter the land...”, with the coming of Mashiach who will lead the entire Jewish people back to Eretz Yisrael.21 This is particularly relevant at present, at the conclusion of “a year of miracles,” as we prepare for a year when, “I will show you wonders.”

Shabbos Ki Tseitsei | 10 - 17 Elul 5777

Fri- Sept 1st  Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:30 pm

Sat Sept 2nd  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:49 am
Mincha  7:30 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:27 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:25 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush will be sponsored by Shimon and Tova Cox, in honor of several Simchas in their family!!  We will also have our delicious cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit

SHOFAR FACTORY SUN SEPT 3rd 3-4 PM AT THE NE BRANCH LIBRARY
In the library community room.  6801 35th Ave NE.   With Rabbi Emlen.  Fun for the whole family.   RSVP to rabbiherbstman@gmail.com

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

ELUL 10th  FARBRENGEN IN HONOR OF RABBI YOSEF CARO - FRI SEPT 1st  5:00 pm
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in front of the Men’s Mikvah
In 1522, Rabbi Yosef Caro started writing the Beit Yosef, his famous commentary on the Arba Turim, Yaakov Ben Asher’s comprehensive Halachic code. He started writing this commentary in Adrianople, Turkey, and continued for the next twenty years, during which time he relocated to Safed, Israel. He completed the monumental work on the 11th of Elul. It took another ten years for the writings to be published. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE STARTS SUN SEPT 10th 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL Shabbos Kids Club
Looking for volunteers to give a shuir to the older kids either once per month or a one time occasion It is for the ages 5-12.  The shuir is generally about 10-15 minutes long on any topic, parsha, holidays,Jewish history, Mitzos.  Your choice.  Please contact me   Thank you.  Tova Morah@msn.com 206-383-2516

FROM THE PRESIDENT
Please keep all food in the Social Hall.  Please feel empowered to tell anyone you see leaving the Social Hall with food to please not do so.  Doing this will help us clean for the coming Holidays!

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
For more information, please contact Yechezkel Rapoport.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Labor Day / Elul Bagel Brunch on at BCMH Mon Sept 4th 11 am. 
Must register & pay by Wed., Aug. 30 to 
www.bcmhseattle.org Cost: $10/Adult (ages 12 & up); $5/Child (ages 4-11); Kids 3 & under are free; $40/Family Rate. During Brunch: Program for kids "Making Your Own Shofar" with Rabbi Shimon Emlen. **Free for kids attending Brunch, $5 per child otherwise.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS SHOFTIM
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507855/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Seitzei-11th-Day-of-Elul-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org.

1. This week’s portion begins, “When you go out to war upon your enemies.” Although the Torah is intended to be eternally relevant, on the surface, it is difficult to understand the lesson which can be derived from this portion which describes the conduct of the Jews in war (and in particular, a war which is not directly commanded by G‑d, a milchemas reshus, which is not at all applicable in the present era).

The lesson we can learn from this portion involves the dimension of our service that is involved with material things and matters of this world, refining and elevating its physical substance, making it a vessel for holiness and thus, transforming the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

This service is of a different nature than the service in the realm of holiness itself, the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. The latter service is characterized by peace, drawing G‑dliness into the world. No “enemy” is involved. In contrast, when one is involved in refining the world at large, then one must “go out to war upon your enemy.” The nature of the material world opposes G‑dliness and stands in contradiction to the establishment of a dwelling for Him. To create a dwelling for G‑d, a place where His essence is revealed, within this world, it is necessary to “wage war” against this dimension of worldliness and conquer it.

The aspect of concealment within this world — and its tendency to oppose the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d — was created by G‑d, Himself. Thus, the power which opposes holiness does not stem from the world’s material substance alone, but rather, from the nature with which it was endowed by G‑d. Accordingly, it is understandable that a Jew must summon up very powerful energies to wage war against such power.

For this reason, the Torah uses the expression, “When you go out to war upon your enemy.” A Jew “goes out to war,” i.e., he must leave his own realm, the involvement with holy matters, and involve himself with material affairs.

When involved in this service, he must know that he has the potential to succeed. Therefore, he is told that he must wage war, “upon your enemies.” Grammatically, it would have been proper to state “against you enemies,” or “with your enemies.” Nevertheless, the Torah used a somewhat awkward construction to teach us that, before the war begins, a Jew has to know that he stands above his enemies.

In microcosm, this conception of war is relevant within our own lives as well. A Jew possesses a G‑dly soul and, on a lower level, an animal soul and a body. He must fight a war, the conflict with the yetzer hora, to overcome the natural drives of the body and the animal soul with the intent of conquering them and thus, preventing them from disturbing his service of G‑d. Furthermore, ultimately, he should reach the point where he serves G‑d, בכל לבבך, interpreted by our Sages to mean, “with both your desires,” i.e., the yetzer hora will also become transformed. The potential for this service stems from the fact that, in essence, a Jew is “above your enemies.”

The Torah teaches us about two types of war: milchemas mitzvah — wars which G‑d commanded us to wage, e.g., the wars necessary to conquer Eretz Yisrael and annihilate the Canaanites who lived there previously, the war against Amalek, and a war to defend the Jewish people against attackers; and milchemas reshus — those wars waged by a king “with other nations to extend the boundary of [Eretz] Yisrael] and magnify its greatness and reputation.”

The war with the seven Canaanite nations — and similarly, in the Messianic age, the war to conquer the lands of the ten nations — has as its purpose, the conquest of their land and its transformation into Eretz Yisrael, the holy land. In contrast, a milchemas reshus is not a mitzvah and is intended merely to “extend the boundaries of Israel” in a place which, by nature, belongs to gentiles.

In the personal sphere, a milchemas mitzvah involves waging a war against the material dimensions of the world according to the Torah’s commands with the intent of conquering them for Torah, making them like Eretz Yisrael.It involves, however, only those aspects of the world which are necessities for life. In contrast, a milchemas reshus involves “extending the boundaries” of holiness beyond our minimum necessities. A person goes beyond the limits of the minimum which Torah allows him and elevates other aspects of the world, transforming them into holiness.

To express this concept in regard to eating: Rather than eat bread and water, one eats succulent meats and drinks aged wines, but does so for the sake of holiness. Similarly, in regard to the world at large, a person goes beyond the limits of his own environment and seeks new areas to refine by establishing a synagogue, a house of study, or a place where mitzvos are performed.

milchemas reshus does more than involve a wider sphere of activity than a milchemas mitzvah, it requires a different type and quality of service. To understand this concept, we must probe into the very nature of a milchemas reshus: On the surface, the concept of a milchemas reshus is problematic. In regard to a milchemas mitzvah, the reason the Jews go to war is because G‑d commanded them to. He told them to conquer Eretz Yisraeland make it their land. Thus, what the Jews are taking rightfully belongs to them. Although — as Rashi quotes in the beginning of his commentary on the Torah — the gentiles may claim: “You are thieves,” the Jews can answer, “The land belongs to G‑d... and He gave it to us.”

In contrast, when it comes to conquering other lands, this rationale does not apply. On the contrary, these lands were given to the gentiles, not to the Jews. If so, how can the Jews go out and conquer these lands. Seemingly, it would be appropriate to call them thieves for doing so.

A similar, and perhaps even deeper question applies regarding the parallels to this concept in our service of G‑d. A Jew has the power to transform the material substance of this world into holiness, because of the potential granted to him by the Torah. Indeed, in an ultimate sense, these entities were brought into being with the intent that they be transformed into holiness.

Although a war is necessary to bring about that process of transformation, that is because G‑d desired a dwelling in the lower worlds. Hence, even these entities were created in a manner in which they “belong” to the lower worlds and appear as an “enemy” to the service of holiness. Despite this tendency, however, they were also intended to be transformed into holiness.

We see this concept in regard to Eretz Yisrael. Although G‑d had promised Avraham that He would give Eretz Yisrael to his descendants,1 when the Jews re-entered Eretz Yisrael, they had to assert their control over the land through war. Indeed, before the Jews conquest, the Torah referred to Eretz Yisrael as “the inheritance of the nations.” Nevertheless, at the very beginning of creation, the potential that the Jews would conquer Eretz Yisrael and transform it into a land of holiness was already granted.

This concept is easily understandable. Since G‑d created Eretz Yisrael, He is entitled to give it to whomever He pleases. He granted it to the Jews, however, in a manner that will enable them to appreciate it, not as a gift given from above, but rather as something which they acquired through their own efforts. This requires that they wage a war to transform the land from being the heritage of gentiles into Eretz Yisrael, the holy land.

The above applies, however, in regard to wars which are mitzvos. In this instance, there is an explicit Divine command to conquer this portion of the world for holiness and reveal its essential connection to the Jews. When, however, speaking of a milchemas reshus, there is no Divine command involved, nor does the land belong to the Jews. Thus, taking it away from the gentiles — or in the personal sphere, taking it away from worldliness — is seemingly improper.

This, however, is the purpose of this portion of the Torah — Parshas Ki Seitzei, which describes a milchemas reshus — to teach us that we possess the potential for a new and different service; a war fought according to the directives of the Torah, but which was not obligated by its command. This endows the Jews with the potential to conquer additional portions of the world and make them and ultimately, the entire world — not only the limited area of Eretz Yisrael — a dwelling for G‑d.

This is the purpose of the creation of all existence. Although the Torah states that only Eretz Yisrael was given to us from above — and not the world at large, this is because G‑d desired that this aspect of the task to make the world a dwelling for Him be dependent totally on the service of the Jews. Torah does not give any commands regarding these matters, leaving them solely in the hands of the Jewish people.

Thus, a milchemas reshus brings out a new dimension of service, serving G‑d voluntarily, on one’s own initiative, and thus, reaches a more complete level in the efforts to make this world a dwelling for G‑d. Through this service, even those elements of existence which belong to the realm of worldliness — as opposed to those which were, at the outset, designated for holiness — become part of G‑d’s dwelling.

There is, however, a question involved: Since there is no obligation from the Torah to carry out a milchemas reshus and there is a danger involved,2 why should such a risk be taken? Similarly, in the personal sphere, since the “war” to transform the material substance of the world requires that one become involved in material things, there is a possibility that the person’s spiritual level will sink.

Though danger also exists in a milchemas mitzvah: a) We have no choice. We are commanded to wage such a war. b) The Torah’s command itself protects us from danger.

In a milchemas reshus, however, there is no such command. Hence, the question arises: Why should a Jew expose himself to danger? The Torah explicitly commands us to protect ourselves from physical harm. Although this service can bring a person to a higher level, since there is a risk involved, it would appear proper that one should devote one’s time and energy to the service of holiness where one will surely succeed.

Furthermore, if one fails in a milchemas reshus, there is a possibility that one will no longer be able to continue any service at all. Under such circumstances, it would seem preferable to devote oneself to the service of holiness, where one’s future will not be jeopardized.

[Needless to say, we are not speaking about individuals who have nothing else to do, and because, “A person was born to toil,” feels it necessary to wage a milchemas reshus. Every Jew has what to do in the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. Why should this be jeopardized?]

This, however, is the lesson taught to us by this Torah portion: Despite the danger involved, a Jew must commit himself to this service. Furthermore, he is granted a Divine promise for success, “the L‑rd, your G‑d, will give the enemy into your hand.”3

Thus, we see a fusion of two opposites: On one hand, the Torah teaches us that the Jew must choose to go out to war himself despite the danger involved. Simultaneously, he must fulfill the command to preserve his life. This is possible because a Jew is connected with the essence of G‑d which is the source for the fusion of opposites.

This leads to a deeper understanding: The world and worldliness (“your enemy”) has a power which it was granted by G‑d. Indeed, it exists as an entity separate from the realm of holiness.4 For this reason, it is necessary to wage war to conquer such an entity and this war possesses a certain amount of danger.

Nevertheless, because a Jew is connected with G‑d’s essence, he has the potential to bring about a new development in creation, conquer these elements of existence, and thus, have them included in the dwelling for G‑d established in the lower worlds. G‑d promises him success in these activities: “The L‑rd, your G‑d, will give the enemy into your hand.” Furthermore, “you will take captives.” This phrase can be interpreted to mean that even those aspects of existence which were “captured” by the “enemy” can be redeemed and transformed into holiness.

Potential for this service is derived from the fact that a Jew is essentially “upon (i.e., above) his enemies.” He is one with G‑d, transcending entirely the limits of the material world. This reflects a higher dimension of soul than the service to conquer Eretz Yisrael. Although the latter conquest also involves a war, as mentioned above, from the outset, Eretz Yisrael was the part of the world destined to become included in the realm of holiness. Therefore, it involves a dimension of service which is also limited in nature and which relates to worldly matters. In contrast, the service of milchemas mitzvah relates to that aspect of the Jewish people which is “above your enemy,” transcending all aspects of material existence and one with G‑d.

These concepts are also reflected in the personal realm, in a Jew’s war with his yetzer hora, his struggle to refine his body and animal soul. On the verse, “And you shall... see the difference between one who serves G‑d and one who does not serve Him,” our Sages comment, “ ’One who serves G‑d’ is one who reviews his subject matter one hundred and one times. ‘One who does not serve Him’ is one who reviews his subject matter only hundred times.”

In Tanya, the Alter Rebbe differentiates between these individuals and a tzaddik. A tzaddik is called “a servant of G‑d,” using the past tense. He has already completed his battle with the yetzer hora and hence is referred to with a title that attests to the acceptance of his service as an established fact. In contrast, the expression, “one who serves G‑d,” indicates that the person to which it is referring is presently in the midst of his struggle with his yetzer hora, i.e., a benoni.

The Alter Rebbe continues, explaining the difference between “one who serves G‑d” and “one who does not serve Him.” In that era, it was customary for a student to review his subject matter one hundred times. Therefore, it was the one hundred and first time, the time when the person went beyond his habit and normal practice, which caused him to be distinguished as “one who serves G‑d.” His striving (“war”) to rise above his nature and personal habits merited that he be awarded such a title.

These ideas can be related to the concepts of milchemas mitzvah and milchemas reshus explained above. Although a person has already waged the milchemas mitzvah which is required of him and thus refined his nature and habits to the extent that he is worthy of the title tzaddik, one might assume that he need not be involved in “wars” any more. On the contrary, he should proceed from strength to strength in the realm of holiness.

Nevertheless, in order to merit the title “one who serves G‑d,” one cannot remain satisfied with one’s previous achievements. Rather, one must “go out to war,” strive to change and elevate one’s habits and nature, and reach an even higher level of holiness. This applies even to one who has engaged in such milchemos reshus previously. Although after refining his behavior to be included in the realm of holiness, he strove to seek greater heights, having attained those heights, he cannot remain passive, but must “serve G‑d,” by seeking an even higher peak.

The above is particularly relevant in the month of Elul. The yetzer hora may try to tempt a Jew, telling him, “Surely, you have already carried out all the dimensions of the service of Elul, observing Torah and mitzvos b’hiddur.Therefore, it is time to rest. If you want, continue your service, but do it in a regular manner, in a pattern that fits your accepted norms. Don’t risk anything. Devote your energies to holiness.”

In the present generation in particular, the yetzer hora will add, “This is the last generation of exile and the first generation of the redemption. Seemingly, our energies should be directed towards preparing the world for the coming of Mashiach by devoting our energies to progress in holiness, to rising higher spiritually.”

