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PARASHA TETZAVEH | 10-17 Adar I, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 15th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:14 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 16th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:48 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:14 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:15 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon -  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:20 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is sponsored by Paul and Tamar Azous. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 22nd 
Mexican Food catered by The Summit.  Fine Wines.  Deadline to Register is Thursday Feb. 21st   
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/friday-night-dinner-tickets-55938466459   Discounted pricing available with: rosilevin@gmail.com.  Separate children's dinner & program with dedicated counselors and activities. RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim - Motzei Shabbos 7:15 PM
Thank you to Mendel Herbstman for sponsoring ! Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 24th 
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent  SPACE LIMITED!

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of Purim Katan, 14 Adar I

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:15 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet SANHEDRIN with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Private Audiences with the Bostoner Rebbe - IN SEATTLE SUN FEB 17th 
An amazing opportunity to meet an amazing Rebbe in person!  Reserve your time via email 
BostonRebbe@gmail.com The Bostoner chassidim are most well known for helping Jews with health issues – in hospital and outside.   They are also famous for their music, and for their ability to inspire young people.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayer_Alter_Horowitz  is visiting Seattle
https://jewishaction.com/tribute/the_bostoner_rebbe is his father

Nominations for the Federation’s Jewish Communal Professional Award
Deadline for submitting nominations for the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle 2019 Pamela Waechter z"l Jewish Communal Professional Award is Friday, March 15, 2019. Contact Cindy Bockelman: cindyb@jewishinseattle.org or 206-774-2251. More info:
www.jewishinseattle.org

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT , LOCAL TRIPS, AND KOSHER RESTAURANT DELIVERY!– ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670
dubanrides@gmail.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS TEZAVEH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468795/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tetzaveh-11th-Day-of-Adar-I-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

Both the beginning and the conclusion of this week’s Torah reading mention the kindling of the menorah in the Sanctuary. Significantly, in the conclusion of the Torah reading, the kindling of the menorah is coupled with bringing the ketores, the incense offering: “Aharonshall burn incense each morning when he cleans the lamps. And he shall burn incense in the evening when he kindles the lamps.”1

As mentioned frequently,2 the use of the word besochem in the verse, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within,” implies that G‑d dwells, not only in the physical sanctuaries and Batei Mikdashos the Jews have constructed, but also within the spiritual sanctuary that exists in every Jew’s heart. Accordingly, all the different tasks carried out in the Sanctuary have parallels in our divine service.3

The relevance of the kindling of the menorah and the bringing of the incense offering in the above context can be understood by the analysis of their place in Parshas Tetzaveh, a Torah reading which is devoted almost exclusively to the concept of priesthood. This Torah reading contains a lengthy explanation of the priestly garments and a description of the sacrifices brought when the priests were inaugurated into the service of the Sanctuary.

Indeed, the mention of these services in this Torah reading is problematic in nature. Seemingly, the kindling of the menorah should have been mentioned in Parshas Terumahwith the description of its structure. Similarly, it would appear that the description of the fashioning of the incense altar — and hence, the bringing of the incense offering — should have been included in that Torah reading, together with the description of the Ark, the menorah, the Table for the Showbread, the external altar and the other structural elements of the Sanctuary.

The above questions can be resolved as follows: The incense altar and its offering are mentioned as the final element of the construction of the Sanctuary and the preparations for its service to emphasize its unique importance. Indeed, we find that the Divine Presence did not rest in the Sanctuary until the incense offering was brought.

What is the reason for this uniqueness? Our Sages explain that the sacrifices offered on the altar in the courtyard of the Sanctuary relate to a Jew’s body, while the incense offering brought on the inner altar relates to a Jew’s soul.4

This concept is also reflected in the inferences that can be drawn from the Hebrew names used to describe these different offerings. The Hebrew for sacrifice is korban, which has its root in the word kerov, meaning “close.” In contrast, the Hebrew for incense offering ketores relates to the root ketar, the Aramaic for “bond.”5 By bringing a sacrifice, a Jew draws close to G‑d. Through the incense offering, however, a Jew and G‑d become fused in total unity.

