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Parshas Tazriah - Metzorah | 5 -12 Iyar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  APR 20th
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:48pm /COUNT OMER № 21/

SHABBOS SAT APR 21st 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:38 am/
Mincha 7:48 pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 2
Maariv/Havdalah 8:50 pm  /COUNT OMER № 22/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush lite this week.  Yitzchok Rothman is a contributor, in honor and in memory of the 44th Yahrzeit of his mother, Bilhah bat Yitzchok Wolf ha Levi z"l ( 4th Iyar), and in honor of the 70th Yom Ha' Atzmaut!  Delicious meat cholent is sponsored by Moshe Chayon and made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit.

Weekday Services 
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 8:00 pm, followed by Maariv c. 8:45 pm /COUNT OMER № 23-27/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Please drop a check by shul, or pay online at 
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting.org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm 
Thank you! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

FARBRENGEN ALERT – IYAR 5 – FRI APR 20th 6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the 2nd of Iyar,Tiferet sh'b'tiferet - Birthday of the Rebbe MaHaRash, the fourth Lubavitcher Rebbe; yahrzeit of Chasidic masters Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Vitebsk and Rabbi Shmuel-Shelke of Nicholsburg. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

"Disaster Preparedness" workshop at CSTL, Sun Apr 22nd from 10-11 am, 
Run through the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management. This is a great opportunity to prepare your family for any event as well as organize with your neighbors. The presentation provides an overview of the hazards that can impact Seattle, and steps that individuals and families can take to become more prepared to deal with them. This includes guidance on how to develop a disaster plan, build a disaster supply kit, and organize with your neighbors to become better prepared Please RSVP here: 
https://tinyurl.com/CSTLDisasterPrep If you are interested in co-sponsoring or helping organize this event, please email elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com 

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Rebbetzin Tziporah Heller in Seattle - April 28 & 29
www.ashreichemyisrael.org

New Sunday Night Series for Men & Women at Yavneh Educational Center
First two classes will be April 29 and May 6 at 7:00 pm taught by Larry Russak. Topic: "King Arthur, Ivanhoe, Robin Hood and the truth about the Jewish Exile from England" May 13, class taught by Judy Balint Topic: "Israel Up Close and Personal Part 1"June 3, class taught by Marlene Kaplan Topic: "Conversational Street Hebrew for Beginners"
www.bcmhseattle.org

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle NWIsraelFest Apr 8 – 22
www.JewishInSeattle.org ,

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

NYHS Leadership Dinner, Sun Apr 29.. 
NYHS will honor Rabbi Rob Toren with the Jack De Leon Community Leadership Award. RSVP and/or place a tribute here or contact Melissa Rivkin at 
mrivkin@nyhs.org or 206-232-5272.

NYHS Gourmet Food & Dessert Auction, Wed May 16th 
At the home of Connie Kanter. Bid and buy items from our community chefs in support of NYHS. Free and open to all!  RSVP and to donate items, please contact us at 
nyhs@nyhs.org.

Seattle Kollel Partners in Torah Part II for Women April 29-May 16, 8-9 pm,
Contact Aliza Brand at 
alizabrand94@gmail.com, (773) 663-1512. More info: www.seattlekollel.com/partners-in-torah

Mercaz Shavuoton – Fri May 18th – Mon May 21st
An Amazing Shavuot All Inclusive Retreat .·  At Camp Solomon Schecter in Olympia, WA, 1 hour and 20 minutes south of Seattle.   Excellent all night learning. Classes during the days. ·  Children’s programming. ·  Delicious food.   Spirited tefillot. ·  Comfortable accommodations with private or semi-private bathrooms. ·  Friends, fun and conversation! Hiking trails, basketball, gaga, game room, lake with sandy beach, swing set and more! Register, Sponsor and Find More Info at: 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/ Please Register By May 2nd, When Early Bird Pricing Ends


REBBE’S SICHO FOR TAZRIAH - METZORAH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507760/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tazria-Metzora-6th-Day-of-Iyar-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

 This is a time when every person is obligated to do all that depends on him to bring about the coming of Mashiach immediately for “All the appointed times for Mashiach’scoming have passed.” This is cogently true at present after the conclusion of the month of Nissan. Surely, in the immediate future, Mashiach will actually come and everyone will point to him and say, “Here look, Mashiach has actually come.”

These concepts, the imminence of Mashiach’s coming and every Jew’s responsibility to act to bring that coming closer are connected to this week’s Torah reading, Tazria-Metzora.

To explain: Parshas Tazria begins with the mention of a woman giving birth to a son. This is an allusion to the coming of the future redemption which is often described using the metaphor of birth. In particular, the birth of a son can be interpreted as a reference to the strength and permanence that will characterize the ultimate redemption, for this redemption will not be followed by an exile.1 In this context, the woman is an allusion to the Jewish people whose service will ultimately bear fruit in the advent of the Era of Redemption.

Parshas Metzora also shares a connection to Mashiach’s coming. Our Sages teach: What is Mashiach’s name? “The leper of the School of Rebbi” as implied by the prophecy, “He has borne our sicknesses and endured our afflictions.” Mashiach will sit among the lepers and be a leper himself.2

(Based on the above, we can appreciate the derivation of the name of the parshah from the verse, “This is the law applying to the leper on his day of purification.” Although the commonly accepted name of the parshah is Metzora, “the leper,” in some communities, it is referred to as Parshas Taharah, “the portion of purification.” Based on the above, we can appreciate both names as applying to the Mashiach; Metzora, refers to him as he exists within exile, and Taharah, refers to his state after he reveals himself and redeems the Jewish people.)

To explain the above concept: Commenting on the verse, “When a man will have a blemish on his skin,” the Alter Rebbe explains that Adom (the Hebrew term used for “man”) refers to a person who is completely developed in all aspects of his personality. Therefore, the blemish is only on his skin,3 i.e., it affects only the lower and more superficial elements of his being which have not been refined as of yet.

The Alter Rebbe continues, explaining that leprous blemishes are “Sublime matters. They are not impure until they are determined to be so by a priest.... Until then, they are not impure, but rather sublime lights.”4

These two explanations of leprous blemishes — that reflect the superficial aspects of one’s being that have not yet been refined and that they are a reflection of sublime G‑dly lights — are interrelated. Because they are a reflection of such sublime lights, even when there is a descent and nurture is derived by undesirable forces, the effects are only superficial.

In this context, we can appreciate the purification of a leper’s blemishes in a different context: The purification process does not represent the introduction of a new quality, but rather the revelation of the inner, true dimension possessed by these blemishes, their existence as sublime lights. This is reflected by the phrase, “on the day of one’s purification.” This implies that the purification from leprosy is connected with “day,” i.e., with revelation, revealing the inner nature of these sublime lights.

To focus on this concept: It is precisely the sublime nature of these Divine lights that allows for the derivation of nurture by undesirable forces. These lights are too powerful to be enclothed within vessels and therefore, there is the possibility for descent.5

When these powerful lights shine to vessels which cannot enclothe them, they cause the vessels to feel a yearning to rise above their immediate situation and to become included within the light of G‑d. This state is described as ratzu. This allows for the possibility for nurture to be derived by the external forces because there is no downward influence of holiness directed toward worldly involvement. To give an example of this on the personal level: After a person feels tremendously inspired in prayer, the energy he feels may be expressed in anger directed at another person.

What is necessary? To develop equilibrium with such feelings of ratzu, it is necessary to put a stress on shuv, involvement in the world. This is characterized by bittul. The yearning for G‑dliness has an element of yesh, self-concern, for in any love relationship, the person expressing love feels his personal identity. Conversely, in the approach of shuv, one must be like a subject who is totally overwhelmed when in the presence of his master and who feels no self-importance whatsoever.

This bittul will find expression in various efforts to draw Divine light downward, thus fulfilling G‑d’s desire for a dwelling within the lower worlds. Thus, this thrust of shuv has the potential to draw down the “sublime lights” that are too transcendent to be enclothed in vessels to be revealed within this world.

The fusion of these two tendencies of ratzu and shuv comes about through the revelation of a light that transcends both qualities. This is reflected in the quality of Tiferes (beauty) which has the power to create a synthesis between Chessed (kindness) and Gevurah(might), because within it, is revealed a light which utterly transcendent in nature..

This process is reflected in the description of the purification of a leper as toras hametzora,“the law of the leper.” Seemingly, the verse should have stated taharas hametzora, “the purification process for the leper.” Why does it use the word toras? To indicate that, in a spiritual sense, the purification of a leper comes about through the Torah.

Torah study requires bittul, as implied by fusion of the phrases in our prayers, “My soul will be as dust to all. Open my heart in Your Torah.” It is Bittul that makes one an appropriate recipient for the Torah.

The Torah is associated with the attribute of Tiferes as our Sages declared, “Tiferes is the giving of the Torah.” Thus, the Torah has the potential to unite the two thrusts of ratzu and shuv and hence, cause the sublime lights to be drawn down and revealed within the vessels of this world.6 This revelation, in turn, prevents the external forces from deriving nurture.

Based on the above, we can consider leprosy an analogy for exile and the purification from this impurity as an analogy for the redemption. Exile is characterized by the concealment of G‑dly light. This darkness, however, has its source in sublime lights which are too transcendent to be revealed within this material world. Since the source of this darkness is so high, it affects only the lower and more superficial elements of our existence.

This conception also leads to another idea: Our efforts to refine the world in the time of exile do not involve the introduction of a totally new idea, but rather the revelation of the true nature of the exile itself. Therefore, the exile need not be nullified entirely, but rather transformed into redemption.

This concept is revealed in the relationship between the Hebrew words for exile and redemption, golah (גולה) and geulah (גאולה). The difference between these two words is one letter, the Alef, which stands for G‑d, Alufo Shel Olam (“L‑rd of the world”). Through our service in the present era, we can reveal the sublime G‑dly lights that are not revealed in the time of exile.

In particular, this is brought about through service that is characterized by bittul and mesirus nefesh. These qualities bring the yechidah of the Jewish soul into expression and thus, lead to the expression of the Divine level of Yochid (“One”) which brings about the fusion of ratzu and shuv and thus causes the sublime Divine lights to be revealed within the vessels of this world.

Based on the above explanation, we can understand the sequence in the two portions that are read this week. As a preface to the concept of leprosy described in both parshiyos, the Torah speaks of a woman giving birth which is an analogy of how our service at present can lead to the redemption. In continuation, the Torah reading mentions leprosy the exile, for in truth the exile relates to sublime G‑dly heights which ultimately will be revealed in this world in the Era of the Redemption.

Afterwards, Parshas Metzora whose very name alludes to exile begins with the description of the leper’s purification process, the revelation of the true nature of the exile.7 This is further emphasized by the fact that Mashiach is called a leper and is described by our Sages as living among lepers.

This teaches us that Mashiach also exists in the world in the midst of the exile.8 He is also in exile and he waits anxiously to become revealed and to proceed to redeem the Jewish people.

* * *

2. This week, we study the second chapter of Pirkei Avos. The first teaching of that chapter states:

Rebbi said: Which is the right path that a man (adom) should choose for himself? That which is honorable (tiferes) to himself and brings him honor (tiferes) from man.

There are several difficulties which are raised by this teaching: a) The very question “Which is the right path?” is problematic. Can there be a right path other than the path of the Torah and its mitzvos. b) Why does the Mishnah use the term adom which, as mentioned above, refers to a person whose service of G‑d is complete? c) What is the connection between this statement and its author, Rebbi? And why does the Mishnah refer to him in this manner and not by name, Rabbi Yehudah HaNasi?

These questions can be answered within the context of the concepts explained above regarding Mashiach’s coming: In Rebbi’s generation, his colleagues said: “If Mashiach is among those alive today, he is surely our holy teacher [i.e., Rebbi] for he suffers physical afflictions and is the epitome of piety.” Therefore, Rebbi speaks about an adom, a person who like himself has reached a perfect level of fulfillment and therefore has to elevate only the superficial elements of his being and yet suffers the pains of exile.

It must be emphasized that, at present, since we — as the final generation of the exile — have already completed all elements of service demanded of us by G‑d, every Jew in this generation is on the level of adom.

And the question is: Since we have completed everything demanded of us, “What is the right — i.e., the most direct and most effective — path” to bring about the actual coming of Mashiach?

The answer brings out the advantage of the quality of Tiferes, which, as explained above, has the ability to fuse together the two thrusts of ratzu and shuv. Conduct in this manner has the potential to hasten the coming of Mashiach for Mashiach will serve two functions, king (as he is called Melech HaMashiach) and teacher (for he will teach the Torah to the entire people), which represents a similar fusion of two opposite tendencies.

To explain: Our relationship to a king depends on the quality of Kabbalas Ol, i.e., a person goes beyond himself and nullifies himself to the king’s authority. In contrast, teaching implies the establishment of an internal bond.9 Thus, the fusion of these two qualities parallels drawing down transcendent G‑dly light into revelation within our limited world.

* * *

3. The above concepts can be associated with the present month, the month of Iyar. In contrast to the month of Nissan which is associated with redemption and revelation from above, Iyar represents man’s contribution, the advantage achieved through service on this plane. Thus, the relationship between these two months also relates to the concept of drawing down transcendent G‑dly light into revelation within our limited world.

The fusion between these two months is established through the second of Iyar, Tiferes sheb’Tiferes, the birthday of the Rebbe Maharash.10 This allows for the revelations associated with Nissan, the month of redemption to be drawn into the world through our service.

Iyar (אייר) is an acronym for the names, Avraham, Yitzchok, Yaakov, and Rachel. The three Patriarchs represent the three vectors of the Sefiros and Rachel represents the vessels which receive this Divine light. Thus, this constitutes a further parallel to the concept described above.

Rachel is also remembered for her mourning over the Jewish people having been sent to exile. G‑d promises her that “there will be a reward for your efforts,” and that ultimately, “the children will return to their borders,” i.e., the redemption will come.

4. There is also a connection between the above concepts and the Sefirah which was counted last night, Malchus sheb’Tiferes (kingship within beauty). In general, the Counting of the Omer is intended to refine our souls (“May it rectify our nefeshruach, and neshamah) and the world at large (“May abundant influence be bestowed upon all the worlds”). Ultimately, it will also bring about the redemption as reflected in the prayer “May the Merciful One restore the Beis HaMikdash.”

This year, there is a unique dimension to the Counting of the Omer, because Pesach was celebrated on Shabbos. Therefore, each week, the Counting of the Omer begins Saturday night and concludes on Shabbos. Thus, each week Shabbos is associated with the Sefirahof Malchus as manifest within each of the Sefiros (e.g., Malchus sheb’Chesed, Malchus sheb’Gevurah, etc.). There is an interrelationship between the two concepts. Shabbos reflects in microcosm, “the era which will be all Shabbos and rest for eternity,” the Era of the Redemption. Similarly, in this era, we will see the ultimate expression of Malchus; Mashiach will restore the Jewish monarchy. Through his activities, G‑d’s Kingship will be established throughout the world, “And G‑d will be king over the entire earth.”

Our Sages state: “The king’s word can uproot a mountain.” Even the strongest elements of existence, mountains, cannot oppose a king. To explain this concept on a deeper level: It is impossible for any person or entity in a country to oppose a king. The life-energy of the entire nation derives from the king and no entity can stand in opposition to its own source. Similarly, in regard to the ultimate kingship, the sovereignty of Mashiach. Mashiach is the essence of all existence as our Sages state, “The world was created solely... for Mashiach.” Therefore, there can be no real opposition to the revelation of Mashiach and the redemption. On the contrary, the redemption will reveal the genuine existence of every entity within the world.

At this farbrengen, the Rebbe Shlita called for active efforts to bring about the coming of Mashiach by: a) increasing our study of Torah, and in particular, studying about the redemption and Mashiach, and b) enhancing our performance of mitzvos behiddur, in a beautiful and conscientious manner, and in particular, increasing our gifts to tzedakah.

 

Parshas Shemini Machar Chodesh Iyar | 28 Nisan-5 Iyar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  APR 13th   
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:38pm /COUNT OMER № 14/

SHABBOS SAT MAR 24th 
Tehiliim for Mevarchim Iyar  8 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:45 am/
Mincha 7:38 pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 1
Maariv/Havdalah 8:39 pm  /COUNT OMER № 15/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Gala Bar Mitzvah Kiddush Lunch is sponsored by Mike and Lesley Weichbrodt in honor of the Bar Mitzvah of their son Ya’akov. Mazel Tov! Seuda Slishit.

Weekday Services 
Sun Shacharis: 9 am /ROSH CHODESH IYAR
Mon Sharcharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH IYAR
Tue- Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 7:50 pm, followed by Maariv c. 8:35 pm /COUNT OMER № 16-20/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Please help CSTL make our April mortgage payment! You can drop a check by shul, or pay online at 
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting.org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm 
Thank you! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Mike and Lesley Weichbrodt, and grandparents Heinz and Karen Weichbrodt, Sally Weichbrodt, and James and Virginia Rogers OB”M on the Bar Mitzvah of their son Ya’akov.  May he grow to a life of Torah, Chupah, and Maasim Toviml!

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Yechezkel and Ora Rapoport on the birth of their new granddaughter to Rabbi Sadya and Shimona Davidoff..  May they raise her to Torah, Chupah, and Maasim Toviml!

FARBRENGEN ALERT – NISAN 29 – FRI APR 12th 6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the birth of Chaya Davidoff.  In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI ALTER LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

BCMH Men's Club Holocaust Memorial Breakfast Sun., Apr 15th 10:00 am
In the BCMH Volotin Social Hall. Sponsored by the family of Mel Wolf z"l. 

Yom Ha’atzmaut – Israel Independence Day – Wed Apr 18th 7:30 pm
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. 
www.minyanohrchadash.org

Yom Ha’atzmaut – Israel Independence Day – Thu Apr 19th 6:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth.  Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle NWIsraelFest Apr 8 – 22
www.JewishInSeattle.org ,

Ap"Disaster Preparedness" workshop at CSTL, Sun Apr 22nd from 10-11 am, 
Run through the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management. This is a great opportunity to prepare your family for any event as well as organize with your neighbors. The presentation provides an overview of the hazards that can impact Seattle, and steps that individuals and families can take to become more prepared to deal with them. This includes guidance on how to develop a disaster plan, build a disaster supply kit, and organize with your neighbors to become better prepared Please RSVP here:
https://tinyurl.com/CSTLDisasterPrep If you are interested in co-sponsoring or helping organize this event, please emailelizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

BCMH Chavrusa Learning Program, Sunday, April 15, 8:50 am
Given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash. Shiur to follow at 9:40 am.

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

NYHS Leadership Dinner, Sun Apr 29.. 
NYHS will honor Rabbi Rob Toren with the Jack De Leon Community Leadership Award. RSVP and/or place a tribute here or contact Melissa Rivkin at 
mrivkin@nyhs.org or 206-232-5272.

NYHS Gourmet Food & Dessert Auction, Wed May 16th 
At the home of Connie Kanter. Bid and buy items from our community chefs in support of NYHS. Free and open to all!  RSVP and to donate items, please contact us at 
nyhs@nyhs.org.

Seattle Kollel Partners in Torah Part II for Women April 29-May 16, 8-9 pm,
Contact Aliza Brand at 
alizabrand94@gmail.com, (773) 663-1512. More info: www.seattlekollel.com/partners-in-torah


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEMINI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507758/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shemini-29th-Day-of-Nissan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

On this Shabbos, we have read from Parshas Shemini for the eighth time. (This includes the readings on the Shabbos afternoons and on Mondays and Thursdays.) There is a common saying, Shemini Shemoneh Shemainoh, “When Parshas Shemini is read eight times, it will be a plentiful year” in both spiritual and material matters.

This enhances the unique nature of this year which is a year when “I will show you wonders,” i.e., a year filled with manifest Divine miracles which will serve as a preparation for the miracles that will accompany the Future Redemption when “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.” This is particularly true in the present month, the month of Nissan, a month associated with miracles of a truly wondrous nature.

There are several other unique factors associated with this Shabbos: a) It is the first Shabbos after the holiday of Pesach and thus it is on this Shabbos that we begin reading Pirkei Avos. b) It is the last Shabbos of the month of Nissan, and indeed, the day before Rosh Chodesh Iyar. c) Today also concludes as week of the Counting of the Omer. As mentioned,1 this year there is an added dimension of perfection within the Counting of the Omer, because each week, the week of the Omer begins on Saturday night and concludes on Shabbos.

These factors are all interconnected, and similarly, share a connection with the unique and wondrous dimension of the present year, a year when “I will show you wonders.”

To focus first on the expression “When Parshas Shemini is read eight times, it will be a plentiful year” in greater depth: On the surface, the question arises: Shemainoh — “plentiful” shares the same root as the word Shemini itself. If so, why is it that only when Shemini is read eight times (Shemoneh) will it be a plentiful year? Surely, Shemoneh, the eight times we read from the portion, contributes an added influence, but seemingly the reading of Shemini itself should be sufficient to bring about the influence of Shemainoh.

To explain: Shemini refers to the eighth day of the dedication of the Sanctuary, the day when the Divine Presence came to rest among the Jewish people. The potential for this is related to Shemini, “the eighth day.” The natural order is structured in cycles of seven,2thus corresponding to the seven Divine attributes described as middos. In contrast, eight is associated with the Divine light which transcends the natural order.

Thus, the service performed during the first seven days of the dedication of the Sanctuary was associated with the G‑dliness that manifests itself within the natural order. Hence, it was not sufficient to bring about the revelation of the Divine Presence. On the eighth day, this transcendent aspect of G‑dliness was revealed and came to rest within the Jewish people.

This represents the connection between eight and plenty. Eight refers to a beneficence that transcends the limits of the world and thus brings about plenty.

The ultimate intent, however, is that the light which transcends the natural order permeate that limited realm as well and come into revelation within the world itself, and furthermore, that the world as it exists within its own context, appreciate this revelation. This represents a fusion of two opposites, the revelation of transcendent G‑dliness within a world of limitation.

In particular, this concept is revealed in Moshe’s blessing to the Jewish people, “May the Divine Presence rest in the work of your hands;” i.e., the work of the Jew’s hands, their limited service, will become a vehicle for the revelation of G‑d’s infinite properties. From the Sanctuary, the revelation of this quality will spread throughout the world at large.

In an open and manifest manner, this fusion of the finite and the infinite was revealed in the ark.3 Although the ark had a specific width, two and half cubits, when the entire span of the Sanctuary was measured, “the space of the ark was not included in the measure.”

These concepts must be reflected in the service of each individual Jew. There are certain aspects of our service that are associated with boundaries and limitations and others that transcend limitation. Each reflects a particular positive quality. The service within the context of limitation is appropriate to our human personalities and, as such, makes it possible for them to internalize the revelation of G‑dliness.

The service that transcends revelation establishes a connection to those dimensions of G‑dliness which are also unlimited. Thus the ultimate state of service is the fusion of both these qualities, thus establishing a connection with G‑d’s infinite dimension, and simultaneously, allowing for that connection to be internalized with the limited sphere of our personalities and our material world.

Based on the above, we can explain why it is the influence of Shemoneh (“eight”) and not that of Shemini (“the eighth day”) which makes this year “plentiful” (Shemainoh). The difference “the eighth” and “eight” is that “the eighth” refers to a level distinct and separate from the levels which precede it. In contrast, eight refers to a sequence in which not only the number eight, but also the seven numbers which precede it are also counted.

As mentioned previously, eight refers to a transcendent dimension of G‑dliness. Thus, Shemini refers to this transcen­dent dimension as it stands in and of itself, above our material world. In contrast, Shemoneh indicates a bond between this infinity quality and the natural order which is structured in seven, the transcendent G‑dliness investing and manifesting itself within the limits of our world.

For this reason, the reading of Parshas Shemini alone does not bring about plenty for it refers to a level above the limits of our world. When, however, as in the present year, that portion is read is read eight times, this infinite quality is reflected within the nature of our world, bringing about plenty.

There is a further concept implied: The means in which the eighth quality, the transcendent dimension described above, is revealed is through the service with the seven limited qualities which precede it (one reaches eight after counting seven). When one completes the service within the context of limitation, one becomes capable of receiving higher revelations, including qualities which transcend revelation.

To refer to the example of the revelation of infinity mentioned above, that the place of the ark was not included in the measure of the Sanctuary’s span: When was it possible for this infinite quality to be revealed? When first the ark was fashioned according to its precise measure. Were it not to have been completed according to its precise instructions, the Divine Presence would not have rested upon it.4

Similarly, in regard to the reading of Parshas Shemini, the unique dimension expressed this year comes when we read from Parshas Shemini eight times: The first reading reveals the transcendent quality associated with Shemini, the second reading, a reinforcement of this quality, the third reading a chazakah5 which reveals a dimension of strength and permanence. The fourth reading is associated with the four legs of the Divine chariot which give it stability and balance, the fifth reading with “the fifth to Pharaoh,” which is interpreted by the Zohar as referring to a level where “all lights are revealed.” The sixth reading is associated with a repetition of the chazakah mentioned above, and also the completion of the world which was created in six days. The seventh reading is connected with Shabbos which infuses the dimension of rest into the world. And as mentioned above it is the eighth reading which fuses the infinite dimension of G‑dliness with the limitations of our material world.

* * *

2. The potential for the revelation of this transcendent quality within the limits of our material world is generated by Moshe and his prayer “May the pleasantness of G‑d be upon you,” which is interpreted to mean “May the Divine Presence rest in the work of your hands.”

In his own person, Moshe represents the fusion of finiteness and infinity and therefore, he has the potential to serve as “a medium which connects,” and thus bring infinite G‑dliness into revelation within our material world.6

This concept is reflected in the opening Mishnah of the first chapter of Pirkei Avos (which we begin reading this week), “Moshe received the Torah from Sinai and gave it over....” “G‑d and the Torah are one” and it is through the Torah that the Divine Presence rests among the Jewish people. Similarly, it is through the Torah that a Jew has the potential to reveal the transcendent level of G‑dliness within the world at large.

The expression “Moshe received the Torah from Sinai” is also significant, revealing the source for Moshe’s potential. Seemingly, the Mishnah should have said “Moshe received the Torah from G‑d.” Why does it mention Sinai? To teach us that just as Mount Sinai was chosen for the giving of the Torah because it was lower than all mountains, it is humility and bittul which make a person a fit recipient for the Torah. Moshe was the epitome of these qualities being “more humble than any man on the face of the earth.” Therefore, he was the one who received the Torah, and it was he who served as the medium for the revelation of transcendent G‑dliness within our limited world.

To elaborate on the conception of Moshe as representing the fusion of limitation and the levels of G‑dliness that transcend limitation: The name Moshe in Hebrew (van) can be interpreted as an acronym for the names, Moshe, Shammai, and Hillel, who represent the three vectors of Divine influence. Hillel represents the right vector which is characterized by the quality of Chessed (kindness) and thus the School of Hillel is renown for its lenient approach to Torah law. Shammai represents the left vector which is characterized by the quality of Gevurah (might) and thus the School of Shammai is renown for its stringent approach to Torah law. Moshe represents the middle vector which is associated with the quality of Tiferes (beauty) and which possesses an infinite dimension that can unite and harmonize the other two approaches.

The fusion of Chessed and Gevurah can be interpreted as a fusion of limitation and above limitation. Gevurah is associated with the process of contraction and the establishment of limitations. In contrast, Chessed represents influence from above which transcends the limits of the recipients.

Moshe’s potential to bring about this fusion of opposites comes from the fact that Moshe was “drawn out from the water,” i.e., the source for his soul was levels of Divine light that are too transcendent to be openly revealed within this world.7 Even as Moshe was “drawn out from the water,” and existed within this limited world, he possessed a connection to his transcendent source.

Moshe reflected the ultimate of bittul. Therefore, he was able to reveal the advantage possessed by the service of each of the two vectors and unite them together. This in turn brought about the revelation of the Divine Presence within the world.

Moshe endows the potential to carry out his service to every Jew, for every Jew possesses a spark of Moshe in his soul. Furthermore, this quality affects their service within the world at large. We see this pattern reflected at the construction of the Sanctuary. Moshe recited the prayer, “May the Divine Presence rest in the work of your hands,” and the Divine Presence was revealed. This caused the Jews “to offer praise and to fall on their faces,”8i.e., to express complete and utter bittul.

From Moshe’s generation, this potential was transferred from to all subsequent generations, granting them the potential to emulate Moshe’s acceptance of the Torah from Sinai, and thus establish a complete bond of unity with the G‑d through Torah study.

* * *

3. There is also a connection to the completion of the second week of the Counting of the Omer. The first week of the Omer is associated with the quality of Chessed (“kindness”) which characterizes the right vector. The second week is associated with Gevurah (“might”) which characterizes the left vector. Thus, these two weeks parallel the qualities represented by the Schools of Shammai and Hillel mentioned above.

Also, the counting of Malchus sheb’Gevurah (Kingship within might) on the present day is associated with the ultimate expression of kingship, the revelation of “And G‑d will rule forever and ever,” in the ultimate redemption when “the sovereignty will be the L‑rd’s.” Furthermore, this revelation will be overpowering in nature as appropriate for the attribute of might.

Although might is often associated with tzimtzum, the process of Divine self-limitation which brought about the existence of this material world, it also is associated with a powerful revelation of Divine power. Thus, the Resurrection of the Dead is associated with this quality. Furthermore, this overpowering revelation, the revelation of the redemption, will draw G‑dliness into even the aspects of the world that are characterized by concealment.9Since the revelation will permeate even these levels, there will be no further opportunity for exile. It will be a redemption that will not be followed by exile.

* * *

4. Today is also the day before Rosh Chodesh when we read the Haftorah which begins, “And Yonason told him (David), ‘Tomorrow is the new moon. And you will be brought to mind, because your place will be empty.’ ” The Hebrew words for “brought to mind” and “be empty” share the same root (sep).