For this reason, the Torah teaches us, “When you go out to war...” emphasizing how a Jew must constantly wage wars both against his own personal nature and in the world at large to make the world a dwelling for G‑d. Indeed, even Mashiach will “fight the wars of G‑d,” to bring the world to its ultimate state of refinement.5

Thus, in this time, each person must apply himself to the service of Elul in a manner which challenges his nature. This includes the establishment of a bond of love and happiness with G‑d as emphasized by the verse, “I am my Beloved’s...”6

This relationship is expressed through Torah study in which a complete bond is established between a Jew and G‑d. Thus, it is appropriate that each individual increase his own Torah study and also influence others (particularly, children7 ) to attend public sessions of Torah study.

Similarly, there should be an increase in tzedakah which reflects the unity of the Jews. Such unity brings about the love of G‑d and motivates the expression of His love for the Jews. * * *

2. Our Sages state that thirty days before a holiday, we should learn the laws pertaining to it. It is already less than thirty days before the holidays of Tishrei begin and in this context, it is necessary to mention that importance of providing Jews with their holiday needs so that they will be able to celebrate Rosh HaShanah and (the holidays which follow) in the manner stated in the Bible, “Eat sumptuous foods and drink sweet beverages and send portions to those who do not have prepared.” This is particularly relevant this year, when Shabbos comes directly after Rosh HaShanah,8Sukkos, and Simchas Torah, and thus, festive meals will have to be prepared for three consecutive days.

May these activities bring each person a kesivah vachasimah tovah for a good and sweet year and may it conclude the greatest blessing, the coming of Mashiach, who will “fight the wars of G‑d and be victorious,” and then, rebuild the Beis HaMikdash where we will fulfill the mitzvos mentioned in this week’s Torah portion, bringing our first fruits as an offering to G‑d

Shabbos Shoftim | 3 -10 Elul 5777

Fri- Aug 25th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:44 pm

Sat Aug 26th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:45 am
Mincha  7:44 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 1/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:42 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:40 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT BBQ
Join us this shabbat for a delicious Shabbat BBQ dinner with a 24-hour smoked brisket (by Shuky Meyer), hot dogs, teriyaki fish, craft beer, wine and more! Services begin at 6:45 pm, followed immediately by dinner in the social hall. Payment is required in advance. If you are unable to attend, please consider making a donation! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cstl-shabbat-bbq-dinner-tickets-36956862972 

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush is be co-sponsored by Andy Krasnow, in beloved memory of his father, Yitzhok ben Yehudah Ber Z”L, 4th  Elul; and also co-sponsored by Dr. Vernon and Liz Neppe, in beloved memory of the 15th Yahrzeit of Vernon's dear sister, Annette Liebmann ( Chana Feiga bas Sholem Leib Z”L).  Thank you also to Dr. and Mrs. Neppe for an additional donation to the kitchen fund.  We will also have our delicious cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We are saddened to learn of the passing of Leah Alexander, the wife of Professor Edward Alexander, Saturday Aug 19th .  May the Alexander family be consoled with all the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

ELUL 3rd FARBRENGEN FRI AUG 18th 5:30 pm
In honor of Elul 3rd ,yahrtzeit of the first Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi (in modern times) of the Religious Zionist Jewish community in the Holy Land, Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook (
www.chabad.org/calendar). In front of the Men’s Mikvah

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE STARTS SUN SEPT 10th 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL Shabbos Kids Club
Looking for volunteers to give a shuir to the older kids either once per month or a one time occasion It is for the ages 5-12.  The shuir is generally about 10-15 minutes long on any topic, parsha, holidays,Jewish history, Mitzos.  Your choice.  Please contact me   Thank you. Tova Morah@msn.com 206-383-2516

FROM THE PRESIDENT
Please keep all food in the Social Hall.  Please feel empowered to tell anyone you see leaving the Social Hall with food to please not do so.  Doing this will help us clean for the coming Holidays!

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
For more information, please contact Yechezkel Rapoport.


COMMUNITY NEWS

RABBI ELI MONSOUR AT SBH – MON AUG 28th 8 PM
It is a great privilege and opportunity to hear Rabbi Monsour address the community.  At Sephardic Bikur Holim. 

Sephardic Bikur Holim Sephardic Bazar. Sun Aug 27th 9 am – 3 pm
Featuring Dezayuno Sephardic Breakfast 9 am - Noon - with a bulema, boreka, ouevo hamenado, grapes, and fresh squeezed orange juice or coffee. There will be a cafe serving Turkish Coffee, Travados, Yaprakes, Bumewelos, salatho and so much more. Starting at noon, featuring famous Kosher Fatburger, a Mexican Station with Chicken Tamales and Tacos. Jeff's Sausage from LA, Smelt and French Fries, Chicken Wings, Kosher Food Truck. There will be a henna artist, a balloon artist, caricature artists, bouncy Toys. All free of charge. Schedule: 10 am Live Music - Hazzan Ike Azose, 11 am Bulema Cook Off Competition, noon Magician, 1 pm Improv.More info: (206) 723-3028 or
sbholim@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Labor Day / Elul Bagel Brunch on at BCMH Mon Sept 4th 11 am. 
Must register & pay by Wed., Aug. 30 to 
www.bcmhseattle.org Cost: $10/Adult (ages 12 & up); $5/Child (ages 4-11); Kids 3 & under are free; $40/Family Rate. During Brunch: Program for kids "Making Your Own Shofar" with Rabbi Shimon Emlen. **Free for kids attending Brunch, $5 per child otherwise.

Stand With Us NW – Sun Aug 27th 7pm
At Herzl Ner Tamid, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.  Featuring Mohamad Zaobi – Arab Muslim Zionist. 
Northwest@StandWithUs.com

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


 SICHO FOR SHABBOS SHOFTIM
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507853/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shoftim-4th-Day-of-Elul-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org.

1. In Likkutei Torah, the Alter Rebbe describes the spiritual atmosphere of the month of Elul with the following parable:

Before a king enters his city, the inhabitants of the city go out to greet him and receive him in the field. At that time, anyone who desires is granted permission [and can] approach him1 and greet him. He receives them all pleasantly and shows a smiling countenance to all.... To explain [the parable]: In the month of Elul, we go out to receive His blessed countenance in the field.... This refers to the reflection of the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy [for as the stated previously in the maamar, “the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy are revealed in Elul”] in a manner allowing them to be received, “face to face...” as it is written, “k-t is v-u-v-h and will shine for us.”

There is a problematic dimension to this parable: It is explained that the verse, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” which characterizes the service of Elul, begins, “I am my Beloved’s,” to emphasize that it is the Jews who initiate the love relationship with G‑d.

To explain: Shir HaShirim which employs the metaphor of the marriage relationship to describe the intense love and connection shared by G‑d and the Jewish people contains two similar verses: “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” and “My Beloved is mine and I am His.” The Rabbis explain that the two verses reflect two different patterns expressing this marriage relationship.

The latter verse beginning, “My Beloved is mine,” implies that the relationship begins with Divine revelation and this is what stimulates the response and service of the Jews. Conversely, “I am my Beloved’s,” implies that it is the Jews who initiate the relationship with G‑d and motivate Him to respond and draw down influence to them.

This concept appears to conflict with the parable of “the king in the field,” which implies that the king leaves his palace (his usual place) and goes out to the field (the place where his people are found). The parable appears to imply that in Elul, G‑d begins the relationship by revealing His Thirteen Attributes of Mercy.2

Frequently, it is explained that the revelation of the king in the field, i.e., the expression of the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy in the month of Elul, merely generates the potential for the service that follows, but it is that service itself which is of primary importance. Thus, although the revelation from above precedes the service (and is necessary for that service to be carried out for otherwise, the “people of the field,” who are on a low level could not fulfill the service of “I am my Beloved’s”), the development of the relationship depends on man.

Nevertheless, this explanation is not adequate. The maamar relates that, “the inhabitants the city go out to... the field,” implying that there is a priority to the service carried out in the field. Because of that priority (which depends on the service of the Jews), the King goes out to the field, i.e., there is a revelation from above.

There is another conceptual difficulty regarding the nature of the service of Elul. Elul is the month of mercy and therefore, is characterized by an increase in prayer which relates to that quality. Similarly, it is associated with an increase in the study of Torah for the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy which shine in the month of Elul parallel the Thirteen Rules of Biblical Interpretation.3 What connection do the services of prayer and Torah study have to the presence of the King in the field?

These concepts can be understood within the context of the explanation of the metaphor of a field in our personal service. A field is a place where grain grows. Growing grain and converting it into food which grants us sustenance requires, to quote our Sages’ expression, siddurah d’pas, a series of labors which reflect the entire sphere of work on the material plane. All our work on that plane is included in the 39 labors4 which are forbidden on the Sabbath.

The designation of what is considered a labor is derived from the labors which were necessary to construct the Sanctuary in the desert. This teaches us that our involvement in mundane activities must be with one intention, to create a Sanctuary for G‑d, to make the world “a dwelling for Him,” a place where His presence rests.

The importance of these mundane activities can be seen from the fact that most of our time is spent involved with them, dealing with our material needs and earning the wherewithal required for them. To express this in the context of Biblical phraseology. It is written, “Six days shall you work, and the seventh day shall be a Shabbos unto the L‑rd, your G‑d.” Why this disportionate relationship? Since G‑d “chose us from among the nations... and elevated us,” why didn’t He create the world in a manner in which we could devote the majority of our time to holy matters, the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. Instead, in a manner similar to (להבדיל) gentiles, we are primarily involved with material activities.

The explanation is that this reflects the purpose of creation. G‑d created the world so that He could have a “dwelling place in the lower worlds.” Therefore, our service must center — not on the spiritual as it exists for itself5 — but rather on the ordinary and mundane aspects of existence with the intent of drawing G‑d into them.

The primacy of such service is also emphasized by our Sages who state that the first question a soul will be asked in the judgment in the afterlife is: “Did you deal justly in business?” Even before being questioned about Torah study or prayer, the soul will have to give an account of its dealings within the context of material reality.

[This concept is also reflected in the observance of the Shabbos. On one hand, Shabbos is not a day of mundane activity. A Jew should enter Shabbos with an attitude of, “All your work is completed.” On the other hand, this very advice implies that the ultimate conception of Shabbos pleasure does not involve diverting one’s attention from one’s affairs entirely and concentrating solely on spiritual matters.6 Rather, one may reflect on one’s material affairs, although not in the same way as during the week, instead, contemplating them as they are in a complete and perfect state.]

Based on the above, we can appreciate the significance of the King’s presence in the field during the month of Elul. The King’s presence in the field — not only generates the potential for our service — it represents the ultimate purpose of that service. Our efforts must be directed towards bringing the revelation of G‑dliness into the field, into the mundane realities of our material world. Not only must G‑d be revealed in the realms where spirituality is revealed — metaphorically, the king’s palace — the lowest aspects of existence should be transformed into a dwelling for Him.7

The above concepts shed light on the meaning of the verse (Koheles 5:8):“There is an advantage to the work of the land in all things. A king is subjugated to the field.” On a simple level, this verse means that a king is dependent on the field because he derives his sustenance from it. On a theoretical level, it means that the work in the field, i.e., service in the context of mundane reality, provides the King with His livelihood, as it were. Since this is the service which fulfills His desire for a dwelling in the lower world, He is subjugated to the field and the people who carry out this service.

In this context, the metaphor of the king in the field takes on added significance, becoming relevant to the totality of our service of Torah and mitzvos. Hence, it is appropriate for the month of Elul, the month of stock-taking for the previous year and — primarily — the month of preparation for the year to come.

As such, we find that the name Elul serves as an acronym for verses referring to the full spectrum of our service of G‑d: “...[I] caused it to happen. I will provide for you...” — which refers to the service of Torah study,8 “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” — which refers to the service of prayer, “[Sending portions,] a man to his friend and presents to the poor,” which refers to the service of tzedakah, thus including the three pillars on which the earth stands.

It also serves as an acronym for the verse, “[You shall circumcise] your hearts and the hearts of...” which refers to the service of teshuvah which enhances the nature of the above services,9 and the verse, “And they said, ‘I will sing to G‑d...’ ” which refers to the redemption, the culmination of our service.

On a deeper level, there are two dimensions to the presence of “the King in the field:” a) the emphasis on the importance of service within the mundane realities of our world, the field; b) the fact that the King (G‑d) reveals Himself there in an essential manner.

The latter dimension represents the unique aspect of the month of Elul. Throughout the year, the emphasis is on carrying out the service in the field (with the intent that this lead to the revelation of the King). In Elul, which marks the culmination of the service — and the preparation for the service of the new year — the intent of the service, the revelation of the King’s presence is expressed.

The revelation of the King’s presence is dependent on the study of Torah. Service in the field primarily involves activity with mundane affairs, matters which are not by nature holy, but are performed “for the sake of the King,” i.e., the service of “All your deeds should be for the sake of heaven,” and “Know Him in all your ways.” Although this service is for the sake of the King, it does not bring about the revelation of the King.10 The revelation of G‑dliness — particularly, those dimensions of G‑dliness which are transcendent in nature — comes about through the Torah which is G‑d’s will and His wisdom and is one with Him.11

Nevertheless, since the intent is that G‑d be revealed “in the field,” this revelation is brought about by the Torah study of the people of the field. Although during most of the day, they are involved with mundane affairs, by establishing a fixed time12 for Torah study, their entire day becomes permeated by Torah and thus, the revelation of the King is drawn down into every aspect of their lives, even the mundane activities of “the field.”

This does not mean that the “men of field” should give up their usual activities entirely and devote themselves solely to Torah. This is not desired. Rather, to refer to the parable again, when the king passes through the field, the people in the field will temporarily stop their usual activity and approach the king — while they are wearing their ordinary clothes.

Similarly, in Elul, although the “men of the field” will continue their daily activities, because they are aware of the King’s presence, they will increase their study of Torah.13

Significantly, it is the study of Torah and not the service of prayer which brings about the revelation of the King. Prayer primarily involves the elevation of our lowly plane of existence, stepping beyond the limits of the material world to the point where the soul yearns to expire. This movement is directly opposite to the revelation of the King in the field.14

In contrast, Torah study reflects the drawing down of G‑dliness into this world. Although the Torah is also infinite, nevertheless, it has undergone a process of descent which enables it to be grasped by human intellect and to enclothe itself in worldly matters. Furthermore, through the decisions of Torah law that involve worldly matters, the world is altered according to the Torah’s standards. Thus, Torah study is the means to bring about the revelation of the King in the field.

For this reason, during the month of Elul, together with an emphasis on prayer, an emphasis is placed on Torah study15 and both are associated with the verse, “I am my Beloved’s.” Indeed, the full expression of our love for G‑d comes through:

Clinging spirit to spirit, as it is written “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth,” which refers to the service of Torah study in which the actual words of G‑d are in one’s mouth.

* * *

2. Parshas Shoftim begins with the command to appoint judges and enforcement officers. This reflects the emphasis on Torah activity within the world mentioned beforehand. The judges are, to quote the Rambam, “the essence of the Oral Law, the pillars of instruction, from whom statutes and judgment emerge for all of Israel.”

The Torah relates that the judges must be positioned, “in all your gates.” A gate represents the transition between the city and the field beyond it. The judges’ presence at the gate ensure that the activity carried out in the field will be in accord with the Torah’s dictates.