Thus, after the Torah describes the preparations necessary for the Sanctuary which make it possible for the Divine Presence to dwell among — and thus within — the Jewish people, it mentions the incense offering which allows for a bond of oneness to be established between them.6

More particularly, the bond established by the incense offering refers to the soul’s connection to G‑d at the level of yechidah, an unparalleled essential union. The connection to this level is reflected in that:

a) The incense altar was one cubit by one cubit, reflecting the connection to the level of soul associated with oneness;

b) There were eleven spices used in the incense offering. Our conscious powers are structured in a set of ten. The number eleven, by contrast, relates to a dimension of the soul and G‑d that transcends this set, the level described by the phrase, “You are one, but not in a numerical sense.”7

c) When the incense offering was brought, the priest making the offering was alone with G‑d. No one was allowed in the Heichal and between the Ulam and Mizbeiach (See Rambam, Temidim U’Musofim 3:3). And in a greater sense, this concept is reflected in the fact that when the High Priest entered into the Holy of Holies on Yom Kippur, he brought an incense offering. This represented a fusion of the yechidah of time, Yom Kippur, with the yechidah of place, the Holy of Holies, and the yechidah of soul, the High Priest.8

As mentioned above, the incense offering is associated with the menorah. The menorahrefers to the Jewish people as reflected in the verse “The lamp of G‑d is the soul of man.” And the Jewish soul is given the potential to shine with light through the Torah and its mitzvos as it is written, “A mitzvah is a lamp, and Torah, light.”

The kindling of the menorah was intended to draw this light into the world at large. This is reflected in the construction of the windows of the Beis HaMikdash which were designed with their inner side narrower than their outer side. This indicated that their intent was not to bring in light from the outside, but to allow the light from the menorah to radiate forth to the world. In a similar context, our Sages describe the menorah as “testimony to all the inhabitants of the world that the Divine Presence rests in Israel.”

Based on the above, we can appreciate the connection the kindling of the menorah shares with the incense offering and with Parshas Tetzaveh. It is through the menorah that the inner bond established through the incense offering is radiated throughout the world at large.9

A similar concept applies in regard to Parshas Tetzaveh. The name Tetzaveh relates to the word tzavsa which means “connection.” To emphasize the importance of spreading the connection between G‑d and the Jewish people throughout the world, Parshas Tetzavehbegins with the description of the kindling of the menorah. Although the principle focus of this Torah reading is on the priests, by beginning with the kindling of the menorah, attention is drawn to the primary purpose of the priests’ service, to reveal the Divine Presence in the world at large.

These concepts must be paralleled in our divine service every day. Every day, a person arises as “a new creation.” Therefore, every day, we must renew the inner bond we share with G‑d as expressed by our recitation of the verses concerning the bringing of the incense offering.10 Similarly, we mention how this offering was brought in connection with the cleaning and the kindling of the menorah. This indicates how the bond between us and G‑d must be extended into our worldly affairs, causing them to be carried out in the spirit of “All your deeds shall be for the sake of heaven,” and “Know Him in all your ways.”

We see a parallel to this in our prayer service. When reciting the Shema a Jew should “give his soul over to G‑d.” This connection is continued in the Shemoneh Esreh, when he stands before G‑d with the nullification of a subject in the presence of his king.

After the conclusion of the morning prayers, we divert our attention to our worldly activities. In the midst of these activities, it is impossible to maintain the same level of attachment to G‑d experienced during prayer.11 Nevertheless, in the midst of our involvement in worldly matters, the essential connection established with G‑d continues to have a residual effect — and that effect is apparent in one’s conduct. And thus our ketores bond with G‑d forges an everlasting union.

2. As mentioned above, the halachah — as decided by the Rambam and the Sefer Mitzvos Gadol — is that the incense offering is brought between the cleaning of the first five and the final two lamps of the menorah. In this light, it is problematic that in the daily liturgy, we recite the order of the priestly functions in accordance with the view of Abba Shaul, a minority opinion, who maintains that:

The cleaning of the five lamps [of the menorah] preceded the sprinkling of the blood of the daily burnt offering. The sprinkling of the blood of the daily burnt offering preceded the cleaning of the [remaining] two lamps [of the menorah]. The cleaning of the two lamps [of the menorah] preceded the incense offering.

According to this view, the incense offering is brought after the cleaning of the menorahhas been completed entirely.

The Beis Yosef attempts to reconcile this difficulty, explaining that the Rambam’s ruling follows the principle that, in a difference of opinion between the Sages, the majority view is accepted. On the other hand:

Since people at large discovered that “Abbaye recounted the order of priestly functions in accordance with the view of Abba Shaul,” it would appear that he [Abbaye] maintains that the halachah follows this view. Hence, they did not wish to change that order.