This relationship is reflected in the pattern leading to the shining of the new moon. First the moon becomes concealed to the point where it does not shine at all and it is this concealment (“your place will be empty”) that leads to a renewal of the moon’s shining (“you will be brought to mind”).10

Similarly, the concealment of exile is the preparation for the shining of the redemption which is connected with King David’s descendant, the Mashiach. Also, the root sep is associated with redemption for it was the sign that Yaakov and Yosef gave the Jewish people that the redemption would come (פקוד יפקודBereishis 50:24-25. Thus, it also shares a connection to the ultimate redemption, for “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

5. All the above emphasizes how the ultimate redemption should come immediately, particularly in this present year, a year when “I will show you wonders.” Even though we are in the darkness of exile, that very fact, the fact that our place at G‑d’s table in the Beis HaMikdash is empty, should cause G‑d to bring us to mind and devote His attention to redeeming us.

Furthermore, our service carried out within the darkness and concealment of the exile has the potential to bring about the redemption. This pattern parallels our Sages’ comment, “Whoever observes the Torah in a state of poverty will ultimately merit to observe it in a state of wealth.” Through service in the poverty of exile, we will merit to serve G‑d with the wealth of the redemption.

The intent is not, heaven forbid, that we must carry out our service in actual poverty. Whatever was necessary on that account was fulfilled in the previous generations. Instead, as our Sages explained that the true sense of poverty is a lack of knowledge, and we are lacking the ultimate knowledge that will be revealed in the Era of Redemption. In a material sense, however, we have been granted wealth, and we can study Torah and observe its mitzvos in prosperity. Moreover, we have also been granted a glimmer of the spiritual wealth of the Era of Redemption as reflected in the printing of many Torah texts that were unavailable until now.

Therefore it is incumbent on every Jew to work to bring the ultimate redemption. A person cannot complain: “I’m limited in my capacities and, furthermore, must devote much of my time to physical activities within this world. I barely have enough energy to carry out a service which is limited in scope. Surely, I’m unable to carry out a service as great as bringing Mashiach.”

Even such a person must be brought to realize that Mashiach’s coming is dependent on the Jews’ service and on every Jew’s service. And if Mashiach has not come as of yet, this is a clear indication that his coming depends on the service of our generation. Through our service within the limitations and the concealment of this exile, we can tap great energies which have the potential to bring about the redemption. Moreover, the Rambam writes that with every single mitzvah that a Jew performs, he has the potential “to bring about salvation for himself and for the entire world.”

Each Jew has been given the power to carry out this service, and to do so in a perfect manner. Not only can he help another person in their efforts, but rather he can carry out this service himself and thus become a full partner with G‑d in the work of creation.

Each Jew’s soul is “a part of G‑d from above,” and thus his service has the potential to have untold effects. This is particularly true in the present year, a year when “I will show you wonders.” “I” refers to G‑d and when G‑d shows wonders, everything is revealed. We see miracles which transcend the natural order and miracles that are enclothed within the natural order as we have seen in the last months, beginning with the month of Adar.

This pattern continued in the month of Nissan, a month associated with miracles of a truly miraculous nature and will surely continue in the month of Iyar whose name serves as an acronym for the names, Avraham, Yitzchak, Yaakov, and Rachel who represented the four “legs” of the Heavenly Chariot; alternatively, for the Hebrew words of the verse, “I am G‑d, your healer.”11 In particular, this is heightened by the reading from Parshas Shemini eight times, for eight shares an intrinsic relationship with the Era of Redemption.

The power for us to carry out this service is generated by the extension of Moshe in our generation, the Previous Rebbe. In particular, the potential is revealed here in this building which served the Previous Rebbe — and continues to serve — as a place of prayer, a place of study, and a place of deeds of kindness. From here, influence will spread throughout the world, even to those corners of the world which are furthest removed — both geographically and ideologically — from this place and it will be revealed how “My house will be called a house of prayer for all the nations.”

This will be realized in the Era of Redemption, after the ingathering of the exiles. Indeed, we are already seeing a reflection of this in the ingathering of the exiles we have seen in the last years, which allowed many Jews from Russia to emigrate to Eretz Yisrael. In previous years, there were obstacles and quotas impeding such emigration, but now, they are being given permission to leave without any hindrances. This is surely one of the revelations of a transcendent nature which will come in the end of the era of exile.

To conclude in simple terms: Every Jew, man, woman, and child has an individual responsibility to add to his service with the intent of bring about the actual coming of Mashiach. One should not try to shift the burden of responsibility to others. Rather, each person should recognize his individual responsibil­ity.

This service must involve an increase in the study of the Torah, both Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah and an increase in the performance of mitzvos behiddur, i.e., in a beautiful and conscientious manner. In particular, this should involve attention to the custom of studying Pirkei Avos Shabbos afternoon between the holidays of Pesach and Shavuos and throughout the entire summer.

In addition to making such increases oneself, one should also influence others to make similar increases. And all of this should be suffused with yearning for and expectation of Mashiach’s coming.

May our resolutions to involve ourselves in these activities be successful and bring about the coming of the ultimate redemption when “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

Shevii Shel Pesach | 20-28 Nissan, 5778

Erev Shevi’i Shel Pesach, Thu Apr 5th 
Shacharis: 7  am
Mincha/Candles  7:27 pm /ERUV TAVSHILIN/
Maariv 8:17 pm /COUNT OMER #6/
 It is customary to remain awake on the eve of the Seventh of Passover (i.e., tonight) and spend the entire night in Torah study and joyous celebration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea. (
www.chabad.org)

Shevi’i Shel Pesach, Fri Apr 6th 
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m.
Mincha 6:30 PM /Special Time - FOLLOWED BY KINUS TORAH/
Candles & Yartzeit Candles after 8:30 pm from existing flame
Maariv 8:18 /COUNT OMER #7/

Shabbos/Acharon Shel Pesach, Sat Apr 7th 
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m /YIZKOR/
Mincha  6:30 pm followed by MOSHIACH SEUDA
Maariv/Havdalah 8:28 pm /COUNT OMER #8/
Chametz repurchased 9:00 pm

Weekday Services Sun – Thu
Shacharis Sun 9 am
Shacharis Mon-Fri 7 am
Mincha Sun – Thu 7:40 pm
Maariv and Sefira Sun-Thu ≅8:27 pm /COUNT #9-13/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Take time out from your busy cleaning schedule to please pay your dues and pledges to CSTL! Your payments will be greatly appreciated, especially in light of our need to make our April mortgage payment! You can drop a check by shul, or pay online at 
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting.org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm and Thank you! Wishing you a Happy and Kosher Pesach! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

SAVE THE DATE – SHABBOS SHEMINI – APR 14th 
The Weichbrodt family invites you to join them in the celebration of Jacob’s Bar Mitzvah.  Shabbos Shemini, Apr 14th at CSTL Mazel Tov Mazel Tov!

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
There will be babysitting for Tot Groups (ages 0-5) over Pesach from 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM on both days of Yom Tom, April 6 and 7. Children 2 or under should be accompanied by an adult. Please check in on children who are not potty trained. There will be some snacks and water provided, but please bring other kosher for pesach snacks and drinks for your children. Info: Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon /NOT DURING PESACH/
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM /NOT DURING PESACH/
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Regular Sundays following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

PLEASE DO NOT DROP OFF YOUR SHAIMIS AT CSTL
Thank you for your cooperation.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

"Disaster Preparedness" Workshop Sun Apr 22nd 
Run through the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management.A great opportunity to prepare your family for any event as well as organize with your neighbors. If you are interested in co-sponsoring or helping organize this program, please email Liz Roth-Jacobovitz:
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Community Trip to Israel. Apr 29th -May 8th 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info:
www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip,taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun Apr 8th 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth 
www.EzraBessaroth.net


SICHO FOR ACHARON SHEL PESACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2419964/jewish/Moshiachs-Seudah.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

Acharon Shel Pesach, the last day of Pesach, has a special connection to the coming of Moshiach and is celebrated accordingly, by partaking of Moshiach’s seudah.

The last day of Pesach is celebrated by eating a special, festive banquet called Moshiach’s seudah,1 a custom initiated by the Baal Shem Tov..2 The connection between the last day of Pesach and Moshiach is explained by the Tzemach Tzedek:3 “The last day of Pesach is the conclusion of that which began on the first night of Pesach. The first night of Pesach is our festival commemorating our redemption from Egypt by the Holy One, Blessed be He. It was the first redemption, carried out through Moshe Rabbeinu, who was the first redeemer; it was the beginning. The last day of Pesach is our festival commemorating the final redemption, when the Holy One, Blessed be He, will redeem us from the last exile through our righteous Moshiach, who is the final redeemer. The first day of Pesach is Moshe Rabbeinu’s festival; the last day of Pesach is Moshiach’s festival.”

Pesach is the festival which celebrates freedom. The first day celebrates the redemption from the first exile; the last day celebrates the future redemption from the final exile. The two are intimately connected, the beginning and end of one process,4 with G‑d in the future redemption showing wonders “as in the days of your exodus from Egypt..”5

Gatherer of all the camps

That Moshiach’s festival is celebrated specifically on the last day of Pesach is not merely because Moshiach will redeem us from the last exile. Being last has a significance beyond mere numerical order, for that which is last performs a unique function. When the Jews journeyed in the desert after leaving Egypt, they marched in a specific order, divided into four camps. The last to march was the camp of Don, which is described by Torah as “ma’asaf l’chol hamachanos” — “gatherer of all the camps.”6 Rashi explains this as meaning that “The tribe of Don...would journey last, and whoever would lose anything, it would restore it to him.”

The concept of “gatherer of all the camps” — restoring lost property and making sure that nothing is missing — may be applied to various situations.. The Baal Shem Tov, for example, taught7 that just as the Jews in the desert made forty-two journeys before they reached their final destination, Eretz Yisroel, so there are forty-two journeys in each Jew’s individual life. The birth of a person corresponds to the initial journey when the Jews left the land of Egypt,8 and at each stage of life a Jew is somewhere in the middle of one of the forty-two journeys he must experience before he enters the next world.9

Not only a person’s entire life, but also every individual service to G‑d has various stages or “journeys.” In particular, the conclusion of a specific service acts as the “gatherer of all the camps” — to make sure that nothing is missing from that service. Pesach, it was noted earlier, is associated with the concept of redemption, and our service on Pesach is correspondingly directed towards hastening the arrival of the final redemption. But even if service on Pesach was deficient, if opportunities were missed, not all is lost: the last day of Pesach acts as “gatherer of all the camps” for the entire festival. Just as the tribe of Don restored lost articles to their owners, so the last day of Pesach provides a Jew with the opportunity to rectify omissions in the service of Pesach, and thereby regain what is rightfully his.

Because Pesach is associated with the redemption through Moshiach and the last day of Pesach is the finish to and completion of Pesach, the last day of Pesach accordingly emphasizes the coming of Moshiach.

Last generation of exile

We can go further. The notion of “gatherer of all the camps” applies not only to each individual Jew’s life and service, but also to Jewry in general. The forty-two journeys between leaving Egypt and entering Eretz Yisroel took place in the desert, the “wilderness of the nations,”10 which is an allusion to the period of exile when Jews sojourn amongst the nations of the earth.11 The forty-two journeys in the desert served as the means wherewith Jews left the limitations of Egypt.12 Thus all the journeys undertaken until the Jews actually entered Eretz Yisroel may be viewed as part of the exodus from Egypt. So too with the journeys in the exile: until Jews merit the final redemption, they are still journeying to reach Eretz Yisroel. In every generation, Jews are somewhere in the middle of one of those forty-two journeys.

As in the journeys in the desert, there is a “gatherer of all the camps” in the generations-long journey of Jews to the Messianic Era. Our present generation is that of “the footsteps of Moshiach,” the last generation of exile. It is the “gatherer of all the camps” of all generations of Jews.

That this generation of exile is the “gatherer of all the camps” of all generations is not just because it is the last. Exile is not just punishment for sin.13 The mission of Jews is to elevate and refine this corporeal world, to reveal G‑dliness and to transform the physical into a dwelling place for G‑d. Dispersed throughout the world in exile, Jews have been given the opportunity and the means to carry out this mission in all parts of the world.

This has been the Jews’ task throughout their history. “Gatherer of all the camps” in this context means that if any portion of that task is missing, it now can be rectified.14 Thus the era of “gatherer of all the camps” is the era when the world will have been fully refined and G‑dliness revealed: the Era of Moshiach.

It is for this reason that it is our generation which is that of “the footsteps of Moshiach” and “gatherer of all the camps.” For the service of Jews throughout the generations has been all but completed, and only the finishing touches — “gatherer of all the camps” — is needed. We stand ready and prepared to greet Moshiach.

Moshiach, of course, could have come in previous generations. The Talmud, for example, relates15 that at the destruction of the Beis HaMikdosh, a cow lowed twice. The first time meant that the Beis HaMikdosh was destroyed; the second time meant that Moshiach was born. In other words, the potential Moshiach was born immediately after the destruction and had the Jews merited it then, he would have been the actual Moshiach.

Although Moshiach could have come in previous generations, the future redemption nevertheless has a greater connection to our generation — just as the idea of Moshiach is emphasized on the last day of Pesach although the whole of Pesach is associated with the future redemption. For both are the concept of “gatherer of all the camps” and we accordingly celebrate Moshiach’s seudah specifically on the last day of Pesach.

Eighth day of circumcision

There is still more to the connection between the last day of Pesach and Moshiach.. The prophet Yechezkel describes the exodus from Egypt — which took place on the first day of Pesach — as the birth of the Jewish nation.16 The last day of Pesach, the eighth day, is therefore the day of the circumcision, which is “the beginning of the entry of the holy soul.”17 Moshiach is the yechidah18 — the most sublime level of the soul — of the Jewish people. Until the body of Jewry has undergone circumcision it is not whole; its holy soul is missing. Moreover, the Alter Rebbe writes, the highest level of circumcision will take place in the future, when “The L‑rd will circumcise your heart.”19

The Haftorah read on the last day of Pesach is also connected with the Messianic Era. It states:20 “The wolf will lie down with the lamb...He will raise a banner for the return...the earth will be full of the knowledge of the L‑rd.” All of these verses refer to the Messianic Era.

Thus the relationship between the last day of Pesach and Moshiach. But why do we mark this relationship by eating a meal?

Belief in Moshiach is a cardinal tenet of the Jewish faith, enshrined as one of Rambam’sthirteen principles of belief:21 “I believe with perfect faith in the coming of Moshiach; and although he may tarry, I will wait for him every day that he shall come.” But abstract belief is not enough. Our intellectual awareness must be translated into concrete action — by eating of Moshiach’s seudah. Moreover, the food from Moshiach’s seudah becomes part of our flesh and blood, and our faith in, and yearning for Moshiach permeates not just the soul’s faculties but also the physical body.

Chassidus brings Moshiach

Moshiach’s seudah was initiated by the Baal Shem Tov, and there is good reason why it was by him specifically. In a famous letter to his brother in law, R. Gershon of Kitov, the Baal Shem Tov tells of the time he experienced an elevation of the soul to the highest spheres. When he came to the abode of Moshiach, he asked, “When will the Master come?” to which Moshiach replied, “When your wellsprings shall spread forth to the outside.”22 In other words, it is the Baal Shem Tov’s teachings — Chassidus — which will bring Moshiach, and it is therefore particularly appropriate that it was the Baal Shem Tov who initiated Moshiach’s seudah on the last day of Pesach.

In the time of the Baal Shem Tov, the principal element of the seudah was matzah. The Rebbe Rashab, fifth Rebbe of Chabad, added the custom of drinking four cups of wine.23Matzah is poor man’s bread, flat and tasteless. Wine, in contrast, not only possesses taste, but induces joy and delight, to the extent that our Sages say, “Shirah (song) is said only over wine.”24 Chabad Chassidus conveys the concepts of Chassidus, first propounded by the Baal Shem Tov, in an intellectual framework, enabling them to be understood by a person’s Chochmah (wisdom), Binah (knowledge), and Da’as (understanding) — ChaBaD. And when a person understands something — in this case the concepts of Chassidus — he enjoys it that much more. Chabad, in other words, introduced “taste” and “delight” into Chassidic doctrines, which until then were accepted primarily on faith alone.25

The four cups of wine also allude to the Messianic Age, for which the dissemination of Chassidus — especially Chabad Chassidus — is the preparation.26 The four cups symbolize:

— the four expression of redemption.27

— the four cups of retribution G‑d will force the nations of the world to drink.27

— the four cups of comfort G‑d will bestow upon the Jews.27

— the four letters of G‑d’s Name which will be revealed.28

— the four general levels of repentance.29

Sichah, Acharon Shel Pesach, 5742

Pesach | 14-22 Nissan, 5778

Erev-Erev Pesach, Thu Mar 29th 
Shacharit 7 am
Mincha/Maariv 7:20 pm 
Bedikat Chametz (search for chametz) after 8:06 pm          

Erev Pesach, Fri Mar 30th 
Fast of First Born Begins 5:17 am
Shacharit 7:00 am / Siyum Bechorot 
Last time to eat chametz  11:06 am
Last time to burn chametz (biur chametz) 12:10 pm
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:18 pm
Start Seder after: 8:08pm
Finish Eating: before hatzot 1:14 am

Shabbos/Pesach Day 1, Sat Mar 31st 
Shacharis 9:30 am /Latest Shema 10:01 pm/
Mincha 7:18 pm
Maariv/ Sefira  8:18 pm /COUNT #1/
Candles (from existing flame after)/Seder Prep should not start before 8:18 pm
Start Seder after: 8:18 pm
Finish Eating: before hatzot 1:14 am

Pesach Day 2, Sun Apr 1st 
Shacharis 9:30 am
Mincha: 7:25 pm
Maariv/Havdala/Sefira 8:19 pm /COUNT #2/

Chol haMoed Pesach, Mon-Wed Apr 2nd – 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha 7:30 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:15 pm /COUNT #3-5/
It is customary to remain awake on the eve of the Seventh of Passover (i.e., tonight) and spend the entire night in Torah study and joyous celebration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea. (
www.chabad.org)

Erev Shevi’i Shel Pesach, Thu Apr 5th 
Shacharis: 7  am
Mincha/Candles  7:27 pm 
Maariv 8:17 pm /COUNT OMER #6/

Shevi’i Shel Pesach, Fri Apr 6th 
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m.
Mincha 6:30 PM /Special Time - FOLLOWED BY KINUS TORAH/
Candles & Yartzeit Candles after 8:30 pm from existing flame
Maariv 8:18 /COUNT OMER #7/

Shabbos/Acharon Shel Pesach, Sat Apr 7th 
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m /YIZKOR/
Mincha  6:30 pm followed by MOSHIACH SEUDA
Maariv/Havdalah 8:28 pm /COUNT OMER #8/
Chametz repurchased 9:00 pm

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Take time out from your busy cleaning schedule to please pay your dues and pledges to CSTL! Your payments will be greatly appreciated, especially in light of our need to make our April mortgage payment! You can drop a check by shul, or pay online at
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting.org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm and Thank you! Wishing you a Happy and Kosher Pesach! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Rabbi and Mrs Mendy on the bar mitzvah of their son Shmueli. May they merit to grow in Torah, Mitzvot, and Maasim Tovim.

SAVE THE DATE – SHABBOS SHEMINI – APR 14th 
The Weichbrodt family invites you to join them in the celebration of Jacob’s Bar Mitzvah.  Shabbos Shemini, Apr 14th at CSTL  Mazel Tov Mazel Tov!

PUBLIC SEDERS AT CHABAD HOUSE MINYAN– FRI MAR 30thand SAT MAR 31st at 8 pm
4541 19th Ave NE.  Featuring an inspiring Hagadah, Matzah, Wine/Grape Juice, Chrain, Charoses, and a delicious seder meal!  
https://www.facebook.com/chabadhouseminyan/

MA'OT HITTIM CHARITY FOR PESACH 
Donate online 
www.CSTLSeattle.org, with Notation “Maot Hittim”, or mail you checks to CSTL, 6250 43rd Ave NE, Seattle WA 98115.  Contract Jonathan Greene for more info, j.i.greene625@gmail.com

SELL YOUR HAMETZ BEFORE 9 AM THU MORNING MAR 29thwww.chabad.org/sellchametz

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI ALTER LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
There will be babysitting for Tot Groups (ages 0-5) over Pesach from 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM. On the first days, there will be babysitting on Sunday, April 1. (NOT Sat March 31) On the second days, there will be be babysitting on both days, April 6 and 7. Children 2 or under should be accompanied by an adult. Please check in on children who are not potty trained. There will be some snacks and water provided, but please bring other kosher for pesach snacks and drinks for your children. This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon /NOT DURING PESACH/
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM /NOT DURING PESACH/
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

PLEASE DO NOT DROP OFF YOUR SHAIMIS AT CSTL
Thank you for your cooperation.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mercaz Pre-Pesach Dinner  Thu Mar 29th 5-7 PM/THE NIGHT OF BEDIKAT CHAMETZ
After all your cleaning and prep, take a break and enjoy a delicious meal! - great food for adults and for kids!  Eat and run, stay and enjoy with friends, or take it to go! 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/pre-pesach-dinner.html

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
 However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier AVE S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Community Trip to Israel. Apr 29th -May 8th 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info:
www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip,taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun Apr 8th 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth 
www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR YUD ALEPH NISAN
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507749/jewish/Yud-Alef-Nissan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. [The Chassidim conveyed a blessing upon the Rebbe Shlita which concluded with the Priestly Blessings. The Rebbe responded:] 

It is Jewish custom to begin at the conclusion of the previous statement. Thus, in continuation with the above blessings, the Torah conveys G‑d’s words of assurance, “I will bless them..” The blessings that emanate from G‑d’s “full, open, holy, and ample hand,” are limitless in nature. They are not restricted by time or space, and will be drawn down immediately.

These blessings are associated with the conclusion of Psalm 90, the first of the 11 Psalms recited by Moshe our teacher. That Psalm concludes, “May the pleasantness of G‑d, our L‑rd, be upon us. Establish for us the work of our hands, establish the work of our hands.”1

All the qualities of Moshe are relevant to every Jew for every Jew possesses a spark of Moshe in his heart.2 Therefore, this Psalm, “a prayer of Moshe,” can bring him all possible blessings. This is particularly true after forty years have passed and we have been granted, “eyes to see, ears to hear, and a knowing heart.”

The repetition of the request, “Establish for us the work of our hands,” can refer to our activities during the week and to our activities on Shabbos3 which are different in nature and hence require a different request. The Shabbos can be considered as miraculous when compared to the days of the week. Thus we are requesting that G‑d also “establish for us” a miraculous framework of conduct.

G‑d will show the Jews open miracles. Although we have seen the beginning of this process, we can be assured that G‑d will amplify and intensify these wonders. Each Jew will see open miracles in his own personal life. This will begin by the conduct of every Jew being elevated to a miraculous plane, causing him to step beyond even the upraised level of conduct appropriate to 5750 (הי' תהא שנת נסים) “a year of miracles,” and to behave in a manner appropriate to the message of the present year, “I will show you wonders.” This implies a twofold increase because wonders are higher than miracles, and also these wonders will be “shown,” openly revealed.

The word “establish” has a connection to the concept of a foundation and thus relates to the beginning of the Rambam’s classic text Mishneh Torah, “The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of all knowledge....”4 Through the study of the Rambam’s text we will bring close the Redemption,5 and we will leave the exile with happiness, health, and good spirits.

This will be enhanced and hurried by our efforts to make the world into a vessel for G‑dliness, carrying out this shlichus in every element of our existence in this lowly material world. This is reflected in the fact that shliach (שליח), plus ten (the ten powers of our soul), is numerically equivalent to Mashiach (משיח). 

May speaking about these concepts lead to their being reflected in deed. May we openly see how “the Divine Presence will rest in the works of your hands”6 and may the Divine Presence dwell among us in a permanent and fixed manner.

Since “He fulfills the desire of those who fear Him,” and “You open Your hand and satisfy the desire of every living being,” G‑d will surely fulfill the desire of every Jew. That desire is expressed at the conclusion of the Book of Psalms, “Let every being that has a soul praise G‑d.” Each Jew has a soul which is “a part of G‑d from above” and thus, wherever a Jew is, he can“praise G‑d.” This activity, especially when it comes on the initiative of the person himself (and not as “bread of shame”) will hasten Mashiach’s coming.

This is related to the tribe of Asher whose Nasi is associated with the present day.. In regard to Asher, the Torah states, “He will grant the delicacies of the king.” Implied is also that, at present, in the conclusion of the exile, each Jew will be granted “the delicacies of the king.”7

This is connected with the fact that “All your sons are students of G‑d.” The Previous Rebbe (in the wedding maamarim) explains that this verse refers to every Jew. As the Baal Shem Tov explains, G‑d cherishes each Jew as parents cherish a child born to them in their old age.8 This should be reflected in an increase in Torah study (and in particularly, an increase in the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah) and indeed, a miraculous and wondrous increase as appropriate for a year when “I will show you wonders.”

The use of the phrase Arenu Niflaos (אראנו נפלאות) as an acronym for the year reflects the contributions of the Jewish people. The usual form of 5751 (הי' תהא שנת נפלאות אראנו) places the nun before the alef, niflaos arenu, implying that first the wonders will take place, and then, they will be revealed. Through their service, the Jews cause that the nature of these wonders be revealed from the outset. These wonders will be shown to each individual in his personal life. G‑d will point with His finger, as it were, and show each individual the open and revealed miracles which are happening to him, and show him how G‑d cherishes him as parents cherish an only son born to them in their old age.

May speaking about these wonders lead to the immediate coming of the Redemption when “Your eyes will behold Your Master;” G‑d will reveal Himself to every Jew. Thus we will begin by “proceeding from strength to strength” now in the last days of exile. And immediately, we will merit to “appear before G‑d in Zion,” together with the entire Jewish people, “with our youth and with our elders... with our sons and with our daughters,” in Eretz Yisrael, and in “the Sanctuary of G‑d established9 by Your hands.”

Parshas Tzav Shabbos haGadol | 7-14 Nisan, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAR 23rd  
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:08 pm

SHABBOS SAT MAR 24th /NOTE LATER DST START TIME!/
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:09 am/
Mincha 6:30 pm /FOLLOWED BY SHABBOS haGADOL DRASHA/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:07 pm  

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
KITCHEN CLOSED FOR PESACH CLEANING. NO KIDDUSH / NO SEUDA SLISHIT IN SHUL

Weekday Services /RECITE THE NOSI DAILY/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 7:20 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 8:05 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Take time out from your busy cleaning schedule to please pay your dues and pledges to CSTL! Your payments will be greatly appreciated, especially in light of our need to make our April mortgage payment! You can drop a check by shul, or pay online at 
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting.org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm and Thank you! Wishing you a Happy and Kosher Pesach! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Gilad and Mihal Ehven on the engagement of their daughter Chaya Mushka to Avraham Simcha Teich. May they merit to build a bayis ne'eman b'Yisroel!

SAVE THE DATE – SHABBOS SHEMINI – APR 14th 
The Weichbrodt family invites you to join them in the celebration of Jacob’s Bar Mitzvah.  Shabbos Shemini, Apr 14th at CSTL  Mazel Tov Mazel Tov!

THE ANNUAL SHABBOS haGADOL DRASHA – SAT MAR 24thFOLLOWING 6:30 PM MINCHA
Featuring Rabbi Alter Levitin.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – NISAN 7th – FRI MAR 23rd 6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of Shabbos haGadol.  In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of  Laurie Boguch (Fratl Geitl bas Mishka z”l) , wife of Phil Boguch z"l. Laurie is survived by her daughter, Sharon Boguch.  Funeral services were held Sunday, February 11th at the Bikur Cholim Cemetery . May Hashem comfort the family amongst the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem

PUBLIC SEDER AT CHABAD HOUSE MINYAN– FRI MAR 30th and SAT MAR 31st at 8 pm
4541 19th Ave NE.  Featuring an inspiring Hagadah, Matzah, Wine/Grape Juice, Chrain, Charoses, and a delicious seder meal!  
https://www.facebook.com/chabadhouseminyan/

SAFETY OF CHILDREN AT CSTL – IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM CSTL BOARD
As a reminder children are not allowed to play outside the Shul. Parents please keep your children in the Kids Program or with their parents in Shul. The Board of CSTL and CSTL will not be responsible for children that are left unattended. Thank you for your cooperation.

MA'OT HITTIM CHARITY FOR PESACH 
Donate online 
www.CSTLSeattle.org, with Notation “Maot Hittim”, or mail you checks to CSTL, 6250 43rd Ave NE, Seattle WA 98115.  Contract Jonathan Greene for more info, j.i.greene625@gmail.com

SELL YOUR HAMETZ BEFORE 9 AM THU MORNING MAR 29thwww.chabad.org/sellchametz

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI ALTER LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

PLEASE DO NOT DROP OFF YOUR SHAIMIS AT CSTL
Thank you for your cooperation.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mercaz Pre-Pesach Dinner  Thu Mar 29th 5-7 PM/THE NIGHT OF BEDIKAT CHAMETZ
After all your cleaning and prep, take a break and enjoy a delicious meal! - great food for adults and for kids!  Eat and run, stay and enjoy with friends, or take it to go! 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud..com/event/pre-pesach-dinner.html

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
 However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier AVE S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Community Trip to Israel. Apr 29th -May 8th 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info:
www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-triptaryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun Apr 8th 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth 
www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR TZAV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507748/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tzav-8th-Day-of-Nissan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Nissan is called “the month of redemption,” because the entire month revolves around Pesach, “the season of our freedom.” Nissan (ניסן) is also connected with the concept of miracles, נס in Hebrew.1 The two concepts are interrelated, for it was with great miracles and wonders that G‑d took the Jews out of Egypt.

The connection with miracles receives greater emphasis this Shabbos which is called Shabbos HaGadol, “the Great Shabbos,” because of the great miracle which occurred then.

What was this miracle? As the Alter Rebbe relates in his Shulchan Aruch, the firstborn of Egypt learned that G‑d would slay all them and tried to convince Pharaoh to release the Jews. When he refused, they revolted against him as implied by the verse, “To strike Egypt with their firstborn....” This represented the beginning of the miracles of the redemption.2

We must understand: Why did our Sages attach so much im­portance to the miracle of “striking Egypt with their first­born”? Why is this considered as a great miracle and the beginning of the redemption?