Although the essential obligation to appoint judges applies in Eretz Yisraeland not in the Diaspora, nevertheless, even in the Diaspora, the mitzvah to establish a court system applies. Even when we are in exile16 where the appointment of judges is dependent on the permission of the secular authorities, when we stand firm for our Torah principles, the power of the Torah effects the conduct of the country (and the entire world at large). Thus, we find the Previous Rebbe describing how the Tzemach Tzedek“arranged affairs” in Petersburg, the capitol of Russia.

* * *

3. A connection to the importance of Torah study can also be found in the teachings of Pirkei Avos studied this week. This week, we begin the first chapter of Pirkei Avos which after describing the chain of receiving and transmitting the Torah, emphasizes the importance of Torah study, counseling, “Raise up many students.”

It also contains the teaching: “The world stands on three things — Torah, the service of G‑d (prayer), and deeds of kindness.”

On the surface, the sequence in which these services are listed is problematic. Every day, they are carried out in a different order. We are advised to first, “give a penny to a poor person and then, pray,” and only after prayer, “proceed from the synagogue to the house of study.”

Similarly, in regard to the history of the Jewish people, the order of the Patriarchs was: Avraham, who is identified with the service of deeds of kindness — receiving guests; Yitzchok, who is identified with service of G‑d (he was prepared as a sacrifice, and prayer was instituted in the place of sacrifices); and only then, Yaakov who is identified with Torah study.

It is Yaakov, however, whom our Sages refer to as, “the chosen of the Patriarchs.” Why was it necessary for them to make such a distinction? To teach us the primacy of Torah study. Similarly, in regard to Pirkei Avos, Torah study is mentioned first because it is the service of primary importance in “maintaining the world,” in establishing a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds, as explained above.

To conclude with a directive for deed: It is important to publicize all the aspects of service associated with the month of Elul, putting an emphasis on the service of Torah study,17 in particular, public sessions of Torah study, where, “ten sit and occupy18 themselves with Torah.”

May this lead to the return of the entire Jewish people to Eretz Yisraelwhen, led by Mashiach, we will appoint judges and enforcement officers including the judges of the Sanhedrin which will meet in the Chamber of Hewn Stone in the Beis HaMikdash. May in the immediate future, we merit the fulfillment of the prophecy when, as related in the Yalkut Shimoni,“Mashiach will stand on the roof of the Beis HaMikdash and proclaim, ‘Humble ones. The time for your redemption has come.’ ”

Shabbos Re’eh – Mevarchim Elul | 25 Menachem Av – 3 Elul 5777

Fri- Aug 18th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:57 pm

Sat Aug 19th Shabbos 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Elul 8 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:41 am
Mincha  7:57 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 6/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:56 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon, Thu, Fri Shacharis  7 am
Tue, Wed Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH ELUL/
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8 pm

KIDDUSH 
Probably Kiddush Lite.  Seuda Slishit

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MEVARCHIM ELUL FARBRENGEN FRI AUG 18th 5 pm
In front of the Men’s Mikvah

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

TAKING CARE OF ME – WITH KAREN BURMAN - SUN AUG 20th 7:30 pm
A physical and spiritual preparation for Elul for women. At the home of Rosi Levin.  6820 39thAve NE.  Please RSVP to 
MHerbstman@gmail.com .  Even is generously subsidized by Chabad of Seattle. Cover $20.

CSTL Shabbos Kids Club
Looking for volunteers to give a shuir to the older kids either once per month or a one time occasion It is for the ages 5-12.  The shuir is generally about 10-15 minutes long on any topic, parsha, holidays,Jewish history, Mitzos.  Your choice.  Please contact me   Thank you.  Tova Morah@msn.com 206-383-2516

CSTL Friday Dinner BBQ – SUN Aug 25th 6:45 pm
Please join us for a delicious shabbos dinner. Shabbat BBQ dinner with a 24-hour smoked brisket (by Shuky Meyer), hot dogs, teriyaki fish, craft beer, wine and more!! Services begin at 6:45 pm, followed immediately by dinner in the social hall. Payment is required in advance. If you are unable to attend, please consider making a donation!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cstl-shabbat-bbq-dinner-tickets-36956862972 
Info: 
g_lurya@outlook.com

FROM THE PRESIDENT
Please keep all food in the Social Hall.  Please feel empowered to tell anyone you see leaving the Social Hall with food to please not do so.  Doing this will help us clean for the coming Holidays!

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
For more information, please contact Yechezkel Rapoport.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Sephardic Bikur Holim Sephardic Bazar. Sun Aug 27th
More info: (206) 723-3028 or 
sbholim@gmail.com

OUTDOOR BISTRO NIGHT AT THE SUMMIT Aug 22nd 6pm to 9pm
Join the Summit at First Hill's very first outdoor party! Come and embrace a perfect summer evening on our 4th floor rooftop deck. For this extraordinary night Chef and his team will be serving up delights from the grill, we'll have live musicians playing, and a cocktail bar pouring beautiful creations --all surrounded by a stunning view of Lake Union and downtown.  A first of it's kind; this party might turn out to be the most exciting and lively bistro we've ever held. No table reservations.  Just email
chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to reserve.   The price for this event is $70 which covers everything.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

SEPHARDIC HAGGADOT FOR SALE
Only $7.50 each or three for $18. You can order at 
www.EzraBessaroth.Net, choose "Sephardic Haggadot" under "Campaigns."  If you would like your Haggadot mailed, please add $5 shipping to your order. 

Labor Day / Elul Bagel Brunch on at BCMH Mon Sept 4th 11 am. 
Must register & pay by Wed., Aug. 30 to 
www.bcmhseattle.org Cost: $10/Adult (ages 12 & up); $5/Child (ages 4-11); Kids 3 & under are free; $40/Family Rate. During Brunch: Program for kids "Making Your Own Shofar" with Rabbi Shimon Emlen. **Free for kids attending Brunch, $5 per child otherwise.

Stand With Us NW – Sun Aug 27th 7pm
At Herzl Ner Tamid, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.  Featuring Mohamad Zaobi – Arab Muslim Zionist. 
Northwest@StandWithUs.com

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS EKEV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507852/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Reeh-27th-Day-of-Menachem-Av-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org.

1. This is the Shabbos on which we bless the month of Elul, the month of stocktaking and teshuvah for the previous year. In this month, we review our behavior in the previous year with the intention of correcting and improving it. Thus, Elul also servzes as the month of preparation for the new year to come. For these reasons, the ultimate intention of our service of G‑d is reflected in this month.

This is alluded to in the name, Elul, which is an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.” This implies that we are intended to unite with G‑d in a deep bond of love and closeness.

This bond has two dimensions, the arousal of the Jew’s desire for union with G‑d through the service of Torah and mitzvos, “I am my Beloved’s,” and the expression of G‑d’s love for the Jews, “my Beloved is mine.” In particular, there are two patterns through which this inner bond is expressed as reflected in two similar verses in Shir HaShirim that describe this marriage relationship.1 One verse, “My Beloved is mine and I am His,” implies that the relationship begins with Divine revelation and this is what stimulates the response of the Jews. Conversely, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” implies that it is the Jews who initiate the relationship with G‑d and He responds to them.2

This reflects the ultimate goal of a Jew’s service, service on one’s own initiative. Instead of responding to an arousal from above — in which case one’s service is tinged with “bread of shame” — the relationship is begun by the Jews. This causes the bond to be internalized to a greater degree than if the Jews’ service was aroused from above. Although the revelation from above comes from a higher source than it is possible for a created being to reach, it is often not internalized. In contrast, when the revelation from above is preceded by an arousal on the part of the Jews, it relates to the Jews’ inner dimensions. Furthermore, it brings about a higher arousal from above than would otherwise be revealed.

We see this pattern reflected in a wedding on the earthly plane. Before the groom consecrates the bride, the bride walks around the groom seven times. This reflects “an arousal from below” on the part of the recipient in order to arouse inner communication, “my Beloved is mine” on behalf of the mashpia.

Although the emphasis in the month of Elul is on service on our own initiative, “I am my Beloved’s,” the name of the month also includes the second half of the verse, “my Beloved is mine,” implying that Elul is also associated with the revelation from above. This revelation comes in the month of Tishrei which follows. Nevertheless, since it is through the service of Elul that the connection with G‑d’s essence which brings about this revelation is revealed, the revelation itself shares a connection with Elul. Thus, Elul represents a month of complete connection, including both the service of the Jewish people and the revelation from above by G‑d.

2. Parshas Re’eh contributes an important dimension to the above concept teaching that the service of “I am my Beloved’s,” — and similarly, all other aspects of our service of G‑d — must be openly revealed, “seen.”

Sight possesses a major advantage over hearing or the other senses. Seeing something makes a powerful and indelible impression upon a person’s thinking processes.3 (For this reason, Torah law forbids a witness to an event from serving as a judge regarding it. Because he saw the event take place, he will never be able to have the removed objectivity necessary to protect the defendant.)

In contrast, when a person hears a concept, it “can enter one end and go out the other.” Even when he pays attention to what is said and hears from a reliable source, the impression hearing makes is not as powerful and, over the course of time, as he reflects about the matter, or if he hears a different report, he may change his mind.

This is the message communicated by the opening verse of our Torah portion: “See I am giving before you today.” G‑dliness, Torah, and mitzvosmust be openly revealed, “seen.” They should not be considered merely as things which are “heard about” and believed in and thus, an added element to one’s consciousness which can be effected by changes over time. Rather, an inner bond and powerful connection must be established resembling the connection established through sight.4

This concept has a deeper dimension. Not only does sight create an essential and true connection with the person who sees, it should also reflect the essence of the object which is seen. One should be able to see beyond an object’s external dimensions and appreciate its inner truth.

This is implied by the expression, “See I...” What should a Jew see? The essence of G‑dliness and nothing else. A Jew should use the potential of sight to relate to G‑dliness, Torah, and mitzvos and not to worldly matters. The world was created by G‑d in a manner which allows nature to cover its true G‑dly life-force.5 When a person looks at the world (without thinking deeply), he sees its material dimensions. The intent is, however, that a person should know — to the point that he actually sees — that the truth is G‑dliness, that G‑d gives life to and maintains the existence of every creation. To quote the Rambam:

“The L‑rd, your G‑d, is true.” He alone is true and there is no other truth which resembles His. This is what is meant by the Torah’s statement: “There is nothing else except Him;” i.e., there is no other true existence like Him.

This direct experience of G‑d should be so powerful that one should question the nature of the material world: Does it truly exist or is it just an allusion? Only the Torah’s statement, “In the beginning, G‑d created the world,” and not the evidence of one’s eyes, should cause one to regard the world’s existence as having actual substance.

The world, in and of itself, is false,6 temporary in nature for the natural state of existence is to return to non-being and indeed, ultimately, the world will return to that level.7 Existence depends on G‑d, “the living G‑d,” and is channeled through Torah and mitzvos, “our life and the length of our days.”

Thus, when a Jew looks at the world, he should see (and thus, establish a powerful internal bond with) the G‑dly life-force which maintains the existence of the world. He should appreciate that “G‑d is the place of the world and the world is not His place,” not only does G‑dliness pervade all existence, but rather, He is the truth of all existence.

Furthermore, we are given the potential to see “I,”8 Anochi, which refers to the essence of G‑d. It is G‑d’s essence, and G‑d’s essence alone which “has the power to bring into being something from absolute nothingness.” As an example of the potential of our power of sight, our Sages relate that, at Mount Sinai, the Jews saw G‑d and His Merchavah, the hidden dimensions of G‑dliness.

Our “seeing G‑dliness” should not negate our individual existence or that of the world at large. On the contrary, “seeing G‑dliness” means seeing the true existence of every entity in the world, seeing how each element in the world is a reflection of G‑d’s ultimate existence. A person should feel that G‑d created him, (his “I) to be an entity (a “something,” not nothing), and yet, should also realize that he is totally at one with G‑d’s essence.

Similarly, within the world at large, one should see the physical existence of the world, but appreciate that existence as an expression of G‑d’s handicraft and thus, perceive how each creation exists, “for the sake of the Torah and for the sake of the Jewish people.” For example, when one sees the stars, one should appreciate how they are a metaphor for the numerousness of the Jews and when one sees the moon, one should appreciate how it is a metaphor for the potential of renewal that exists within the Jews.

In particular, each word in the verse, “See I am giving before you today,” provides us with a significant lesson. “See” emphasizes that one must approach existence in a manner of sight and “I” (Anochi) points to the essence of G‑d as explained above.

“Giving” makes us aware that G‑d has granted us potential and “whoever gives, gives generously.”

“Before you” (לפניכם) is associated with the quality of pnimiyus (inner dimension). The Pnimiyus of G‑d is drawn down to the pnimiyus of a Jew.9

“Today” teaches that the above is not merely a narrative of previous history (or even of previous history as relived from time to time), but rather, a present day event, relevant at all times. “Each day, it should be new for you.”

A similar concept applies in the personal world of our souls. The ultimate level of service is that a Jew sees openly the true nature of his G‑dly soul. This means that he should become conscious of his soul, not only his body, and furthermore, appreciate the essence of his soul, the dimension of Anochi enclothed within him, the level of yechidah. The essential G‑dliness of the soul should express itself in all the powers of the soul. Furthermore, the body itself should be seen as an expression of G‑dliness with its physical shape a reflection of the name, Y-H-V-H.10

The service of Re’eh, revealing G‑dliness, within a person’s individual soul, prepares him for the service of Re’eh in the world at large, revealing how, “Everything which the Holy One, blessed be He, created in His world, He created solely for His glory.”

This, in turn, leads to Parshas Shoftim which describes the practical application of Torah law through the appointment of judges and enforcement agents11 who establish a system of justice12 and morality which expresses the above concepts in actual deed.13

3. The above should also influence our service in the month of Elul which is associated with an increase14 in Torah study.15 The unity with G‑d alluded to in the verse, “I am my Beloved’s” and in particular, its open revelation, Re’eh, is accomplished through Torah study. Torah is “one with the Holy One, blessed be He” and reveals how “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are one.”

To explain: A Jew must use his own intellectual potential to study Torah. Nevertheless, before he does so, he must approach the Torah with self-nullification (which is accomplished through reciting the blessings before Torah study). He must strive to ascend from his frame of reference to the Torah (and not, ח"ו, bring the Torah down to his level).

In this manner, he establishes “a perfect union” with the Torah, and thus, with G‑d. By comprehending the Torah which is G‑d’s will and wisdom, one unites with Him, for “He and His wisdom are one.”

Elul is also associated with an increase in deeds of kindness and tzedakah16 in the spirit of “Love your fellowman as yourself.”

The fulfillment of the latter command is also dependent on the service of Re’eh. The only way a person can truly love another person as himself is when he sees openly his own G‑dly nature and appreciates that same G‑dliness in other Jews, realizing that “we share one father and... all Jews are called brothers because of the source of their soul in the One G‑d.”17

Unless a person openly perceives these qualities, it is impossible for him to have true ahavas Yisrael. We are motivated primarily by our own self-interest. Even the Torah teaches us, “Your own life takes precedence.” Only when one appreciates that one’s true self and that of another Jew are the same, is there a possibility for complete love. This, in turn, leads to an increase in the activities that reflect this love including an increase in tzedakah.18

The lesson from Parshas Re’eh also teaches us an important concept relevant within the context of the stocktaking and personal evaluation which characterizes the service of the month of Elul. A Jew should appreciate Torah and mitzvos, not as an obligation which he must fulfill, but as an expression of a love relationship with G‑d. Furthermore, he should not wait for an arousal from above to begin this service, but must begin on his own initiative. He has the potential to carry out the service of “I am my Beloved’s,” which, in turn, leads to the revelation of “My Beloved is mine” in the month of Tishrei.