I.e., the Beis Yosef is explaining that since a sage of the later Talmudic period followed Abba Shaul’s view, then the principle “the halachah is in accordance with the later authority” should be followed.

This explanation is still problematic: The Rambam surely knew of Abbaye’s treatment of the matter and still ruled that the halachah follows the Sages’ view. Furthermore, in our recitation of the order of the offerings in the Beis HaMikdash in the Avodah section of the Yom Kippur liturgy, the view of the Sages is accepted and we say that the bringing of the incense offering precedes the cleaning of the final two lamps.

Within the context of the application of these concepts in our personal divine service, these difficulties can be explained as follows: a) The Hebrew expression used by the Beis Yoseffor the phrase “people at large discovered” is motzu haolam. The word olam (עולם) relates to the word helam (העלם), meaning “concealment.” I.e., this perspective reflects the concealment of G‑d prevalent within the time of exile. This is also reflected by the name Abbaye which our Sages interpret as an acronym for the Hebrew words (אשר בך ירוחם יתום) meaning “In You, an orphan will take comfort.”12 For in the time of exile, the Jews are like orphans, “children who have been exiled from their Father’s table.”13

At such a time, it is difficult for the inner bond with G‑d represented by the incense offering to be revealed in the world at large, the influence of the menorah. Therefore, in our daily prayers, these two services are not coupled together. On Yom Kippur, however, when every Jew is elevated to a higher spiritual rung and experiences, in microcosm, the connection to G‑d established by the High Priest in the Holy of Holies,14 the possibility exists for the two services to be fused. At this time, a Jew’s inner bond with G‑d can radiate forth to the world at large. Furthermore, the inner bond established on Yom Kippur is not self-contained and affects our conduct throughout the year as well.

3. Significantly, Parshas Tetzaveh which is associated with these two services is always read in the month of Adar. Among the reasons for this is that it is on Rosh Chodesh Adar a pronouncement is issued, reminding the people to make their annual donation of a half-shekel to purchase the offerings for the Beis HaMikdash. Thus this is a month when the services associated with the two thrusts mentioned above are renewed. Furthermore, this renewal is characterized by joy, as our Sages state, “When Adar enters, we increase our joy.”

In particular, there is a connection with the present date, the eleventh of Adar. For as explained above, eleven is associated with the level of yechidah. Similarly, Shabbos is associated with this same quality as reflected in our Sages’ statement that every day of the week possesses “a partner” with the exception of Shabbos. And therefore, the Jewish people were designated as the Shabbos’ partner, for they are also unique among the nations.

The positive influence of the eleventh of Adar is enhanced by the service of the tenth of Adar. Ten refers to the complete expression of our ten soul powers, i.e., the spiritual powers which are under our conscious control. This creates a setting for the revelation of the eleventh potential, the quality of yechidah which is transcendent in nature.

May everyone internalize the inner bond with G‑d symbolized by the ketores offering. And may we make efforts, in the spirit of the kindling of the menorah which spreads light outward, to share these concepts with others. Every individual should try to influence at least ten other Jews and, if possible, extend his influence to every member of our people.15

These efforts, the internalization of the services of the Beis HaMikdash in the heart of every Jew, a “sanctuary in microcosm,” will hasten the coming of the era when we will merit the revelation of the Beis HaMikdash itself. May this take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA TERUMAH | 26 Shevat – 3 Adar I, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 8th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:03 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 9th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:54 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:03 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:06 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon -  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber and Chani Levitin in honor of Chodesh Adar. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim - Motzei Shabbos /NOT THIS WEEK ☹
Next week - Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food. 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – NEW DATE TBD
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of Zayin Adar, Birthday/Yahrzeit of Moshe Rabenu

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:00 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet SANHEDRIN with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT , LOCAL TRIPS, AND KOSHER RESTAURANT DELIVERY!– ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670
dubanrides@gmail.com 


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS TERUMAH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468790/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Terumah-the-4th-Day-of-Adar-I-and-the-Sichos-from-Rosh-Chodesh-and-3rd-of-Adar-I-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish

Our Rabbis taught, “Begin with blessing.” This is particularly appropriate in the month of Adar, a month of which it is said, “When Adar enters, we should increase our joy.” It is a month whose mazal (“source of influence”) is associated with strength and health. Hence, it is a month in which the Jewish people are granted unique blessings.