Also, it is necessary to understand the association between this miracle and the Shabbos, i.e., it occurred on the Shabbos and is commemorated on the Shabbos.3

There is another significant dimension related to the above. The redemption from Egypt is associated with Moshe. He was the one chosen by G‑d to redeem the Jews from Egypt. When he requested that G‑d send another person instead, G‑d refused for it is Moshe who has the power to redeem the Jewish people.4

The purpose of the exodus from Egypt is for the Jewish people to appreciate G‑d’s providence as it is written, “And I will take you unto Me as a people... so that you will know that I, G‑d, your L‑rd, is He who took you out of the bondage of Egypt.” As the Jews exist within our material world, they should come to an awareness of G‑d and accept His commandments (i.e., the acceptance of the Torah) and through their service reveal G‑dliness in the world at large (as reflected in the construction of the Sanctuary).

The Sanctuary was, however, temporary in nature, and in a more permanent manner, this goal was realized in the Beis HaMikdash. The First and the Second Batei Mikdashos were destroyed. Thus, the ultimate vehicle for the revelation of G‑dliness in the world will be the Third Beis HaMikdash, which will be an eternal structure. Then, in the Era of Redemption, “the glory of G‑d will be revealed and all flesh will together see that the mouth of G‑d has spoken;” i.e., there will be an open revelation of G‑dliness which will be appreciated by all mankind.

Since the goal of the exodus was the revelation of G‑dliness, it was associated with miracles which broke the boundaries of nature. The Hebrew for “nature” is teva which also has the meaning “submerged,” i.e., the G‑dly power which is invested in the world is submerged within the natural order which obscures our appreciation of Him. Miracles, in contrast, break through the natural set and allow us to openly appreciate G‑d’s infinite power.

Witnessing these miracles endows the Jews with strength to leave Egypt, to go beyond the boundaries and limitations of worldly existence5 and thus, experience freedom. In the same manner, the future redemption will be characterized by miracles as it is written “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders,” wonders which will transcend the natural order entirely, and which will be greater than those that accompanied the exodus from Egypt. Furthermore, G‑d Himself will “show” us these wonders, revealing them openly... This is the first of the eleven Psalms which were authored by Moshe.

As mentioned, the potential for the redemption is associated with Moshe. The nature of Moshe’s influence and contribution to the Jewish people and to the world at large is expressed in the psalm, Chapter 90 of Tehillim, “A prayer of Moshe.”6 (There is a unique connection between this psalm and the present days as reflected in the custom, initiated by the Baal Shem Tov, to recite the psalm which corresponds to the years of one’s life each day.)

This psalm concludes, “May the pleasantness of G‑d, our L‑rd, be upon us; establish for us the work of our hands; establish the work of our hands.” Our sages interpret this as a prayer in connection with the construction of the Sanctuary in the desert, saying “May the Divine Presence rest in the work of your hands.” With this prayer, Moshe — and this was his unique contribution — established in a fixed manner, the dwelling of the Divine Presence among the Jewish people. The ultimate expression of this process of indwelling will be in the Era of Redemption, with the construction of the Third Beis HaMikdash, which will be an eternal structure.

To focus on the psalm in greater depth: The literary structure of repetition is employed both at the beginning, “A prayer of Moshe, the man of G‑d” and at its conclusion “establish for us the work of our hands; establish the work of our hands.”

This repetition is intrinsically related to the concept of establishing G‑d’s indwelling within the Jewish people in a permanent manner. For this, two qualities are necessary: a) One must have a power which is greater than the natural order that can infuse a revelation of G‑dliness into this world which is characterized by concealment. This involves changing the nature of the world as it were, making it into a vessel intended to receive G‑dliness, and indeed, to receive G‑dliness in a permanent manner.6 b) This power must descend to the extent that it can enclothe itself within the world (for the entity which refines another entity must be on its level). Only in this way, will it be able to transform the world into a vessel that can receive G‑dliness in a permanent manner.7

These two qualities are alluded to in the repetition of the beginning and conclusion of the above psalm, because both these qualities were present within Moshe. Moshe served as “an intermediary who connects,” binding the Jews to G‑d.

The two qualities that an intermediary must possess are reflected in the phrase “the man of G‑d.” Our Sages commented, “His upper half resembled G‑d; his lower half was like a man.” More particularly, however, it is the phrase “Moshe, the man of G‑d,” which brings out these two dimensions. The name for G‑d used in the above phrase is E-lohim (א-להים) which is numerically equivalent to the word hateva (הטבע), meaning “the nature”; i.e., E-lohim refers to the G‑dliness which brings the natural order into being.8 “The man of E-lohim” refers to a person who has been able to establish a oneness with this G‑dliness.. It does, however, represent a limitation, for one unites only with the G‑dliness that invests itself within nature and not with the essential G‑dliness that transcends the natural order which is represented by the name Havayah (י-ה-ו-ה).

In contrast, the name Moshe refers to a higher level. The Torah states that he was given this name because “I drew him from the water.” “The water” refers to the name Havayah,the level of Mah, the G‑dliness which transcends creation. Moshe’s soul had its source in these high levels of G‑dliness and from these levels, it was drawn into this world.9Furthermore, even as Moshe existed within this world, his soul was united with its source in the spiritual realms like fish who live in constant contact with their source of life.

Thus the phrase “Moshe, the man of G‑d,” represents the two qualities mentioned above: Moshe represents the connection with the levels of G‑dliness which transcend nature. Since this connection continued even as Moshe existed within this material world, he had the potential to reveal G‑dliness within the world and transform its nature in a permanent manner as explained above.

“The man of G‑d” emphasizes the other dimension, the connection with the world which allows G‑dliness to be drawn down within the world in an internalized manner, and thus allow for permanent change. Thus, the revelation of G‑dliness which is above nature can be drawn into the creation itself.

A similar concept is reflected in the conclusion of the psalm, “establish for us the work of our hands; establish the work of our hands.” The expression “for us” in the first phrase indicates that the revelation has its source in a level above our own. The second phrase, however, indicates that this level has become internalized within us to the extent that it is the work of our hands that is being established.10

Our Sages relate the concept of repetition to the redemption, and to the aspect of eternality within the redemption. Similarly, repetition is related to Shabbos11 for each Shabbos is twofold in nature, reflecting a rest from the difficulties of the world (which parallels the G‑dliness that is enclothed within nature) and the essential dimension of rest (the G‑dliness that transcends nature). The two are interconnected as our Sages comment on the psalm12“A psalm, a song for the Shabbos day,” “a song for the era which is all Shabbos and rest forever,” referring to the Era of Redemption where the concept of permanence and eternality (the contribution of Moshe13 ) will be given full expression.

In that era, “the pleasantness of G‑d, our L‑rd, will be upon us,” i.e., the essential pleasure will be revealed, and it will be “established for us the work of our hands.”

* * *

2. In this context, it is significant to dwell on the significance of the number ninety. Ninety is three times three times ten and thus represents a complete expression of the concept of chazakah, a threefold sequence associated with strength and permanence.

To explain: Ten represents a state of perfection (and thus the Era of Redemption is associated with the number ten); 30 (3x10), a chazakah of that perfect state and 90 (3x30), a chazakah of that chazakah, and thus the fullest possible expression of this concept.

Ninety is represented by the letter Tzadi. Based on the concept that all aspects of Torah should provide us with a lesson in the service of G‑d, we can also derive a concept from the name of this letter.

Tzadi means “my side” and thus can allude to the following idea: G‑d created the world with two sides: “This one opposite the other,” i.e., the side of holiness and its opposing forces; the good inclination on the right side and the evil inclination on the left side. Since “The Torah which Moshe commanded us is the inheritance of the congregation of Yaakov,” it can be understood that a Jew’s side is the side of Torah and mitzvos and he has no relation to the other side at all.

Nevertheless, since a Jew still has freedom of choice, the Torah and its mitzvos are called “my side” and not “my existence;” i.e., he has to use this potential and choose to identify with the Torah. The material nature of the world conceals G‑dliness and thus the possibility exists that a Jew will not appreciate the need to listen to the Torah’s directives.

What is the intent behind the creation of such circumstances? So that the Jew will transform the world, even those aspects that on the surface oppose the Torah and its mitzvos, and have the Torah internalized within it. The question then arises: How is it possible for a Jew to cause the Torah to be internalized within the world? He cannot be objective about the matter. On the contrary, he shares a connection with the Torah for the existence of the Torah depends on the Jewish people and the Torah was given only because of the Jewish people.

This question is also answered by the name tzadi, “my side,” i.e., as a Jew exists within this material world, he is standing to the side. His connection to the Torah and its mitzvosdoes not compel him to conduct himself accordingly. On the contrary, as mentioned above, he has free choice.

Ultimately, however, he will choose Torah and mitzvos, making them “my side.”14 And since this identification with the Torah comes about through his own free choice, he will have the potential to cause the Torah to be internalized within the world.

(Here we see a parallel to the concepts of “Moshe, the man of G‑d,” described above. Since a Jew has free choice, he is “a man,” i.e., he resembles mankind at large. However, since his soul has its source in the transcendent levels of G‑dliness as mentioned in regard to Moshe,15 he has the potential to draw G‑dliness down in a revealed manner within this world, making this world a dwelling for G‑d, and transforming his human potential so that it becomes “the man of G‑d.”)

A question, however, remains: The service of tzadi, drawing G‑dliness down into even the mundane and natural aspects of the world, should be complete, involving the transformation of every aspect of the world into a permanent dwelling for G‑d. This must involve also the opposite side, the potential which is by nature opposed to G‑dliness. How can these aspects of existence be transformed into a dwelling for G‑d?

The resolution of this difficulty is based on the concept that, frequently the letter Tzadi is called Tzaddik, adding a kuf (ק). A kuf resembles the letter hay (ה). They both are made up of three lines which correspond to the three realms of existence Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah, or our three means of expression, thought, speech and action.

More particularly, the top and right lines which are joined refer to the realms of Beriah and Yetzirah, or to thought and speech. Each of these pairs shares a close bond. The third line, which is separated by a gap, corresponds to the realm of Asiyah or to deed which are each separated from the pairs mentioned previously by a drastic difference.

Our Sages state that the world was created with a hay, which implies that there is a gap between the third line — i.e., our world — and the other two, the spiritual worlds above. This gap allows for concealment that calls for the service of tzadi, to make the Torah and its mitzvos one’s side.

From this level one proceeds to the service of kuf as it exists with the realm of holiness.16The left leg of the kuf extends below the line, indicating how one’s service must be extended to even the lowest levels. In this manner, one becomes G‑d’s partner in the work of creation, refining and elevating even the lowest levels of existence, and making them part of G‑d’s dwelling.

3. Based on the above, we can understand the uniqueness of Moshe and why it is he who was chosen as the redeemer of the Jewish people. Since Moshe was, as explained above, “the man of G‑d,” he had the potential to draw the revelation of the unlimited dimensions of G‑dliness into the world. This granted him the potential to take the Jews out of the limitations of exile, even the lowest limitations, the kelipah of Egypt.

Similarly, it is this potential which ultimately will lead to the era when “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders,” the revelation of miracles, not only miracles that are enclothed within nature, but miracles which transcend the limits of nature entirely. This will be a redemption that will not be followed by exile. The entire world will be permanently established as a dwelling for G‑d.

The above also enables us to understand the greatness of the miracle of “smiting Egypt with their firstborn..” The transformation of the firstborn of Egypt into a force which acted on behalf of the Jewish people represents an elevation of the lowest elements of existence (paralleling the service of the kuf mentioned previously). This, to a greater extent than the miracles which happened to the Jews themselves, revealed the infinite dimension of G‑dliness within the limits of our material world.

For this reason, this miracle is associated with Shabbos for Shabbos is associated with the redemption,17 “the day which is all Shabbos and rest for eternity.” Indeed, the commemoration of this miracle enhances the nature of Shabbos, making it Shabbos HaGadol, “the Great Shabbos.”18

There is also a connection between the above and this week’s parshah, Parshas Tzav. Our Sages explain that Tzav refers to “an encouragement effective immediately and for all time.” Here we see the eternal dimension mentioned above. Significantly, the verse relates how G‑d tells Moshe to command Aharon, who serves as the medium, to communicate to the entire Jewish people. Aharon is characterized by the qualities of “loving peace and pursuing peace, loving the creations and bring them close to the Torah.” The command given in the above verse “encourages” this service in a manner that is “effective immediately and for all time.”

The above is enhanced by the unique nature of the present year, a year when “I will show you wonders.” As we have seen in a clear and manifest wonder, it has been a wondrous year and we can be sure that these wonders will continue and include the greatest wonder, the coming of Mashiach as mentioned in the Yalkut Shimoni.

The miraculous nature of the present year should be reflected in the conduct of every Jew. Each one of us should increase his study of the Torah and fulfillment of mitzvos — behiddur in a manner that appears truly miraculous when compared to his previous efforts. There is a unique potential for this service granted by Moshe’s prayer, “May it be G‑d’s will that the Divine Presence rest in the work of your hands.”

Moshe grants each Jew the power to reveal the service of Tzaddik in his service — for “Your nation are all Tzaddikim.” This begins with the service of Tzadi, making the Torah “my side,” giving oneself over to the Torah to the point that there is no possibility for the existence of another side. Similarly, this approach must be communicated to others, spreading the study of the Torah and the performance of its mitzvos among Jews and spreading the observance of the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants to all mankind.

Here we see a unique working of Hashgachah Protis, (Divine Providence).19 The numerical equivalent of the name Tzadi (צדי) when spelled is 104. Here we see a direct connection to resolution 104 of the Senate which declared Yud-Alef Nissan as a national “Day of Education.”

The above activities should also involve an emphasis on providing each individual with his Pesach needs. One should not wait until the poor come asking. Instead, efforts should be made to discover who is needy beforehand and supply them with all that they require..

This leads to a second point. In this country, it is customary to arrange communal Sedorim.Generally, however, only one communal Seder is arranged and not two. It is important that all those who hold communal Sedorim should hold communal Sedorim for both nights.

Often, the reason while only one Seder is held is that there are not enough funds for two. If necessary, the first Seder should be held in a simpler manner to allow for a second Sederto be held. Furthermore, there is enough time that, if the proper efforts are made, enough funds can be raised to allow both Sedorim to be celebrated in the proper manner.

May we merit the ultimate fulfillment of the prayer of Moshe, “that the Divine Presence rest in the work of our hands” in the Third Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d, established by Your hands.”

Parshas Vayikra Rosh Chodesh Nisan | 29-6 Nisan Adar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAR 16th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 6:58 pm

SHABBOS SAT MAR 17th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:17 am/
Mincha 6:58 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 7:57 pm 

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush  Lite – No Sponsor. Final Kiddush before Pesach.  Please do not bring chametz to shul after this Shabbos. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services /RECITE THE NOSI DAILY/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 7:10 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:56 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – ADAR 29th – FRI MAR 16th  4PM
Please help us celebrate the birthday of Rabbi Shimon Emlen at an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen.  In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
With sadness and pain we inform you of the passing of Mrs. Fraida AndrusierOBM a longtime resident of Crown Heights. She was 69 years old. She was the daughter of Rabbi Binyomin Levitin OBM and the granddaughter of the legendary Chossid Rabbi Shmuel Levitin OBM. She is survived by her husband R’ Leibel Andrusier and their children Levi Andrusier (Columbus, OH), Dina Tashbook (S. Monica, CA), Fruma, Shulamis, Esther, and Chaya all of Crown Heights. She is also survived by her siblings; Rabbi Sholom Ber Levitin (Seattle, WA), Rabbi Yosef Levitin (Crown Heights), and Mrs. Devorah Kornfeld (Seattle, WA). http://crownheights.info/notices/610106/boruch-dayan-hoemes-mrs-fraida-andrusier-69-obm/.  Rabbi and Mrs. Levitin request that calls and visits are not made to their home.  Rabbi Levitin will be sitting Shivah and will be having visiting hours at the home of Frumi and Saifo Marasow -7201 40th Ave NE Seattle WA 98115. Please visit only during times listed in Shiva e-mail.

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing on Monday March 12 of Beth Weisberg z"l (Mindabayla bat Yakov David haLevi z"l,)  , mother of Richard Greene (Beth) and Jonathan Greene (Catherine) and grandmother of Ariel, Eitan, Jacob, Lila and Emma. he family of will be sitting shiva and having visiting hours at the Jonathan and Catherine Greene residence at 3167 NE 83rd St in Seattle.  Please visit only during times listed in Shiva e-mail.
 

PUBLIC SEDER AT CHABAD HOUSE MINYAN– FRI MAR 30th and SAT MAR 31st at 8 pm
4541 19th Ave NE.  Featuring an inspiring Hagadah, Matzah, Wine/Grape Juice, Chrain, Charoses, and a delicious seder meal!  
https://www.facebook.com/chabadhouseminyan/

SAFETY OF CHILDREN AT CSTL – IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM CSTL BOARD
As a reminder children are not allowed to play outside the Shul. Parents please keep your children in the Kids Program or with their parents in Shul. The Board of CSTL and CSTL will not be responsible for children that are left unattended. Thank you for your cooperation.

MA'OT HITTIM CHARITY FOR PESACH 
Donate online 
www.CSTLSeattle.org, with Notation “Maot Hittim”, or mail you checks to CSTL, 6250 43rd Ave NE, Seattle WA 98115.  Contract Jonathan Greene for more info, j.i.greene625@gmail.com

SELL YOUR HAMETZ BEFORE 7 AM WED MORNING 28 MARCH
www.chabad.org/sellchametz

MAOS CHITIM
Berel Pedowitz has set up a gofundme to solicit funds for Pesach for his family (Maos Chitim).   https://www.gofundme.com/pesach-fund Please help with this important mitzvah.

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon /NOT THIS WEEK/
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. NEW Sponsorships now available:  Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

SMOKED SALMON AVAILABLE FROM THE SUMMIT
The Summit at First Hill is offering their cherry wood house smoked salmon for sale now.  Fresh & delicious smoked salmon for $25.00/pound, and certified Kosher for Passover by the Va'ad of Seattle. To place orders please email jeremyd@summitatfirsthill.org. Due to size limitations orders must be 3lbs or more minimum.  Orders must be in before Sunday March 18th. You'll be able to pick up your fish beginning Thursday March 29th.

Shatnez Announcement
Due to the high volume of items brought in for shatnez checking before Pesach, Rabbi O'Connor will not be available to take any new items after March 21. Any items brought afterwards will have to wait until after Pesach for checking. For any questions please send an email to rabbiakivao@gmail.com

Emerald City Fired Arts Sun Mar 18th 10-noon
An Ohr Chadash youth event at E. RSVP by March 13. Cost: Up to $20 Info: baylafriedmantreiger@gmail.com  

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala Sun Mar 18th 
Early Bird Registration due by Feb. 23rd, 2018 at: www.jds.org

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier AVE S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

INTENSIVE MODERN HEBREW AT UW
Learn Hebrew in Nine Weeks! www.summer.uw.edu.  HadarKH@uw.edu

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Community Trip to Israel. Apr 29th -May 8th 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun Apr 8th 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYIKRA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507796/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayikra-Rosh-Chodesh-Nissan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. This Shabbos is unique as reflected by the fact that three scrolls are taken out for the Torah reading;1 we read the weekly portion from one scroll, the Rosh Chodesh reading from another scroll, and the special HaChodesh reading from a third scroll.

This is a very rare phenomenon. There are many occasions when two Torah scrolls are taken out, but taking out three scrolls is extremely uncommon. The only time we read from three scrolls each year is Simchas Torah.2 In addition, from time to time, when Rosh Chodesh Teves, Rosh Chodesh Adar, or Rosh Chodesh Nissan falls on Shabbos, this phenomenon repeats itself.

There is a unique dimension to the passages read from the three Torah scrolls taken out this Shabbos, because each of the readings concerns Rosh Chodesh Nissan, today’s date. This week’s parshah, Vayikra was communicated to Moshe on Rosh Chodesh Nissan, the day the Sanctuary was erected. The HaChodesh reading was also communicated to Moshe on Rosh Chodesh Nissan (a year previously, while the Jews were still enslaved in Egypt). Furthermore, it relates the mitzvah of sanctifying the months and thus shows how there is a special connection between the ordinary Rosh Chodesh passage and Rosh Chodesh Nissan.

Surely we can derive a lesson in the service of G‑d from the above concepts. This lesson can be clarified by contrasting the taking out of three Torah scrolls on Simchas Torah3 with the taking out of three scrolls on the present Shabbos.

The lesson to be derived from taking out a Torah scroll is reflected in the prayers recited at that time which begin, “Whenever the ark set out, Moshe would say, ‘Arise, O L‑rd, and Your enemies will be dispersed; Your foes will flee before You.’ ” This verse is relevant to every Jew, even in the present era when the ark is entombed. Every Jew possesses a spark of Moshe within his soul. This spark brings about “Arise O L‑rd,” an increase in the service of holiness and “Your enemies will be dispersed,...” the nullification of undesirable influences.4 Thus, taking out the Torah scrolls reflects both the services of “turn away from evil” and “do good,” the two prongs of our service of G‑d and endows that service with new strength and vigor.

[The “setting forth of the ark” also endows our material concerns with blessing so that we will be able to carry out our service of G‑d without worry or difficulty. This is alluded in the fact that a portion of manna was placed in the ark as “a keepsake for your generations,” teaching the Jewish people that at all times, their material fortunes are dependent on G‑d as they were during the journey through the desert.]

Thus, taking out three Torah scrolls represents a chazakah,5 a strengthening and reinforcement of the above concepts. In particular, there are two types of chazakos: a) a chazakah that is necessary to maintain our everyday service of G‑d. This is brought about by taking out three Torah scrolls on Simchas Torah. b) A chazakah that is intended to endow the Jewish people with new and additional powers. This comes about only at special times; among them, our present circumstance, taking out three Torah scrolls on Rosh Chodesh Nissan.

The contrast between Simchas Torah and Rosh Chodesh Nissan is also reflected in the subject matter which is read on these two occasions and in particular, from the subject matter read from the third scroll. On Rosh Chodesh Nissan, the reading from the third scroll concerns the unique service of the month of Nissan. In contrast, on Simchas Torah, the reading from the third scroll6 relates the narrative of creation.

The contrast between these readings are reflected in Rabbi Yitzchak’s statement, quoted by Rashi at the beginning of his commentary to the Torah:

There was no need to start the Torah before HaChodesh Hazeh Lochem (the beginning of Parshas HaChodesh), for it is the first mitzvah which was commanded to the Jews. Why did the Torah begin with Bereishis (the narrative of creation)? Because... [G‑d] “related the power of His deeds to His people.”

Thus, Simchas Torah is associated with Bereishis, the creation of the world, and Rosh Chodesh Nissan, with the unique reading of HaChodesh. In this context, the contrast between these two Torah readings reflects the contrast between Tishrei which reflects the natural order of the world and Nissan which reflects the Jews’ potential to step above nature7 as the Midrash relates, “When G‑d chose Yaakov and his descendants, He established for them a month of redemption.”

Thus the taking out of three Torah scrolls on Simchas Torah represents a chazakah — strengthening — of our services with the limits of ordinary experience8 and the taking out of three scrolls on this Shabbos,9 Rosh Chodesh Nissan, represents a chazakah in regard to service which is above the ordinary, the revelation of a miraculous pattern of conduct.

The above concept can be explained in greater detail through focusing on the association of Parshas HaChodesh with “the first mitzvah with which the Jews were commanded.” Here we see an emphasis on a mitzvah, rather than the Torah. The Torah is fundamentally above worldly existence. In contrast, the intent of mitzvos is to guide a person’s conduct within the world and thus create a tzavsa, bond, between man, the world, and G‑d.

Thus, the chazakah established by the three Torah scrolls on Rosh Chodesh Nissan does not relate to a miraculous sequence of events as it exists above the worldly plane, but rather to the service of drawing this miraculous source of influence into contact with the natural order, elevating our ordinary conduct. In particular, this is true during the present year, a year when “I will show you wonders.”

The above concepts are also related to the passages which are read from each of these three scrolls. This is particularly reflected in the reading of Parshas HaChodesh which begins with the verse describing the establishment of a month of redemption for the Jewish people and continues describing the Paschal sacrifice, an offering associated with making a radical leap forward, beyond all limits.

Similarly, the Rosh Chodesh reading represents an increase beyond the ordinary pattern of revelation. This is reflected by the fact that Rosh Chodesh is associated with the moon, while the weekly cycle is associated with the sun. Among the differences between the sun and the moon is that the sun shines constantly without change. In contrast, the moon goes through phases. On Rosh Chodesh, there begins a constant process of growth until on the fifteenth, the moon shines in its fullness.

Thus Rosh Chodesh reflects an addition above the normal order of Divine influence. Its connection today with Shabbos, the fulfillment of the weekly cycle, indicates the fusion of the natural and the supernatural.

A similar concept is also associated with the weekly Torah reading which begins, “And He called to Moshe,” revealing an influence granted to Moshe, allowing him to enter the Tent of Meeting. As mentioned above, every person contains a spark of Moshe. This represents the potential of Daas, knowledge, within the Jewish soul which grants the potential for “meeting,” i.e., for unity between man and G‑d. We have the potential to bind our thoughts to Him and experience an awareness of G‑d that parallels the level of connection that will be achieved by our entire people in the Era of Redemption. Furthermore, as explained later on in the parshah, G‑d has established “a covenant of salt” with the Jews, i.e., an eternal bond that will continue forever.

[These concepts are continued in the parshiyos to be read in the coming weeks, including Parshas Shemini which also describes the events which took place on Rosh Chodesh Nissan and relates how the Divine Presence was revealed to the entire people and how the people praised G‑d in response. Similarly, it describes the service of Nadav and Avihu, whose souls expired in love for G‑d.10 Thus the reading of Parshas Vayikra also reflects a fusion of a miraculous order of conduct with a Jew’s everyday service.]

In particular, the three readings can be seen as a progression. Parshas HaChodeshintroduces the concept of a miraculous order of conduct. The Rosh Chodesh reading describes how this miraculous order of conduct can influence our ordinary lives and Parshas Vayikra reveals how this fusion of the above natural with the natural can become a permanent and fixed dimension of our existence.

This idea is also borne out by the Haftorah which focuses on the service of the Nasi.11 The word Nasi, generally translated as “prince,” literally means “the uplifted one,” i.e., it reflects how the person is raised above the natural order.

As mentioned above, the miraculous order of conduct also relates to the negation of all undesirable influences and their transformation into good. This concept is also reflected in the three Torah readings, and in particular in the conclusion of the Torah readings. The conclusion of the HaChodesh12 reading, “in all of your dwellings, eat matzos” reflects the negation of the yetzer hora (which is described as chametz) in a complete way, “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the earth,” so that all that remains will be matzah.

The Rosh Chodesh reading also involves the concept of transformation as reflected in the goat offered for atonement. Furthermore, the atonement achieved through this offering is all-encompassing in nature. Indeed, our Sages associate this offering with atonement for G‑d Himself, as it were, for His reducing the size of the moon.13 The positive effects of this sacrifice reflect the state of the moon in the Era of Redemption when, “the light of the moon will resemble the light of the sun.”

A similar concept is communicated in the conclusion of Parshas Vayikra where the guilt offerings are described. Also, the verse describing “the covenant of salt” conveys a similar idea for salt makes food that are bitter tasting, taste sweet.

Similarly, the Haftorah concludes with the final verses of the Book of Yeshayahu:

And it shall be that every [Rosh] Chodesh and every Shabbos, all flesh will come and bow down before Me... And they shall go forth and they shall look on the carcasses of the men that rebelled against Me... and they shall be an abhorrence to all flesh.

Afterwards, to conclude on a positive note, the verse “And it shall be...” is repeated again. This repetition emphasizes how the undesirable elements will not only be blotted out, but also will ultimately be transformed and bring about an increase in holiness, a redoubled emphasis on the Jews’ appearance before G‑d.

* * *

2. The above concepts can be related to a difference of opinion found among our Sages. The Mishnah states:

We inquire and extrapolate on the laws of Pesach thirty days before the holiday. Rabban Shimon ben Gamliel says, “Two weeks [before the holiday].”

Although the halachah was decided according to the former opinion, Rabban Shimon benGamliel’s view is also significant as our Sages teach, “These and these are the words of the living G‑d.” Surely, in regard to a person’s spiritual service, it is always possible to fulfill both opinions. In this instance, however, it is also possible to fulfill both opinions in regard to actual deed.

To explain: One should start reviewing the Pesach laws thirty days before the holiday. As the holiday approaches, however, one must reassess one’s situation and increase both the quality and the quantity of one’s study. This increase is alluded to in the prooftext quoted by the Talmud as support for Rabban Shimon’s view, “This month will be a head of months for you,” the verse which, as explained above, relates to a miraculous order of conduct. Taking this step above one’s nature allows one to increase the quality and quantity of one’s service as required by Rabban Shimon ben Gamliel’s opinion.

Just as we must make an effort to study the Pesach laws, we must also make efforts to provide others with their Pesach needs, giving maos chittim, the special tzedakahassociated with Pesach. Here also, though surely one gave thirty days before Pesach, as the Pesach holiday grows nearer, one must reassess and increase his donations.

Similarly, in regard to the size of one’s donations; although one has given a tenth or even a fifth of one’s income to tzedakah, one must reassess one’s earnings and give according to the nature of the blessings with which G‑d has provided one. Giving in this manner will not cause one any losses. On the contrary, as G‑d sees the extent of one’s generosity, He will provide one with more blessings. A person who gives without reservations and limitations, will likewise receive Divine blessings that know no bounds.

* * *

3. The above shares a connection with the Nasi who brought his offerings on Rosh Chodesh Nissan, Nachshon ben Aminadav. Aminadav can be interpreted as a reference to generosity, the meaning of the word nadav.14 Nachshon is connected to the service of jumping into the sea, giving himself over with mesirus nefesh, serving G‑d without limitations.15 Thus, Nachshon ben Aminadav reflects how our generosity must be expressed without limitation, giving in a miraculous manner.

This will bring about the transformation of all undesirable influences. Just as Nachshon’s jumping into the sea, caused the sea to split,16 and led to the final and the most complete phase of the exodus from Egypt, so too, our unbounded gifts to tzedakah will bring near the redemption and indeed transform all the negative influences into good.