Furthermore, this service can be carried out in a manner of Re’eh, which implies that G‑dliness can be seen openly to the extent that it is one’s first and primary appreciation of reality and all worldly matters are secondary or on a deeper level, to see the G‑dly truth of each creation.

In addition to each person carrying out this service himself, he should endeavor to explain it to his family,19 the people to whom he is in contact, and other Jews whom he meets.20 This should lead to an increase in Torah study, particularly, public sessions of Torah study, and increase in ahavas Yisrael and its expression in deeds of kindness and tzedakah.

May this lead to the time when we see the Third Beis HaMikdash21 openly revealed on this earthly plane. This is particularly relevant at present when we see the omens portending the Messianic redemption mentioned by our Sages. In particular, it is significant to cite a passage from the Yalkut Shimoni which has been publicized in recent weeks:

Rabbi Yitzchok declared: In the year when the Messianic king will come, all the gentile nations will challenge one another. The King of Persia will challenge an Arab king and the Arab king will go to Aram for advice. The King of Persia will then destroy the entire world. All the nations of the world will panic and become frightened, falling on their faces, suffering contractions like labor pains. The Jews will also panic and become frightened, asking, “Where will we go? Where will we go?” [G‑d will then reveal Himself, and] tell them: “My children, you need not fear. Everything which I did, I did for your sake. Why are you frightened?... The time for your redemption has come.” “This ultimate redemption will not resemble the first redemption which was followed by aggravation and subjugation to other powers. After the ultimate redemption, there will be no aggravation and subjugation to other powers.” Our Sages taught: When the Messianic king will come, he will stand on the roof of the Beis HaMikdash and call out to the Jews, “Humble ones, the time for your redemption has come.” (Yalkut Shimoni, Yeshayahu 499)

Everyone should realize that there is no reason to become frightened and we have the promise: “The time for your redemption has come.” May we see Mashiach standing on the roof of the Beis HaMikdash and may he announce: “Mashiach is here.”

Shabbos Ekev | 18-25 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- Aug 11th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:09 pm

Sat Aug 12th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:37 am
Mincha  8:09 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 5/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:10 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:15 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush for this Shabbos, Eikev, is sponsored by the Greenberg Family, in honor of Akiva returning to Israel and going into the IDF.  May we all pray for his safe return. Amen!  Also, CGI Camp in honor of the wonderful counselors! Kiddush will be a gala affair, including meat!  Seuda Slishit

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Gavriel and Chana Plotke on the birth of their new granddaughter to Michael and Rebecca Plotke.  May they merit to raise her to Torah Chupa and Maasim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm /NOT THIS WEEK/
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

Sephardic Bikur Holim Sephardic Bazar. Sun Aug 27th
More info: (206) 723-3028 or 
sbholim@gmail.com

OUTDOOR BISTRO NIGHT AT THE SUMMIT Aug 22nd 6pm to 9pm
Join the Summit at First Hill's very first outdoor party! Come and embrace a perfect summer evening on our 4th floor rooftop deck. For this extraordinary night Chef and his team will be serving up delights from the grill, we'll have live musicians playing, and a cocktail bar pouring beautiful creations --all surrounded by a stunning view of Lake Union and downtown.  A first of it's kind; this party might turn out to be the most exciting and lively bistro we've ever held. No table reservations.  Just email
chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to reserve.   The price for this event is $70 which covers everything.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS EKEV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507850/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Eikev-Chof-Av-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org.

Each year, a yahrzeit involves an ascent to a higher spiritual level. This year, the 46th anniversary of Rav Levi Yitzchak’s yahrzeit, is unique for 46 is numerically equivalent toלוי, Rav Levi Yitzchak’s first and primary name. Significantly, this week’s Torah portion also mentions the uniqueness of the tribe of Levi.

The service of Levi is alluded to in the verse which the Matriarch Leah used to explain the rationale for the name Levi, “This time, my man will become attached to me.” This refers to the ultimate marriage bond, with “my man” referring to G‑d and “me” to the Jewish people. This attachment to G‑d is reflected in the Levites’ service: “to stand before G‑d, to serve Him... G‑d is their portion.” Nevertheless, these qualities are not exclusive to the tribe of Levi alone as the Rambam writes:

Not only the tribe of Levi... but each and every person... whose generous spirit and intellectual understanding motivate him to separate himself and stand before G‑d and serve Him... becomes sanctified as holy of holies.

This implies that every individual has the potential to reach the level of the Levites. Furthermore, the expression, “holy of holies,” is an allusion to the High Priest, the most distinguished individual of the tribe of Levi. Even his spiritual level can be reached by others.

In particular, the service of the Levites is characterized by two qualities: On one hand, the Levites are separated from the people at large, as our Torah portion relates, “At this time, G‑d separated the tribe of Levi.”1 Conversely, the Levites were charged with:

Instructing the masses in His just ways and righteous judgments as it is written, “They shall instruct Yaakov in Your judgments and Yisrael in Your Torah.”

Thus, it was their task to reach out to the entire Jewish people and lift them up to a higher level. This applies even when the Jews are on a low spiritual rung as implied by the fact that the selection of the Levites came — as our parshah relates — after the sin of the Golden Calf. Although the Jews had sunken to such a level, the Levites were able to lift them higher and motivate them to teshuvah.

These two extremes are also seen in the Beis HaMikdash, the place of the Levites’ service. On one hand, the Beis HaMikdash — and in particular, the Holy of Holies — is the holiest place in the world. Conversely, the Beis HaMikdash’s windows were structured so that “light would go out from there to the entire world.” Similarly, the concept of a dwelling for G‑d’s Presence, the function of the Holy of Holies, is intended to be extended throughout the entire world until the world at large becomes, “a dwelling for G‑d,” a place where His essence is revealed.

These two extremes are also reflected in the primary service of the Beis HaMikdash, the offering of the sacrifices. The Sefer HaBahir states: “The secret of the sacrifices ascends to the secret of the Ain Sof.” From that level, influence is drawn down into this world, elevating all the animal, vegetable, and, mineral elements of existence.2

This fusion of opposites was revealed within Rav Levi Yitzchak’s life. On one hand, he was an elevated individual, uplifted by his immense Torah knowledge which included both the revealed realm of Torah law and the hidden secrets of Pnimiyus HaTorah. Nevertheless, he also served as a Rav of a large city and was responsible for spreading Torah and strengthening Jewish practice throughout the region.

These activities were particularly significant because, at that time, the persecution of the Soviet Government had forced many Rabbis to reduce their public activities and remain content with observing Torah and mitzvostogether with a small core of followers, and, at times, only by themselves. Some Rabbis were even coerced into signing statements for the Government which ran contrary to their own convictions or to the teachings of the Torah.

In this environment, Rav Levi Yitzchok continued to carry on his Rabbinic functions openly and proudly. Indeed, due to the vacuum of Rabbinic leadership, he spread his activities throughout Russia. Not only did he refuse to concede to the Russians’ demands, he traveled to Moscow and interceded on behalf of the Jews and Torah and mitzvos with high government officials, including the President of the Country. Furthermore, he was successful in securing the observance of certain mitzvos,3 for example, shemurah matzah.4

His activities were carried out at a risk to his life. As a result of this activity, he was exiled, a punishment which, from a certain perspective, is more severe than death and ultimately, he passed away in exile.

Even while in exile, he continued his activities to spread Yiddishkeit in whatever degree possible. Furthermore, it was there in which he composed his Torah writings, despite the difficulty in obtaining ink and paper, with the intention that eventually, these be published.5

Rav Levi Yitzchak’s activities extended to the lowest aspects of existence. Thus, as Rabbi and afterwards, while in exile, he also worked to spread justice and righteousness among gentiles. In this manner, he reflected the service of Levi, extending the highest levels of spirituality throughout the world at large.

These qualities receive greater emphasis today, his yahrzeit. Although a yahrzeit commemorates the departure of a soul from the body and an ascent from this world, the Zohar teaches that the presence of a Tzaddik in all the worlds (even this physical world) is felt more powerfully after his death than in his lifetime.6

It is possible to receive influence from a Tzaddik by studying his teachings as implied by the Rebbe Rashab (Rav Levi Yitzchak’s Rebbe) who told Chassidim at the time of his passing, “I am going to heaven, but I am leaving my writings for you.” This implies that through studying his writings, it is possible to establish a connection with him as he is “in heaven.”

This concept can be explained as follows: The word Anochi (the first word of the Ten Commandments) is an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “I wrote down and gave over Myself,” i.e., by giving the Torah, G‑d gave Himself over to the Jews. Since, “the righteous resemble their Creator,” they also invest themselves in the texts they compose.

Similarly, in the world at large, after his passing a tzaddik effects even the lowest levels of existence:

All [a tzaddik’s] deeds, teachings, and service which he carried out throughout his lifetime are revealed and shine... from above downward at the time of his passing,... bringing about salvation in the world, atoning for the sins of the generation.

On the day of a tzaddik’s yahrzeit, he ascends to an even higher level.7Nevertheless, these high peaks are also drawn down into this world — to those who follows the tzaddik’s teaching and to the world at large — as obvious from the text of the Kaddish: “May His great name be exalted and hallowed... May His great name be blessed forever and ever.” The Hebrew word for “blessed” also has the connotation, “be extended” and the Hebrew for “forever,” can also mean, “to the world.” Thus, the above verse can mean: “May G‑d’s great Name be extended into the world.”

To explain this concept from a deeper perspective: Before the soul descends into this world, it is described “as standing,” i.e., confined to a particular level beyond which it cannot advance. Through the descent into a physical body and the service of Torah and mitzvos within the context of our material world, the soul is given the potential to proceed. Thus, all the ascents of the soul in the spiritual worlds are dependent on the soul’s service in this realm.

Because the soul’s service on this plane is the source for its potential to ascend, all the peaks to which it ascends have an effect in this world, influencing the students who are connected to that soul. This, in turn, gives the soul the potential for further and higher ascents. Also, it hastens the coming of the ultimate fulfillment for the soul when it will again encloth itself in this world in the Era of Resurrection.8

2. The date of Rav Levi Yitzchak’s yahrzeit, the 20th of Av, also provides us with a lesson. The Hebrew word for 20 (עשרים) is numerically equivalent to the Hebrew word Kesser, meaning “crown.” There are ten Sefiros, each of which has a dimension which rises upward and a dimension which descends below, thus equaling 20. Kesser which is above all these levels, permeates and pervades them.

This concept is also reflected in our service: Kesser is connected with royalty for a crown is the symbol of kingship. When describing the effect of the Jews’ declaration of Na’aseh V’Nishmah, the Midrash relates the following parable which sheds light on the relationship between a king and the crown: The subjects made three crowns for the king. One, he put on his own head, and two, he placed on the head of his subjects.

This implies that the three crowns are on the same level and thus, the crowns given to the subjects are connected to the crown worn by the king. Furthermore, even the crown worn by the king was given to him by the subjects — metaphorically, is dependent on the service of the Jews in this world. This concept is reflected in the verse, “A king is subjugated to the field.” Although the people in the field are on a lower level than those living in the king’s capitol, their service in the field crowns the king — metaphorically, fulfills G‑d’s intent and desire for a dwelling in the lower worlds.

The service of refining the lower levels shares an intrinsic connection to the 20th of Av: The month of Av is connected with the transformation of the lowest levels to holiness as the Midrash states:

A lion (Nebuchadnezzar) arose in the month whose sign is a lion (Av) and destroyed the “lion of G‑d” (the Beis HaMikdash) in order that a lion (G‑d) should come in the month whose sign is a lion and build the “lion of G‑d.”

Thus, the revelation of the lion of holiness (which is a reference to the level of Kesser) comes about through the transformation of the forces which destroyed the Beis HaMikdash. This begins on Shabbos Nachamu and receives more intensity from Shabbos to Shabbos with G‑d promising9 the Jews, “I, yes I, will console you.”

There is also a connection between the above and the coming new year.

ארי-ה, Hebrew for lion, can be interpreted as an acronym for the Hebrew words: Elul, Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur, and Hoshana Rabbah. From the 15th of Av, when it is customary to wish a colleague to be inscribed for a good and sweet year, and more particularly, from the 20th of Av10 onward, we begin the preparations for the month of Elul, the month of teshuvah and mercy, when the King goes out into the field and the people in the field greet Him. He receives them all pleasantly, showing a shining countenance to all and fulfilling their requests.

The above concepts can be connected with the end of this week’s Torah portion (11:24) which declares:

Every place on which your feet will tread will become yours. Your boundaries will extend from the desert [to] Lebanon, from the river, the Euphrates river, until the Final Sea.

By referring to the Mediterranean as “the Final Sea” (instead of “the Great Sea” as in Parshas Maasei 34:6), the Torah alludes to the concept that, ultimately, in the Messianic age, Eretz Yisrael will expand throughout the entire world, reaching, “the Final Sea.”11

The Euphrates river mentioned is also significant, as we see that the Torah (Devarim 1:7) refers to the Euphrates as “the Great River.” In his commentary on that verse, Rashi notes that the Euphrates is actually not a large river and is referred to as “great,” because it is next to Eretz Yisrael.12Rashi concludes, quoting a parable offered by our Sages, “If you come close to a person anointed with oil (Eretz Yisrael, the chosen land), oil will become attached to you (importance is also attached to the Euphrates).”

The significance of the latter statement can be understood in terms of our Sages statement:

All the mitzvos the Patriarchs performed before You were vaporous in nature (i.e., they did not effect the material substance of the world), but in regard to us, “Your name is like oiled poured forth.” [“Like one who pours from one vessel to another;” i.e., the mitzvos we perform have actual substance.]

Oil is connected with the essence and, yet, is drawn down into the lowest levels. Similarly, after the giving of the Torah, holiness can be drawn down into the material substance with which the mitzvos are fulfilled.

This concept is also related to the Euphrates River which Bereishisdescribes as the fourth of the rivers emanating from Eden. This implies an association with the lowest levels. Thus, our Sages associate this river with the fourth exile which we are presently enduring. Through oil, the revelation of the essence which permeates through all things, even this low level can be elevated.

* * *

3. The first Mishnah of the fifth chapter of Pirkei Avos states, “The world was created with ten utterances.” Our Sages note that the expression, “And G‑d said, ‘Let there be...’ ” is repeated only nine times in the Torah. However, “Bereishis (the verse, “In the beginning,...”) is also considered one of the utterances.”

In Chassidus, it is explained that the utterance Bereishis is general in nature,13 including all the other nine statements which brought about the creation of all the particular elements of the world. Nevertheless, it is also “an utterance,” i.e., its spiritual level shares a commonalty with the other utterances and reflects only the aspect of G‑dliness which is associated with the creation of the worlds.

There is, however, a positive interpretation of the word maamar, “utterance.” In Parshas Ki Savo, it has the meaning of “importance” or “praise.” This implies that it is possible to draw down into the world a level of G‑dliness that transcends the limits of the world. Torah, which is one with G‑d, can be drawn into the world making it more “praiseworthy” and enhancing its “importance.”

* * *

4. This Shabbos follows the fifteenth of Av14 which as mentioned previously,15 is connected with an increase in Torah study. Preferably, this increase should be expressed in communal study, in groups of three, and if possible in groups of ten or more. G‑d promises to bless those who increase their study with extended life. Every Jew, men, women, and children, should make such an increase.