Furthermore, we find that the happiness of Adar has the potential to transform undesirable influences. This concept is reflected in our Sages’ statement “Just as when Av enters, we reduce our joy, when Adar enters, we increase our joy.” Even the undesirable factors associated with the reduction of our joy in the month of Av can be transformed into positive influences through the celebrations of the month of Adar.2 And ultimately, this will lead to the most complete celebration, the rejoicings of the Redemption.

To explain: The greatest happiness that a Jew can possibly feel is his connection with G‑d. Even as he exists within the limitations of this material world, and furthermore, as he is in exile within this world, he is still “the only son” of G‑d, King of kings. When a Jew comprehends this concept, it brings him great joy. This joy, in turn, changes the manner in which he approaches his life within the context of his worldly existence.

For the nature of happiness is that it permeates through the entire scope of the person’s existence. When a person is happy, he lives happily. This happiness affects the way he conducts his life and all the people with whom he comes in contact. He shares happiness with those around him and his happiness brings him success in all matters. And this can be openly seen in the events that transpire in the world at large.3

The connection between the month of Adar and positive influence raises a question: Our Sages teach, “Israel has no mazal,” i.e., the various different sources of spiritual influence (mazalos) do not control the fate of the Jewish people.4 If so, what relevance is there to the fact that the mazal of Adar is associated with health and strength?

This concept can be resolved as follows: The mazalos have power over the gentiles, for their fate is controlled by the natural order. A Jew, by contrast, even as he exists in this material world stands above the limits of the natural order. Accordingly, he has the power to change the workings of the natural order through his divine service and draw down positive influence.

In Adar, however, this is not necessary. In and of its own right, without the positive forces generated by a Jew’s service, Adar is a month of health and strength for the Jewish people. Moreover, these positive influences are reflected in our actual material life. Thus our Sages counseled, “When a Jew has a legal dispute with a gentile, he should postpone the judgment until the month of Adar.”

The relevance of the above concepts receives special emphasis in the present year when Rosh Chodesh Adar falls on the third and fourth days of the week d and s in Hebrew. Our Sages associate the sequence of these two letters with the phrase gommel dallim,“showing kindness to the poor.” Furthermore, when coupled together, the two letters form the word gad which means “good fortune.”

The expression gommel dallim is worthy of analysis. Seemingly, it would have been proper for our Sages to use the expression gommel rashim. For although both the words dal and rash mean “poor,” rash connotes a much direr state of poverty.

This difficulty can be resolved through the comprehension of the difference between the letters raish (ר) and daled (ד). Although their forms are similar, there is a clear difference between them. The daled possesses a yud in its right corner. This yud reflects the quality of bittul, “selflessness,” which allows for a connection to be established between the recipient (in terms of the Sefiros, the Sefirah of Malchus) and the source of influence (the Sefirah of Yesod).

Within the context of our divine service, this means that a Jew always possesses an essential Jewish spark within his soul. This in turn connects him to the source of G‑dly influence. This applies even when a Jew is in a state of poverty, dallus. Indeed, because of this influence, it is impossible for a Jew to fall into dire poverty, rashus.

This inner Divine connection was brought about by the giving of the Torah. For it was at that time that the decree separating spirituality from materiality was nullified and G‑dliness became a permanent part of the Jew’s being. And it was then, that the potential for the flow of Divine influence to the world, gommel dallim, was established.5

2. The weekly cycle of Torah portions shares parallels with the sequence of spiritual influences reflected by the times in which these portions are read. Accordingly, there is a connection between this week’s Torah reading and the uniquely positive spiritual influences of the month of Adar.

This connection becomes apparent through the resolution of an obvious question: This week’s Torah reading begins with G‑d’s command to the Jewish people to donate to the Sanctuary: “And you shall give an offering... gold, silver, and brass.” Seemingly, G‑d’s request should have been made in an ascending order, beginning with the items which every individual could easily give. Since there were differences in the levels of wealth of the Jewish people, it would appear more appropriate to begin with an item that could be given freely by all. Why then did G‑d mention gold first?6

The Jews possessed an abundance of gold at that time, for they received spoil from the Egyptians before leaving that land and also gathered great wealth after the miracles of the Red Sea. Nevertheless, we may assume that among the Egyptians from whom they took this wealth, and therefore among the Jews themselves, there were still differences between the value of gold, silver, and brass and the Jews possessed a smaller quantity of the more precious metals. Indeed, we find that in actuality, more brass and silver were donated to the Sanctuary than gold.