The connection to the Redemption is particularly appropriate on the present date, Shabbos Parshas Vayikra, Rosh Chodesh Nissan, 5751, a year when “I will show you wonders.” Each of these factors shares a connection to the future redemption: Shabbos is a reflection of “the era which is all Shabbos and rest for all eternity;” Parshas Vayikra begins by describing how “G‑d spoke to Moshe from the Tent of Meeting.” The ultimate expression of the Tent of Meeting, the Sanctuary, will be the Third Beis HaMikdash. Rosh Chodesh represents the renewal of the moon which is associated with the renewal of the Jewish people that will take place in the Era of Redemption. Greater emphasis is placed on this in the present month, Nissan, the month of redemption. 5751 (תנש"א) spells out the word Tinasei which calls to mind the phrase Tinasei Malchuso, “May His sovereignty be upraised.” And “I will show you wonders,” is part of the prophecy, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

May the chazakah established by taking out three Torah scrolls lead to our service in the Third Beis HaMikdash, where “we will partake of the Paschal sacrifices and the festive offerings... and give thanks to You with a new song for our redemption and for the deliverance of our souls.”

Parshas Vayakel-Pekudei Mevarchim Nisan – Chazak - Parah | 22-29 Adar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAR 9th  
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:48 pm

SHABBOS SAT MAR 10th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Nisan 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:25 am/
Mincha 5:48 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:47 pm  /DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME – SPRING FORWARD ONE HOUR/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush is sponsored this week by Velvil and Mushke Rosler, marking their first six months of love and joy with their daughter, Lilly.  We will also have our delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 7 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:46 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PlaySpace for Children at CSTL –
The CSTL board, as well as other members, are working on creating a safe play space for our children in the parking lot behind the building. A committee has been recently established, Please email Tamar Azous at tamar@azous.com to help!

FARBRENGEN ALERT – MEVARCHIM NISSAN – FRI MAR 9th  4PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the Shabbos Mevarchim Nissan –. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. NEW Sponsorships now available:  Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

The Shmurah  Matzah Co-op is Open for Orders!
Each year before Pesach we make a group purchase of double wrapped palletized  Shmurah Matzah from the renown Lubavitch Matzah Bakery. We calculate the cost of the Matzah by adding the shipping and price per pound of the Shmurah Matzah to arrive at the final sale price without additional fees or markup. Shmurah Matzah is available in Wheat, Whole Wheat, Spelt, and reduced-price broken Matzahs for non-Seder meals. To order: sbrandeis@gmail.com

"Wine, Cheese & Chocolate" Sun Mar 11th 7:30-9:30 pm
A pre-Passover tasting. More info: www.IslandSynagogue.org

Ohr Leah Rosh Chodesh Class Tue Mar 13th 7:15 pm
with Sephardic Bikur Holim Rubbisa Hassan. More info: mollott@gmail.com

Rabbi Menachem Nissel at the Kollel Wed Mar 14th 8 pm
Topic: "Tefillah for the Overwhelmed". www.SeattleKollel.org

Emerald City Fired Arts Sun Mar 18th 10-noon
An Ohr Chadash youth event at E. RSVP by March 13. Cost: Up to $20 Info: baylafriedmantreiger@gmail.com  

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala Sun Mar 18th 
Early Bird Registration due by Feb. 23rd, 2018 at: www.jds.org

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier Ave S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

THE SEPHARDIC JEWISH BROTHERHOOD BIRTHRIGHT TRIP JUN 24-JULY 4
Tour Israel with amazing people with Greek, Sephardic, and Turkish backgrounds. The trip is totally FREE and anyone between the ages of 18 and 26 who hasn't been on a Birthright Israel trip before is eligible. What's more, we are working on creating an extended portion of the Trip to Salonica, Greece! 
info@sephardicbrotherhood.com

INTENSIVE MODERN HEBREW AT UW
Learn Hebrew in Nine Weeks! www.summer.uw.edu.  HadarKH@uw.edu

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

ARC Babysitting Class Sun Mar 11, 9:00 am-4:45 pm
For kids ages 11-15 in BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Cost: $85/BCMH Members , $95/Non-Members. Pay via Pay Pal at www.bcmhseattle.org  

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Community Trip to Israel. Apr 29th -May 8th 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sun Apr 8th 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYAKEL-PEKUDEI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507793/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayakhel-Pekudei-23rd-Day-of-Adar-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

In the last few years, it has been customary to emphasize the connection every concept shares with the ultimate redemption. Sometimes, effort has to expended in order to find such a connection, but there is always a point of association. Since “all the appointed times for Mashiach’s coming have already passed,” and in particular, several years have passed since the Previous Rebbe announced “All of you stand prepared” to proceed to the redemption, every concept surely shares a connection with that era.

[In particular, each term within the Previous Rebbe’s statement is worthy of elaboration: “All of you” is significant because it emphasizes how the future redemption will — in contrast to the previous redemptions experienced by our people — encompass every single Jew without distinction.1 Not only will the large majority of our people be redeemed, the redemption will involve each and every Jew. Also, in an expanded sense, “all of you” refers to the totality of each person’s existence, all of his powers and his portion in the world at large. “Stand” indicates the adoption of a position of strength in the service of G‑d as reflected in the verse, “to stand and serve before G‑d.” “Prepared” emphasizes the importance of the object for which one is preparing as reflected in our Sages’ differentiation between the meals of Shabbos and Yom Tov which involve preparation, and those of an ordinary weekday which do not.]

Although as explained above, every concept shares a connection to the redemption, there are times — for example, this present Shabbos — when the connection is openly revealed. To explain: Vayakhel begins with the description of Moshe’s calling together the Jewish people to study Torah. From this, we derive the custom of calling Jews together for Torah study each Shabbos.2 However, in an ultimate sense, Vayakhel alludes to the most complete and inclusive congregation, the time when “a great congregation will return here,” in the Era of Redemption.

Similarly, Pekudei which means “counting” in an ultimate sense refers to the tenth census of the Jewish people which will be held in the Era of Redemption. In particular, when the two parshiyos are combined together as in this year, that allusion to the future redemption is clearly emphasized.

To explain, Vayakhel in and of itself does not necessarily point to the Redemption. As explained above, it can refer to the congregation of Jews for Torah study. Similarly, Pekudei can be associated with the other censuses that were held throughout Jewish history, or to the service in the Beis HaMikdash that involved Pa’is, counting the priests’ fingers to determine who would be privileged to perform the service.

When, however, the two parshiyos are combined, we see a clear reference to that census which will be held when, “a great congregation will return here.”3 A further connection to the Redemption is that this is the Shabbos which blesses the month of Nissan, a month associated with “miracles of a truly miraculous nature,”4 and is known as “the month of redemption.”

[Indeed, the Shabbos which blesses Nissan possesses a more powerful quality than the month itself, because the entity which conveys a blessing on another entity must itself possess a higher quality.]

We find that there are several levels of redemption as reflected by the fact that Adar is also a month of redemption. Nevertheless, our Sages speak of joining redemption to redemption, i.e., proceeding from one level of redemption to the next. [Their intent is to join the redemption of Purim to the redemption of Pesach. Since they do not explicitly mention this, however, we can interpret this as referring to joining the redemption of Purim to the ultimate Redemption.]

The concept of redemption also shares a connection with Shabbos, because Shabbos represents a redemption from the mundane activities of the weekdays. Indeed, on Shabbos a person must be on an elevated plane to the extent that he feels that, “all his work is completed.”

All the above is enhanced by the fact that this year, 5751, is a year when, “I will show you wonders.”5 This refers to the wonders of the redemption which will surpass the miracles of the exodus from Egypt. Furthermore, the redemption from Egypt was only temporary in nature and allowed the possibility for future exiles. In contrast, after the future redemption, the potential for exile will no longer exist.

May we soon merit that redemption. Then we will see the priestly garments which are described in our Torah portion. In regard to those garments, there are several different opinions mentioned in the Talmud. Furthermore, there is a difference of opinion regarding the High Priest’s head plate between the Sages — whose opinion is accepted as halachah— who maintain that the words קודש לה' were written on two lines, and Rabbi Eliezar ben Yossi who said, “I saw the High Priest’s head plate in Rome and the words קודש לה' were written on only one line.” This indicates that there were several different approaches to actually fashioning these garments. Both of these approaches were acceptable because the Torah does not specify how the words קודש לה' should be written.

Similarly, we find several approaches to the fashioning of the High Priest’s cloak and to the leggings worn by the priests. All of these different approaches are acceptable and were actually present in the Beis HaMikdash. This multiplicity is desirable. Since the Torah is “the Torah of truth,” and truth is multi-faceted in nature, the ultimate expression of this truth is for all these different dimensions to be actually revealed on the level of deed.

May we no longer have to debate how these garments should be made because we will actually see them in the Third Beis HaMikdash. Then we will witness the ultimate expression of Vayikra, the Torah reading begun in today’s Minchah service, “And He called to Moshe.”6

The redemption will come and will be accompanied by open miracles. There is an advantage to conduct according to the natural order, for in this manner, the natural order itself is elevated. Nevertheless, since we have waited so long for the ultimate redemption, we can rest assured that it will be characterized by open miracles. May this be in the immediate future.

* * *

2. This Shabbos, which begins the last week of Adar, represents the transition between Adar and Nissan. On the surface, Nissan is above Adar, for the miracles of Nissan transcended the natural order, while those of Adar were confined within nature. One could explain the entire sequence of events — the deposition of Vashti, the appointment of Esther, and the like — as a matter of coincidence. Thus, indeed our Sages explain that the allusion to Esther in the Torah is the verse, “I will surely conceal My face,” i.e., the veiling of G‑dliness within the natural order. (This also is reflected in the fact that G‑d’s name is not mentioned in the Megillah.)

There is, however, an advantage to the Purim sequence, miracles enclothed within nature, for they permeate — and thus elevate — the natural order. Indeed, this is the intent of our service, to lift up the worldly order of existence and to have G‑dliness revealed on this plane.

We see this concept reflected in the renown story of the Alter Rebbe who, during his imprisonment in Petersburg, was once ferried from one prison to another in the middle of the night. Seeing the moon, he sought to use this opportunity to recite the Kiddush Levanah (Sanctification of the Moon7 ) prayers and asked the boatman to halt the vessel’s progress. When the latter refused, the Alter Rebbe halted the vessel in a miraculous way, allowed it to continue, and then asked the boatman again to stop. Seeing that he had no alternative, the boatman consented and it was only then, that the Alter Rebbe recited his prayers. Why was the boatman’s consent necessary? So that the mitzvah could be fulfilled within the context of the natural order.

The circumstances in which this story took place emphasize the relevance of its lesson. The Alter Rebbe’s imprisonment came because of his efforts to spread Chassidus and his redemption signified Heavenly consent for the intensification of those activities. Indeed, were undesirable elements not to have interfered, with his redemption, we would have merited the full revelation of the two lights (Shneur), the light of the revealed Torah and the light of the Torah of Chassidus. And this revelation is drawn down l’zman, (לזמן a word which results from the rearrangement of the letters of the Alter Rebbe’s second name Zalman זלמן) meaning “to time,” an indication how this revelation will permeate time and space, the limitations of this world.

Indeed, we see an allusion to the redemption in the Alter Rebbe’s life span — 68 years. 68 is numerically equivalent to the word (סח), meaning “diversion of attention.” Our Sages declare, “Mashiach will come when our attention is diverted,” like the discovery of a lost object which comes unexpectedly. The connection of this concept to Mashiach is reflected in the verse “I found David, My servant.”

This relates to the fusion of the concepts of Vayakhel and Pekudei mentioned above, i.e., the ultimate gathering together of the Jewish people which will come in the Era of Redemption and the tenth census which will be taken then. This census will differ from the previous ones which included only men over the age of twenty. This census will count every Jew, men, women, and child.

One of the unique aspects of a census is that it reflects the dearness of the entities which are counted, to quote our Sages, “because He cherishes them, He counts them at all times.” Thus, the counting of the Jews in the Era of Redemption will reflect how every Jew — even the youngest child — is treasured by G‑d.

This points to the importance of Jewish education, of reaching out to every Jewish child. The Baal Shem Tov taught that even a leaf’s turning in the wind is controlled by Divine Providence. Surely, there is a special Divine Providence controlling everything that occurs to each member of the Jewish people, even a young child. We must, within the context of this unique Providence, do whatever we can to prepare each member of the Jewish people, and every aspect of the world at large, for the ultimate Redemption.

Shlita continued the sicha with references to the conflict in the Persian Gulf, a promise that the miraculous sequence of events which we have witnessed will continue, and a call to increase our efforts to provide our fellow Jews with their Pesach needs. These concepts were presented in an essay, “The Ultimate Miracles are Yet to Come.”}

* * *

3. [After the distribution of mashkeh in connection with various positive activities, the Rebbe Shlita said:} All that is necessary is for a person to perform one small act and G‑d will help him and lift him above all things. This is enhanced by the influence of a Chassidic farbrengen which — as revealed in the note which descended from Heaven — can achieve more than the influence of the angel Michoel.

Nothing brings a father greater joy than seeing his children join together in harmony. Similarly, when the Jews join together in unity, love, and joy, G‑d derives great happiness, as it were, and grants them abundant blessings, including the ultimate blessing, which is of such fundamental importance at present, the coming of the Future Redemption.

Parshas Ki Tisa | 15-22 Adar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAR 2nd 
Shacharis 7:00 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:37 pm

SHABBOS SAT MAR 3rd 
Shacharis: 9:00 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:33 am/
Mincha 5:37 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:37 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush this week (including a meat cholet) is sponsored by Moshe Yalovsky, in honor and in memory of the yahrzeit of his grandfather, Moshe Gedaliah ben Aharon Mordechai haLevi, z"l.  The cholent is made by our own R Mendy. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9:00 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7:00 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 5:45 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:35 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PlaySpace for Children at CSTL
The CSTL board, as well as other members, are working on creating a safe play space for our children in the parking lot behind the building. A committee has been recently established, Please email Tamar Azous at tamar@azous.com to help!

FARBRENGEN ALERT – SHUSHAN PURIM – FRI MAR 2nd 4:00PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the Shusan Purim - In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:00 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10:00 AM
In the library. Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9:00 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9:00 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. NEW Sponsorships now available:  Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

The Shmurah  Matzah Co-op is Open for Orders!
Each year before Pesach we make a group purchase of double wrapped palletized  Shmurah Matzah from the renown Lubavitch Matzah Bakery. We calculate the cost of the Matzah by adding the shipping and price per pound of the Shmurah Matzah to arrive at the final sale price without additional fees or markup. Shmurah Matzah is available in Wheat, Whole Wheat, Spelt, and reduced-price broken Matzahs for non-Seder meals. To order: sbrandeis@gmail.com

Rabbi Frand at BCMH Tue Mar 6th 7:45 pm
Drasha Topic: "Gratitude is a Two Way Street"

Kollel Avot Ubanim Grand Finale Motzei Shabbos, March 3rd 7:45 pm 
with Henrik Bothe, physical comedian, at Sephardic Bikur Holim. Sponosred by Dr. Elie and Miriam Levy. More info: www.seattlekollel.com

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier AVE S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

THE SEPHARDIC JEWISH BROTHERHOOD BIRTHRIGHT TRIP JUN 24-JULY 4
Tour Israel with amazing people with Greek, Sephardic, and Turkish backgrounds. The trip is totally FREE and anyone between the ages of 18 and 26 who hasn't been on a Birthright Israel trip before is eligible. What's more, we are working on creating an extended portion of the Trip to Salonica, Greece! 
info@sephardicbrotherhood.com

INTENSIVE MODERN HEBREW AT UW
Learn Hebrew in Nine Weeks! www.summer.uw.edu.  HadarKH@uw.edu

UPCOMING BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT
Here are a list of upcoming Bistro Night dinners at the Summit:   June 19th, August 21st (rooftop outdoor event), October 23rd, December 11th.  For more information or to make a reservation, please email Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org.

Jewish Overnight Summer Camp Scholarships! DEADLINE TUE MAR 6th
Camp gives children an opportunity to explore interests, make lifelong friends, and learn what Judaism means to them, while having loads of fun too! To help more children experience Jewish camp, the Federation awards need-based scholarships..
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Jewish Prisoner Services International (JPSI)
Please help with the very important chesed of Pidyon Shevuim.  Volunteers are needed to Visiting/Teaching at Jails and Prison, Advocacy, Answering letters from inmates, Web database development and database work. info@jpsi.org and list your area of interest, please include your preferred contact information  Thank You, Matthew Perry, Secretary/Treasurer JPSI, 206-617-2367

ARC Babysitting Class Sun Mar 11, 9:00 am-4:45 pm
For kids ages 11-15 in BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Cost: $85/BCMH Members , $95/Non-Members. Pay via Pay Pal at www.bcmhseattle.org  

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sunday, April 8, 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR KI SISA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507791/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Sisa-16th-Day-of-Adar-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

Parshas Ki Sisa possesses a problematic dimension. The literal meaning of the opening verse of Parshas Ki Sisa is: “When you will lift up the heads of the children of Israel,” elevating the level of the Jewish people, and indeed elevating their “heads,” their loftiest potential. Nevertheless, the body of the Torah reading concerns the sin of the Golden Calf, the most serious of all sins, the ultimate source for the exile. How does such a series of events correlate to the theme of Ki Sisa, the elevation of the Jewish people?

It is possible to explain the connection between the two themes as follows: The elevation of the Jews to the highest peaks can come despite the fact that one has descended to the lowest depths. Furthermore, the descent is itself a phase in the ascent. Every descent is in essence for the purpose of ascent, and is capable of bringing one to a level higher than that enjoyed before the descent. Thus it is through the descent of the sin of the Golden Calf that the Jews can reach the peaks of Ki Sisa.1 After the sin of the Golden Calf, the Jews were able to rise to the level of baalei teshuvah, and “In the place where baalei teshuvah stand, even the totally righteous are not able to stand.”

Similarly, this concept is reflected in the advantage possessed by the Second Tablets, the giving of which is described in our Torah portion, over the First Tablets to the extent that G‑d thanked Moshe for breaking them, as it were. The first tablets were associated with the level of “the righteous,” while the second tablets were associated with the higher rung of baalei teshuvah.

This explanation, however, is insufficient. Firstly, the very principle that an ascent requires a descent requires explanation. Furthermore, the wording of the opening verse, “When you will lift up the heads of the children of Israel,” appears to indicate that everything which follows in the Torah reading comes as a result of this elevation. The converse, that the elevation comes as a result of the descent of the sin, does not fit the simple meaning of the Torah’s verses.

Furthermore, the concept that Ki Sisa, i.e., the elevation experienced by the Jewish people, is associated with the giving of the second tablets also raises a question. It is in Parshas Ki Sisa that the great qualities possessed by the first tablets are mentioned.2

These points lead to the following conclusion: The process of the Jews’ elevation, Ki Sisa, is many-phased. One of those phases involves the first tablets, i.e., the service of the righteous before the sin of the Golden Calf. Then, we precede to the Golden Calf. The intent, however, is not the sin of the Golden Calf, but rather, how the Golden Calf exists in the Torah, i.e., a high spiritual rung as will be explained. Indeed, it is the potential generated by this service which brings about — when necessary — the nullification and the transformation of the sin of the Golden Calf.

To explain: As mentioned above, the expression “When you lift up the heads of the children of Israel” indicates that: a) one rises to a level above the head, i.e., the quality of faith which transcends the intellect. This is an innate potential possessed by every Jew. As the Alter Rebbe writes in Tanya, this potential “transcends intellect.” Therefore:

Even the most simple among the people and the sinners of Israel sacrifice their souls for the Sanctification of G‑d’s Name... so that they will not deny [the existence of] the One G‑d. [This service is carried out] without any knowledge or meditation, but rather [emanates from a level which] transcends knowledge and understanding.

b) The head itself is raised to this level. The intellect is raised to the point where it negates avodah zorah, the service of other gods, not only as an act of faith which transcends intellect, but as an expression of the intellect itself.

The internalization of this quality of faith represents an elevation of the Jews’ potential. By expressing an affirmation of G‑dliness and a negation of other gods, [sources of influence,] not only on a level where intellect does not operate, but within the context of our understanding, the worship of other gods is utterly negated and G‑d’s Oneness is affirmed in the most complete manner.

[Were this affirmation to be made on the level of faith alone, the possibility would exist that although one believes, one would think differently. Thus, on the levels of conduct where “the light of faith” does not shine, G‑d’s Oneness would not be affirmed. When this oneness is internalized within the power of intellect, however, it permeates every dimension of our conduct.]

This concept, the negation of belief in other gods and the affirmation of G‑d’s Oneness, also lies at the heart of the Haftorah which describes the confrontation between the prophet Eliyahu and the prophets of Baal [I Melachim, Chapter 18]. As a result of Eliyahu’s challenge to the prophets of Baal, their failure in evoking a response from their divinity, and G‑d’s miraculous wonders, the people proclaimed, “G‑d is the L‑rd, G‑d is the L‑rd.”

This narrative describes a very low spiritual state for the Jewish people, a time in which they were unable to appreciate who to believe in Baal or, l’havdil, G‑d. Nevertheless, through the confrontation arranged by Eliyahu,3 the people were able to know — i.e., grasp with their intellect, not only with their power of faith —that “G‑d is the L‑rd.”

In order for a Jew to negate belief in other gods — not only through the service of teshuvah which transcends intellect, but also on the level of intellect, it is necessary to “lift up one’s head.” A Jew’s head refers to his study of the Torah. “Lifting up one’s head,” refers to reaching a higher plane of Torah study.

To illustrate this concept: Yerovam ben Nevat is connected with the concept of idol worship. He made, not only one Golden Calf as the Jews did in the desert, but two. Nevertheless, despite this descent, his potential was great and he had reached a very high peak of Torah study. Thus, our Sages relate that Achiyah HaShiloni4 could find no fault in Yerovam’s Torah knowledge and together with him, developed new insights into the Torah. Indeed, Yerovam was able to understand the teachings of the Book of Vayikra which deals with the sacrificial offerings on 103 different levels.5

Here we see a connection to idol worship, because 103 is numerical equivalent to the Hebrew for “calf” (עגל). Thus, in its source, Yerovam’s potential was on a very high rung, a rung that is connected with the ultimate source for a “calf,” the “face of an ox,” which makes up “G‑d’s Chariot” in Ezekiel’s mystic vision.

Thus we see a two dimensional process: a very high source, but — to allow for free choice — a potential for descent to the very lowest levels, and ultimately, the correction of that descent, and a new ascent. Nevertheless, the descent and the subsequent ascent need not be part of the process of Ki Sisa. Ideally, as the “calf” exists within the Torah, it refers to an elevation of the head, a high level of Torah study which negates totally — not only from the point of view of faith, but also from the perspective of intellect — the possibility of believing in other gods.

To cite a parallel to this concept: In Hilchos Avodas Kochavim, the Rambam writes:

The worshipers of false gods have composed many texts concerning their service, [describing] what is the essence of their service, what practices are involved, and what are its statutes. The Holy One, blessed be He, has commanded us not to read those books at all, nor to think about them or any matters involved with them.... This prohibits enquiring about the nature of their service even if you, yourself, do not serve them.

Nevertheless, this prohibition applies only for a common person. In contrast,

A court must know the types of worship [practiced by gentiles] because an idolater is only stoned to death when we know that [he has worshiped a false god] in the mode in which it is traditionally worshiped.

Thus, although a common person is forbidden to study the nature of idol worship, a Torah judge is required to study these subjects. Because of his elevated spiritual level, his connection with idol worship helps bring about the nullification of idolatry. Thus his involvement with such matters is a holy service, the very opposite of idolatry in its usual sense.

Similarly, our Sages praise Yisro’s declaration, “Now I know that the G‑d, the L‑rd, is greater than all the other gods.” Because he had served “all the other gods,” his statement of awareness of G‑d’s existence was all the more powerful, reflecting the transformation of evil into good. This statement represented a complete nullification of idolatry which, as the Zohar explains, was one of the necessary preparatory steps for the giving of the Torah. Here again idolatry ultimately serves a positive purpose.

In this context, we can explain the place of the narrative of the Golden Calf within the process of Ki Sisa. In an ideal sense, the nullification of idolatry should be expressed in a manner that precludes any connection to such service (the first tablets). If, however, for some reason, there is a descent into idolatry, there is the potential for an ascent to a higher level through the service of teshuvah. Indeed, the sin itself can be transformed into a positive influence (the second tablets).

The latter process, however, must involve a slightly different approach. After the descent of sin, it is impossible to begin directly with the nullification of idolatry by elevating one’s intellectual faculties. Instead, one must first arouse a level that shares no connection to idolatry whatsoever, the essence of the soul which transcends intellect.6 Afterwards, the process of Ki Sisa involves having the essence of soul influence the powers of intellect and emotion. Thus, the negation of the worship of idolatry will come, not only from the essence of the soul, but also from our conscious powers.

This is also implied by the verse, “Hew out two tablets of stone like the first ones.” The second tablets involve, not only the arousal of the essence of the soul, but also that — like the service associated with the first tablets — the essence permeate through our conscious powers.

This concept is also alluded to in the verse which precedes the entire narrative of the sin of the Golden Calf and the giving of the second tablets: “And He gave to Moshe... the two tablets of the testimony.” Our Sages note that the word לוחות is written in a short form לחת, lacking a vav. They interpret this as an allusion, teaching us that the right and the left tablets were equal.

The two tablets correspond to the positive mitzvos — the fundamental thrust of the first five commandments — and the negative commandments — the basic thrust of the second five commandments. Thus this relates to our Sages’ teaching, “G‑d made a single statement. I heard two things;” that the first two commandments, the affirmation of G‑d’s presence and the negation of other gods, and similarly the positive and negative dimensions of the Shabbos laws were communicated at once, because they share a singleness of purpose.7

This emphasizes how even the negative commandments which warn us to refrain from action are mitzvos and thus share the intent of establishing a tzavsa, connection and bond of unity, between G‑d and man and between Him and the world at large. Furthermore, this goal is reflected in the potential we are granted to fulfill the negative commandments through positive action, i.e., through studying the laws of the negative commandments, it is considered as if one actually observed them.

This leads to another concept, that the fundamental aspect of the negative commandments is the form in which they exist in their source. There they represent elevated levels of holiness as explained above in regard to the connection between the negation of idolatry and the 103 planes of Torah study. Through emphasizing the source of the negative commandments, a powerful dimension of the light of Torah is revealed.8 This light shines in all places, even where there are negative forces involved, negating those negative forces and nullifying their influence.9

This then represents the process of Ki Sisa, the elevation of the Jewish people, and its connection with the first and the second set of tablets. Both sets of tablets share the same thrust, the negation of idolatry and all the negative forces which stem from it,10 not only from the standpoint of faith, but also from the perspective of intellect. Because of the negative dimensions brought about by the sin of the Golden Calf, the second tablets also required the arousal of the essence of the soul. However, their ultimate intent is the same, revealing the complete level of service that can be achieved through Torah study, when that Torah study is elevated and enhanced through the service of “lifting up the heads of the children of Israel.”

* * *

2. A connection can be established between the above concepts and the Purim holiday which we have just celebrated. This is of greater significance this year, because this year the celebration of Purim is unique, involving a three day continuum of happiness for Purim is followed by Shushan Purim and Shabbos, which the Torah calls “the day of your rejoicing.”11

Purim is associated with the service of mesirus nefesh (self-sacrifice) for the Sanctification of G‑d’s name as epitomized by Mordechai’s refusal to bow for Haman. His example inspired the entire people as reflected by the verse, “And they told him of Mordechai’s people.” Throughout the entire year, the Jews displayed mesirus nefesh which transcended intellect. And to commemorate this, our celebration on Purim is Ad d’lo yoda, above the confines of intellect.

Purim, however, also has an effect on our conscious powers as reflected in our Sages’ interpretation of the verse, “And the Jews had light” as referring to the study of the Torah.11 Even the mitzvah of becoming drunk on Purim can be interpreted as becoming involved in the study of the secrets of the Torah as hinted at in our Sages’ statement, “When wine goes in, the secrets come out.”

In a complete manner, this involves the study of the teachings of Chassidus. And it is through this study that the belief in the potential for other gods [i.e., sources of influence] is nullified, not only from the perspective of faith, but also from the standpoint of our conscious powers. This will “raise up the heads of the children of Israel,” elevating their intellectual potential through the study of Chassidus. Furthermore, this will lead to the ultimate elevation, the coming of Mashiach12 who will reveal the secrets of the Torah and, indeed, reveal “the new Torah that will emerge from Me.”

* * *

3. Purim is thirty days before Pesach. As the Alter Rebbe writes in his Shulchan Aruch, thirty days before Pesach, we should begin studying the laws of the holiday. Similarly, since the celebration of the Pesach holiday involves many expenses, it is proper that efforts be made to provide everyone who lacks with their Pesach needs. Although there are organizations that are involved with these activities throughout the entire year, there must be an increase in these efforts in connection with the Pesach holiday, providing them with both food and clothing so that they can celebrate the holiday in an ample manner, as befits “free men.”

Our Sages teach that tzedakah brings close the redemption.13 May our efforts bring close the ultimate redemption and thus we will proceed to Parshas Vayakhel in its most complete expression, “the great congregation” which “will return here” with the coming of Mashiach. May it be in the immediate future.

4. Our Sages note that even after the Purim miracle, we remained servants of Achashverosh. Similarly, we are also “servants of Achashverosh.” Nevertheless, although we are in the midst of exile, the dominant nation in this exile is a generous country, a country who offers assistance to many nations and offers assistance to its Jewish residents. In appreciation, may G‑d grant that country success in its war against Basra and may we soon merit the fulfillment of the prophecy, “Who is that coming in soiled garments from Basra?” with the coming of redemption.

Parshas Tezaveh ZACHOR - PURIM | 8-15 Adar, 5778

This Shabbos is called Shabbos Zachor. It is very important that everyone come to shul to hear the Torah reading of the special Maftir, as it is a fulfillment of a Biblical law. Men have an obligation to fulfill this commandment and it is customary that women try to fulfill this commandment, when possible.