In this context, it is worthy to mention the importance of the education of young children16 and the presence at this farbrengen of the children from Camp Gan Yisrael,17 a camp “in the field.”

May this increase in Torah study lead to the time when, “A new Torah will emerge from Me.” Then, we will merit true extended life, the era of the resurrection when, “Those who lie in the dust will arise and sing,” with Rav Levi Yitzchok at their head (for today, the spiritual source of his soul shines powerfully).18 May this take place immediately, inתש"נ, “a year of miracles,” which will lead to תשנ"א, a year when, “I will show you wonders.”


Shabbos Vaeschanan – Nachamu | 11-18 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- Aug 4th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:20 pm

Sat Aug 5th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:32 am
Mincha  8:20 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 4/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:22 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:15 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush contributors and a big thank you for this Shabbat Va'etchanan/Nachamu, are Dr. Vernon and Liz Neppe; Dr. Shimon Dershowitz and Dr. Susan Hankin; Rabbi Simcha and Valerie Brandeis; Rabbi Shmuel and Rosie Tennenhaus: and Dr. Martin and Dr. Liz Frasch.  Also many thanks to Rabbi Mendy Levitin, for giving his time, talent, and his skill in making the (MEAT) cholent!!  Nachamu, Nachamu, ami!  Seuda Slishit

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Mrs Shirley Guterson and Mrs Frieda Tonkon.  May the families be comforted with all the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – EREV SHABBOS NACHAMU 6 – 7 PM 
Torah and Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah. Nachamu Nachamu Ami!  
Followed by early Mincha/Maariv minyan

MENS MIKVA ALERT – FRI AUG 3rd CLOSED 6 am – 9 am, THEN REGULAR HOURS
More info:  Contact Rabbi Kavka.

SHABBAT NACHAMU
The Shabbat after the Ninth of Av is called Shabbat Nachamu ("Shabbat of Consolation") after the opening words of the day's reading from the prophets ("haftara"). This is the first of the series of readings known as "The Seven of Consolation" read in the seven weeks from the Ninth of Av to Rosh Hashanah.  
www.chabad.org

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm /NOT THIS WEEK/
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS NACHAMU
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507849/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vaeschanan-Shabbos-Nachamu-13th-Day-of-Menachem-Av-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The Haftorah of Shabbos Nachamu, the first of “the Seven Shabbasos of Consolation,” begins, “Take comfort, Take comfort, My people.” Our Sages explain the repetition of this phrase as follows: The sins of the Jews, the retribution they receive, and the consolation they receive afterwards, are interrelated. The Jews sinned in a twofold manner. They were punished in a twofold manner and they will be consoled in a twofold manner.

This statement is slightly problematic: Even when a sin is twofold in nature, a person should receive one just measure of retribution and after repenting, one equivalent measure of consolation.

In resolution, it can be explained that the repetition of the phrase, “Take comfort, take comfort,” implies, not that we will be given two different consolations,1 but that there will be a single consolation that is twofold in nature, relating to both our spiritual and physical dimensions. This is reflected in the fact that the consolation is granted for the Beis HaMikdashwhich is also twofold, having both physical and spiritual dimensions. It was a physical building and yet, simultaneously, it was also a Sanctuary for G‑d,2 the place where the Divine Presence was openly revealed. Revealed spirituality permeated every aspect of the Beis HaMikdash. Thus, the actual building was both physical and spiritual.3

Indeed, this was evident from the manner in which the Beis HaMikdash and its vessels were constructed. At the outset, the materials that were used had to be consecrated as it states, “And You shall take an offering for Me;” i.e., “for My sake.” Similarly, the command to build the Sanctuary states, “And you shall build Me a Sanctuary,” i.e., “for My sake.” Similarly, the service in the Beis HaMikdash, the offering of the sacrifices, was twofold in nature, including a physical deed which was permeated by a spiritual intention.

Therefore, the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash is twofold in nature. The intent is not that there were two levels or two stages of destruction, but rather, the destruction of an entity that was simultaneously physical and spiritual in nature. Accordingly, the consolation must be twofold, involving both the spiritual and the physical. This will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash, the “Sanctuary of the L‑rd established by Your hands.” It will reveal the ultimate of spirituality within a physical building, fusing the spiritual and the physical together.

This fusion of physicality and spirituality must also be reflected in our service which involves drawing G‑d’s presence into the world, transforming the world into a dwelling for Him. To explain: The world was created in a manner which allows its material substance to conceal G‑dliness4 and thus, G‑dliness appears to be an added dimension to our existence. Our service of Torah and mitzvos involves the material substance of the world and is intended to invest G‑dliness (i.e., spiritual power and energy) in that material substance.

This transforms the world into a twofold dwelling for G‑d, i.e., a dwelling where spirituality and physicality are fused together. G‑dliness will be openly revealed within the physical dimensions of the world.

More precisely, the twofold nature of the service of Torah and mitzvos is reflected by fusing together the performance of the mitzvah (a physical deed, carried out with material entities) and the intent of the mitzvah (the spiritual service which is reflected in our thoughts and feelings).

Our Sages explain that each person is a microcosm of the world at large. Thus, in the world at large, our service involves working to reveal its spiritual life-force within its material substance. Similarly, each person’s individual world is two dimensional, including both body and soul. Our service is to reveal how the two are a single indivisible entity, by employing our body and our physical power as intermediaries for the revelation of the soul through the service of Torah and mitzvos.

This makes the individual into a unified being, whose life is two dimensional, combining spirituality and physicality — body and soul — in a single activity, the service of G‑d. Not only must a Jew serve G‑d with both body and soul,5but rather his service must combine body and soul together. In this manner, he will reveal the soul of the world, its spiritual life-force.6

There are two dimensions to this service: Those mitzvos which are primarily spiritual (i.e., dependent on the intellect or the emotions) must be carried in a manner that one’s body and soul join together in a unified activity. For example, the mitzvah of prayer which is primarily a spiritual activity, as our Sages declared: “What is service of the heart? Prayer” and similarly, the mitzvos of loving G‑d and fearing Him, involve the arousal of spiritual feelings which do not necessarily affect our physical hearts. However, the ultimate expression of these mitzvos is for them to affect the heart causing it to yearn with a burning love for G‑d and to beat faster in fear of Him. The spiritual and spiritual dimensions become fused together in a single expression of emotion.7

A similar principle applies in regard to Torah study, an intellectual service which is on an even higher plane than the emotions mentioned previously. There is a natural connection between our feelings and our physical state. When a person feels an emotion in his heart, there are times when his pulse will be affected. In contrast, intellectual activity is “cold,” and the comprehension of a concept does not bring about any physical activity.

The ultimate effect of Torah study, however, is that a person’s intellectual activity affects his physical brain. Intensive study causes furrows in the brain which actually increase the brain’s capacity for further intellectual activity. (Because this concept applies in regard to Torah study, it also applies in regard to other intellectual activities and studies.)

Furthermore, Torah study must involve “all one’s 248 limbs.” Only, then, will it be preserved. Thus we see that it is Jewish practice to shake back and forth when one studies — and similarly, when one prays. Thus, the person is totally involved, physically as well as spiritually; “My entire being shall declare...”8

On the surface, shaking in this manner is not desirable, for any physical activity disturbs one’s concentration. Furthermore, it is common to shake back and forth when hearing one’s teacher relate words of Torah. This could even be considered as disrespectful. Nevertheless, this is common practice since a Jew’s physical and spiritual activities complement each other.

Conversely, as explained above, most mitzvos involve physical acts whose fulfillment must be infused with a spiritual dimension, the intention which motivates the fulfillment of the mitzvah. For example, in regard to the mitzvah of tzedakah, the essential element of the mitzvah is providing the recipient with his needs. This can be accomplished without any intellectual or emotional input on the part of the donor. On the contrary, our Sages teach that if a person loses money and a poor person finds it, he is considered to have fulfilled the mitzvah of tzedakah.9 Nevertheless, the proper manner for tzedakah to be given is for his mind and his heart to be involved, for him to give graciously, out of feelings of generosity.

Based on the above, we can understand the passage from our Sages referred to originally. The Jews’ sin was twofold: i.e., effecting their state and that of the world in both a spiritual and physical way. Accordingly, the punishment they received, the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash and the subsequent exile, was also twofold, spiritual and physical, in nature.10Similarly, it is through a twofold service that one brings about the conclusion of the exile and the twofold consolation, the ultimate fusion of physicality and spirituality, that will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash.

On a deeper level, the consolation which is connected with our physical dimension [and is brought about by our fulfillment of the physical dimensions of the mitzvos (which is not connected with intellect or reason)] has a higher source than the aspect of the consolation which relates to our spiritual dimension [and which is brought about by the spiritual dimensions of the mitzvos].

The physical deed which — in and of itself — has no connection to reason and intellect and, at times, is not motivated by intellect, relates to and expresses a level which transcends intellect entirely. Nevertheless, the ultimate intent is to involve all aspects of our beings. Hence, there is also a need for a spiritual service which involves our intellect and emotion.

This is the inner explanation of our Sages’ statement regarding the fulfillment of the mitzvah of tzedakah cited above. Intellectually, the person did not think of giving tzedakah; he lost the money and did not know that it would reach the hands of a poor man. Nevertheless, the source for his act is rooted in a service above all intellectual grasp.

To internalize this quality, it is proper that tzedakah be given in a manner in which one does not know who the recipient is. Nevertheless, the tzedakahshould be given with a full heart. This is reflected in our Sages’ advice to hang Tzedakah over one’s shoulder and allow the poor to take. In this manner, one combines knowledge (the willful intent to give) with not-knowing (above knowledge, the inability to identify the recipients).

A similar fusion of intent should be present in regard to all the mitzvos. One should combine kabbalas ol (an acceptance of the yoke, a commitment which transcends intellect) with a commitment based on knowledge of the mitzvah and its intent (intellect).

In this context, the twofold nature of our service does not mean only the fusion of the spiritual and the physical, but also the fusion of the levels above reason with reason. This is possible because every fusion of opposites has its source in G‑d’s essence which is above all limits and qualities, includes them all, and thus, can fuse them all together.

On this foundation, the consolation of the Jewish people which will come in the Messianic age can be conceived of as a single essential point, the level of Yechidah, which represents the ultimate of all qualities. Accordingly, Mashiach — who is connected with the level of Yechidah — “will come at a time of distraction,” (i.e., the level above intellect) — and yet will be a teacher (reflecting intellect).11

We see a similar fusion of the supra-intellectual and the intellectual in regard to G‑d, Himself. G‑d declares, “I discovered Dovid, My servant.” Something which is discovered was not known about previously, i.e., it relates to a level above knowledge.12 Nevertheless, although the choice of Dovid transcended intellect, it was expressed through a careful series of events: There were two sisters, Ruth and Orpah.13 Ruth clung to Naomi, but Orpah did not. Ultimately, this sequence led to the birth of Yishai and then, of Dovid. After Dovid was born, G‑d tested his leadership qualities through his care for sheep and caused him to undergo several trials until he became king of Israel. Thus, the two-fold consolation mentioned above is also connected with Mashiach and the quality of Yechidah which he will reveal.

The above also shares a connection to Parshas Va’eschanan which describes Moshe’s prayer to enter Eretz Yisrael. Were that prayer to have been accepted, Moshe would have led the Jews into Eretz Yisrael and built an eternal Beis HaMikdash which could never have been destroyed.

Moshe’s prayer includes the totality of existence for ואתחנן is numerically equivalent to 515. Our Sages relate that there are seven heavens and seven spaces in-between these heavens. The size of the earth and each of these heavens and spaces is the distance that a person can walk in five hundred years. Thus, 15 times 500 represents the entire scope of existence.

From Va’eschanan, we proceed to Parshas Eikev, “And it shall come to pass after you listen.” Chassidus interprets “listening” as stemming from kabbalas ol, a commitment which transcends all limits and yet, also passes through and becomes internalized by the powers of intellect. This brings about, “And the L‑rd, your G‑d, will preserve for you the covenant and the kindness which He swore to your ancestors,” a covenant resulting from a commitment that is not limited by intellect.14

* * *

2. The Talmud explains that from the fifteenth of Av onward, the power of the sun decreases and “whoever increases will receive an increase.” Rashiexplains: Whoever increases his Torah study at night will have his life increased. Therefore, the Shulchan Aruch mentions the importance of increasing Torah study at night15 from the fifteenth of Av onward.16 Since the Torah is “our life and the length of our days,” an increase in Torah study17will lead to an increase in our lifespans.

It is proper to publicize the importance of increasing Torah study from the fifteenth of Av onward so that it will effect each individual, his family, and the entire Jewish people. Furthermore, as mentioned previously, as explained in the Previous Rebbe’s maamar, Asarah SheYoshvim, it is preferable that this study be communal in nature. Therefore, we should strengthen existing Torah shiurim and establish new shiurim wherever possible. Since “Study is great because it leads to deed,” this increase in Torah study will surely bring about an increase in the performance of mitzvos.

This will also lead to an increase in life. In simple terms, those who increase their Torah study will have their lifespans increased. Furthermore, a Jew’s commitment to Torah study will lift him above all worries. Thus, our Sages declared, “The Torah was given only to the eaters of manna;” i.e., a Jew who studies Torah should be able to devote himself to that study entirely without any concern for worldly affairs. He can rely on G‑d to provide for all his needs and for the needs of his family. Even if a person has financial worries, making a commitment to Torah study will lift him above them entirely for as our Sages relate, every Jew deserves affluence equal to that of King Solomon.

In this manner, we will merit a long, prosperous, and healthy life which will be dedicated to the study of Torah. This will lead to the time when, together with the entire Jewish people, we proceed with Mashiach to Eretz Yisrael and to the ultimate consolation, the building of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

Shabbos Devarim - Chazon | 4-11 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- July 28th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

Sat July 29th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:29 am
Mincha  8:30 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 3/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:34 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:15 pm

EREV TISHA b'AV: MON. JULY 31st  
Shacharis: 7 am 
Chatzot – Restrictions on Learning Torah begin 1:15 pm
Mincha 5:30 pm
Seudah Hamafsekes/pre-fast meal with bread & eggs after Mincha 
Sunset/Fast begins: 8:45 pm 
Maariv 9:22 pm /EICHA AND KINOT/

TISHA b'AV: TUES. AUG. 1st 
Shacharis: 7 am /KINOT/
Midday (Permissible to sit on regular chairs once again) 1:15 pm 
Tallis and Tefilin 8 pm 
Mincha: 8:15 PM - 
Fast Ends: 9:21 PM 
Maariv & Kiddish Levana 9:20 pm /9 Days restrictions continue to 1:15 pm Wednesday/

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush this Shabbat is being sponsored by CSTL members wishing our best to Michael and Ilana Levin as they leave Seattle in order to return to live in Israel!  Specifically, we wish to thank the following sponsors: Rabbi S.B. and Mrs. Levitin; Rabbi Alter and Debbie Levitin; Rabbi Elazar and Esther Bogomilsky; Rabbi Saifo and Frumi Marasow; Rabbi Shmueli and Rosie Tennenhaus; Mark and Tziviah Goldberg; Shimon and Dr. Susan Dershowitz; Dr.Yussi and Rachel Greenberg; Dr. Scott and Karin Pollack; David Voluck; Ben and Sarah Dershowitz; Yitzchok and Liz Rothman; Herschel and Meirav Cox; and Pat Leckenby. Please join us for this gala Kiddush!. Seuda Slishit

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Diana Rose Gould, Dina Raizel bas Sarah, on the 2nd of Av.  The levaya was on Thursday.  May her neshama have an aliya

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Shabbos Kallah for Brachie Goldshmid SHABBOS CHAZON JUL 29th AT 7 pm
Marave Herbstman is hosting.  Women & girls are invited to 4402 NE 65th St starting at 7:00pm. (Sorry, your sons cannot come--this is a FEMALES ONLY gathering.)