This adds emphasis to the question raised above: Why was gold mentioned first?7 And furthermore, the question arises: What is the lesson to be derived from this for subsequent generations?

These questions can be resolved by considering another question which is raised regarding the construction of the Sanctuary as a whole. Every Jew was commanded to donate towards the Sanctuary’s construction and in actuality, each member of the Jewish people — men, women, and children — made such donations. The questions arises: Since the Sanctuary was intended to establish a dwelling for G‑d in this world,8 seemingly, that dwelling should have been fashioned only through the service of the most elevated and sophisticated among the people.9 Why were the donations to the Sanctuary allowed to be made by every single Jew?10

Nevertheless, precisely this is the message that the Torah wishes to communicate: that every Jew, even a simple man or woman or a young child, has the power to establish a dwelling for G‑d.

To explain: The command to build the Sanctuary was communicated after the giving of the Torah at which time, G‑d chose the Jewish people. In Chassidic thought, it is explained that this choice encompassed the physical person of each and every Jew. Even as a Jew exists within a material body in this physical world, he is a member of “a nation of priests and a holy people.”

This relates to the concept mentioned above, that the giving of the Torah nullified the Divine decree separating the spiritual from the physical. Thus even as the Jewish people exist in the material world, their true nature is spiritual. They are “an actual part of G‑d,” and “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one.”

Even when a Jew sins he remains a Jew. He cannot divorce himself from his true source. As the Rambam states, the true desire of every Jew is to serve G‑d. If, at times, this is not reflected in a person’s conduct, we should realize that this is a deviation from his true will, that his natural inclination temporarily forced him to act against his genuine desire.

In this context, we can understand our Sages’ directive, “A person should always occupy himself in Torah study although his intention is self-oriented. For from service that is not for G‑d’s sake comes service which is for G‑d’s sake.” In the Hebrew original of the above expression, the word mitoch translated as “from” also can be rendered “the depth of.” Thus, the expression can be interpreted “the depths, i.e., the core, of service which is not for G‑d’s sake is service that is for G‑d’s sake.” This means that although a person is outwardly studying the Torah or performing a mitzvah for an ulterior motive, the inner motivation for his act is the desire to fulfill G‑d’s will.

From the giving of the Torah on, this has been and is the nature of every Jew. And therefore, after the giving of the Torah, the command was given for a dwelling for G‑d to be constructed within our material world through the donations of every Jew, regardless of his individual attributes.

Based on the above, we can understand why gold was mentioned first when G‑d commanded the Jews to donate toward the Sanctuary. A Jew shares an intrinsic connection to gold. Since a Jew, as he exists within the material world, is “G‑d’s only son,” he is by nature rich. He has the potential to give generously, and to give gold. Indeed, the very Hebrew word for gold, zahav, reflects a Jew’s tendency to give, for our Sages interpret this word as an acronym for the phrase, “He who gives while healthy,” i.e., the person gives not to ward off any unfavorable influences, but as a natural expression of his inner self. And to emphasize this attribute, the first item asked of the Jewish people was gold.11

3. Based on the above, we can appreciate the connection between the month of Adar and Parshas Terumah. Both reflect how even as a Jew exists within the context of this material world, he is connected with his spiritual source. This in turn brings him success and prosperity even within the framework of material existence.

A Jew is in essence rich and his inner spiritual wealth should be reflected in actual material wealth. If this is not openly apparent, this is only because G‑d desires that a Jew reveal this wealth through his efforts, that he transform the darkness of the world into light. This in turn will draw down an abundance of Divine blessing into the world.

The above is particularly true in the present time, when the Jewish people have completed all the spiritual tasks demanded of them and all that is necessary is to actually accept Mashiach. At this time, each and every member of the present generation, the last generation of exile and the first generation of Redemption, is surely worthy of abundant material wealth.

This leads to a practical directive: Each Jew should seek to obtain wealth, spiritual wealth as our Sages stated, “There is no concept of wealth other than knowledge,” and also actual material wealth. The latter will, as the Rambam explains, enable one to devote oneself to the study of Torah and the observance of mitzvos in a more complete manner. Similarly, one will be able to donate more generously to tzedakah, including the tzedakahgiven for the construction of synagogues and houses of study.