EREV SHABBOS FRI FEB 23rd 
Shacharis 7:00 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:27 pm

SHABBOS SAT FEB 24th 
Shacharis: 9:00 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:47 am/
Mincha 5:27 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:26 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT 
Kiddush Lite. Galit Lurya is co-sponsoring Shabbos Zachor Kiddush in honor of her birthday and sharing it with Moshe Rabbenu's birthday and yahrzeit. Meat cholent is prepared and sponsored by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9:00 am
Mon,Tue,Thu, Fri Shacharis 7:00 am  
Wed Shacharis 6:50 am /FAST OF ESTHER/
Sun -Tue Mincha 5:35 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:15 pm/

FAST OF ESTHER Wed Feb 28th
Fast Begins 5:20 am /16.1 degrees/
Shacharis: 6:50 am /Selichos/
Mincha 5:15 pm /Fast of Esther/
Fast Ends 6:23 pm /Eat after hearing megillah

PURIM – Wed Feb 28th & Thu Mar 1st  
Wed Maariv/Megilah Reading/Party 6:30 pm
Thu Shacharis 7:00 am /Megilah Reading/
Thu Mincha 1:30 pm /Megilah Reading/
Thu Maariv 8:00 pm

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MAGICAL PURIM PARTY AT CSTL WED FEB 28th 6:30 pm
Megilah Reading, Magician, Music, Dancing!  Chinese Food by Island Crust, Face-painting and Raffle. $20/adult, $10/child, $60/family. Pre-Pay http://www.cstlseattle.org/3182565

Pj library at MMSC Mon FEB 26 10:00 am
Special Purim Story time for kids at MMSC. Info: Chaya Elishevitz  chaya1818@gmail.com

PlaySpace for Children at CSTL –
The CSTL board, as well as other members, are working on creating a safe play space for our children in the parking lot behind the building. A committee has been recently established, Please email Tamar Azous at tamar@azous.com to help!

FARBRENGEN ALERT – CHES ADAR FRI FEB 23rd 4:00 PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the Yahrzeit of Moshe Rabbenu, Zayin Adar. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION 10:00 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10:00 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9:00 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9:00 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE. For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. NEW Sponsorships now available:  Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

BCMH Sushi & Trivia Melavah Malka SAT FEB 24th 8:30 pm
RSVP at: 
www.bcmhseattle.org

The Shmurah  Matzah Co-op is Open for Orders!
Each year before Pesach we make a group purchase of double wrapped palletized  Shmurah Matzah from the renown Lubavitch Matzah Bakery. We calculate the cost of the Matzah by adding the shipping and price per pound of the Shmurah Matzah to arrive at the final sale price without additional fees or markup. Shmurah Matzah is available in Wheat, Whole Wheat, Spelt, and reduced-price broken Matzahs for non-Seder meals. To order: sbrandeis@gmail.com

Rabbi Frand at BCMH Tue Mar 6th 7:45 pm
Drasha Topic: "Gratitude is a Two Way Street"

Kollel Avot Ubanim Grand Finale Motzei Shabbos, March 3rd 7:45 pm 
with Henrik Bothe, physical comedian, at Sephardic Bikur Holim. Sponosred by Dr. Elie and Miriam Levy. More info: www.seattlekollel.com

This year Affordable Kosher will not be opening Passover Depot.
However, all the merchandise will be available at the Safeway store at 3820 Rainier AVE S, Sea. 98118 Info:  Info@AffordableKosher.com

THE SEPHARDIC JEWISH BROTHERHOOD BIRTHRIGHT TRIP JUN 24-JULY 4
Tour Israel with amazing people with Greek, Sephardic, and Turkish backgrounds. The trip is totally FREE and anyone between the ages of 18 and 26 who hasn't been on a Birthright Israel trip before is eligible. What's more, we are working on creating an extended portion of the Trip to Salonica, Greece!
info@sephardicbrotherhood.com

INTENSIVE MODERN HEBREW AT UW
Learn Hebrew in Nine Weeks! www.summer.uw.edu. HadarKH@uw.edu

UPCOMING BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT
Here are a list of upcoming Bistro Night dinners at the Summit: June 19th, August 21st (rooftop outdoor event), October 23rd, December 11th. For more information or to make a reservation, please email Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org.

Jewish Overnight Summer Camp Scholarships! DEADLINE TUE MAR 6th
Camp gives children an opportunity to explore interests, make lifelong friends, and learn what Judaism means to them, while having loads of fun too! To help more children experience Jewish camp, the Federation awards need-based scholarships..
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Jewish Prisoner Services International (JPSI)
Please help with the very important chesed of Pidyon Shevuim.  Volunteers are needed to Visiting/Teaching at Jails and Prison, Advocacy, Answering letters from inmates, Web database development and database work. info@jpsi.org and list your area of interest, please include your preferred contact information  Thank You, Matthew Perry, Secretary/Treasurer JPSI, 206-617-2367

ARC Babysitting Class Sun Mar 11, 9:00 am-4:45 pm
For kids ages 11-15 in BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Cost: $85/BCMH Members , $95/Non-Members. Pay via Pay Pal at www.bcmhseattle.org  

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sunday, April 8, 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR ZACHOR
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507789/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tetzaveh-9th-Day-of-Adar-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

This week’s Torah portion begins with the command to light the Menorah, “And you shall command the children of Israel and they shall bring you pure olive oil for the light to keep a lamp burning constantly. It [the Menorah] should be prepared in the Tent of Meeting... from the evening until the morning.”

These verses raise several questions: a) Generally, the Torah uses the expressions “Command the children of Israel,” “Speak to the children of Israel,” and the like, when conveying a command. What is the intent behind the expression, “And you shall command the children of Israel,” which appears to imply that Moshe himself should be the originator of the command? b) Why must the oil be brought to Moshe when the Menorah was to be lit by Aharon? c) On the surface, the verse should say, “oil to illuminate,” not “oil for the light.” d) First, the verse speaks about “the light” (ma’or) in Hebrew and then, it mentions “a lamp” (ner). e) The first verse speaks of keeping “a lamp burning constantly,” while the second verse mentions it burning “from the evening until the morning.” f) The expression “to keep burning,” (le’ha’alos, literally “to raise up,”) is not ordinary. Seemingly, the verse should have said, “to kindle the light.”

There is also a problematic dimension in the conclusion of the Torah portion which describes the fashioning of the incense altar. On the surface, it would have been more appropriate to mention this together with all the other vessels of the Sanctuary in ParshasTerumah. Based on the principle, “the beginning is rooted in the end,” it follows that there is a connection between the two points and the explanation of the placement of the description of the incense altar is dependent on an understanding of the opening verse of the Torah portion.

The above difficulties can be resolved within the context of another concept. Parshas Tetzaveh possesses a unique dimension, being the only parshah in the Torah from the time Moshe was born onward in which Moshe’s name is not mentioned. Our Rabbis explain that the reason for this omission is that Moshe had asked G‑d, if He would not to forgive the Jews for the sin of the Golden Calf, to “Blot me out of Your book which You have written.” Since “the curse of a wise man will be fulfilled even when it was uttered conditionally,” it was in this parshah, that Moshe’s “curse” was fulfilled. Although the Torah is associated with Moshe’s name, as the prophet declares, “Remember the Torah of Moshe, My servant,” and Moshe’s name is constantly mentioned,1 e.g., “And G‑d spoke to Moshe,” “And G‑d said to Moshe,” in this parshah, Moshe’s name is omitted.

On the surface, the omission of Moshe’s name appears to have negative connotations. Nevertheless, since everything is controlled by G‑d Who is the essence of good and, “it is the nature of the good to do good,” we can assume that even the fulfillment of Moshe’s request to be blotted out from the Torah contains a positive dimension. Indeed, we are forced to say that it reflects a particularly elevated level.

To explain this concept: Although Moshe’s name is not mentioned, the words, “And you shall command,” refer to him. Furthermore, “And you” refers to the essence of Moshe’s being, a level higher than that communicated by his name. For a person’s name is not the essence of his being, it is an added dimension to his being which allows him to relate to others. Simply put, why does a person have a name? So that others can call him. In and of himself, he has no need for a name. Thus, before a person is given a name, the essence of a person exists. Therefore, even after the name is given, it represents an additional dimension, something other than the person’s essence.2

“And You,” on the other hand, reflects the essence of a person’s being, the dimension that is totally at one with the essence of G‑d. Thus, although the name Moshe reflects a very high level,3 it is merely a name which is an addition to the essence of his being. In contrast, “And you” refers to the essence of his being, the dimension which transcends all names and relates to G‑d’s essence. Thus, by using the expression “And you” rather than Moshe’s name, the Torah reveals a higher and deeper dimension of his being.

This explanation is, however, problematic. If “And you” represents a revelation of a higher dimension of Moshe’s being, how can we possibly say that his request to be “blotted out” of the Torah is fulfilled in Parshas Tetzaveh?

This difficulty can be explained as follows: The essence is above all revelation, not only revelation to others, but also, revelation to oneself. It cannot by revealed in one’s thoughts or feelings. The rationale for this is that every revelation has a particular medium of expression which defines — and thus limits — it. Since the essence is truly unlimited, there can be no medium which reveals it.4

Nevertheless, although on one hand, the essence does not come into revelation, that statement must be interpreted to mean that the essence never descends into the limits of the mediums of revelation. It does not mean that the essence never expresses itself. On the contrary, because it is the essence, it transcends both hiddenness and revelation and therefore, expresses itself — not within the usual mediums and limits of revelation — but as it is, on its essential level.5

Based on the above, we can appreciate how, by referring to him with the expression “And you,” G‑d “blotted Moshe out” of the Torah. Since “And you” refers to the essence, a level that transcends all revelation and names, Moshe — i.e., the existence of Moshe within the context of limitation — is blotted out.6 It is only the essence of his being that is expressed. And it is through the mitzvah of the Menorah that this quality is revealed.

This concept allows for the resolution of the difficulties mentioned previously. However, there is a need to explain one further concept: Lighting the Menorah is representative of the totality of a Jew’s service. He must kindle “the lamp of G‑d which is the soul of man” with “the light of Torah and the candle of mitzvah.” In this manner, his soul will shine with this light, true light, which will illuminate a person’s soul, his body, and his portion in the world at large, shedding light on those individuals around one. Indeed, this light will illuminate the entire world, showing how the world is connected with G‑dliness, how it is a dwelling for Him, blessed be He.7

The potential to carry out this service comes from Moshe, our teacher, as implied by the expressions, “And you shall command,” “and they shall bring you.” As explained above, “And you” refers to Moshe’s essence. Tetzaveh, the Hebrew for “command,” relates to the word tzavsah, meaning “connect.” When the essence of Moshe connects to “the children of Israel,” the potential is granted to illuminate the world. Furthermore, the oil is brought “for the light,” i.e., we reveal the source of light and revelation, including the ultimate source, G‑d’s essence.

This is made possible by being “crushed,” i.e., the service of bittul, “My soul will be as dust for all.” This grants the potential to “open my heart for Your Torah,” for a person to become one with the source of light present within the Torah, with G‑d’s essence.

This grants the potential “to keep a lamp burning constantly,” for light to shine at all times, even within the context of the limitations of this world — time and space. (The latter concept is alluded to by the phrase, “from the evening to the morning.”)

This concept is relevant to every Jew, because every Jew possesses a spark of Moshe our teacher.8 Thus, “And you” can refer to the essence of each Jew’s individual soul, the dimension which transcends revelation and hiddenness and is united with G‑d’s essence. This potential, which can also be openly expressed, generates the possibility to carry out our service in all situations.

Based on the above, we can interpret the verses cited previously as follows: “And you” teaches that each person must carry out this service himself. It is not sufficient that he appoint an agent, he must be personally involved. Furthermore, that involvement must relate to the essence of his being, “And you.”9

Tetzaveh refers, as explained above, to the concept of connection, establishing a bond with the worldly environment in which one lives. A person cannot live with his head in the heavens, preoccupied only with spiritual matters. He must involve himself with his environment. Indeed, since the essence of his being is involved in his service, the fact that he establishes a connection with his material environment will not be a hindrance. He will be able to express the highest levels of service on the lowest material plane.

This in turn must be communicated to “the children of Israel,”10 i.e., one cannot remain content with one’s own service. Instead, one must reach out to others in the spirit of “And you shall love your fellowman as yourself.”

This will allow one “to take to you,” to bring everything with which he comes in contact, into the connection with the essence of his being described above.

This service involves “olive oil,” i.e., taking olives, a bitter food, and transforming it into a positive quality. A person should not content himself with activities that are pleasant and sweet. Instead, he must involve himself with the material aspects of the world, entities which must be transformed. Nevertheless, through his service, he produces “pure” oil, transforming even these lowly elements and refining them.

This is made possible because one is “crushed,” i.e., one’s nature is dominated by the service of bittul, mentioned previously.11 And it is through this service, that one reaches “the light,” the very source of light as described above.

This service will “keep a lamp burning constantly.” In particular, “le’ha’alos,” translated as “to keep burning,” means to elevate. The above service elevates all the elements of our lowly world. Ner, (נר) the Hebrew for “lamp,” is also significant for it is numerically equivalent to 250, the total number of the limbs of the body, plus our two hands.12 These are the mediums through which a Jew elevates the material entities of this world.

This service continues “constantly,” and moreover, it is carried out, “from the evening until the morning,” i.e., it is drawn down into the limits of time.13 This all comes of a result of the fundamental connection with the level “And you,” the essence of a Jew, a potential which transcends all definition.

* * *

2. The above concepts also relate to the description of the incense altar in the conclusion of the parshah. One of the reasons why the incense altar is described at the conclusion of Parshas Tetzaveh and not together with the other vessels of the Sanctuary in Parshas Terumah is that the incense offering represented a unique service of a more elevated nature than the other services of the Sanctuary.

Indeed, its place in the Torah, at the conclusion of Parshas Tetzaveh, parallels its place in the order of the offerings in the Sanctuary, where it was the last of the offerings brought each day. It is last because it reflects the ultimate intent and the perfection of our service. Ketores, the Hebrew for incense also means “connection,” reflecting the connection with G‑d established through this sacrifice. In this vein, the Zohar uses the phrase b’chad ketirah esketrinah, “With one bond, I have connected myself.” Thus, it reflects a process of essential connection parallel to that explained above in connection with the verse, “And you shall command.”

To elaborate: The primary service in the Sanctuary and later, in the Beis HaMikdash, was the offering of sacrifices. The Hebrew for sacrifice, korban, is related to the word korov,meaning “close;” i.e., the sacrifices were a process of drawing close to G‑d.

The ketoros, however, represents a deeper bond. Not only is one close to G‑d, one establishes a bond of oneness with Him. Since the soul is enclothed within the body, there is room to think that oneness with G‑d is not an imperative; though one should approach Him, there is no need to rise totally above the limits of our material world.

The potential to establish such a bond of oneness stems from the service of “And you shall command” described above, the connection with the essence of the soul. As long as we are speaking about a limited dimension of the soul — i.e., any of the five names used to described it — a person’s entire existence will not be bound to G‑d. When the connection is established with the essence of the soul, it pervades and permeates every aspect of one’s being, including even one’s material existence.

This is reflected in the ultimate expression of the ketores, the incense offering of Yom Kippur, the day on which the Jews as they exist within the context of this material world “resemble the ministering angels.” On this day, the essence of the soul is revealed within a person’s physical body.

In microcosm, this level is reflected in the essential connection established through prayer each day as reflected in the Baal Shem Tov’s statement that, “It is an act of great Divine kindness that a person continues to exist after prayer.”

* * *

3. The above concepts can be connected to the uniqueness of the present date, the Ninth of Adar. On that day, the Previous Rebbe arrived in America with the intent of establishing his permanent dwelling there and establishing America as the center for the service of “spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward.” This reflects the connection between the essential light, “the wellsprings of Chassidus,” with the lowest of all levels. Indeed, this date marked the beginning of the primary efforts to spread Chassidus and Yiddishkeit in the outer reaches of the world at large.

The potential for this service is generated by the Moshe of the generation, the Previous Rebbe, whose utter bittul (the level of “crushed” mentioned previously) establishes a connection with the essence of the light.

In particular, the present year, the 51st anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s arrival is significant. We have already completed the first year in the second Jubilee cycle. Reaching this landmark calls for an intensification of our efforts and activities to carry out the service begun on the Ninth of Adar. Despite all the activity which has been carried out until now, until the redemption actually comes and this world is revealed as G‑d’s dwelling, the place where His essence is expressed, more activity is required. Each person must do his part in this effort as reflected in the Rambam’s statement that a person should always see himself as equally balanced between good and evil and the world as equally balanced between good and evil and with one good deed, he can bring salvation to himself and to the entire world.14

Parshas Terumah “When Adar Enters, Joy Increases” | 1-8 Adar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI FEB 16th  
Shacharis 6:50 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:16 pm

SHABBOS SAT FEB 17th 
Shacharis: 9:00 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:47 am/
Mincha 5:16 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:16 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT 
Kiddush Lite. Chulent (Fleishig) by Rabbi Mendy Levitin is sponsored by Rabbi Alter and Debbie Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9:00 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7:00 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 5:25 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:15 pm/

SUNDAY BRUNCH – SUNDAY 18th FEBRUARY 10:00 AM
Featuring Holocaust survivor, Mr Steve Adler. We’re hoping particularly to educate about the Holocaust and we encourage children to come too (provided they’re supervised by a parent and able to show appropriate behavior during the talk). We greatly appreciate the assistance of the Holocaust Center for Humanity of Seattle, and particularly Julia Thompson in facilitating this. Vernon Neppe, Chair of Education at CSTL.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PlaySpace for Children at CSTL – Committee Meeting Thu Feb 22nd  8:00pm
The CSTL board, as well as other members, are working on creating a safe play space for our children in the parking lot behind the building. A committee has been recently established, but we are looking for others who would like to provide feedback and support for this project. This can include input, as well as donations to an already existent fund. There is a scheduled meeting for Thursday, February 22 at 8pm. If you would like to be involved or have any questions, please email Tamar Azous at tamar@azous.com. We are really excited for the opportunity to continue to enhance the resources of our Shul.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – 1 ADAR FRI FEB 15th  3:00PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:00 am – Noon 
Followed by Cocao and Marshmallows  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

AVOS U’BONIM SEASON FINALE MELEVAH MALKA SAT NIGHT FEB 17th  7:00 PM
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video. Grand Raffle.  Prizes. Info: 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com. Generously sponsored

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10:00 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9:00 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9:00 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE. For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel Presidents’ Day Learning at the Kollel Mon Feb. 19th 
www.seattlekollel.com

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY HAMENTASHEN SALE SUN FEB 18th 10:00-11:00 am
The EBLA has Prune, Poppy, and Apricot Hamentashen available now for purchase, for $12 a dozen.  After Feb 26 they will have Strawberry and Raspberry. Available Sunday, February 18 from 10-11 am at the EB social hall.  You may also place your orders by calling 206 722-5500 and arrangements will be made for a convenient pick up time.

Kolel Avot Ubanim Grand Finale Motzei Shabbos, March 3rd 7:45 pm 
with Henrik Bothe, physical comedian, at Sephardic Bikur Holim. Sponosred by Dr. Elie and Miriam Levy. More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com   

Torah Day School Carnival Sunday, Feb. 25th  1:00 - 3:00 pm
Suggested donation: $10/person. The community is invited. Location: 1625 S Columbian Way, Sea. More info: 
www.tdsseattle.org  

Jewish Overnight Summer Camp Scholarships! DEADLINE TUE MAR 6th
Camp gives children an opportunity to explore interests, make lifelong friends, and learn what Judaism means to them, while having loads of fun too! To help more children experience Jewish camp, the Federation awards need-based scholarships.. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

PAVE GRANTS TO Create a DIY Jewish Experience: DEADLINE FEB 23rd 
PAVE is offering grants of up to $120 to 10 recipients ages 25 to 45 to create Jewish experiences with friends and family. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel President's Day Learning MON FEB 19th
More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Jewish Prisoner Services International (JPSI)
Please help with the very important chesed of Pidyon Shevuim.  Volunteers are needed to Visiting/Teaching at Jails and Prison, Advocacy, Answering letters from inmates, Web database development and database work. info@jpsi.org and list your area of interest, please include your preferred contact information  Thank You, Matthew Perry, Secretary/Treasurer JPSI, 206-617-2367

ARC Babysitting Class Sun Mar 11, 9:00 am-4:45 pm
For kids ages 11-15 in BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Cost: $85/BCMH Members , $95/Non-Members. Pay via Pay Pal at www.bcmhseattle.org  

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

BCMH Sushi & Trivia Melavah Malka SAT FEB  24th  8:30 pm
RSVP at: 
www.bcmhseattle.org

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9:00 PM – 11:00 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, 
taryno@jewishinseattle.org  or (206) 774-2217.

Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Day Sunday, April 8, 7:00 pm,  
At Ezra Bessaroth www.EzraBessaroth.net


REBBE’S SICHO FOR TERUMAH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507788/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Terumah-2nd-Day-of-Adar-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org 

This Shabbos falls in the beginning of the month of Adar, a month whose nature is characterized by our Sages’ statement, “When the month of Adar enters, we increase our joy.” Joy is a fundamental concept in the service of G‑d that is appropriate throughout the year as it is written, “Serve G‑d with joy.” To quote the Rambam: “The happiness with which a person should rejoice in the fulfillment of the mitzvos and the love of G‑d who commanded them is a great service.”

Since the service of G‑d must continue every moment of our lives, for “I was created only to serve my Creator,” it follows that at every moment of our lives, we must be involved in the joy mentioned above. Thus, theRama concludes his gloss to the Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim, “A good-hearted person is always celebrating.”

Beyond this happiness which is relevant at all times, there is an additional measure of happiness associated with the month of Adar. Indeed, that additional happiness is felt, “When the month of Adar enters,” at the very beginning of the month.

In particular, this applies on the present day which is the second of Adar, which together with the two days of Rosh Chodesh Adar represents achazakah, a three day continuum of happiness. Also, Shabbos is referred to as “the days of rejoicing.” And thus there is a unique dimension of happiness associated with the present day.

To focus on our Sages’ expression, “When the month of Adar enters, we increase our joy” in greater depth: In his commentary on the Talmud,Rashi explains the reason for our increase in happiness, “These are days of miracles for the Jewish people, Purim and Pesach.” The commentaries question why Rashi mentions Pesach. On the contrary, what connection do the miracles of Pesach share with the beginning of the month of Adar? And also, we do not find as great a stress on celebration and happiness in the month of Nissan. According to Rashi’s commentary, Nissan should also be characterized by happiness.1

Also, the expression, “increase our joy” implies that the joy is of the same nature as that experienced throughout the year, there is merely more of it. On the surface, since the joy of Adar is associated with unique miracles, it should be of a totally different kind than the joy experienced throughout the year.

The explanation of the above concepts is as follows: The celebration of Purim is associated with the renewal of our commitment to the Torah. Thus on the verse, “The Jews established and accepted,...” our Sages commented that “they now established what they had already accepted when the Torah had been given.” Although the Jewish people had willingly accepted the Torah at Mount Sinai, it was not affirmed as an intrinsic, unalterable part of their beings until the events of Purim. At the giving of Torah, “G‑d held the mountain over their heads like a tub,” forcing them to accept it, as it were. In contrast, in the era of Purim, the Jews accepted the Torah willingly.

Here we see the connection to Pesach because the ultimate intent of the exodus of Egypt was to lead to the giving of the Torah as G‑d promised Moshe, “When you take this people out of Egypt, you will serve G‑d on this mountain.”

Our Sages’ statement explaining the uniqueness of the Jews’ affirmation of the Torah on Purim is, however, problematic. The deficiency in the Jews’ acceptance of the Torah on Mount Sinai is that it was associated with miracles, that the influence of these miracles upon the Jewish people was so great, that they had no free will. Thus they were forced to accept the Torah. As Rashi emphasizes in his commentary to the above passage, however, the events of Purim were also associated with miracles. Thus, the question arises: Why are the events of Purim considered more of a willful acceptance of the Torah than the process which began with the exodus from Egypt and which was completed at Mount Sinai.

This question can be resolved within the context of the theme that the Purim miracle involves the transformation of darkness into light or to use the phraseology of the Megillah, “the month that was transformed.” The very same Achashverosh who ordered to have the Jews killed, ordered the Jews to do “what is right in their eyes.” In contrast, during the exodus from Egypt, the nature of the Egyptians was not transformed, and, on the contrary, it was necessary to wipe them out entirely through the miracles of the Red Sea.

To explain the contrast in a slightly different manner: The essence of the Pesach miracles was the revelation beyond the limits of nature. “The King of kings, the Holy One, blessed be He, revealed Himself to them and redeemed them.” Thus, it was the intensity of the revelation which nullified the opposing forces. On Purim, in contrast, the miracles were enclothed within the forces of nature and thus, the essential emphasis was on the transformation of the nature of the Jews’ setting within the world and not on the nullification of the opposing forces.

Thus these two approaches are also reflected in the Jews’ relationship with the Torah. After the exodus from Egypt, the emphasis was on receiving the revelation from Above, responding to G‑d’s prompts. In contrast, the acceptance of the Torah on Purim was characterized by an inner desire of the Jewish people, an arousal stemming from their own initiative.

The uniqueness of the miracles of Purim evokes a happiness of a different nature, a happiness which surpasses understanding, ad d’lo yoda.Happiness and miracles are interrelated for “happiness breaks through boundaries” and similarly, miracles represent a breaking through the boundaries of nature.

Although in general, all miracles represent the breaking of the boundaries of nature, in particular, there is an aspect of the Purim miracles which surpasses all other miracles in this quality. Breaking through boundaries does not represent the utter nullification of the limiting forces. Rather, it implies that a boundary exists and yet it becomes broken. Thus, since Pesach is associated with the revelation from above, its miracles involve the nullification — but not the breaking through — of nature’s boundaries. In contrast, in Purim, the boundaries of nature were not nullified. Nevertheless, although the natural setting remained in force, a miracle above nature “broke through.”

Since the miracles of Pesach represent a nullification of all the opposing forces, the redemption that follows this nullification is not as great a new development. In contrast, in regard to the miracles of Purim, even after the miracles transpired, Achashverosh remained in power. And therefore, the fact that in such a setting, Haman’s decrees were nullified and Mordechai and the Jewish people as a whole were given positions of power, reflects how the power of redemption breaks through the boundaries of exile.

For this reason, the joy — which breaks through boundaries — of Purim is greater than that of other holidays, transcending all limits, ad d’lo yoda. Since the Megillah associates the totality of the month with the Purim miracle, describing it as “the month which was transformed,” the joy of Purim affects the entire month and therefore, “When the month of Adar enters, we increase our joy.”

Rashi, however, also mentions the miracles of Pesach because the ultimate of happiness involves the appreciation of the advantages of both the miracles of Pesach and the miracles of Purim and the fusion of these two services.

The miracles of Pesach possess an advantage; they reveal a higher level of G‑dliness, a dimension which transcends nature entirely. Nevertheless, this revelation negates — and is not internalized within — the limits of our worldly existence. Thus the miracles of Purim are a necessary complement for they involve the limits of nature. Nevertheless, they also require the complement of Pesach for they are lacking the dimension which transcends nature.

To restate the concept in other terms: The miracles of Pesach represented the redemption from Egypt. However, Egypt was nullified, it was not transformed into good. In contrast, the miracles of Purim did reflect the transformation of Achashverosh. However, the redemption of Purim was not complete. Even afterwards, we remained subjects of Achashverosh.

Thus, the ultimate of redemption reflects the fusion of both Pesach and Purim, that the forces of nature be transformed and not nullified, but that the redemption be complete and not partial. This will be revealed in the Era of Redemption when “as in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders;” i.e., there will be a revelation from Above which resembles — indeed which transcends — the revelations of the exodus from Egypt. Simultaneously, that revelation will be connected with the transformation — not the nullification — of the world as reflected by the prophecy, “I will transform the nations, [making them] pure of speech.”

Based on the above, we can also resolve the problem raised originally that, our Sages’ expression “When the month of Adar enters, we increase our joy,” implies that the happiness of Adar is merely an increase, but not of a different nature, than the happiness experienced throughout the year.

The happiness of Purim which results from the miraculous breaking through the boundaries of nature [but doing so within the context of nature as explained above] is also connected with the Jews’ reaffirmation of their acceptance of the Torah on Purim. Both of the concepts share an emphasis on internalizing G‑dliness within the world. The Jews’ willful acceptance of the Torah is paralleled by the transformation of the worldly aspects of our environment.

The reaffirmation of the acceptance of the Torah on Purim must be drawn down throughout the entire year, affecting the totality of our service. Therefore, the happiness of Purim is drawn down throughout the entire year, emphasizing how Torah permeates (rather than breaks) our worldly environment.2 Thus, the happiness associated with the acceptance of the Torah is of the same nature as that of Purim. Purim, however, represents an intensification of that happiness each year.

2. There is a connection between the above concepts and this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Terumah. Parshas Terumah continues the theme of the giving of the Torah, begun in Parshas Yisro. The giving of the Torah emphasizes how the Torah is given within the context of our material world. Parshas Terumah develops this theme further, revealing how a Sanctuary for G‑d can be established within this material world, how physical entities can become a dwelling for Him.

To explain: On the opening verse of Parshas Terumah, “And you shall take an offering for Me,” our Sages comment:

There is a sale in which the one who makes the sale is sold together with the merchandise. The Holy One, blessed be He, said to Israel, “I sold My Torah to you, it is as if I sold Myself with it.... I gave you My Torah, I cannot part from it, nor can I tell you not to take it. Wherever you go, make a dwelling for Me and I will dwell within. This is what is meant by the command, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary.”3

Indeed, the construction of the Sanctuary represents the fulfillment of the intention of the giving of the Torah, that G‑dliness be drawn down to the world as it exists within its own context. There are two dimensions to the revelation of the giving of the Torah: the spiritual realms descend to the material and the material realms ascend to the spiritual.