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm /NOT THIS WEEK/
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE NINE DAYS CONTINUE UNTIL 1:15 PM WED AUG 2nd 
During "The Nine Days" from Av 1st to the Ninth of Av, a heightened degree of mourning is observed, including abstention from meat and wine, music, bathing for pleasure, and other joyous and enjoyable activities. (The particular mourning customs vary from community to community, so consult a competent Halachic authority for details). Consumption of meat and wine is permitted on Shabbat, or at a Seudat Mitzvah (obligatory festive meal celebrating the fulfillment of a mitzvah) such as a Bris (circumcision), or a "Siyum" celebrating the completion of a course of Torah study (i.e., a complete Talmudic tractate). The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of conducting or participating in a Siyum on each of the Nine Days (even if one does not avail oneself of the dispensation to eat meat). Citing the verse (Isaiah 1:27) "Zion shall be redeemed with mishpat [Torah] and its returnees with Tzedakah," the Rebbe urged that we increase in Torah study (particularly the study of the laws of the Holy Temple) and charity during this period (www.chabad.org) Contact Rabbi Levitin with specific questions.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Continues to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

"The Isadore and Ruth Gibber Worldwide Tisha B'Av Event" Tue Aug 1st 
Emunah for Life, how to manage life's challenges. Info 
theseattlekollel@gmail.com
Program A: 2:45 pm at BCMH, 5145 S Morgan Street. 
Program B: 6:30 pm at SBH, 6500 52nd AVE S. 
Suggested donation: $15/Adults or $10/Students.

The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or emailrabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS CHAZON
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507848/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Devarim-Shabbos-Chazon-6th-Day-of-Menachem-Av-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Rav Levi Yitzchok of Berditchev interpreted the name, Shabbos Chazonto mean “the Shabbos of vision,” the time when each individual is given a chance to see the Third Beis HaMikdash. On the surface, this is the direct opposite of the simple interpretation of the name which connects it to the Haftorah, the vision of Yeshayahu which is a particularly harsh reproof of the Jewish people. [For this reason, it is included among the three Haftorosof retribution which are read before Tishah BeAv.] The consolation of the Jewish people begins only after Tishah BeAv and yet, according to the above interpretation, on the Shabbos before Tishah BeAv, each Jew receives the most complete consolation possible, the revelation of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

This difficulty can be resolved within the context of the explanation of the concept, “a descent which is intended for an ascent.” The concept of descent in and of itself has no place in creation. G‑d is the essence of good and “it is the nature of the good to do good.” Hence, there is no place for a descent in the world which He created unless it is intended to bring about an ascent that is so great that it makes the descent worthwhile. A descent for such a purpose can be considered a stage of the ascent which follows it.

This explains why each person is shown a vision of the Third Beis HaMikdash on the Shabbos before Tishah BeAv. The vision reveals that the ultimate purpose of the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash was the beginning of a process which will lead to the high peaks of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash.

This explanation, however, is insufficient: Descent and ascent are opposite thrusts. Although G‑d has ingrained within the nature of the world that a descent will lead to an ascent, descent is still the opposite of ascent. Furthermore, the concept itself is worthy of question. Why did G‑d ingrain such a nature in the world? Why is a descent necessary? In our present context: Why is it not possible to approach the heights of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash without first undergoing the descent connected with the Beis HaMikdash’s destruction?

These questions can be resolved by an analysis of the opening verse of this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Devarim: “These are the words which Moshespoke.” The word “these” implies an open revelation, an appreciation that the words of Torah1 are alive and new, as if one is hearing them from Moshe today.2 Each day, we receive the Torah anew. Therefore, the blessings which praise G‑d as “the Giver of the Torah,” use the present tense. Just as each day, man becomes “a new creation,” receiving his soul anew from G‑d, each day, the giving and the receiving of the Torah is renewed.

This provokes a question: Why did G‑d create man in a manner in which he is required to sleep? Man is created to serve his Creator through the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. Why was he created in a manner which requires him3 to interrupt this service and devote several hours each day to sleeping.4

This question can be resolved as follows: The purpose for man’s creation is to elevate the entire creation and bring it to a higher level of completion. Even though after G‑d created the world, “G‑d saw that it was good,” the creation is not self-contained. On the contrary, G‑d created the world in a manner which leaves room for man to become “a partner in creation,” and bring out a new dimension in existence.5

This new dimension is revealed through the service of Torah and mitzvoswhich elevate the nature of the world. Our Sages explain that the giving of the Torah allowed the potential for “the lower realms to ascend to the higher realms.” Although G‑d created these dimensions of existence as “lower,” through our service of Torah and mitzvos, they are elevated and lifted up onto the “higher” plane, reflecting the manner in which a miracle is uplifted above the natural order.

Similarly, within each person’s individual service, once a person has accustomed himself to a specific pattern of behavior, he should strive to reach a new and higher peak. Thus, Tanya explains our Sages’ definition of “one who serves G‑d” as “one who reviews his subject matter 101 times.” In that era, it was normal for each person to review his subject matter 100 times. Thus, by studying the subject matter for the 101st time, the person went beyond his nature and therefore, merited the title “one who serves G‑d.”

This new dimension of service is reflected in the fact that each day, a person becomes “a new creation” after his activity is interrupted through sleeping. Were a person to continue his study of Torah and fulfillment of mitzvos without interruption, the aspect of newness would not be revealed. Since his service would continue constantly, even when there is an increase, it would follow as a natural progression and not as a radical change.

In contrast, by creating man in a manner in which he is required to sleep and thus interrupt his service, G‑d emphasizes the importance of newness and how man has the potential to introduce this element into his service of G‑d. Furthermore, since this dimension of newness requires an interruption, this interruption can be seen as part of the service of G‑d infused by the quality of newness.

These concepts can be applied to the concept of a descent for the sake of an ascent.6 Were a person to continue his service in a constant pattern of growth and ascent, the new dimension of the ascent would not be perceived. In contrast, when there is an interruption in the pattern of growth, one is able to perceive the new quality in the ascent. Furthermore, the new dimension in the ascent which follows a descent allows for an ascent of a greater degree.

This process is reflected in the study of Torah, in the development of new Torah concepts. For this reason, to a great extent, the development of new Torah concepts has taken place in the time of exile.7 The composition of the Babylonian Talmud began a different pattern of revelation of new Torah concepts. The Mishnah was written in clear, concise terminology. In contrast, the Babylonian Talmud, composed in exile8 revealed a greater quantity and a new dimension of Torah ideas. This pattern has been continued in subsequent generations and the descent into the awesome darkness of exile — in particular, in this the generation directly preceding Mashiach’s coming — has granted the Jews the potential to develop a new dimension of service and to express this dimension through the development of new Torah concepts.9

The core of the idea is that in a state of revelation, when one is in a process of constant growth and ascent, man’s own initiative and power to contribute is not emphasized. It is possible that the reason he is constantly advancing is because of the revelation from above and it is impossible to know whether those advances would continue were those revelations to cease. In contrast, when a person is found in a state of descent — in particular, a descent to the lowest depths — and, nevertheless, he is not affected at all and continues his service with all his strength, this reveals the power of service on one’s own initiative and reflects a constant and eternal dimension.

In this context, we can understand why each person is shown a vision of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash on Shabbos Chazon. The intent of the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash was to bring about an ascent to a higher Beis HaMikdash in the Messianic age, a Beis HaMikdash which expresses the quality of newness (and thus, is brought into existence by a new dimension of service carried out by the Jews).

Since the revelation of this new Beis HaMikdash requires the destruction of the previous one, this destruction can be considered as the beginning of the construction of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash. Though on an obvious level, one perceives destruction, the inner intent10 is a phase of new building.11The new dimension of service of the Jewish people will produce a new and greater Beis HaMikdash

Our Sages interpreted the verse, “The honor of this later house will exceed that of the former one,” as a reference to the Second Beis HaMikdash which exceeded the First Beis HaMikdash in size (it was 100 rather than 30 cubits high) and remained for a longer period (420 years rather than 410). It a larger sense, however, the verse can be interpreted as a reference to the Third Beis HaMikdash whose “honor” will exceed that of the previous two for it will be “the Sanctuary of G‑d, established by Your hands,” a timeless, eternal structure.

The advantage of the Third Beis HaMikdash over the previous two is alluded to in the phrase,כתית למאור, “crushed for the light.” The First Beis HaMikdash lasted ת"י (410) years and the Second Beis HaMikdash lasted ת"כ (420) years. Ultimately, they were both “crushed,” destroyed. Yet, this serves as a preparation for “the light,” the revelation of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

The word למאור also alludes to the unique dimension of service which will lead to the building of the Third Beis HaMikdashלמאור refers to a source of light and rut to revealed light. The First and Second Batei Mikdashosreflected the aspect of revealed light. Through their being “crushed,” destroyed, the world was plunged into darkness. Nevertheless, by continuing to serve G‑d in the midst of this darkness, the Jews reveal a new dimension, service on their own initiative. This establishes a connection to the למאור, to the Essence of G‑d which transcends revealed light and which will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d, established by Your hands.”12

Accordingly, in these Three Weeks of Retribution, a Jew should not despair. Despite our appreciation of the depths of the descent, we must consider it as the beginning of the construction of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash.13 On the contrary, the vacuum created by the destruction of the Beis HaMikdashwill awaken a new and deeper level of service including the development of new concepts of Torah law. This, in turn, will lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy, “A new Torah will emerge from Me.”

In this context, it is appropriate, to mention the importance of making siyumim of Talmudic tractates, not only on tractates of Mishnayos, but also on tractates of Gemara, at least tractates like Tamid, which has several chapters of Gemara.

There is another advantage to the study of Tamid. It contains the description of the service of the Beis HaMikdash. Thus, it complements the study of Middos which relates the Beis HaMikdash’s structure. The study of these subjects is considered equivalent to the building of the Beis HaMikdash.

May the above lead to the actual construction of the Beis HaMikdash. For thousands of years, the Jews have prayed three times, “May our eyes behold Your return to Zion in mercy.” Surely, it is fitting that all these prayers be answered. Furthermore, in addition to our prayers, Rabbis have issued halachic decisions ruling that G‑d is obligated to bring the redemption. May this lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy at the conclusion of the Haftorah, “Zion will be redeemed through judgment (i.e., through an increase in Torah study, in particular, Torah law) and those who return to her through tzedakah,” when G‑d will lead each Jew out of exile. We will proceed, “with our youth and our elders,... with our sons and our daughters,” to our holy land, to Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash.

Shabbos Matos-Masei | 27 Tamuz – 4 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- July 21st Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:38 pm

Sat July 22nd Shabbos 
Tehilim for Shabbos Mevarchim Menachem Av 8:00 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:20 am
Mincha  8:38 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:44 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Tue –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Mon 6:50 am /Rosh Chodesh/
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

KIDDUSH 
The Kiddush sponsor for this week, Shabbos Matos Masay, is Frumeth Hirsh Polasky, in honor of Rabbi and Mrs. Levitin, for welcoming her to the community.  Also cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE NINE DAYS BEGIN SUNDAY EVENING JULY 23rd at 8:55 pm
"When Av begins, we diminish [our] rejoicing" (Talmud, Taanit 26b). On the 1st of Av, "The Three Weeks" mourning period over the destruction of the Holy Temple--which began 13 days ealier on Tammuz 17--enters an intensified stage. During "The Nine Days" from Av 1st to the Ninth of Av, a heightened degree of mourning is observed, including abstention from meat and wine, music, bathing for pleasure, and other joyous and enjoyable activities. (The particular mourning customs vary from community to community, so consult a competent Halachic authority for details). Consumption of meat and wine is permitted on Shabbat, or at a Seudat Mitzvah (obligatory festive meal celebrating the fulfillment of a mitzvah) such as a Bris (circumcision), or a "Siyum" celebrating the completion of a course of Torah study (i.e., a complete Talmudic tractate). The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of conducting or participating in a Siyum on each of the Nine Days (even if one does not avail oneself of the dispensation to eat meat). Citing the verse (Isaiah 1:27) "Zion shall be redeemed with mishpat [Torah] and its returnees with Tzedakah," the Rebbe urged that we increase in Torah study (particularly the study of the laws of the Holy Temple) and charity during this period (www.chabad.org) Contact Rabbi Levitin with specific questions.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Continues to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

"The Isadore and Ruth Gibber Worldwide Tisha B'Av Event" Tue Aug 1st 
Emunah for Life, how to manage life's challenges. Info 
theseattlekollel@gmail.com
Program A: 2:45 pm at BCMH, 5145 S Morgan Street. 
Program B: 6:30 pm at SBH, 6500 52nd AVE S. 
Suggested donation: $15/Adults or $10/Students.

Seattle Kollel
Wednesdays through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus
Through Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at:www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed
Through July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seed
Tuesday, July 25, 7:15 pm, Pre Tisha B'Av Leil Iyun at the Kollel. Guest speakers will be Rabbi Ron-Ami Meyers, Rabbi Rafi Mollot and Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum. More info:
www.seattlekollel.com
The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or email
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR MATOS-MASEI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507847/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Matos-Masei-28th-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The three weeks between the 17th of Tammuz and Tishah BeAv are referred to as the Three Weeks of Retribution and Bein HaMetzorim, “between the straits,” names whose connotation is not openly positive.

This presents a conceptual difficulty. The number three is generally connected with positive themes, e.g., the three Patriarchs, the three pilgrimage festivals. Similarly, our Sages associated the giving of the Torah with the number three, praising G‑d for giving, “a threefold light to a threefold people... in the third month.” Furthermore, the number three has the implications of permanence as expressed in the verse, “the threefold cord will not be snapped speedily.” Similarly, in halachic terms, the number three is connected with a chazakah, a presumption that can be assumed to continue. Accordingly, it is difficult to understand: Why is the concept of retribution and destruction, the direct opposite of holiness and permanence,1 associated with the number three?

Generally, the concept is explained as follows: The awesome descent of the Three Weeks is intended to allow for an ascent. When a person wants to reach a level which is much higher than his present rung, it is necessary for him to undergo a descent first. Similarly, for the Jews to reach the peaks of the Messianic redemption, a redemption which will not be followed by a descent, it is necessary that they first undergo the descent of exile. In this context, the Three Weeks are associated, not with exile, but rather with the Third Beis HaMikdash that will be built after this exile.

This explanation, however, is insufficient for the Three Weeks connect the aspect of descent (and not the subsequent ascent) with three. When a descent is intended for the sake of an ascent, the descent itself is not desired. Indeed, it will ultimately be nullified and all that will remain is the ascent. If so, why is three which is, as above, usually connected with permanence, associated with a dimension that has no self-contained purpose and which ultimately will be nullified?2

The question can be reinforced: Generally, the number three expresses an ascent which follows a descent. For example, in the narrative of creation, the first day, is referred to in the Torah as yom echad, “one day,” i.e., a day of oneness, to quote the Midrash, “the day that G‑d was at one with His world.” It was followed by the second day, “the day on which strife was created,” as reflected in the separation of the higher waters from the lower waters. Accordingly, the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is not mentioned in connection with the second day since division, even when necessary for the world, cannot be called “good.”