And this will lead to the construction of the Third Beis HaMikdash, a mitzvah which is incumbent on every single Jew. And it will be fulfilled by the entire Jewish people, for every Jew — man, woman, and child12 — will donate towards the construction of that BeisHaMikdash.

Similarly, at this time, in connection with the twofold influence of the months of Adar, there must be an emphasis on the service of happiness. Our happiness should continue to grow and increase throughout these two months. Indeed, efforts should be made to increase and heighten this celebration. These efforts should begin with an increase in Torah study, as it is written, “The precepts of G‑d bring joy to the heart,” and this study should lead to deed, an increase in the performance of mitzvos behiddur, in a careful and beautiful manner.

From “serving G‑d with joy,” we should proceed to spreading joy and happiness in the most literal sense, making efforts that the members of one’s household and similarly, all of those with whom one comes in contact, experience greater joy. And this will lead to the ultimate joy, the coming of the Redemption. May it take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA MISHPATIM Mevarchim Adar Aleph | 26 Shevat – 3 Ad

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 1st  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:52 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 2nd 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Adar Aleph -  7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:58 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:52 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:53 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon, Thu,  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Tue, Wed Shacharis 6:50 AM /ROSH CHODESH ADAR I
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:00 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is co-sponsored by Ploni Almoni. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 7 PM at CSTL
Generously Sponsored this week by Rabbi Shneur Zalman and Chaya Levitin, in honor of the 6th birthday of their son Yisachar Dov. . Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of our friend Bill Abramson (Ze’ev ben Aharon Z”L), who passed away in Israel this week, and in honor of the yahrzeit (30th  of Shevat) of Chaplain Gary Friedman, Chaim Tzvi ben Yehuda Leib Z”L. 

MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:00 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

MELAVE MALKA AT Ezra Bessaroth – FEB 2nd 
Featuring NYHS Scholar in Residence Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder, Rosh Yeshiva of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, Yeshiva University.  
www.ezrabessaroth.net

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle..org

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel..org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER 
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670 
dubanrides@gmail.com.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS MISHPATIM
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468783/jewish/The-25th-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

1. Our Rabbis teach, “Open with blessing.” The 25th of the month, כה in Hebrew, relates to the Priestly Blessing which begins “In this manner koh (כה), bless the children of Israel.” The Priestly Blessing has the positive qualities of both blessing and prayer as explained on previous occasions.

This will be enhanced by the influence of the present month, the eleventh month which reflects a transcendent influence.1 And from Shvat, we proceed to Adar, a month whose mazal (source of influence) is healthy, implying that it is a source of healthy influence for every single Jew.

The influence of Adar begins at present, for all matters associated with a month are drawn down on Shabbos Mevarchim (the Shabbos on which the month is blessed). Since the preparations for Shabbos begin on the preceding days (and we have already reciting the evening service associated with the day preceding the Shabbos), the positive influences associated with a “healthy mazal” are already present.

The above is enhanced by the recurring influence of Shabbos Mevarchim which is associated with the renewal of the moon and also with the ultimate renewal of every member of the Jewish people — men, women, and children — which will take place in the Era of the Redemption.2

All the more emphasis on the above exists in the present year, a leap year which our Sages refer to as “a perfect year.”3 In particular, this relates to the month of Adar, for there are two Adars in a leap year, indicating that all the positive influences associated with Adar are of twofold intensity.

The positive nature of the present time is also reflected in this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Mishpatim. As mentioned at our last gathering,4 Parshas Mishpatim is associated with those aspects of Torah that can be comprehended by human intellect. Accordingly, there is a necessity to emphasize that cases governed by these laws must be judged before a Jewish court, and not before gentiles. “Even when one knows that in a particular instance the secular law will parallel Jewish law, one may not judge the case before their authorities.” Although the result of the judgment would be the same in both courts, we are required to judge the case only before a Jewish court.

There is a point of connection to this concept in the events of the preceding days. To explain: One of the prophecies concerning the Era of the Redemption is, “Nations shall not lift up a sword against other nations.... They shall beat their swords into plowshares.” From “swords,” which refers to the totality of armaments and weapons, they will make “plowshares,” instruments which cultivate the earth and produce food.

In this context, there is a unique significance to the statements made by the leader of this country who announced that funds which were previously allocated to the production of arms will be used to produce food. This clearly emphasizes the thrust towards a total negation of armament and war.