Parshas Yisro represents the descent of the spiritual into the material, while the construction of the Sanctuary described in Parshas Terumahreflects how the world, as it exists within its own context, becomes a dwelling for G‑d.4 Thus, Parshas Terumah is appropriate for the month of Adar, a month which as explained above, is associated with the transformation — and not the nullification — of the framework of material existence within its own context.5

In particular, there are two dimensions to Parshas Terumah: a) The connection between Terumah and the Torah. Terumah (תרומה) can be broken up into Torah (תורה) and mem (מ), the mem alluding to the forty days in which the Torah was transmitted to Moshe. Thus, Terumah relates to the Torah as it is transmitted within this world. b) Terumah refers to the physical entities from which the Sanctuary was made, the gold, silver, brass, and the like which became a dwelling for G‑d.

These two dimensions which exist within Parshas Terumah parallel the two aspects of Purim described above. The concept of the transmission of the Torah relates to the dimension of Purim associated with the Jews’ willful reaffirmation of their commitment to the Torah. And the concept of the physical entities of the world becoming part of G‑d’s dwelling parallels the transformation of Achashverosh and the natural setting which accompanied the Purim miracle.

The ultimate expression of this process of transformation will be realized in the era of Redemption. At present, “we are servants of Achashverosh,” and our efforts of transforming our worldly environment are therefore limited. It will not be until the era of Redemption that this process will be completed in a full sense.

Similarly, although in every place and in every era, the Divine Presence dwells within the Sanctuary, in microcosm within the Jewish heart and within each particular Jewish home, nevertheless, the ultimate expression of a dwelling for G‑d will be in the era of Redemption, in the Third Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d established by Your hands.”

3. The above concepts should also be applied within our actual conduct. Thus, reflection on the above should produce: a) an increase in Torah study for as explained above, the word Terumah includes the word Torah. b) An increase in giving to tzedakah, giving our financial resources for a G‑dly purpose. Jewish law requires one to give a minimum of ten percent of one’s capital, and preferably twenty percent. At present, however, one should give without any reservations at all.6 c) Making one’s home and one’s environment, a dwelling for G‑d, a Sanctuary in microcosm. d) Influencing gentiles to observe the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants and thus, preparing for the fulfillment of the prophecy, “I will transform the nations to a clear speech.”7 e) Spreading the mitzvos of Purim through the Purim campaign. There should not be a single Jew in a far removed corner of the world who does not have the opportunity to fulfill all the Purim mitzvos.

And all the above should be carried out with joy, the increased happiness of the month of Adar, which breaks through the boundaries of the world, transcending all limitations.

These activities will enhance the wondrous nature of the present year, causing G‑d to nullify all the undesirable elements associated with Haman and his household. On the contrary, the nations of the world will — as they did to Mordechai — elevate the Jews and bring them to positions of power and influence.

These two developments, the nullification of the enemies of the Jewish people and the assistance the gentile nations will offer the Jews, represent a foretaste of the era of Redemption, when we will witness the fulfillment of the prophecies, “And I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the earth,” and “And all your brethren of the nations shall bring an offering for G‑d... in a pure vessel.”

May we soon no longer have to content ourselves with a foretaste for the redemption will have actually come. Thus, we will “join redemption to redemption,” and even before celebrating the redemptions of Purim and Pesach, experience the ultimate and complete redemption. May it be in the immediate future.

Parshas Mishpatim SHEKALIM – MEVARCHIM ADAR | 24 Shevat – 1 Adar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI FEB 9th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:05 pm

SHABBOS SAT FEB 10th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Adar 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:53 am/
Mincha 5:05 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite

Maariv/Havdalah 6:06 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush Lite. Chulent (Fleishig) by Rabbi Mendy Levitin is sponsored anonymously in the memory and merit of Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka Schneersonעייה who’s yahrzeit was this week. Her empowering role as the matriarch of Lubavitch should elevate and inspire the stewardship of all Jewish women. Whether in the home, the community or the workplace, we should strive to emulate her qualities as an  ‏עובד השם.  ”Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Wed Shacharis 7 am  
Thu & Fri Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH ADAR/
Sun -Wed Mincha 5:15 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:15 pm/

SUNDAY BRUNCH – SUNDAY 18th FEBRUARY 10 AM
Featuring Holocaust survivor, Mr Steve Adler. We’re hoping particularly to educate about the Holocaust and we encourage children to come too (provided they’re supervised by a parent and able to show appropriate behavior during the talk). We greatly appreciate the assistance of the Holocaust Center for Humanity of Seattle, and particularly Julia Thompson in facilitating this. Vernon Neppe, Chair of Education at CSTL.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – 25th  SHEVAT FRI FEB 9th   3PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of the Yahrzeit of  Rebetzin Menucha Rochel Slonim. 
http://chabadhebron.com/chof-daled-shevat-yarzeit-of-menucha-rochel-slonim/  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menucha_Rochel_Slonim

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

PAINT AND SIP – SUN FEB 11th 7:30PM
Hosted by Myriam Caro. A ChabadofSeattle.org project.  Info: 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
Followed by Cocao and Marshmallows  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

AVOS U’BONIM MELEVAH MALKA SAT NIGHT FEB 10th 
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video. Grand Raffle.  Prizes. Info:  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com.  Generously sponsored

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Jewish Overnight Summer Camp Scholarships! DEADLINE TUE MAR 6th
Camp gives children an opportunity to explore interests, make lifelong friends, and learn what Judaism means to them, while having loads of fun too! To help more children experience Jewish camp, the Federation awards need-based scholarships..
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Teen Israel Experience Scholarships! DEADLINE MAR 26th 
A journey to Israel is a life-changing experience for a Jewish teen. Young people who have visited our Jewish homeland return with wonderful stories about gaining a stronger Jewish identity. The Federation offers generous need-based scholarships, with support from the Samis Foundation. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

PAVE GRANTS TO Create a DIY Jewish Experience: DEADLINE FEB 23rd 
PAVE is offering grants of up to $120 to 10 recipients ages 25 to 45 to create Jewish experiences with friends and family. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel President's Day Learning MON FEB 19th,
More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Jewish Prisoner Services International (JPSI)
Please help with the very important chesed of Pidyon Shevuim.  Volunteers are needed to Visiting/Teaching at Jails and Prison, Advocacy, Answering letters from inmates, Web database development and database work. info@jpsi.org and list your area of interest, please include your preferred contact information  Thank You, Matthew Perry, Secretary/Treasurer JPSI, 206-617-2367

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com     

BCMH Sushi & Trivia Melavah Malka – SAT FEB 24th  8:30 pm,
RSVP at: 
www.bcmhseattle.org

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

REBBITZIN SEIGELBAUM FROM BAT AYIN RETURNS TO SEATTLE FEB 10th & 11th 
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

Mercaz Shabbaton Feb 10-11th 
With Rav Natan Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva of Bat Ayin Yeshiva. Sponsorship available. Email: 
info@mercazseattle.org

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEKALIM
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507786/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Mishpatim-25th-Day-of-Shevat-5751-1991.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

There are four special Torah readings which take place before the month of Nisan — Shekalim, Zachor, Parah and HaChodesh. Every concept in Torah contains a lesson in how we should lead our lives; the word “Torah” in fact stems from the word “lesson” (hora’ah). This is especially true for the four parshiyos, which have been singled out from the regular order of Torah readings to be repeated in this specific order. Parshas Shekalim, since it is the first of the four, has special significance among them. Its lesson is of general significance, and conveys the fundamental and primary principles which should guide our G‑dly service.

The basic idea of giving Shekalim is that of tzedakah (charity). This is particularly true today after the Beis HaMikdash has been destroyed, and the mitzvah of giving shekalim in its original form is no longer possible. Today this mitzvah is commemorated through giving a coin worth half of the standard currency (similar to the half-Shekel) to tzedakah on the Fast of Esther.

Tzedakah represents all the mitzvos, “outweighs” them all” and is called the mitzvah by the Jerusalem Talmud. In addition, tzedakah must be done constantly, for two reasons:

a) G‑d created a world order in which there is giving and receiving. This was the reason that need and want are present in the world — in order that there be the possibility of performing tzedakah and kindness.

Tzedakah, therefore, is an intrinsic part of the creation. This is reflected in the fact that a command to give tzedakah was not really necessary: it is a logical imperative, and therefore binding on all human beings. It is even part of the nature of animals, which are kind to their children and, often, even to others.

Since tzedakah is an essential feature of the nature of the world, it is present as long as the world still exists, i.e. constantly.

b) Everything G‑d gives to the world is similar to His “tzedakah.” His gracious endowment of our very life and sustenance is clear proof of His great kindness. Nevertheless, this kindness is granted middah k’neged middah — commensurate to our actions. We must therefore involve ourselves in charitable acts in order to merit His “tzedakah.” And since we are constantly dependent upon His tzedakah, our charitable acts must also be constant.

This explains the fundamental importance of Parshas Shekalim over the over three special parshiyos. It is connected with tzedakah, which is constant, and applies in all places and situations.

2. These two explanations actually correspond to two different dimensions of tzedakah. Tzedakah in the simple sense is possible only when the recipient is lacking something. However, this is only when a person gives tzedakah. There is a second type of tzedakah — G‑d’s tzedakah — which comes even when the recipient is not really lacking anything at all. Instead of merely taking one out of an impoverished state, His tzedakah could be compared to granting someone wealth.

This idea can be seen from Jewish law, which states that one must give tzedakahin proportion to one’s ability. It is well known that G‑d Himself fulfills all the mitzvos, and therefore He must give tzedakah in proportion to His limitless, unfathomable greatness. The same idea finds expression even in our performance of this mitzvah. One category of tzedakah is that of gemilus chassadim — giving an interest-free loan. Gemilus chassadim does not have the same qualifications of tzedakah which is in the form of a donation. In order for a person to be eligible to receive a donation, halachah requires that he be needy. If his total worth is 200 zuz or more, he is not permitted to receive donations; only if it is 199 (which is the numerical value of tzedakahzuz or less. Gemilus chassadim, on the other hand, can even be given to a wealthy person.

These two dimensions of tzedakah are actually interdependent, for only when the lower form (to fulfill a lack) is carried out does G‑d do His part and give a boundless blessing from Above.

The explanation of this is as follows: only in a low situation (where there is something lacking) is it necessary for G‑d to give a boundless revelation. We see this from the Talmud’s (Megillah 13b) statement that the shekalim given by the Jewish people in the generation of Haman nullified his evil decree. This must have permanent significance, for the Torah is not a history book. What lesson can we derive from the effect brought about by their shekalim?

The explanation of this is that in order to nullify the powerful evil embodied by Haman, it was necessary to have a revelation that completely transcended the order of worlds (seder hishtalshelus). When there is no such threat, a lower revelation will suffice; but the severity of the lack elicits a limitless, revealed response from G‑d. We therefore see that this level which transcends seder hishtalshelus is revealed only where there is lack. Similarly in our case: the higher dimension of tzedakah (G‑d’s response) is closely connected with the tzedakahgiven to fulfill someone’s want.

These same two dimensions of tzedakah are reflected in the two types of shekalim — that given for the communal sacrifices (terumas hamizbe’ach) and that given for the construction of the base of the Mishkan (terumas ho’adonim).The general function of sacrifices is to achieve atonement, as the verse itself says (Ex. 30:15), “to atone for your souls.” Atonement is necessary only where there is something lacking, and therefore corresponds to the first dimension of tzedakah— the level of G‑dliness commensurate with the worlds. The second type of shekalim, however, involved the construction of the Mishkan, which was constructed as the place for G‑d’s presence to be revealed. This revelation from Above — even where there is no lack per se — matches the second dimension of tzedakah, the infinite G‑dly revelation.

We can find these same two dimensions within the Mishkan itself. There are two opinions as to the primary function of the Mishkan and Beis HaMikdash. The Rambam holds that its main purpose is the offering of sacrifices, while the Ramban finds foremost importance in its role as the place for the revelation of G‑d’s presence — especially above the Aron, the Holy Ark which contained the tablets.

[Their variant conclusions reflect the varied nature of their works. The Rambamintended his Mishneh Torah purely as work of halachah, governing how peopleshould act. He therefore stressed the service performed in the Beis HaMikdash,that of the sacrifices.

The Ramban, on the other hand, was explaining the Chumash, which contains the command, “Make for Me a Mikdash so that I shall dwell among you.” He therefore stressed the G‑dly revelation (the fulfillment of the promise, “I shall dwell”) in the Mishkan. This fits particularly well with the general spirit of the Ramban’s commentary, which (as he writes in the introduction to this work) contains Kabbalah. This revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah is closely related to the revelation of G‑dliness.]

The offering of sacrifices therefore corresponds to fulfilling a lack (atonement) and bringing a revelation commensurate with the world. The revelation of G‑d’s presence corresponds with bringing down an infinite revelation which transcends the worlds. And since the Mishkan contained both, it must also have a third level of revelation higher than both of them — a G‑dly revelation that has the power to unite the finite and infinite together.

Since everything has its source in Torah, it must contain these two dimensions of finite and infinite revelation. We find them reflected in the aspect of Torah which existed in the Mishkan, the Aron, which contained the two tablets.

We find something curious in the verses which describe the Aron (Ex. 25:10,17,21). First the Torah describes the construction of the Aron and the placing of the tablets inside. It then describes the Aron’s cover, the kapores. It then repeats the placing of the tablets as follows: “And you shall place the cover above the Aron and place in the Aron the testimonies [i.e. the Tablets] that I will give you.” This expression is most curious, since it speaks of the tablets being placed only after the Aron was covered, implying that the tablets were placed on top of the Aron rather than inside!

The Or HaChayim HaKadosh says that this alludes to the fact that the tablets represented a higher spiritual level than the kapores. From this we see the two dimensions discussed above embodied in the tablets. The tablets within the Aronrepresent the first level, that of a finite level of G‑dliness being drawn down intothe world. But there is a second dimension of Torah which is higher than the previous level. This is Torah not as it comes down to affect the world, but as it is itself united with G‑d. A similar idea is reflected in the existence of keruvim above the Aron. The two keruvim represented G‑d’s love for the Jewish people, a love which transcends even G‑d’s connection with Torah.

We find these two categories of finite and infinite within Torah even in our generation. Pnimiyus HaTorah is infinite in comparison with Nigleh; so too more recent revelations of Chassidus Chabad in comparison with earlier works in Pnimiyus HaTorah.

This can be understood in view of the Alter Rebbe’s famous parable of a king whose son became deathly ill, his only cure being to crush the most precious jewel of his crown, mix it with water and feed it to him. When he finally gave the cure, the son’s mouth was firmly closed; yet he still poured the mixture over his mouth in the hope that perhaps a single drop would enter and save his life. The same applies to the revelation of Chassidus, which is G‑d’s cure to awaken us from the darkness of exile and give us new life and energy in serving G‑d.

To analyze this further: being faint and weak alludes to two opposite traits. On the one hand it indicates a lack of life, corresponding to the first type of tzedakah— filling an emptiness. On the positive side, though, the word “weak” (chalosh)also means “lottery” (goral), which, as explained regarding Purim and Yom Kippur, represents a tremendously high revelation. Within the person, this is reflected by the fact that all his senses and faculties are hidden within him and raised to a higher internal level.

In the parable, the son swallows the cure, which becomes part of him. The same applies to Chassidus, which becomes internalized and brings an awakening and energizing of the individual. This applies in the both extremes we have been mentioning: a) It fulfills that which was lacking, and b) Brings a tremendous revelation from Above. Consequently, even someone who is “unconscious,” G‑d forbid, is awakened from his faint and proceeds to then pick up and drink all the other drops which did not find their way into him. As mentioned above, the highest revelations come to the place of need, and accomplish not only a fulfillment of that need but the greatest form of revealed good. The most complete revelation of this is the revelation of a dimension of Torah higher than both Nigleh and Pnimiyus, which will be experienced fully in the Messianic Age.

3. The practical lesson from all this is as follows: Parshas Shekalim stresses tzedakah, as does the month of Adar (which we bless this Shabbos), which contains Purim and the mitzvah of matanos l’evyonim. Every individual must therefore add in tzedakah. This applies in the physical sense, through giving money, food and drink. It also applies in the spiritual sense, through helping another person, giving advice, learning with him, etc.

The main thing, however, is the tzedakah of G‑d, which includes His revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah, including both its study and it being brought to others. May it be G‑d’s will that the increased study of Chassidus bring us to the immediate revelation of Mashiach, then we will be able to learn the secrets of Torah directly from him, since he is both a king and a teacher (melech and rav).This is indeed part of the king’s function — to provide all the needs of his subjects.

The appointment of Melech HaMashiach has in reality already occurred, as we say in the verse (Ps. 89:21), “I have found My servant Dovid; I have anointed him with My holy oil.” All that is needed is for the people to accept him as king and for the actualization of the total unity (hiskashrus) between the king and the people — with the complete and total redemption.

Parshas Yisro THE TEN UTTERANCES | 17-24 Shevat, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI FEB 2nd  
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:54 pm

SHABBOS SAT FEB 3rd 
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:58 am/
Mincha 4:54 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite

Maariv/Havdalah 5:55 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Thank you to Kiddish sponsor is Yaakov Kimelfeld, in memory of his father, Moshe ben Yaakov ZT”L, whose yahrzeit is 19th Shevat.  We will also have a delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am 
Sun -Wed Mincha 5:05 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:55 pm/

SUNDAY BRUNCH – SUNDAY 18th FEBRUARY 10 AM
Featuring Holocaust survivor, Mr Steve Adler. We’re hoping particularly to educate about the Holocaust and we encourage children to come too (provided they’re supervised by a parent and able to show appropriate behavior during the talk). We greatly appreciate the assistance of the Holocaust Center for Humanity of Seattle, and particularly Julia Thompson in facilitating this. Vernon Neppe, Chair of Education at CSTL.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – 17 SHEVAT FRI FEB 2nd  3PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of Chof-Beis Shevat, yahrzeit of the Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka Schneerson. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

PAINT AND SIP – SUN FEB 11th 7:30PM
Hosted by Myriam Caro. A ChabadofSeattle.org project.  Info: 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
.Followed by Cocao and Marshmallows  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

PLEASE HELP US PAY FOR CSTL SECURITY
From the CSTL Board:  The membership of CSTL has spoken, and the consensus is that we wish to maintain a security presence at CSTL on Shabbat and chaggim. A four-hour shift (the minimum available) costs us $160, a total of around $10,000/year.  We are asking all families and member units to donate $100 to this fund.  To Donate:  
www.CSTLSeattle.org.

AVOS U’BONIM MELEVAH MALKA SAT NIGHT FEB 3rd  
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video.    Grand Raffle.  Prizes.  Info:  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com.  Generously sponsored by Rabbi Elazar and Esther Bogomilsky

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

KOSHER FOOD BANK Wed Feb 7th 5:00-6:30 pm,
Jewish Family Service's kosher food bank for the month of February. RSVP to:
emagasis@jfsseattle.org  if you plan to attend.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Jewish Prisoner Services International (JPSI)
Please help with the very important chesed of Pidyon Shevuim.  Volunteers are needed to Visiting/Teaching at Jails and Prison, Advocacy, Answering letters from inmates, Web database development and database work. info@jpsi.org and list your area of interest, please include your preferred contact information  Thank You, Matthew Perry, Secretary/Treasurer JPSI, 206-617-2367

Shiur for Women "Parsha & Prayer" Mon Feb. 5, 7:30 pm
Given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash.

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

REBBITZIN SEIGELBAUM FROM BAT AYIN RETURNS TO SEATTLE FEB 10th & 11th 
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

Mercaz Shabbaton Feb 10-11th 
With Rav Natan Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva of Bat Ayin Yeshiva. Sponsorship available. Email: 
info@mercazseattle.org

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR YISRO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507785/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Yisro-18th-Day-of-Shvat-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

On the verse, “And G‑d spoke all these words,” our Sages commented:

This teaches that the Holy One, blessed be He, recited the Ten Commandments in a single statement, something which is impossible for a human being to do. If so, what is meant by [the statement] of the commandments individually, “I am the L‑rd,...” “You shall have no other gods...”? He returned and explicitly mentioned each commandment in its own right.

We find the concept that G‑d recited two commandments simultaneously mentioned in two other instances in connection with the Ten Commandments: a) Our Sages relate that the first two commandments: “I am the L‑rd, Your G‑d” and “You shall have no other gods” were recited as a single commandment. b) In the first account of the Ten Commandments, it is written, “Remember the Shabbos,” and in the second account, it is written, “Observe the Shabbos.” Our Sages explain that both these commands were given as one.

The above concepts raise several questions. Firstly, since G‑d ultimately repeated each of the Ten Commandments individually, of what value was it to mention them all together? Also, every narrative in the Torah is intended to be a lesson in the service of G‑d. What lesson can we learn from G‑d’s mention of all the commandments together, something which is obviously beyond our human potential?

Furthermore, it is necessary to understand: Why after the entire Ten Commandments were recited together was this phenomenon repeated in regard to the first two commandments and then repeated again in regard to the commandments for the Shabbos?

These questions can be resolved on the basis of our Rabbis’ interpretation of the verse: “And G‑d spoke all these words, saying.” Generally, the word “saying,” laimor in Hebrew, implies a charge to relay a commandment to someone else. In this instance, however, that interpretation is not appropriate for the entire Jewish people were present. Hence, laimor is interpreted to mean “to repeat,” to repeat the words of Torah, in a manner that the words of Torah spoken by a Jew will be “G‑d’s word.” Our mouths will be merely intermediaries to communicate G‑d’s Torah.

Since the concept of G‑d’s relating all the Ten Commandments in a single statement and the concept that our Torah study is a reflection of G‑d’s word are derived from the same verse, we can assume that they are interconnected. Although it is impossible for man, with human power, to make two statements at the same time, since our study of Torah is not human speech, but G‑d’s word, we can also emulate this transcendent level.

To explain this concept in terms of our service, we must examine our Sages’ statements in regard to the Shabbos commandments: Our Sages taught:

“Remember” and “Observe” were recited in one statement. Similarly, the commandments “Those who transgress it (the Shabbos) will surely die,” and “On the Shabbos day, [offer] two lambs (whose sacrifice transgresses the Shabbos laws)” were recited in one statement. This is what is meant by the expression, “G‑d made a single statement. I heard two things.”

This quote reflects how the positive commandments — “Remember” and the offering of the Shabbos sacrifices — and the negative commandments — “Observe” and the prohibition against work — are in a essence a single matter. Both together express the holiness of the Shabbos. The fulfillment of the positive commandment and the observance of the prohibition have a single intent, increasing the holiness of the Shabbos. Therefore, the fulfillment of the positive commandment of offering the Shabbos sacrifices does not merely supersede the Shabbos prohibitions. In this instance, offering the Shabbos sacrifices — which involves performing forbidden labors — is an expression of the negative commandment as well for the goal of both the positive and negative commandments are the same.

To explain the above concept: The difference between positive commandments and negative commandments is that positive commandments involve “doing good,” performing a positive activity which draws down G‑dly light within a person’s soul and within the world at large. In contrast, the negative commandments involve “turning away from evil,” separating oneself from activities and elements which are against G‑d’s will. Our negation of these elements and activities nullifies and removes the spirit of impurity in the world at large.

Nevertheless, although the negative commandments appear to involve merely refraining from undesirable activity, they also possess a positive dimension. This can be inferred from the Maharsha’s interpretation of our Sages’ statement that Chabakuk established all the 613 commandments on a single base, “A righteous man will live by his faith.” The Maharsha explains that the multitude of mitzvosis only from the perspective of man, from G‑d’s perspective, all mitzvos share a single thrust.

The Maharsha continues, associating this concept with G‑d’s statement of the Ten Commandments in a single utterance, explaining that this reflects how He and His mitzvos are one, and that there is no multiplicity. Similarly, by coupling the mitzvah of believing in G‑d with the prohibition against other gods, all the positive and negative commandments are coupled together. This is impossible, however, for a human being limited by the constraints of material and temporal existence to emulate. Nevertheless, Chabakuk’s directive again included all the mitzvos in one single command, reflecting how even after the mitzvos are separated into positive and negative commandments, they can be unified in a single thrust.

To focus on this concept: All the commandments, even the negative commandments, are intended for a single purpose: to reveal G‑d. The manner in which the negative commandments perform this positive function does not involve carrying out a particular activity, but rather, refraining from action.

This is because their source is a higher dimension of G‑dliness which transcends the means of expression we have available. There cannot be an act which draws down this source within the world — as is the case in regard to the positive commandments — because this level cannot be comprehended. All we can do is ensure that we do not prevent the expression of these levels by transgressing these commandments and thus, creating obstacles.

Within this context, we can understand the function of the negative commandments in the Era of Redemption. All the mitzvos, both the positive and the negative commandments will still be in effect in that era for, “This Torah will never be rejected.” Yet one might ask: In that era, after “the spirit of impurity has been removed from the world,” what will be the function of the negative commandments? However, on the basis of the above, this question can be resolved. Then, we will realize the true purpose of the negative commandments, i.e., that it is not the negation of evil as at present, but rather drawing down those transcendent dimensions of G‑dliness of which we can have no positive appreciation.

At present, the negative commandments involve the nullification of undesirable elements because we live in a world where such negative elements exist. Thus, we are given commandments that involve refraining from activities so that we will not grant strength to these undesirable entities and thus hinder the revelation of G‑dliness.

After the negation of the evil, however, when “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the earth,” the negative commandments will perform a higher function. Man and the world at large are capable of receiving only a limited measure of G‑dly revelation, that which is appropriate for them. A G‑dly revelation which transcends their existence can be appreciated only through the approach of negation, and this will be the role of the negative commandments in the Era of Redemption.

Thus from G‑d’s perspective, all the mitzvos both the positive and the negative commandments, have a single goal — “G‑d made a single statement” — the revelation of G‑dliness.1 However, since the intent is revelation within a world of division and this intent is accomplished through the service of man whose personality is similarly diversified, “I heard two things;” i.e., as the mitzvos are applied by man, there are differences.

With the giving of the Torah to the Jewish people, G‑d nullified the decree separating the spiritual realms from the physical. This allowed for the potential for man to realize and express the oneness of the mitzvos as they exist from G‑d’s perspective through his own service. Although by nature, man is limited and diversified, the giving of the Torah extended the opportunity of reflecting G‑d’s transcendent oneness in our approach to mitzvos.2

Man must begin by approaching the mitzvos with a recognition of the differences between the positive and the negative commandments and the differences in their intent, drawing down holiness and the negation of evil. The ultimate purpose, however, is to appreciate the Torah and mitzvos as they exist within G‑d’s perspective, that they are mediums for the revelation of G‑d’s will within the world. Thus, even the negative commandments have a positive purpose. They afford man a chance to develop a connection with G‑d, for they are also mitzvosand thus are a means of tzavsa, connection with G‑d. Indeed, they establish a connection with the higher levels of G‑dliness to which we can relate to only in this manner.

In this context, we can understand Rabbi Akiva’s statement that, when responding to the Ten Commandments, the Jews answered “Yes” to both the positive and negative commandments. At that time, the Jews saw all the commandments of having the same goal, drawing G‑dliness into the world.3

On a deeper level, although as explained above, the existence of negative commandments reflects a recognition of the limitations of the world, it can be explained that it is the negative commandments in particular that go beyond those limitations. As explained above, it is through the negative commandments that we can relate to the higher, transcendent aspects of G‑dliness. Also, the negative commandments extend a connection to Torah even to places and situations which are not fit to serve as vessels for G‑dliness. In contrast, the positive commandments are limited according to the nature of man and the world and they are capable of drawing G‑dliness only into places fit for positive activity.4

The significance of the negative commandments can be explained further through an analysis of our Sages’ statement in regard to kiddushin, the establishment of the marriage bond.5 They explain that this act “causes [a woman to be] forbidden to the entire world, as a consecrated article (hekdesh).”

The act of kiddushin is two dimensional: a) It establishes a positive connection between the groom and his bride; he acquires her as his wife; b) it causes relations between the women and other men to be forbidden.

These two dimensions are reflected in the ultimate marriage bond, the connection between G‑d and the Jewish people. There is a positive dimension, the unity between the Jews and G‑d. (This is expressed by the performance of the positive commandments.) There is also a dimension that involves prohibition. As a woman must set herself apart from other men, so too, the Jews must separate themselves from the undesirable elements in the world. (This is expressed through the observance of the negative commandments.)

The definition of kiddushin as causing a woman to be “forbidden to the entire world, as a consecrated article (hekdesh)” implies, however, that there is a positive dimension to the establishment of these prohibitions. This is reflected in the comparison to hekdesh, articles on which holiness above the nature of the world6 has been conveyed. It also implies that a bond with this holiness has been established7 and that this holiness is drawn down into the world.

It was explained above that the negative commandments draw down a level of G‑dliness that transcends the limitations of the world. For that reason, this level cannot be drawn down by a positive act, only through refraining an activity, i.e., negating our potential for action. This, however, is also a limitation.

Thus, the true infinite dimension of the Torah and its mitzvos is expressed in the fusion of the positive and negative in a single act performed by man. This is reflected in our Sages’ statement that the commandments “Those who transgress it (the Shabbos) will surely die,” and “On the Shabbos day, [offer] two lambs (whose sacrifice transgresses the Shabbos laws)” were recited in one statement. In such an instance, the fulfillment of the negative commandment is combined with a positive activity, bringing the sacrifices. Although offering the sacrifices involves the performance of activities which are otherwise forbidden on the Shabbos,8 this positive activity contributes to the holiness of the Shabbos, thus fulfilling the same purpose as the negative commandments.9

There is another positive activity which expresses the aspect of the mitzvos which transcends all limits. Our Sages declared, “Whoever studies the laws of a burnt offering (or any other mitzvah) is considered as if he brought a burnt offering (or fulfilled the mitzvah in question).” Although a person is not a priest, is not in the Beis HaMikdash (indeed, this applies even when the Beis HaMikdash is destroyed), through his study of the Torah, he can be considered as if he offered a sacrifice.

This concept also applies in regard to the negative commandments. By studying the laws of the negative commandments, one is considered to have fulfilled them; i.e., the influence produced by the negative commandments is drawn down through a positive activity, Torah study.