This was followed by the third day, which compensated for the division of the second day, creating peace and unifying the two opposites. For this reason, the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is repeated twice, revealing a compound goodness which qualitatively exceeds the goodness of the other days.

This is reflected by the attribute of Tiferes (“beauty,” which was expressed on the third day of creation) which unifies Chessed (“kindness,” expressed on the first day of creation) withGevurah (“might,” expressed on the second day of creation). This reveals a unity which surpasses that of the first day. On the first day, the unity existed on a level above division. Thus, there is the possibility that division will ultimately arise. In contrast, the unity of the third day is established within the context of division, bringing about a true state of unity.

The same concept is reflected in Torah where we find the concept of “a controversy for the sake of heaven,” the controversy between Hillel and Shammai. This division has its source in the division which came into being on the second day of creation and, in turn, serves as the source for subsequent differences of opinion within Torah.

A “controversy for the sake of Heaven,” is obviously not a simple matter of strife or conflict. Nevertheless, it — even the controversy between Hillel and Shammai — brought about a descent. Ultimately, however, it serves a positive function.3 The debate between a thinking process that favors leniency (since its source is the attribute of Chessed) and a thinking process which tends to severity (since its source is the attribute of Gevurah) leads to a clarification of Torah law.4 A third opinion emerges which reconciles and unifies both conflicting perspectives.5

Thus, both in the world at large and in Torah, the concept of descent and division is associated with the number two and three is associated with the ascent and unification that follows. Similarly, in regard to the Batei HaMikdashos: The first (associated with the Patriarch Avraham, and the attribute of Chessed) and the second (associated with the Patriarch, Yitzchok, and the attribute of GevurahBatei Mikdashos were destroyed, while the third Beis HaMikdash (associated with the Patriarch Yaakov and the attribute of Tiferes) will be an eternal structure. Thus the original question is reinforced: Why are these weeks which are connected with mourning, destruction, and exile associated with the number three?

This question can be resolved by developing a different understanding of the concept “a descent for the purpose of an ascent.” To explain: A Jew should be in a constant process of ascent, “always ascending higher in holiness,” “proceeding from strength to strength.” If so, what is the reason for a descent? To proceed to a higher and more elevated rung that could not otherwise be reached. To give an example from every day life, when faced with obstructions and difficulties, a person summons up inner strength that brings out greater achievements that would otherwise be impossible.

In this process of descent for the sake of ascent, there are two levels: a) a descent which is limited within the context of the natural order, b) a descent which cannot be fathomed by the rules of nature.

In the first case — which reflects the progression from two (descent) to three (ascent) — just as the descent is limited, so, too, the ascent has certain limits. In contrast, when the descent is unlimited, as in the Three Weeks, the ascent which follows is also unlimited in nature.

The first type of descent was implanted by G‑d in the natural order of the world. In contrast, the second descent is brought about by man, through his sins. Thus, in the first instance, there is a direct connection between the descent and the ascent which will follow. In contrast, when a person sins, on a revealed level, there is no apparent connection between the sin and the ascent through teshuvah which will ultimately follow. In particular, when the descent that is brought about by sin is connected with three — and thus, has the power of permanence — the ascent becomes even higher.

To rephrase the matter: The process of ascent that is brought about by descent is a natural phenomenon. Since the descent into the realm of division brings about a higher sense of oneness, the division is not genuine. On the contrary, even on the level of division, it is felt how it is temporary in nature, with no purpose in and of itself, and that it exists only to bring out the higher level of unity. When is there genuine division? When there is an approach that possesses the aspect of permanence associated with three and yet appears to be totally negative in thrust with no connection with the ascent that will follow. When unity is established in that context, then it is true and complete.

In this context, we can understand the Three Weeks. This period, brought about by our sins, reflects the lowest possible descent, a descent that would not be possible within the order of nature, and reflects the aspect of permanence associated with the number three. Thus, we see that this exile continues without end, to quote our Sages:

In the first generations, their sin was revealed and the end [of the period of retribution] was also revealed. In the later generations, their sin was not revealed and the end [of the period of retribution] was also not revealed.

Even after our Sages declared, “All the appointed times for Mashiach’s coming have passed,” the exile continues. Furthermore, on the surface, there is no way in which it is apparent how such an exile will lead to the redemption.

Nevertheless, this itself is an indication that it will lead to an ascent which is totally beyond our comprehension, that it will surpass even the peaks of holiness that were attained previously, establishing an entirely new framework of reference.

Furthermore, since this is the purpose of the descent of the Three Weeks — although it is not consciously felt — we must appreciate that the Three Weeks themselves have a positive dimension. The Three Weeks are associated with the revelation of the three powers of intellect.

In that context, the word פורעניות rendered as “retribution” can be reinterpreted in a positive context. The Zohar associates Pharaoh (whose name פרעה shares the same Hebrew root asפורעניות) “with the revelation of all the sublime lights.” Similarly, these Three Weeks can be the source for a revelation of light that transcends all limits, the light that will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash.6

In this context, we can explain the connection between the Three Weeks and this particular Shabbos, the Shabbos on which the Book of Bamidbar is completed.7 The process of descent for the sake of ascent which is revealed in the Three Weeks goes beyond the limits of nature. Thus, it brings about a strengthening of the Jews in Torah, as evidenced by their calling out in powerful tones, Chazak, Chazak, Vinischazeik, (“Be strong, Be strong, May you be strengthened”).8

The concept of an immeasurable ascent which comes because of the descent into exile is also alluded to in each of the parshiyos of Matos and Masei.

The name Matos refers to a branch which has become strong and hard because it was cut off from the tree.9 There is a parallel to this in our service of G‑d. The Jewish soul as it descends into a body, particularly as it exists in exile, is, on an apparent level, cut off from its source. This brings about a hardening and strengthening process. On the surface, the hardening is negative in nature, intensifying the challenges which a Jew faces. Through confronting these challenges, however, a Jew attains added strength and power in his service of G‑d which enables him to endure the challenges of exile without being affected.

Similarly, the parshah of Masei shares a connection to the exile. Masei meaning “journeys,” in an extended sense can refer to all the journeys undergone by the Jews in their departure from Egypt (the place of boundaries and limitations) with the intent of reaching Eretz Yisraelin the Messianic era. These journeys add strength to the Jews as expressed in the exclamation,Chazak, Chazak, Vinischazeik.

Thus, the extended exile which is felt acutely in these Three Weeks should not bring a Jew to despair, but rather to an appreciation of the heights to which the exile will bring us. This realization should, in turn, bring about a strengthening of Torah and mitzvos which will lead to the Messianic redemption. This should be expressed in “spreading the wellsprings outward,” extending the influence of Torah to places which by nature have no connection to it.

In particular, this should be expressed in making siyumim, conclusions of the study of Talmudic tractates or Torah works. These siyumim should be made in every place possible. May this lead to a siyum of the exile.

Shema in the evening?” “Evening” refers to exile. Within the exile there can the recitation, i.e., the revelation, of Shema, the Oneness of G‑d and His unique connection to the Jews. This is brought about by מאימתי, which as the Maggid’s son Rav Avraham explained, can also be rendered as, “Out of awe,” i.e., the fear and awe of G‑d.

This leads to the conclusion of the Talmud: “The School of Eliyahu [i.e., the prophet Eliyahu who will announce Mashiach’s coming] taught: Whoever studies Torah laws every day is assured of life in the World to Come.”10 The study of Torah law gives a Jew control over the entire world and enables him to experience the World to Come within the context of his life in this world. This will lead to the era of the redemption.}

This must lead to the ultimate decision of Torah law, that the exile has endured for too long and the Messianic redemption must come now.11

Shabbos Pinchas | 20-27 Tamuz 5777

Fri- July 14th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:45 pm

Sat July 15th  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:20 am
Mincha  8:45 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 1/
Maariv/Havdalah 10:02 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon  –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Abraham and Shprintze Kavka on the birth of a baby girl to Naomi and Levi! May they merit to raise her to Torah, Chupa, and Maasim Tovim!

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush Lite – No sponsor.  Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE THREE WEEKS 
We are now during the three weeks, weddings are not held; we do not play musical instruments or listen to music; we do not eat fruit which we have not yet eaten this season or wear new clothing that would require us to recite the Shehecheyanu blessing ; We do not cut our hair or shave. Consult Rabbi Levitin for details.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ezzy Bezzy BBQ Sunday, July 16,  6:30-7:30 pm
Cost: $20/person, by reservation only. 
https://ebbbq.wordpress.com/about/

The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

Seattle Kollel
Wednesdays through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info:
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus Through Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at: www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed. Through July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at: www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seedTuesday, July 25, 7:15 pm, Pre Tisha B'Av Leil Iyun at the Kollel. Guest speakers will be Rabbi Ron-Ami Meyers, Rabbi Rafi Mollot and Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum. More info:www.seattlekollel.com


The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or email 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR PINCHAS
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507845/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Pinchas-21st-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Our1 Sages relate that the world will exist in its present state for six millennia: Two thousand years of chaos, two thousand years of Torah, and two thousand years of [which include the preparation for] the Messianic era. Thus, at present, in the closing years of the sixth millennia, there is added significance to the period of Bein HaMetzorim when we commemorate the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash and look forward to the time when it will be rebuilt.

In particular, this year, there is a unique dimension to this period as emphasized by the fact that it begins and is concluded on a Tuesday [on the dates of the 17th of Tammuz and Tishah BeAv respectively].

Tuesday is singled out as the day on which the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is repeated. This shares a particular connection to the 17th of Tammuz, since 17 is the numerical equivalent of the word טוב meaning “good” in Hebrew. Thus, the period of Bein HaMetzorim begins on a day whose nature is positive. This reinforces our hope that, as the Rambam writes:

All these fast days will ultimately be nullified in the Messianic age. Furthermore, they will be transformed into festivals and days of happiness and joy.

In this context, the repetition of the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” can be interpreted as referring to two types of good: a) entities whose positive nature is openly apparent; b) a good which comes from “the transformation of darkness to light and bitterness to sweetness,” as will be seen in regard to the 17th of Tammuz.

The concept of repetition is also connected to the Messianic redemption. Our Sages declared:

There are five letters which are repeated [i.e., have two forms, one for when they appear in the midst of a word and one when they appear at a word’s conclusion]. All these letters allude to the redemption. For example, the Tzadi, with it G‑d will redeem Israel in the final years of the fourth kingdom as it is written, “A man [Mashiach], Tzemach is his name. Under him, will flourish....”

The unique dimension of the 17th of Tammuz is enhanced by the Shabbos which follows since the Shabbos elevates the days of the previous week. In general, the Shabbasos of Bein HaMetzorim are above the aspect of mourning. On Shabbos, it is forbidden to carry out any of the rites of mourning associated with these days. On the contrary, these Shabbasos have to be characterized by joy and happiness; indeed, greater happiness than on other Shabbasos to negate the possibility of someone thinking that they are at all associated with sadness.2

In particular, this Shabbos reflects the positive dimensions of the Three Weeks as reflected by its date, the 21st of Tammuz. 21 is the numerical equivalent of the word אך (“only”), and alludes to the verse meaning, “It shall be only good for Israel.”3

The positive aspects of this Shabbos are further emphasized by the weekly Torah portion, Parshas Pinchas. Firstly, the very inclusion of this Torah portion in the period of Bein HaMetzorim is positive. “There is no good other than Torah.” Thus, the addition of a fourth Torah portion (besides Matos, Masei and Devarimwhich are always read during Bein HaMetzorim) is a positive point.

Furthermore, Pinchas is identified with the prophet Eliyahu who will announce the coming of Mashiach. In addition, the portion begins with G‑d’s declaration, “Behold, I grant him My covenant of peace.” This is Eliyahu’s mission, to establish peace among the Jewish people as the prophet Malachi relates, “Behold, I will send you Eliyahu, the prophet, who will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers.” This emphasis on peace will nullify the cause of the exile, unwonted hatred.4 When the exile’s cause is nullified, the exile itself will cease.

Similarly, the conclusion of the portion which describes the sacrifices offered on the Sabbath and the festivals alludes to the potential to transform the fast days into holidays and festivals.

The uniqueness of these Three Weeks is related to the Haftoros recited in this time. This period is called “the Three Weeks of Retribution” because theHaftoros of these three weeks, at least on the surface, deal with retribution. Only afterwards, follow “the Seven Weeks of Consolation” whose Haftoros mention prophecies of consolation. There is, however, a positive aspect to these Three Weeks. The numbers three and seven allude to the seven emotional powers and the three powers of intellect. From this, it appears that these Three Weeks are on a higher plane and are also the source for the positive qualities to be expressed in the weeks that follow.

In that context, the word פורעניות rendered as “retribution” can be reinterpreted in a positive context. The Zohar associates Pharaoh (whose name shares the same Hebrew root as פורעניות) “with the revelation of all the sublime lights.” Similarly, these Three Weeks can be the source for a revelation of light that transcends all limits.

This unbounded revelation is reflected in the three Torah portions which are always read during Bein HaMetzorim, the parshiyos: Matos, Masei, andDevarim. Each of these three parshiyos deal with a different dimension of the conquest, division, and inheritance of Eretz Yisrael. Furthermore, this includes not only the land of the seven nations which lived on the west side of the Jordan, but also the three nations (the Keni, Knizi, and Kadmoni5 ) whose territory began on the eastern bank of the Jordan. As explained previously,6 the tribes of Reuven and Gad desired to settle in these lands to fulfill G‑d’s promise to grant Avraham the lands of ten nations. Here, we see a fusion of the intellect and the emotions, a conquest of all ten nations alluding to control of all our ten potentials. In particular, the conquest of the lands of the Keni, Knizi, andKadmoni allude to the positive nature of these Three Weeks which reflect our three intellectual potentials.

The above is enhanced this year by the inclusion of Parshas Pinchas among the Shabbasos of Bein HaMetzorim. In particular, a positive dimension is revealed when the 17th of Tammuz falls on Tuesday. This creates an association between that day and the third aliyah of Parshas Pinchas which describes the division ofEretz Yisrael, stating:

Among these, the land will be divided....7 To a larger [tribe], you shall give a greater inheritance. To a smaller [tribe], you shall give a lesser inheritance.... Nevertheless, you must divide the land by lot.

Thus, three different approaches to the division of the land are mentioned: a) inheritance, b) a division based on the criteria of reason (“To a greater [tribe]...”), c) division by lots. It can be explained that these three different approaches are reflected in the phrase from the liturgy: “Fortunate are we! How good is our portion, how pleasant our lot, and how beautiful our heritage.” Through these three services, we hasten the division of Eretz Yisrael using these three approaches in the Messianic age. Indeed, the division of the land mentioned inParshas Pinchas can be interpreted as an allusion to that ultimate division of the land.8

The above concepts are also alluded to in the parshiyos, Matos and Masei which are read in today’s Minchah service. Parshas Masei begins, “These are the journeys of the children of Israel when they left the land of Egypt.” In Likkutei Torah, the Alter Rebbe asks: After the first journey, the Jews had already left Egypt. Why are all the journeys linked to this departure? He explains that the ultimate goal of all the 42 journeys was to leave Egypt, i.e., to transcend one’s boundaries and limitations.