Indeed, the fullest expression of the unity of the mitzvos and their fundamental oneness — “G‑d made a single statement” — comes through the study of the Torah. Here, it is through the same activity, laboring in the study of the Torah, that one draws down the influence produced by both the positive and the negative commandments.10

* * *

2. There is a point of connection to the above concepts in this week’s parshah, Parshas Yisro. At the outset, in the narrative of Yisro’s joining the Jewish people, a concept is communicated which parallels the ideas explained above regarding the positive nature of the negative commandments.

The Torah relates that Yisro was “the priest of Midian,” a priest for idol worship, and quotes him as saying “Now I know that G‑d is greater than all the gods” on which our Sages commented, “There was not a single deity that Yisro had not served.” His conversion thus reflected “a transformation of darkness into light” which brought about “a revelation of G‑d in His glory in the higher realms and in the lower realms” and served as a preparation for the giving of the Torah.

The Torah was given to draw down an aspect of G‑dliness that transcends the world within the world — to use Kabbalistic terminology — to reveal the fiftieth gate of understanding. The transformation of darkness into light draws down this level, for such efforts reveal a level of light that is too great to be enclothed within this world.11

The conclusion of the parshah, the verse, “In every place where you will mention My name, I will come and bless you,” relates to the great levels attained through the study of the Torah. By using the expression “in every place,” the verse indicates that because of Torah study, “mentioning My name,” G‑d “will come and bless” even places that by nature are not fit for blessing. Even though the service of “turning away from evil” has not been completed, through the study of Torah, G‑d’s blessings can be drawn down. This is a result of the fact that when a Jew studies Torah, he is reciting “G‑d’s word,” and thus, there are no limits to its effects.

The above concepts can also be related to the parshah of the coming week, Parshas Mishpatim which we begin reading in the afternoon service. That parshah begins “And these are the judgments that you shall place before them.”

Our Sages emphasize that with the words “And these are,” the Torah connects the laws which are described in Parshas Mishpatim with the revelation at Mount Sinai. These laws are a continuation of the giving of the Torah. Although they represent the aspect of Torah that can be grasped by our intellect, it is obvious that their source is the transcendent revelation at Mount Sinai.

Also, our Sages interpret the phrase “that you shall place before them” as a charge to arrange one’s presentation of Torah concepts “as a set table, with everything prepared for a person to eat.” Although generally, a room should be cleaned before food is served, i.e., in the analog, a person should refine his conduct before attempting to advance further; nevertheless, the nature of Torah study is that, even when a person has not refined himself, he still is presented with “a set table.” Torah study gives him the potential to elevate his conduct, fusing the negation of evil and drawing down positive influence into a single activity.

This produces a directive for action. In general, Shabbos is a time when Jews should gather together for Torah study. In particular, this applies on Shabbos Parshas Yisro when we read the narrative of the giving of the Torah. Similarly, at this time, we should resolve to increase our study of the Torah and our involvement in communal study sessions. These sessions should also involve the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah as emphasized by the connection with Ma’aseh Merchavah (the mystic secrets of G‑d’s being) with the giving of the Torah.12

Study sessions of this nature should be established for every Jew, man, woman, and child, even those who are just beginning their connection with the Torah. Nevertheless, even at the beginning of one’s study, one shares a connection to the totality of the Torah. This is reflected in our Rabbis’ teaching that the kamatz alef aw which a young child first learning the alphabet studies reflects the kamatz alef aw which begins the word Anochi, the first word of the Ten Commandments and which includes within it, the entire Torah.

May our increase in the study of the Torah hasten the coming of the era when, “A new Torah will emerge from Me” in the Era of Redemption.13 Even before the Era of Redemption, the Jews will live in security. They need not fear despite the fact that the nations of the world challenge one another and the entire world is seized with panic and consternation. On the contrary, they must realize that “All that I have wrought, I have performed only for your sake” and that Mashiach will soon “stand on the roof of the Beis HaMikdash and proclaim, ‘Humble ones, the time for your redemption has come.’ ”

Parshas Beshalach – Shabbos Shira Yud Shevat - Tu b’Shevat | 10-17 Shevat, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI JAN 26th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:43 pm

SHABBOS SAT JAN 27th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:02 am/
Mincha 4:43 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite/Maariv/Havdalah 5:45 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
This week’s Kiddush is being sponsored by Chabad of the Pacific Northwest, in honor of the 68thYartrzeit of the previous Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzak Shneersohn, and the 67th Anniversary of the day when Rabbi Menachem Mendel Shneerson accepted the nasiyas as Lubavitcher Rebbe. We will also have a delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am /NO TACHANUN WED. Tu b’SHEVAT/
Sun -Wed Mincha 4:55 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:44 pm/

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Abraham and Shprintze Kavka  on the bris of their new Grandson Dovid Zev, ben Shaina and Zaimy Kavka.  May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim. .

SUNDAY BRUNCH – SUNDAY 18th FEBRUARY 10 AM
Featuring Holocaust survivor, Mr Steve Adler. We’re hoping particularly to educate about the Holocaust and we encourage children to come too (provided they’re supervised by a parent and able to show appropriate behavior during the talk). We greatly appreciate the assistance of the Holocaust Center for Humanity of Seattle, and particularly Julia Thompson in facilitating this. Vernon Neppe, Chair of Education at CSTL.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD SHEVAT FRI JAN 26th    3PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of the Yud Shevat, one of the most important dates on the Chabad Calendar. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

PAINT AND SIP – SUN FEB 11th 7:30PM
Hosted by Myriam Caro. A ChabadofSeattle.org project.  Info:  
MHerbstman@gmail.com

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
There is no Tot Shabbat program this week (upstairs room, ages 0-5)
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please emailelizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

PLEASE HELP US PAY FOR CSTL SECURITY
From the CSTL Board:  The membership of CSTL has spoken, and the consensus is that we wish to maintain a security presence at CSTL on Shabbat and chaggim. A four-hour shift (the minimum available) costs us $160, a total of around $10,000/year.  We are asking all families and member units to donate $100 to this fund.  To Donate:  
www.CSTLSeattle.org.

AVOS U’BONIM MELEVAH MALKA SAT NIGHT JAN 27th 
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video.  Melavah Malka!  Grand Raffle.  Prizes.  Info:  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com Generously sponsored by Ploni Almoni. 

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle "Connections 2018" Sun Jan 28th 11 am
At the Westin Hotel, Seattle.Guest speaker Susan Stamberg. To register or more info:
www.jewishinseattle.org

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at 
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

EZRA BESSAROTH BRUNCH – SUN JAN 28th 10 AM
Join NY Times Bestselling author Bruce Henderson for a delicious brunch @ EB accompanied by a fascinating discussion of his new book,  "Sons and Soldiers" Cost: $5/person.  
www.EzraBessaroth.net

FRUTICAS (TU b’SHEVAT) AT EZRA BESSAROTH – TUE JAN 30th 6 PM
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

BCMH Sisterhood Tu B'Shevat Event for Women, Jan. 28th  7:00-9:00 pm.
Cost: $20, limit of 20 participants, first come, first serve. Register at 
www.bcmhseattle.org

REBBITZIN SEIGELBAUM FROM BAT AYIN RETURNS TO SEATTLE FEB 10th & 11th 
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

Mercaz Shabbaton Feb 10-11th 
With Rav Natan Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva of Bat Ayin Yeshiva. Sponsorship available. Email:
info@mercazseattle.org

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR BESHALACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507782/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bo-4th-Day-of-Shvat-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

This week’s parshah describes several miracles of a general nature which occurred to the Jewish people after they left Egypt including the splitting of the sea and the slaughter of the Egyptians, the sweetening of the waters of Marah, the manna, the slav [the fowl with which G‑d provided the Jews], the well of water which accompanied the Jews through the desert, and the defeat of Amalek in battle.

The fact that the Torah groups all of these miracles in a single Torah portion appears to indicate that they share a connection. Nevertheless, that connection is difficult to understand. On the surface, they appear to be separate and different matters.

Another question can be asked based on Rashi’s commentary in the beginning of Parshas Yisro. There Rashiasks: What motivated Yisro to come to the Jews? And answers: The splitting of the Red Sea and the war with Amalek. Similarly, on another verse, Rashi explains that he was motivated by the miracles of the manna and the well. On the surface, why did these miracles motivate Yisro more than the Ten Plagues or the other miracles G‑d which performed in Egypt.

Also, the word Torah means “instruction.” Thus, every story the Torah relates is told to provide us with an “instruction” in our service of G‑d. What instruction can we derive from the narrative of these miracles?

The resolution to these questions depends on the understanding that the three miracles, the splitting of the Red Sea, the manna, and the war with Amalek, were of a general nature, whose significance continues for all time.

In regard to the splitting of the Red Sea: It is explained that the splitting of the Red Sea was one of the preparations necessary for the giving of the Torah, and thus continues to have ongoing relevance. For this reason, we recall the splitting of the sea in our prayers each day.

The continuous relevance of the manna is obvious from G‑d’s command to set aside one measure as “a keepsake for your [future] generations,” so that we will constantly be aware that G‑d is providing our livelihood. For this reason, the Shulchan Aruch recommends reciting the passage concerning the mannaeach day.1

Similarly, the war with Amalek is described as continuing, “from generation to generation.”2 Many authorities consider the mitzvah of remembering Amalek as obligatory upon us at all time and for this reason, it is customary to recall Amalek each day in the Six Remembrances.

The connection between these three miracles can be explained within the context of the song sang after the crossing of the Red Sea which expresses our praise of G‑d and our thanks for His saving us from the Egyptians. Nevertheless, the song also mentions the retribution visited upon the Egyptians and the death they suffered.3 On the surface, the question arises: Why is it necessary to mention the gentiles at all? Why doesn’t the song focus on the Jews alone?

The mention of the gentiles is necessary, however, because the purpose of this song is not to praise the greatness of G‑d in the spiritual realms or His love for the souls of Jewish people. Rather, the intent is to praise His power and greatness within this material world and to acknowledge His bond with the Jews as they exist, one nation among many gentile foes. Although they are “a lamb among seventy wolves,” G‑d protects them from harm and works miracles for them.

This is the setting for the revelation of how, as the song concludes, “G‑d will reign forever and ever,” how His sovereignty will be expressed throughout the world. Commenting on the above verse, the Midrashrelates: “Although You have existed for all time, Your throne was not established, nor were You made known in Your world until Your children uttered the song.” At the splitting of the Red Sea, the Divine power invested and enclothed within the world was openly revealed,4 and the potential was granted to see G‑dliness in every entity in the world. Through the Jews’ recitation of the song,5 they brought about the recognition of G‑d’s sovereignty in the world.

In order to bring about the revelation of “And G‑d will reign forever and ever” in the world at large, a person must first internalize the awareness of G‑d’s sovereignty within his own consciousness. He must realize that G‑d’s Kingship encompasses the totality of his existence, even his mundane physical realities.

This is the message of the manna, that one’s livelihood comes directly from G‑d, and from G‑d alone.6 Even when a Jew must work to earn his livelihood and other intermediaries are involved, he is being sustained by G‑d. Thus, the Rebbe Maharash would say that earning a livelihood today, in the time of exile, is “mannafrom heaven.”

A Jew is essentially above the natural limitations of the world. Even when he descends and is involved with those realities and the gentiles in his environment, he remains essentially above nature and is sustained by“manna from heaven.” [This lesson is further reinforced by the miracles of the slav and the well of water which accompanied the Jews in the desert. They are also examples of how G‑d provided for the Jews material needs in a supernatural manner.]

The realization that G‑d controls his material existence makes it possible for a Jew to internalize his awareness of G‑d’s sovereignty. Since “He placed the world within their hearts,” this awareness makes it possible for G‑d’s sovereignty to be expressed in the world at large. There are, however, impediments to the revelation of His sovereignty which must be nullified in order for that revelation to be complete. This is the purpose of the war against Amalek.

Our Sages comment, “G‑d swore that His name, nor His throne will be complete until the name of Amalek is wiped out entirely.” Thus, Amalek represents the antithesis of G‑d’s sovereignty. Since the expression of G‑d’s sovereignty is an eternally relevant concept, the negation of Amalek, who prevent that expression, is also of constant relevance.

On a personal level, the quality of Amalek refers to coldness in the service of G‑d. On the verse, “Remember what Amalek did to you...as you came forth from Egypt, how he met you on the way...,” the Midrash explains that the Hebrew korcha translated as “he met you,” could also be interpreted as “he cooled you off.” Similarly, the Rabbis have noted the numerical equivalence between Amalek (עמלק) and the word safek(ספק) meaning “doubt.”

Amalek represents the potential which raises doubts in our minds and cools off our excitement after witnessing the miracles that accompany our personal exodus from Egypt. It deadens a Jew’s sensitivity to the providence with which G‑d controls our lives.7 Therefore, for G‑d’s sovereignty to be revealed, Amalek must be nullified.

On the basis of the above, we can understand why it was the news of the miracles of the splitting of the sea and the war with Amalek that motivated Yisro to join the Jewish people and declare, “Now I know that the L‑rd is greater than all the gods.” It is, however, necessary to resolve several difficulties in regard to that quote: a) How is calling G‑d greater than other divinities praise for Him? b) Why does the Torah mention that Yisro had been an idolater? Why should it mention such an uncomplimentary piece of personal history? The Torah refrains from making uncomplimentary statements even when a non-kosher animal is concerned. Surely, this would be appropriate in regard to Yisro.

These questions can be resolved within the Rambam’s explanation of how people came to worship other divinities. The Rambam states that initially, the people conceived of these divinities as intermediaries. They understood that G‑d was the ultimate source of influence, but felt that because He was so lofty, it was not fitting that He control the mundane realities of worldly experience, and these matters, He entrusted to the sun, the stars, and other intermediaries.

Thus, their mistake was ascribing willful power to these intermediaries, believing that they had a certain measure of independent control over our experience when in truth, they are merely, “an axe in the hands of the chopper,” i.e., just as an axe is an inanimate object with no will of its own, so too, these intermediaries are controlled by G‑d alone and they have no independent power of determination.

Thus, in essence, the negation of idol worship involves, not only the nullification of the belief in idols, but a rejection of all intermediaries, an awareness that even within the context of our material existence, our fate is controlled by G‑d alone. Thus, after Yisro heard about the miracles of the splitting of the Red Sea, themanna, the well, and the war with Amalek, he came to the awareness that G‑d’s sovereignty was manifest in every element of existence, including even our mundane realities. He understood the true nature of all the forces which appear as powers in this world, that they are merely like “an axe in the hands of the chopper” and therefore, he renounced idol worship entirely.8

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above concepts and Yud Shvat, the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, which was commemorated this week.9 The Previous Rebbe’s service was expressed in spreading Yiddishkeitand Chassidus throughout the world, preparing the world for the revelation of G‑d’s sovereignty.

[There is also a connection between the miracles mentioned above and the teachings of Chassidus. Torah is described as “bread” and within Torah itself, the teachings of Pnimiyus HaTorah as “bread from Heaven,”manna. Similarly, oil is used as a metaphor for Chassidus and the slav were distinguished as a uniquely succulent fowl.10 ]

The relation of the teachings of Chassidus to the revelation of G‑d’s sovereignty within the world was reflected in the Previous Rebbe’s efforts to translate the teachings of Chassidus into secular languages and his efforts to spread justice and righteousness (as expressed through the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants) among the gentiles.

The nature of the Previous Rebbe’s service is reflected in his name, Yosef Yitzchok. Yosef is associated with the concept of “increase” and Yitzchok with “laughter” and “joy.”

More particularly, Yosef refers to the service of “May G‑d add on to me another son,” i.e., transforming one who is “another,” estranged from his Jewish roots, to a “son.”11 Yitzchok is associated with the service of “Whoever hears will laugh with me,” spreading happiness and joy in a manner that “whoever hears,” i.e., even someone who does not consciously intend to hear, “will laugh with me.”

An added dimension of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit is reflected by the fact that this year, it is commemorated on a Friday. Friday is set aside for the preparations for Shabbos. Similarly, this points to the fact that ours, the sixth millennia (and more particularly, the latter portion of the sixth millennia, more than three quarters of it having passed), is a preparatory stage for the seventh millennia, “the day which is all Shabbos and rest for eternity.” Indeed, it is already “Friday afternoon” and we are waiting with anticipation for “Shabbos.”

This must be associated with an increase in the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah as a foretaste and preparation for the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah in the Era of Redemption.

3. The above concepts also share a connection with Tu BeShvat, the Rosh HaShanah of the Trees. The trees are part of the plant kingdom called tzomeach in Hebrew. Literally, the word tzomeach means “growth,” thus also pointing to the concept of increase, continually progressing further.

On Tu BeShvat, it is customary to partake generously of fruits and in particular, the species of fruit for whichEretz Yisrael is blessed. The Torah praises Eretz Yisrael for seven species of produce. Two, wheat and barley, are grains. The other five, grapes, pomegranates, figs, olives, and dates, are fruits. The difference between grain and fruit is that grain is a staple food, necessary for the maintenance of our well-being. Fruits are delicacies, eaten for pleasure. Tu BeShvat gives us the potential to carry out our service, not only according to the very minimum necessary to maintain our existence, but rather in a manner that leads to pleasure.

Similarly, it is customary to eat carobs on Tu BeShvat. The mention of carobs relates to Rabbi Chaninah ben Dosa who would eat only “one measure of carobs” a week. Our Sages describe Rabbi Chaninah as being “trained in miracles,” i.e., miracles were an ordinary aspect of his everyday life.

The same applies for every Jew. Although we are living in a material world, in an environment with gentiles that is apparently controlled by the forces of nature, a Jew is connected with G‑d who controls nature. “The Guardian of Israel does not sleep or slumber” and protects him in a manner which transcends nature. Indeed, miracles are an ordinary element of a Jew’s life. If there is a person who does not recognize these miracles, it is only because he has his eyes closed. There can be no other explanation. If a person opens his eyes and thinks about what has happened to him, he will realize the open miracles that are shaping his life.

If this is true regarding a Jew in the world at large, how much more so does it apply to a Jew living in Eretz Yisrael, G‑d’s chosen land, of which it is written, “the eyes of G‑d are always upon it, from the beginning of the year to its end.” It is not necessary for him to open a newspaper and read how one non-Jew shot a missile at the Jews and another non-Jew — one of the pious of the nations of the world — shot another missile which intercepted it. All he has to do is look at the world around him and appreciate the miracles, miracles of a good and positive nature, which are occurring to him and to those around him.

A Jew must act maturely within the world and employ all the natural means at his disposal. His activities must, however, be suffused with bitachon, trust in G‑d that He will provide him with open and abundant good. Similarly, in regard to the Jewish people as a whole, we must proceed with confidence that G‑d will bring the ultimate and complete redemption. And thus, thankful for the miracles that He has wrought for us already and trusting that He will perform other miracles in the future, we must — particularly on Shabbos Shirah, the Shabbos of Song — recite songs of praise to Him.

The above concepts will be enhanced by the study of the maamar, Baruch Sh’Osoh Nissim (“Blessed be He who performed miracles”) which was distributed on Yud Shvat.12 The distribution of the maamar should lead to an increase in the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah. Similarly, together with the maamar, two dollars were given to be distributed to tzedakah. Our Sages relate that tzedakah is equivalent to all the mitzvos. The word mitzvah is related to the word tzavsa meaning “connection.” Thus, these gifts to tzedakah will increase the connection and bond, the Jews share with G‑d. This will lead to an increase in Torah and mitzvos in general which in turn will lead to an increase in G‑d’s blessings, including blessings of peace and prosperity.

In that vein, it is worthy to mention the custom of eating the fruits associated with Eretz Yisrael on Tu BeShvat. May the observance of this custom strengthen our connection with Eretz Yisrael and may we witness in the imminent future the fulfillment of the prophecy, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.

Shabbos Bo | 3 – 10 Shevat, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI JAN 19th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:32 pm

SHABBOS SAT JAN 20th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:04 am/
Mincha 4:32 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 5:36 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
This week’s Kiddush is being sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber and Mrs. Chanie Levitin, in honor of the 7th Yahrtzeit of Rebbetzin Levitin's mother, Miriam bas Alter Mordechai ZT”L.  We will also have a delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am 
Sun -Wed Mincha 4:45 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:34 pm/

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Shimon and Meira Emlen on the birth of their daughter Devorah Leah!  May they merit to raise her to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT - YAHRZEIT OF THE BABA SALI- FRI JAN 19th    3PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of the yahrzeit of Rabbi Israel Abuchatzera (1890-1984), known as "Baba Sali."  From a young age he was renowned as a sage, miracle maker and master kabbalist. In 1964 he moved to the Holy Land, eventually settling in the southern development town he made famous, Netivot. He passed away in 1984 on the 4thof Shevat. His graveside in Netivot has become a holy site visited by thousands annually.
www.chabad.org/calendar

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

PAINT AND SIP – SUN FEB 11th 7:30PM
Hosted by Myriam Caro. A ChabadofSeattle.org project.  Info:  
MHerbstman@gmail.com

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

PLEASE HELP US PAY FOR CSTL SECURITY
From the CSTL Board:  The membership of CSTL has spoken, and the consensus is that we wish to maintain a security presence at CSTL on Shabbat and chaggim. A four-hour shift (the minimum available) costs us $160, a total of around $10,000/year.  We are asking all families and member units to donate $100 to this fund.  To Donate:  
www.CSTLSeattle.org.

AVOS U’BONIM SAT NIGHT
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video.  Ice Cream!  Grand Raffle.  Prizes.  Info:  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com Generously sponsored by Chavi and Avremi Gitler. 

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle "Connections 2018" Sun Jan 28th 11 am
At the Westin Hotel, Seattle.Guest speaker Susan Stamberg. To register or more info:
www.jewishinseattle.org

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at 
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

EZRA BESSAROTH BRUNCH – SUN JAN 28th 10 AM
Join NY Times Bestselling author Bruce Henderson for a delicious brunch @ EB accompanied by a fascinating discussion of his new book,  "Sons and Soldiers" Cost: $5/person.  
www.EzraBessaroth.net

FRUTICAS (TU b’SHEVAT) AT EZRA BESSAROTH – TUE JAN 30th 6 PM
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

BCMH Sisterhood Tu B'Shevat Event for Women, Jan. 28th  7:00-9:00 pm.
Cost: $20, limit of 20 participants, first come, first serve. Register at 
www.bcmhseattle.org

REBBITZIN SEIGELBAUM FROM BAT AYIN RETURNS TO SEATTLE FEB 10th & 11th Info: www.EzraBessaroth.net

Mercaz Shabbaton Feb 10-11th 
With Rav Natan Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva of Bat Ayin Yeshiva. Sponsorship available. Email:
info@mercazseattle.org

Limmud Seattle – Motzei Shabbos Jan 13th to Sun Jan 14th 
A unique experience of engaging, hands-on Torah learning in a community that celebrates Jewish diversity.
http://www.limmudseattle.org/  at the Shoreline Conference Center:18560 1st Ave NE, Shoreline, WA

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.


 REBBE’S SICHO FOR BO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507782/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bo-4th-Day-of-Shvat-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

Parshas Bo possesses a unique dimension. The parshiyos which precede it, Shmos and Vaeira, describe the preparations for the exodus from Egypt. Parshas Beshallach which comes afterwards describes the aftermath of the exodus. The redemption itself, however, is discussed in only one parshah, Parshas Bo.

Indeed, the entire parshah revolves around the redemption. Even the beginning of the parshah (which describes the final phase of preparation for the exodus, the last three plagues) shares a direct connection to the exodus as evidenced by the demand voiced by Pharaoh’s servants that he allow the Jews to leave Egypt.

Similarly, the conclusion of the parshah is connected with the redemption as reflected in the mitzvah oftefillin which states, “And it will be a sign on your hand and a remembrance between your eyes... that G‑d took you out of Egypt with a strong hand.”

There is, however, a problematic dimension to this point. Although the entire parshah is connected with the redemption, the very name of the parshah, Bo and the verse with which it is connected, “And G‑d said to Moshe, come to Pharaoh,” point to the fact that Pharaoh still maintained his power and therefore, Moshe had to approach him. Despite the seven plagues which were inflicted upon him, Pharaoh remained unbroken. The question arises: Why is the parshah which centers on the redemption given a name which indicates Pharaoh’s power?

There is also a question regarding the mention of the mitzvah of tefillin at the conclusion of thisparshah: The passage describing the mitzvah of tefillin states, “And when it will come to pass that G‑d will bring you into the land of the Canaanites.” Based on this verse, there are some authorities who maintain that the Jews were not obligated to wear tefillin during the forty years that they journeyed through the desert. Even according to the opinions which maintain that the Jews did wear tefillinthroughout their journey, there is still a connection between tefillin and Eretz Yisrael as our Sages declared, “Fulfill this mitzvah so that you will enter the land.” Thus, tefillin are related to the ultimate and final phase in the exodus from Egypt, the entry into Eretz Yisrael.1

Since tefillin are associated with the ultimate and final phase of the redemption, the question arises: Why is this mitzvah mentioned in a parshah which describes only the preliminary stages of the redemption? Indeed, as related in Parshas Beshallach, until the miracle of the Red Sea, the Jews still considered returning to Egypt and for that reason, “G‑d did not lead them through the land of the Philistines... lest the people change their minds when they see war and return to Egypt.” Furthermore, it is difficult to understand why tefillin are mentioned in a parshah which begins with an indication of Pharaoh’s power.

These questions can be resolved within the context of the Zohar’s statements at the beginning ofParshas Bo. The Zohar states:

Why is it written, “Come to Pharaoh”? It should say, “Go to Pharaoh.” The word “come” indicates that since G‑d caused Moshe to enter room after room until he confronted a sublime and powerful crocodile [the symbol of Pharaoh].... Moshe was afraid of it.... When the Holy One, blessed be He, saw that Moshe was afraid... He declared, “Behold, I will confront you Pharaoh King of Egypt....” G‑d, Himself, was forced to combat him. He and no one else.

The Zohar implies that Pharaoh is the source of the forces of evil and therefore, Moshe feared him. Accordingly, G‑d did not tell him to go to Pharaoh (i.e., to go by himself). Rather, He told him “Come,” i.e., come with Me, for G‑d Himself had to negate Pharaoh’s power.2

Moshe was sent to confront Pharaoh “so that I will be able to demonstrate these miraculous signs in his midst.” The intent of the confrontation was the nullification of Pharaoh and the negation of his power. In this context, we can understand why Moshe was forced to proceed room after room inside Pharaoh’s palace. Since the intent was to break Pharaoh’s power entirely, this had to be done in the inner rooms of his palace, the place where his power was manifest in the most open manner. When his power was broken there, its expression throughout his kingdom was also nullified.3

Thus, the command to Moshe to “Come to Pharaoh” was not intended only as an intermediary phase in bringing the Jews out of Egypt. Instead, it had a purpose of its own, to break and nullify Pharaoh’s power.

The importance of the destruction of Pharaoh’s power can be understood within the context of the connection between the exile and redemption from Egypt and the acquisition of Eretz Yisrael. In the covenant Bein HaBesarim, G‑d promised Avraham that his descendants would inherit Eretz Yisrael. At the same time, however, He also told him that the Jews would undergo exile and slavery.

The rationale for the association between the two is that G‑d desires the Jewish people to earn Eretz Yisrael through their own efforts, so that it will not be given to them as “bread of shame.” The Jews are charged with the task of transforming a material land into Eretz Yisrael, making it “a land which desires to fulfill the will of its Creator,” and which shares a unique connection to the Jewish people, who are “the pupil of G‑d’s eye,” as it were.4 Therefore, “the eyes5 of G‑d are always upon it from the beginning of the year until its end.”

This generates the potential for Eretz Yisrael to “spread throughout the entire world,” and for there to be an open revelation of G‑dliness, “the glory of G‑d will be revealed and all flesh will see.” In the Era of Redemption when these prophecies will be fulfilled, it will be openly manifest how our material existence is one with G‑d’s true existence.

This was made possible by the fulfillment of the decree, “Your descendants will be strangers in a land that is not their own;” i.e., forcing the Jews to confront a material existence that has no connection with them. Furthermore, this land, the land of Egypt, will oppose the Jewish people and cause them difficulty,6 for it is “the nakedness of the land,” “the most depraved of all lands,” the lowest possible level.

This descent, however, brought out the potential for: a) the Jewish people themselves to reach an elevated level. On the verse, “And Yaakov lived in the land of Egypt,” it is explained that it was in the land of Egypt that Yaakov — and his descendants, the Jewish people — experienced true life. b) The Jews to elevate the Divine sparks enclothed in the material substance of the world. This is reflected in the Jews spoiling the Egyptians, taking from them, “golden and silver utensils and garments,” and similarly, in the eruv rav, the multitude of gentiles who left Egypt with them. c) The destruction and nullification of those aspects of worldliness which cannot be elevated. Concerning these elements of existence, it is said, “their destruction represents their purification.” Furthermore, their destruction adds power to the realm of holiness. This is reflected in our Sages’ statement, “Tzur was built only through the destruction of Jerusalem.” Conversely, the destruction of Tzur, and similarly, other centers which stand in opposition to holiness, lead to the strengthening and rebuilding of Jerusalem. This reveals the power of holiness in a manner where no opposition is possible for all opposing forces have been totally negated.7

Only after these negative factors were nullified did the Jews leave Egypt. Indeed, the destruction of these forces which opposed to holiness made it possible — had not other factors interfered — for them to proceed directly to Eretz Yisrael, the land in which the service of establishing a dwelling for G‑d in this lowly world is carried out.

Based on the above it is possible to explained why Bo was chosen as the name for the parshah which deals with the exodus from Egypt, including the ultimate stage of that exodus, the entry into Eretz Yisrael as explained in regard to the mitzvah of tefillin.

The most prominent dimension of the exodus from Egypt is, as the very name “exodus” implies, the departure from a situation that opposes holiness. This is reflected, in the most complete sense, not in the elevation of the sparks of holiness enclothed within Egypt, but in the nullification of Egypt’s power. The elevation of the sparks of holiness reveals the good which was hidden within Egypt; it does not, however, effect the very nature of Egypt itself, that dimension which stands in opposition to holiness and “causes difficulty to Israel.” For the exodus from Egypt to be complete, this negative dimension must be nullified and destroyed.

This is the intent of “Coming to Pharaoh,” to enter the innermost rooms of his palace, to confront the source of evil at its very root and to nullify it utterly. As explained above, the nullification of these negative factors grants the potential to proceed into Eretz Yisrael. Furthermore, this leads to the possibility of a positive conception of Pharaoh, the source for “the revelation of all lights,” an unbounded revelation which transcends even the limitations of holiness.

The exile in Egypt is the source of all exiles and the redemption from Egypt, the source of all redemptions. In particular, the exodus is related to the future redemption as reflected in the verse, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

Indeed, the parallel between the two is further emphasized by our Sages’ explanation that, ideally, the redemption from Egypt should have been the ultimate redemption. Directly after leaving Egypt and receiving the Torah, the Jews should have entered Eretz Yisrael, never to be exiled again. For certain reasons, however, G‑d brought about a series of events that led to further exiles beginning with the exile in Babylon and concluding with the fourth and present exile, the exile of Edom, so that the Jews’ inheritance of Eretz Yisrael will come about as a result of their own efforts.8

As explained above, the emergence from exile is associated with two factors: a) the elevation of the sparks of holiness that have fallen into exile. This is accomplished through our observance of Torah andmitzvos and our service of “May all your deeds be for the sake of heaven” in which we use the material substance of the world for a spiritual intent. b) The destruction and nullification of those negative factors which cannot be elevated to holiness. For this reason, we find many prophecies describing the fall of the nations which ruled over the Jews, e.g., “Babylon has fallen and she will be broken,” “There will be a slaughter for G‑d in Batzra,” “And saviors will ascend on Mount Zion to judge the Mount of Eisav.” The only nations which will remain will be those which help and support the Jewish people, as it is written, “I will send refugees from them... and they shall bring their brethren from among the nations an offering to G‑d... upon My holy mountain Jerusalem.” At that time, “I will transform all the nations to a pure tongue, so that they will all call upon the name of G‑d, to form a single block.”9

Then, after the ultimate redemption, the service of the Jewish people will be fulfilled in a complete manner, “as the mitzvos of Your will.” Indeed, the observance of the mitzvos will be on such a high level that our present observance will be considered merely as “signs” for those mitzvos.

For this reason, the Torah associates the mitzvah of tefillin with the entry into Eretz Yisrael. Here, the intent is on the ultimate fulfillment of the mitzvah, its fulfillment in the Era of Redemption, therefore, it is associated with the entry into Eretz Yisrael, i.e., the ultimate entry into Eretz Yisrael. There, in “the palace of the king,” the Jews will establish a complete connection with G‑d through the observance of the mitzvos.10

* * *

2. It is written, “He placed the world in their hearts;” i.e., everything that transpires in the world at large depends on, and has its source, in the service performed by a Jew in his heart. A person is called “a world in microcosm” and is instructed by our Sages to realize that the world at large was created “for him.”

Thus, the above concepts relating to the redemption from exile, the destruction of the forces of exile, and the entry into Eretz Yisrael, all have parallels within our personal service of G‑d. Eretz Yisraelrefers to the realm of holiness, the observance of Torah and mitzvos where G‑dliness is openly revealed. In contrast, the Diaspora refers to mundane affairs, activities which share no intrinsic connection to holiness. On the contrary, they cause difficulty (maitzirim in Hebrew which relates to Mitzrayim, Egypt)and confusion (bilbul in Hebrew which relates to Bavel, Babylon).

Ultimately, “Eretz Yisrael will spread out to all other lands;” i.e., our service of holiness will permeate even our mundane activities and they will be performed in a manner of “May all your deeds be for the sake of Heaven” and “Know Him in all your ways.”

For this to be possible, however, there are certain aspects regarding our involvement in the world at large, e.g. the aspects of Egypt and Babylon mentioned above, that cannot be elevated and which must be broken and destroyed.

In Chassidic thought, a similar concept is described in regard to our power of desire and the selfish and materialistic orientation which characterizes it. The power of desire itself is positive and can be directed toward holiness. In contrast, its selfish and materialistic orientation is bad and must be destroyed entirely.11

We can learn how to carry out the service of nullifying evil from the command, “Come to Pharaoh.” It is necessary to confront and break the evil in its place of power. Once this process is completed, it is possible to nullify all its peripheral expressions.

Since confronting evil in its place of power may cause a Jew to become afraid, G‑d tells the spark of Moshe that exists within every Jew, not to be afraid, to come with Him to Pharaoh, that He Himself will wage war against him and negate the power of evil.

Each person has a different conception of Egypt and Babylon, i.e., the aspects of material existence which cause him difficulty and confuse him. There are some who are disturbed and confused because of a deficiency in their service of G‑d, while others are disturbed and confused because of a lack in their material affairs.12

We can be assured that these hindrances will also be nullified. The Jews are considered as G‑d’s children as it is written, “My son, My firstborn, Israel.” Parents eagerly try to fulfill their children’s desires although they recognize that what their children want is really unimportant and the child desires it only because of his limited understanding. Although he knows this to be true, a parent does not make such calculations. As soon as he sees that his child wants something, he does not try to teach him that it is not worth wanting, he tries to obtain it for his child.

Similarly, when G‑d sees that a Jew — His small child, as it were — wants something, even though the matter is of petty concern, merely a material lack, He tries to provide His child with it. Before the Jew feels a real need, G‑d “satisfies the desire of every living being.”13

Furthermore, if the above applies when a child wants something of no real consequence, surely it holds true when the child, the Jews, want something of genuine worth, indeed, of the most ultimate importance, that the Jews and the Divine Presence14 leave exile. Even if the Jews are still lacking in their service, G‑d “will redeem Israel from all his afflictions,” including the greatest affliction, the exile, and only afterwards, will “He redeem Israel from all His sins.”15

3. The above concepts are particularly relevant in our generation because Parshas Bo, is always read in connection with the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit.16 The Previous Rebbe’s service was, as his name Yosef implies, associated with the verse, “May G‑d add on to me another son;” transforming one who is “another,” estranged from his Jewish roots, into a “son.” Thus, the Previous Rebbe was involved in spreading Yiddishkeit and Chassidus to those Jews who (through no fault of their own, merely because they were tinokos shenishbu) were distant from Jewish practice. These efforts included the translation of Jewish texts (including works of Pnimiyus HaTorah) into other languages for those who could not understand Lashon HaKodesh (“the holy tongue”).17

Furthermore, the Previous Rebbe was also involved with gentiles — those who are “another” in a real sense — and sought to spread justice and righteousness in the world at large, strengthening people’s faith in the Creator, and thus motivating them to fulfill the seven universal commandments given to Noach and his descendants.

These efforts — both among the Jews and among the gentiles — were enhanced when the Previous Rebbe came to America.18 This gave a greater potential to elevate even the lowest aspects of existence and for these efforts to spread.

Significantly, the Previous Rebbe’s activities were carried out with the emphasis that they were preparations for the ultimate redemption. His drawing close those Jews far from Jewish practice was a preparation for the fulfillment of the prophecy, “And the L‑rd will stretch forth His hand... to His people.. [in] the islands of the sea... and gather the dispersed of Israel.” Similarly, his efforts with the gentiles were a preparation for the fulfillment of the prophecy, “Then I will transform the nations to a clear speech...”

Thus, it is appropriate to prepare for the commemoration of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit by: a) increasing the study of his teachings; b) giving tzedakah to those institutions which carry out his directives and those which are named after him; c) holding farbrengens at which resolutions will be made to continue following in the path of service he outlined.

In particular, an emphasis should be made on the closeness of the ultimate redemption. To quote the Previous Rebbe, “All of you, stand prepared to greet Mashiach.” This is particularly in the present year, a year when “I will show you wonders,” and indeed, in the last weeks, we have seen open signs of the coming of the redemption.

The Yalkut Shimoni states that in the year when Mashiach will come:

Nations will challenge each other.... The King of Persia19 will challenge an Arab king.... All the nations of the world will panic and be seized by consternation.... [G‑d will tell the Jews:] “My children. Do not fear. Everything which I have wrought, I have performed only for your sake. The time for your redemption has come.”

Surely, these events will bring no harm to the Jewish people, particularly those living in Eretz Yisrael,“the land where the eyes of G‑d, your L‑rd, are always upon it, from the beginning of the year until its end.” On the contrary, Eretz Yisrael is the safest place in the world.

The gentiles will not be able to harm the Jews. Those who have suffered harm will surely be healed immediately.20 And even before the imminent coming of the redemption, “All the children of Israel will enjoy light in their dwellings.”

The knowledge of the imminence of Mashiach’s coming should inspire an increase in our observance of the Torah and its mitzvos for, as the Rambam writes, “one mitzvah can tip one’s individual balance... and that of the world at large and bring deliverance and salvation.”

May we soon no longer need any signs for Mashiach’s coming because, in the closest and most immediate future — he will come

Shabbos Vaeira – Mevarchim Shevat | 25 Teves – 3 Shevat, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI JAN 12th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:21 pm

SHABBOS SAT JAN 13th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Shevat – 8 am
Shacharis: 9 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:06 am/
Mincha 4:21 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 5:25 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
This week’s Kiddush is sponsored by Arkadiy and Tatyana Gertsen in honor of their granddaughter, Sarah Greenberg's Bat Mitzvah!  Sarah is the daughter of Mariana and Netanial Greenberg; granddaughter of Arkadiy and Tatyana Gertsen and Leah and Andy Hartman.  Great-granddaughter of Sofiya Gertsen, mother of Arkadiy Gertsen. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am
Mon,Tue,Thu, Fri Shacharis 7 am 
Wed Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH SHEVAT/
Sun -Wed Mincha 4:35 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:24 pm/

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Sarah Greenberg on her Bas Mitzvah!  Mazel Tov to Sarah’s parents Mariana and Netanial Greenberg , grandparents Arkadiy and Tatyana Gertsen and Leah and Andy Hartman, and great grandmother Sofiya Gertsen

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Mrs. Nechama (bas Shimon) Strauss , wife of Shmuel Leib ob”m. She is survived by her children, Shloime, Mark and Shimon and grandchildren. Shiva will be in Brooklyn, NY.
http://www.collive.com/show_news.rtx?id=48986

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT IN HONOR OF CHOVAT haLEVAVOT- FRI JAN 12th    3PM
Please join us on for an Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of the publication of Chovat Halevavot (“Duties of the Heart”) , the classical work on Jewish ethics, authored by Rabbi Bachya ben Yosef ibn Paquda (the first "Rabbeinu Bechayei") on or before 1161, and translated into Hebrew from the original Arabic by the famed translator R. Judah ibn Tibbon in 1167. It was first published on the 25th of Tevet of the year 5319 from creation (1559).

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

PAINT AND SIP – SUN FEB 11th 7:30PM
Hosted by Myriam Caro. A ChabadofSeattle.org project.  Info:  
MHerbstman@gmail.com

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon /NOT THIS WEEK/
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

PLEASE HELP US PAY FOR CSTL SECURITY
From the CSTL Board:  The membership of CSTL has spoken, and the consensus is that we wish to maintain a security presence at CSTL on Shabbat and chaggim. A four-hour shift (the minimum available) costs us $160, a total of around $10,000/year.  We are asking all families and member units to donate $100 to this fund.  To Donate:  
www.CSTLSeattle.org.

AVOS U’BONIM SAT NIGHT /NOT THIS WEEK/
Father and son/daughter learning. Inspirational Living Torah video.  Refreshments.  Grand Raffle.  Prizes.  Info:  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com Generously sponsored by James Packman,in loving memory of his father Howard Packman, Chaim ben Avigdor Tzvi Z"L whose birthday is this coming week (January 11th)

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle "Connections 2018" Sun Jan 28th 11 am
At the Westin Hotel, Seattle.Guest speaker Susan Stamberg. To register or more info:
www.jewishinseattle.org

Camp Yavneh 2018, June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9 PM – 11 PM
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

EZRA BESSAROTH BRUNCH – SUN JAN 28th 10 AM
Join NY Times Bestselling author Bruce Henderson for a delicious brunch @ EB accompanied by a fascinating discussion of his new book,  "Sons and Soldiers" Cost: $5/person.  
www.EzraBessaroth.net

FRUTICAS (TU b’SHEVAT) AT EZRA BESSAROTH – TUE JAN 30th 6 PM
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

BCMH Sisterhood Tu B'Shevat Event for Women, Jan. 28 7:00-9:00 pm.
Cost: $20, limit of 20 participants, first come, first serve. Register at 
www.bcmhseattle.org

REBBITZIN SEIGELBAUM FROM BAT AYIN RETURNS TO SEATTLE FEB 10th & 11th 
Info: 
www.EzraBessaroth.net

Mercaz Shabbaton Feb 10-11th 
With Rav Natan Greenberg, Rosh Yeshiva of Bat Ayin Yeshiva. Sponsorship available. Email:
info@mercazseattle.org

Limmud Seattle – Motzei Shabbos Jan 13th to Sun Jan 14th 
A unique experience of engaging, hands-on Torah learning in a community that celebrates Jewish diversity. 
http://www.limmudseattle.org/  at the Shoreline Conference Center:18560 1st Ave NE, Shoreline, WA

Community Trip to Israel. April 29th -May 8th , 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAEIRA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507781/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vaeira-26th-Day-of-Teves-5751-1991.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The 24th of Teves, the Alter Rebbe’s yahrzeit, generally falls in the week of Parshas Vaeira.Based on the principle that the festivals have a connection to the Torah portions read at that time, we can assume that there is a connection between the Alter Rebbe’s yahrzeit and Parshas Vaeira.

That connection can be seen in the second verse of the Torah reading which states, “And I revealed Myself to Avraham, to Yitzchok, and to Yaakov [the Patriarchs (Rashi)] as the Almighty G‑d.” The Hebrew word for Almighty, ש-די, is an acronym for the names Shneur שניאור, the Alter Rebbe’s name; DovBer דובער, the Maggid of Mezritch’s name; and Yisrael ישראל, the Baal Shem Tov’s name. These three Rebbeim represent the “Patriarchs” of the Chassidic movement.

The service of the Patriarchs was a preparatory stage for the giving of the Torah and the entrance intoEretz Yisrael. Indeed, G‑d redeemed the Jews because of the covenant that He had made with the Patriarchs. Similarly, the service of the “Patriarchs” of Chassidus prepares us for the Future Redemption and the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah which comes at that time.

To explain the above in greater depth: The Torah is eternal and its narratives are not merely accounts of past history, but rather directives which apply at all times. In particular, this applies in regard to the Patriarchs for, “the deeds of the Patriarchs are a sign to their descendants” and the Patriarchs endow their descendants, the Jews in every generation, with their immense spiritual legacy.

In this context, the relevance of the beginning of the Torah portion, “And I revealed Myself to Avraham, to Yitzchok, and to Yaakov as the Almighty G‑d, but I did not reveal My name Havayahto them,” raises a question. Since the name Havayah has been revealed — the fullest dimension of this revelation coming at the giving of the Torah — of what significance is it that the Patriarchs were not granted such a revelation?

Furthermore, it is necessary to understand: The name ש-די is associated with creation as the Talmud states, “I am He who said די (“enough”) to the world.” If so, what is unique about the revelation of the name ש-די to the Patriarchs?

This narrative raises another question. On the phrase, “but I did not reveal My name Havayah to them,” Rashi comments, “I did not let My attribute (מדה) of truth become known to them.” The use of the word middah is problematic because it also has the connotation “measure.” How can the nameHavayah which reflects an infinite dimension of G‑dliness be associated with any particularmiddah?

The concept can be explained as follows. There are two interpretations to the name ש-די: “I am He who said די (‘enough’) to the world,” and “There is די (‘enough’) within My Divine potential for every creation.”

According to the first interpretation, די refers to the world and indicates that the world will be confined within certain limits. According to the second interpretation, די refers to G‑d and points to His potential to provide His creations with all their needs.

Thus, the revelation of the name ש-די to the Patriarchs refers to the second dimension. At the time of creation, the revelation of the first dimension of ש-די established the limits of our worldly existence. By revealing Himself to the Patriarchs, G‑d brought about an influx of Divine beneficence that satisfied “every creation.”

Implied by the above is that the Patriarchs were able to reveal G‑dliness within the context of the world’s limits. The revelation they brought about, however, was also limited, only that dimension of G‑dliness which could be enclothed within the creations themselves, for until the giving of the Torah there was “a decree” separating the spiritual from the physical. “My name Havayah,” the potential to drawn down the dimension of G‑dliness which transcends the world, was not revealed to them.

At the giving of the Torah, however, G‑d nullified this decree and granted the potential for the G‑dliness which transcends creation to be revealed within the context of our limited existence. This does not mean that the revelation would nullify those limits. Instead, the intent was that the world itself would become a vessel for G‑dliness, that the infinite revelations would be internalized within it, and in this manner, the world would become “a dwelling for G‑d.”

For this to be accomplished, it was necessary that there be preparatory stages for this revelation. First the dimension of ש-די that established the world’s limitations had to be revealed and afterwards, the dimension of ש-די which brought about the revelation of G‑dliness that was able to be enclothed within the limits of creation. This refined the world and prepared it for the revelation of the giving of the Torah. Thus, even after the Torah was given, the revelation to the Patriarchs is significant for it grants the potential for our limited world to internalize the revelation of the name Havayah. This allows us to appreciate that, from an inner dimension, the revelation of the name ש-די to the Patriarchs is not an independent revelation, but rather a phase in the revelation of Havayah.

In this context, we can appreciate Rashi’s statement, “I did not let My attribute (מדה) of truth become known to them.” The intent is that the name Havayah be revealed with the context of middah(“measure”). The measure in which it is revealed, however, is “My middah,” G‑d’s infinite measure, and not the limited measure of the world itself.

To explain the above from a deeper perspective: The difference between the two sources of revelation, Havayah and ש-די, as they exist after the giving of the Torah, reflect the difference between the Torah (which is above limitation) and the world (which is limited). In particular, this contrast can be seen as a reflection of the difference between the Torah and the mitzvos. Mitzvos are also related to the limits of the world and thus have certain limitations regarding the times and places where they are to be fulfilled. In contrast, the Torah is above the limitations of the world. Therefore, the obligation for Torah study is constant, applying in all times and in all places.

Furthermore, this contrast between the Torah and its mitzvos applies only with regard to the actual performance of the mitzvos. As the mitzvos exist within the Torah itself, they like the Torah, are above the limitations of time and space. Accordingly, even though the Beis HaMikdash is destroyed, when a Jew in the Diaspora studies the laws of the sacrifices even during the night, his study is considered equivalent to the actual offering of the sacrifices.1

Similarly, as the mitzvos exist within the Torah, there is no difference between the positive commandments and the negative commandments. As they exist within the world, the positive commandments represent the performance of an activity and the negative commandments, an act of restraint. As they exist within the Torah, however, they both represent positive forces.

The manner in which the mitzvos exist within the Torah is exemplified in our Sages’ statement that when the Jews received the Torah, they answered “yes” when they were instructed to fulfill both the positive commandments and the negative commandments. This implies that one makes a commitment to the essence of the mitzvos, the connection (tzavsa) with G‑d established by themitzvos. Furthermore, the negative commandments are also appreciated as mediums to draw down holiness.

These concepts should be reflected in the existence of a Jew within this material world. He must see his 248 limbs and 365 sinews as extensions of the 248 positive commandments and the 365 negative commandments.

Based on the above, we can understand the change brought about by the giving of the Torah from a deeper perspective. The intent of the giving of the Torah was that the G‑dliness which transcends the creation should not remain above the limitations of the world, but rather should permeate those limitations as explained above. This is accomplished through the mitzvos which are, on one hand, associated with the limitations of worldly existence — for as explained above, the mitzvos are dependent on the limits of time and place — and yet are connected with the infinite potential of the Torah. This allows the spiritual source of each entity to be revealed and even those entities which appear negative to become positive forces which reveal G‑d’s will.

This is brought about by the Torah, the revelation of the name Havayah. Before the giving of the Torah, when there was a decree separating the spiritual and the physical, the world was only able to receive a revelation of G‑dliness that did not negate the limits of the world (ש-די). Thus, it was possible to say that the revelation of this level is separate from the revelation of the name Havayah.Through the revelation of the giving of the Torah which allowed the infinite G‑dliness of Havayahto permeate all aspects of existence, it was revealed that the revelation of G‑dliness within creation is also a dimension of this infinite revelation.

This relates to our Sages’ statement that the Patriarchs observed the entire Torah before it was given. In this manner, they revealed the level of ש-די within the world. The inner dimension of this revelation is the name Havayah.

Of the Patriarchs, the one most closely associated with the Torah is Yaakov.2 Thus the Torah describes him as “a simple person, a dweller of tents,” i.e., “the tents of Shem and Ever.” Similarly, we find the verse, “they will instruct Your judgments to Yaakov and Your Torah to Israel.” Thus, although more than the other Patriarchs, Yaakov was forced to confront difficulties and troubles in the world at large — the difficulties of Lavan, Eisav, Dinah, and Yosef — the Torah emphasizes how he remained on a level of completeness as it is written, “And Yaakov came to the city of Shechemcomplete.” Our Sages comment, “complete in his body, that his limp was healed; complete in his finances, that he was not lacking anything from the large present [sent Eisav], complete in his Torah, that he had not forgotten his studies in the house of Lavan.”

Yaakov remained complete even though “a man wrestled with him.” On the contrary, “he strove with an angel and with men and prevailed.” He was able to force the angel to bless him and, furthermore, the wound he suffered when wrestling with the angel healed.

This is a reflection of the connection between Yaakov and the Torah. Since the Torah is the source for all perfection, even the aspects of perfection connected with worldly matters, Yaakov who is associated with Torah confronts worldliness and remains “complete.”3

Based on the above, we can appreciate the connection between the 24th of Teves, the yahrzeit of the Alter Rebbe, and Parshas Vaeira. Of the three “Patriarchs” of the Chassidic movement, the Alter Rebbe, like the Patriarch Yaakov is associated with Torah study. This is reflected in the fact that the Alter Rebbe is referred to as “the author of the Tanya and the Shulchan Aruch.” These two texts are of fundamental importance, the Tanya being “the Written Law of Pnimiyus HaTorah” and theShulchan Aruch, a basic text of Nigleh, the revealed dimensions of Torah law.4

It can be explained that just as the revelation of G‑dliness by the Patriarchs was a preparation for the revelation of the Torah, the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah by the “Patriarchs of Chassidus” serves as a preparatory stage for the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah in the world at large in the Era of Redemption. This will be the complete revelation of the name Havayah. This revelation will permeate even the lowest dimension of worldly existence.

Just as among the Patriarchs, the fullest expression of their service was exemplified by Yaakov, similarly, among the “Patriarchs of Chassidus,” the Alter Rebbe epitomized the spreading ofPnimiyus HaTorah, revealing its teachings within a structured intellectual pattern. This transition into the realm of intellect reflects how Pnimiyus HaTorah is drawn down into the limits of the world at large.

These two concepts — the emphasis on the Torah and the efforts to draw down that Torah into the limits of the world at large — are reflected in the Alter Rebbe’s name, Shneur Zalman. Shneur relates to the words Shnei Or (“two lights”), the light of Nigleh and the light of Pnimiyus HaTorah. Zalman shares the same letters as the word l’zman (“to time”), reflecting how these lights of Torah will permeate the limits of time (and thus space) which define our material world.5 Since the Alter Rebbe fused the two dimensions of Torah, Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah, together, he also had the potential to reveal Torah, the G‑dliness that transcends creation, within the creation itself.

Just as Yaakov our Patriarch was forced to confront many difficulties and tribulations, so, too, the Alter Rebbe was subjected to the difficulties of imprisonment. Nevertheless, these difficulties did not hinder his service. On the contrary, he was redeemed and his redemption increased the spreading of the wellsprings of Chassidus outward. This service was continued by the Rebbeim who followed him, each one spreading Chassidus further and thus preparing the world at large for the revelation ofPnimiyus HaTorah in the Era of Redemption.

2. The Hebrew word Avos translated as “Patriarchs” literally means “fathers.” By referring to Avraham, Yitzchok, and Yaakov as the fathers of the Jewish people, we imply that just as a father’s estate becomes the property of his children, each Jew a descendant of the Patriarchs, inherits their great spiritual legacy.

Thus, we must look at every Jew as an heir to the Patriarchs and realize how, “His nation are a part of G‑d; Yaakov is the cord of His inheritance.” Similarly, every Jew is called Yisrael, one who “strove with an angel and with men and prevailed.” Because of a Jew’s essence, each Jew, regardless of his present situation, even as he exists in the darkness of exile in this material world, can “strive with an angel and with men and prevail.”

Furthermore, every Jew, regardless of his present situation, inherits the entire Torah as it is written, “The Torah which Moshe commanded us is the inheritance of the congregation of Yaakov.” Since each Jew is a member of “the congregation of Yaakov,” he is an heir to the Torah. An heir receives his inheritance regardless of his personal standing. Similarly, each Jew receives the entire Torah as his inheritance.6

This is what we must perceive when we look at another Jew. If these positive qualities are not perceived, we must understand that they are being obscured by the darkness of exile, and it is necessary to search further. If one sees undesirable qualities, one must realize that the other person is, to quote the Baal Shem Tov, only a mirror and those undesirable qualities are in fact one’s own. The appreciation of the positive qualities of each Jew are emphasized by the teachings of the “Patriarchs of Chassidus.” Thus, the Baal Shem Tov taught that G‑d loves each Jew as dearly as parents love an only son.

The awareness of these concepts should inspire greater ahavas Yisrael. In this context, we see a unique emphasis in the teachings of the Alter Rebbe who devoted an entire chapter, Chapter 32,7 to the subject of ahavas Yisrael. Furthermore, in the first draft of the Tanya, the Alter Rebbe did not include Chapter 32. This implies that the content of the chapters 31 and 33 themselves could be understood without such an addition. Thus, the fact that such an addition was made highlights its importance and reflects that the lesson of Chapter 32 is of fundamental significance.8

In this context, we can appreciate the significance of the fact that Rosh Chodesh Shvat is celebrated on Wednesday, “the day on which the luminaries were suspended in the heavens.” The word “luminaries” is plural, referring to both the sun, “the great luminary,” and the moon, “the small luminary.”

This provides every Jew with a twofold lesson in his service of G‑d. Firstly, he must appreciate that he is a “luminary,” that he can and he must, shine forth and provide others with light. Secondly, the mention of the two luminaries, the sun and the moon, teaches one that he must be both a great luminary and a small luminary.

Being a “great luminary” implies that a person realizes that he possesses important potentials which he wants to use in a contributory fashion. (Needless to say, for his contributions to be received, it is necessary for him to give in a generous and positive manner.)

Being a “small luminary” implies that a person must appreciate and radiate to others that other individuals can contribute to him as our Sages comment, “Who is a wise man? One who learns from every person.” As a small luminary, one reflects the positive virtues that others possess.

A person must know how to express both these dimensions in his life and must have the sensitivity to appreciate which quality is demanded at each particular time.

The above statements concerning the positive qualities of each Jew are particularly appropriate regarding the present generation, the heirs to the legacy of holiness left by the martyrs of the previous generation. We are “a brand saved from the fire,” a clear example of how, despite awesome challenges, “Yaakov came to the city of Shechem complete.”9

One must realize how much G‑d loves the Jewish people as a whole and each individual Jew in particular as we recite in our prayers, “With eternal love, You have loved us.” In particular, the present era, is a time when this love is expressed. It resembles the month of Elul, a time when “the King is in the field” and receives everyone with a pleasant countenance and shows everyone a smiling countenance. Now is a time when we can approach G‑d with our requests and He will grant them.

Particularly, after the Holocaust, G‑d owes the Jewish people, as it were, to make up for the horrors which the Jewish people suffered10 and to bring them blessing, including leading them to teshuvahwhich will speed the coming of the Future Redemption. The Jews — each individual and the people as a whole — will be blessed with open and apparent good and only with good.

If this is true at all times and particularly in our generation, it has special relevance at present when, “nations are challenging each other.” G‑d gives the Jews a special promise that “all that I have performed I have performed for your sake.” Throughout the world, we are promised, “The Guardian of Israel does not slumber or sleep.” In particular, this applies in Eretz Yisrael, where “the eyes of G‑d, your L‑rd are always upon it from the beginning of the year until its end.”

3. The verse “And Yaakov came to the city of Shechem complete,” provides us with a practically applicable lesson. At first, Yaakov feared a war over Shechem. Nevertheless, when all the nations around him massed to attack him, he put on armor and conquered Shechem “with his sword and bow.”

To apply this in present terms, all the nations around Eretz Yisrael attacked her and the Jews were forced to “put on armor” and they conquered Shechem and the areas of Judah and Samaria with “a sword and a bow.” After G‑d has given these lands back to the Jewish people, it is absolutely forbidden to return them; doing so would endanger the lives of millions of Jews. Rather they should be settled by the Jewish people.

With unique Hashgachah Protis, at this time, hundreds of thousands of Jews are arriving in Eretz Yisrael from Russia. They should be given the opportunity to settle in these lands in peace and security. In this manner, through teshuvah, these Jews will be able to correct and make up for the seventy years they were prevented from observing Torah and mitzvos.11

* * *

4. In connection with the yahrzeit of the Alter Rebbe, it is proper to increase our study of his works, establishing fixed times to study the Tanya and his Shulchan Aruch, together with the explanation of these works in the texts of the Rebbeim who followed him. This applies to everyone, both men and women, for women are also required to study the laws governing those mitzvos in which they are obligated and also the teachings of Chassidus, for they enable us to fulfill the mitzvos of the love and fear of G‑d which women are also obligated to fulfill.

(In this context, it is worthy to mention the efforts of my mother who was known for her ability to copy carefully Chassidic texts to enable them to be circulated throughout the Chassidic community.)

The study of the works of the Rebbeim is facilitated by the fact that at present, there are a multitude of texts of Chassidus and the explanations of the Rebbeim in Nigleh which are being printed. Furthermore, even many of the texts which were previously printed using the characters of Rashiscript, are now being reprinted using square letters.

May the printing of these Chassidic texts hasten the coming of the era when no single Jew will remain in exile and rather, we will proceed “with our youth and with our elders, with our sons and with our daughters,” to the ultimate redemption.12 May it be in the immediate future.

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