Conversely, all the subsequent journeys were included within the first journey which took the Jews out of Egypt. Had the Jews merited, they would have continued directly into Eretz Yisrael, bringing about the Messianic redemption.

Nevertheless, due to the people’s sins, the redemption was delayed and they were forced to wander forty years in the desert. Similarly, this descent brought about the potential for later exiles. The ability to transform these negative elements is also alluded to in this week’s Torah reading. Parshas Matos deals with the subject of vows, including an allusion to the nullification of vows by a Sage.9 This relates to the nullification of all undesirable entities including the exile.

2. Parshas Pinchas also contains a description of the daughters of Tzelophchad’s request to inherit their father’s portion of Eretz Yisrael. The commentaries mention that their love for Eretz Yisrael came to them as a heritage from their ancestor Yosef who also displayed a great love for the Holy Land.

There is also a connection between Yosef and the 17th of Tammuz because Yosef was seventeen years when he was sold into slavery. Our Sages also connect this with the concept that seventeen is numerically equal to good. To explain:

Our Sages relate that after Yaakov’s confrontations with Lavan and Esav, he “desired to live in prosperity.” That desire was not granted immediately. Nevertheless, G‑d set into motion a series of events which led to the ultimate fulfillment of that desire. Yosef’s descent into Egypt eventually led to Yaakov living the 17 best years of his life in prosperity in Egypt. This, in turn, gave the Jews the potential to sustain the hardships of exile, and, ultimately, to transform the exile into a positive quality.

This is connected to the concept that Yaakov10 represents the entire Jewish people. Indeed, his second name, Yisrael, is the name of the people as a whole and, as explained in Tanya, his soul included the soul of each member of our people.

Each of the three Patriarchs represented a different quality in the service of G‑d: Avraham — deeds of kindness, as exemplified in his welcoming of guests; Yitzchok — prayer, as exemplified in his being chosen as a sacrifice; Yaakov — Torah study, as exemplified by his devoted attention to the study halls of Shemand Ever.

Although all these three services are of primary importance and must be fulfilled every day,11 there is a prominence granted to Torah study. Every moment of the day and night, a Jew has the obligation — and the opportunity — to study Torah; this applies even on Tishah BeAv. [Until the present year, for Mashiach will surely come beforehand.] There have been limitations against studying Torah on that day because Torah study brings happiness which is inappropriate on such an occasion. Despite these restrictions, there is an obligation to study those aspects of Torah which are permitted during the entire day.12

The fundamental connection a Jew shares with Torah is further emphasized by our Sages’ interpretation of the name Yisrael as an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “There are 600,000 letters in the Torah.”13

Our Sages relate that Yaakov taught all the Torah which he had studied to Yosef. Yosef, in turn, transmitted Yaakov’s influence to the entire Jewish people, granting them the potential to reach a complete level of Torah study. Indeed, Yosef related these qualities to the entire Jewish people, those who identified with them and those who, were it not for his influence, would be estranged from their Jewish roots. This is alluded to in Rachel’s association of the naming of Yosef with the prayer, “May G‑d add on to me another son.” This implies that Yosef has the potential to transform someone who is “another,” estranged from his Jewish roots, into a “son.” This quality of transformation will also be expressed in the transformation of the exile into a positive quality.

In particular, there is a greater emphasis on the above in the present generation whose Nasi is named Yosef since “the Nasi includes the entire people.” This is expressed in regard to his redemption which he interpreted as general in nature:

The Holy One, Blessed be He, did not redeem me alone... but rather, all who love our holy Torah, fulfill its mitzvos, and all those who bear the name “Jew.”

This year, the 110th anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s birth, his connection to Yosef receives greater emphasis for that number represents the number of years of Yosef’s life. The Previous Rebbe set the example of spreading Yosef’s service, extending Torah study to all Jews, even those estranged from their Jewish roots. Indeed, he emphasized this dimension in the letter and the maamarhe released to mark the first commemoration of Yud-Beis Tammuz, stressing the importance of spreading Torah study to all Jews and highlighting the importance of public sessions of Torah study. Implicit in his words is the promise that the Messianic redemption will be brought about through these activities.

3. Yeshayahu the prophet declares, “Tzion will be redeemed through justice and those who return to through tzedakah.” The Alter Rebbe explains that justice refers to Torah study and that these two activities, Torah study and tzedakah, will bring about the Messianic redemption. In particular, this applies to the study of the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah which includes the entire oral law. The above applies to a greater extent on Shabbos, a day which should be utilized to “gather groups together in Torah study.”14 In particular, these concepts are relevant during Bein HaMetzorim.

Also of unique relevance at the present time is the study of the structure of theBeis HaMikdash as revealed in Yechezkel’s prophecies, in the Mishnah in the tractate of Middos, and in the teachings of the Rambam in Hilchos Beis HaBechirah. (To enable people to study all these texts, they have been printed in a single volume.)

Similarly, it is important to hold siyumim (gatherings celebrating the conclusion of Torah texts) during these days including the day of Tishah BeAv itself.15These directives should be publicized in every place throughout the world.

May these activities hasten the coming of the time when Bein HaMetzorim will be transformed into a period of celebration with the coming of Mashiach.16

Shabbos Balak | 13-20 Tamuz 5777

 

Fri- July 7th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:50 pm

Sat July 8th  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:16 am
Mincha  8:50 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 6
Maariv/Havdalah 10:03 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon, Wed –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Tue – Shacharis 6:50 am /Fast of 17 Tamuz/
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

FAST OF 17th TAMUZ TUE JULY 11th 
Fast Begins 3:03 am
Shacharis 6:50 am
Mincha 8:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 9:45 pm

KIDDUSH 
Thank you to Rabbi Levitin and Chabad of Seattle for sponsoring Kiddush in honor of Yud Beis/Yud Gimel Tamuz.  Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES SHABBOS FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD BEIS TAMUZ - SAT JULY 8th 5 PM
Farbrengen for women and girls in honor of Yud-Beis / Yud-Gimel Tammuz at Tziviah Goldberg's, 5 pm Shabbos Parshas Balak. 4038 NE 58th St. Bring a story or D'var Torah if you like. 

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/


COMMUNITY NEWS

Hot Wings and Cool Music with Mercaz - Sun July 9th 5pm-9pm. 
Eating together and playing music before the three weeks, bring your singing voices and an instrument! Wings, Salads, Vegetarian Option, Lemonade, BYOB.  Register at
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/hot-wings-and-cool-music.html

Ezzy Bezzy BBQ Sunday, July 16,  6:30-7:30 pm
Cost: $20/person, by reservation only. 
https://ebbbq.wordpress.com/about/

The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

Seattle Kollel
Wed through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus .
June 26 - Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at: 
www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed    
June 26 - July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seed 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR BALAK
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507841/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Chukas-7th-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Yud-Beis Tammuz, in addition to being the Previous Rebbe’s day of redemption, is also his birthday. This year there is a unique dimension to this aspect because it is the 110th anniversary of his birth. The Torah associates the number 110 with Yosef who lived for 110 years, mentioning that fact in two separate verses.

Yosef’s lifespan has raised several questions. On one hand, the Talmud states that “the years of Yosef’s life was reduced,” and indeed, he did not live as long as his father or grandfather. On the other, the Midrash chooses Yosef as an example of long life, stating:

Since he worked hard to honor his father in Egypt, he merited the crown of old age... as it is written: “And Yosef saw Ephraim’s great-grandchildren.”

It can be explained that there is no contradiction between the two: Compared to his brothers and his ancestors, he did not live long. When compared to an average person, however, his life was prolonged. In addition, Yosef possessed the unique aspect of seeing the third generation of Ephraim’s descendants and Menasheh’s grandchildren(Bereishis 50:23; see The Living Torah). The Torah does not explicitly describe any other figure as being blessed with the fortune of living together with that many generations of his descendants.1

Despite this dimension, Yosef’s life was, in fact, shorter than that of his brothers and, indeed, less than 120 years. Furthermore, Yosef’s life was shorter than that of his father.2 This fact can be clarified by another concept.

It can be explained that the reason that Yosef merited to see a continuity of his descendants is a result of the fact that Yosef was the first Jew to serve as a king. With the exception of the fact that he did not sit on the throne, he fulfilled all the functions of the monarchy.3

Thus, Yosef serves as the source of monarchy for the Jewish people and we find the expressions, “the kingdom of the House of Yosef” and “the Mashiach of the House of Yosef.” Even though the ultimate dimension of monarchy is associated with the House of David, who will come from the tribe of Yehudah, that dimension will not be revealed until the Messianic age. Until then, Yosef is supreme and Yehudah receives from him.

[The ultimate expression of monarchy is seen in the crown. For this reason, the sign of whether a monarch of the House of David was fit for his position was whether the crown fit him or not. A crown, Kesser, in Hebrew, is identified with the Sefirah of that name.

There is a connection between this year’s commemoration of Yud-Beis Tammuz and the attribute of Kesser. This is the 63rd anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s release from prison. 63 can be divided into 50 (a number identified with Kesser) and 13 which stands for the 13 Attributes of Mercy and the drawing down of their influence to the Jews who are divided into twelve tribes and the tribe of Levi.]4

The concept of prolonged years and continuity from generation to generation is integrally connected with the concept of monarchy as it is written, “Prolong the king’s life, extend his years from generation to generation.” Therefore, the Torah explicitly associates these qualities with Yosef. Nevertheless, since the ultimate aspect of monarchy will be revealed in the House of David, Yosef’s life was actually not as long as that of his brothers. Furthermore, the Zohar explains that Yosef did not live to be 147, the age to which his father Yaakov lived, because he gave 37 years of his life to King David, implying that ultimately, the Kingdom of Yosef will lead to the Kingdom of David.5

On the basis of the above, we can appreciate the unique dimension of Yud-Beis Tammuzin the present year, the 110th anniversary of the birth of the Previous Rebbe — the Yosef of our generation. Here, it is possible to see the continuity of the generations whose service he inspired, a service that will bring about a spreading of the wellsprings of Chassidus outward and thus, lead to the coming of Mashiach.

This concept can be associated with the redemption of Yud-Beis Tammuz which was of a collective nature, strengthening and encouraging Torah and Yiddishkeit, not only in the Previous Rebbe’s generation, but in the generations that follow until the present day. Indeed, we see that as a result of his redemption, the Previous Rebbe was able to reach America, “the lower half of the world.” There, he continued to spread Torah andmitzvos and transferred this mission to the coming generations who have expanded this service. This will lead to the ultimate expression of monarchy, the coming of Mashiach whose sovereignty will spread throughout the entire world.

The above concepts receive greater emphasis due to the fact that the Previous Rebbe is the sixth generation6 of the Chabad Nesi’im who spread the wellsprings of Chassidus outward, reaching the furthest reaches of the world.

Our Sages relate that there will be six millennia to the existence of the world in its present state: two thousand years of chaos, two thousand years of Torah, and two thousand years of [preparation for] the Messianic age. Thus, the sixth millennia is intended to prepare us for the seventh millennia, the age which is “all Sabbath and rest for eternity.”

* * *

3. Each year, on one’s birthday, it is customary to study the chapter of Psalms associated with the number of years of one’s life together with its commentaries. Similarly, this Psalm is recited each day throughout the year. Because of the attachment of Chassidimto the Previous Rebbe, it is proper that they study and recite the Psalm associated with his birthday.

Psalm 111 contains the verse, “He has made a remembrance of His wondrous works.” The Tzemach Tzedek comments on this verse:

Whatever G‑d does for the righteous in this world is only a “remembrance” of what He will do for them in the world to come.... Even the miracles of the exodus from Egypt are only a “remembrance” when compared to the miracles which will be in the Messianic era as implied by the verse, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

The above receives even greater emphasis this year, תש"נ, “a year of miracles,” which will lead to תשנ"א, whose letters form an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “May this be the year of ‘I will show wonders.’ ” This is further intensified by the connection to this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Balak, which contains several allusions to the Messianic redemption. For example, the Rambam writes that the verse, “A star will shoot forth from Yaakov and a staff will arise in Israel,” is a reference to Mashiach’s coming.

The above concepts can be applied in each of our lives since each Jew has a connection to royalty as our Sages declare, “the Jews are like the sons of kings.” Similarly, the Jewish people as a whole are called Yosef and thus, particularly, our generation whoseNasi is named Yosef — and “the Nasi includes the entire generation” — share a connection to the Previous Rebbe, the Yosef of our generation.

Each Jew, within the context of his life in the physical world, receives a crown7 of kingship from G‑d. This gives him the potential to live in a manner of redemption, without being hindered by any of the obstacles of the exile. On the contrary, he rules over his environment and reveals G‑d’s sovereignty in the world.

To allow a Jew to carry on this service, G‑d grants him manifold blessings so that he can live a life of peace and prosperity — in Eretz Yisrael or in the Diaspora — and thus, further his service of Torah and mitzvos. The celebration of Yud-Beis Tammuz this year grants further potential for such service, endowing each Jew with the potential to spread this service to others, “raising up many students,” and thus establishing continuity with the generations to come.

When each Jew lives in “a manner of redemption,”8 the world will be prepared for the ultimate redemption. Then, this, the last generation of exile will become the first generation of redemption.

On a practical level, resolutions should be taken regarding the following: a) Gifts should be given to tzedakah in multiples of 110 and in multiples of 63; b) The farbrengens ofYud-Beis Tammuz should be continued and, in every place, farbrengens should be held on the 14th and 15th of Tammuz, in the hope that this will transform the 17th of Tammuz into a day of celebration, c) The campaign of public sessions of Torah study should be reinforced, d) The maamar, Asarah SheYoshim released by the Previous Rebbe in connection with Yud-Beis Tammuz should be studied, e) Psalm 111 should be studied together with its commentaries.

These activities will lead to the fulfillment of the promise, “And you shall spread westward, eastward, northward, and southward,” spreading G‑dliness throughout the world. This will lead to the coming of Mashiach. May it be in the immediate future.

* * *

4. At present, the affluence enjoyed by the Jewish community allows the possibility for Rabbis to study Torah without disruption and thus, penetrate to the depth of Torah, deriving practical halachic decisions. It must, however, be emphasized that although, from an abstract perspective, the most challenging aspect of Torah study is to deal with the application of halachah, before actually putting into practice — or advising others to put into practice — one’s decisions, it is proper to consult with a Rabbi who has experience in rendering decisions in applied halachah. Indeed, we find that in previous generations, before a Rabbi was allowed to render halachic decisions, in addition to having Semichah, “ordination,” he had to have shimush, “internship,” during which he assisted a practicing Rabbinical authority.

The influence of the practical application of halachah is evident form the following story concerning an important Rabbi (whose name will not be mentioned lest some of the particulars in the story are not accurate) who was being tested to see if he was fit for a Rabbinical position. He was asked many questions which he answered correctly with the exception of one, to which he gave an answer that contradicted the views of most other authorities. When questioned about this point, he explained, that G‑d has helped him to, as of yet, never err in regard to an actual halachic question. Apparently, the question was being asked merely from a theoretical perspective with no intent of being applied to actual behavior and therefore, his answer was lacking.

May today’s Rabbis render the halachic decision of immediate relevance: that the exile has lasted too long and may G‑d carry out their decision and bring Mashiach.

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