Since “the law of the land is your law,” there is significance to the statements made by the leader of this country, a country of kindness.5 This is particularly true since they were immediately accepted by the majority of the representatives chosen by the people. Hence, these statements now have the authority of Torah law.

They are relevant, not only within the national and international sphere, but also within the realm of our interpersonal relations. This adds further emphasis to the importance of following the example of Aharon the Priest, who “loved the created beings and drew them close to the Torah.” Even when one has reason to be displeased with a colleague’s conduct,6 one should relate to him with love. Indeed, this thrust towards love and charity is one which should be emulated by both Jews and gentiles alike.7

These concepts are relevant at present, for as mentioned on previous occasions,8 we are at the pinnacle of Jewish history, the time most appropriate for the Redemption. And this will cause the very next moment to be the last moment of the exile and the first moment of the Redemption, when “as in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”9

And at this time, we will merit the revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.” Herein, there is a connection to the opening words of Parshas Mishpatim, v’eileh hamishpatim, which, as Rashi relates, come to emphasize how the laws related in this Torah portion are a continuation of the revelation of Sinai. Similarly, the Torah which we study every day and the Torah to be revealed in the Era of the Redemption are a continuation of that revelation.

At that time, we — together with the entire Jewish people — will proceed to our Holy Land, in Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash. Herein, there is a connection to the Torah portion of the coming week Parshas Terumah which begins with the command, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within.” For the ultimate fulfillment of this command will be in the Era of the Redemption, with the construction of the Third BeisHaMikdash. May this take place immediately — with all the significance implied by the word “immediately.”10 And may we — with the Nasi of our generation at our head — proceed to the true and ultimate Redemption, led by Mashiach.

PARASHA YITRO | 19-26 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 25th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:41 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 26th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:03 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:41 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:43 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:50 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is co-sponsored by Anonymous and by Avremi & Chavi Gitler in memory of their nephew, התינוק  מנחם מענדל בן יבלחט"א ר יואל זאב שי. Yartzeit  is כ"ו שבט.The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Generously Sponsored this week by: Shmueli Tennenhaus and Rosie Levin. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (22nd of Shevat) of the  Rebbetzin Chaya Mushkah Schneerson, wife of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU - SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

MELAVE MALKA AT Ezra Bessaroth – FEB 2nd 
Featuring NYHS Scholar in Residence Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder, Rosh Yeshiva of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, Yeshiva University.  
www.ezrabessaroth.net

Jewish Women Connections at the Westin – SUN JAN 27th 11 AM
The largest philanthropic gathering of Jewish women in the Pacific Northwest, featuring guest speaker Sharon Tal, the renowned designer behind re-launch of the legendary Maskit Fashion House. Read Sharon's story in the latest issue of Jewish In Seattle magazine. See and shop a selection of Maskit designs at a post-event Trunk Show!  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Send Your Child to Jewish Camp
The Federation supports formative Jewish experiences through camp scholarships and incentives. Applications are now open for 2019 Jewish overnight camp scholarships. Last year, need-based scholarships made it possible for 263 children to attend. For first-time campers, incentive grants of up to $1,000 are available. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Campus Crash Course Sun Jan 27th 4 pm - 9 pm
Jewish and other pro-Israel students can face BDS initiatives, demonizing language, and other attacks on Israel's legitimacy on college campuses. StandWithUs presents a course that prepares students to turn difficult conversations into something positive.  Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS YITRO
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468779/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Yisro-20th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

The Ten Commandments are recorded twice in the Torah: once in Parshas Yisro, and once in Parshas Vaeschanan. Since the Ten Commandments are the foundation for the entire Torah and include the entire Torah, it is obvious that their repetition communicates central lessons relevant to the Torah as a whole, i.e., they each represent an approach that is vital to our observance of the Torah in its entirety.1

The fundamental differences between the narrative of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro and the narrative of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan is that Parshas Yisro relates how the Ten Commandments were given by G‑d. Parshas Vaeschanan, by contrast, presents Moshe’s description of the giving of the Ten Commandments. They are “the words of Moshe,” and not the direct word of G‑d.

This difference reflects two fundamental dimensions of the Torah: On one hand, the Torah is “G‑d’s will and G‑d’s wisdom,” “the Torah and the Holy One, blessed be He, are one.” From this perspective, the Torah is a “hidden treasure,” above the grasp of man.

Conversely, however, “the Torah has journeyed and descended through hidden stages, stage after stage through the entire set of the spiritual cosmos until it became enclothed in material entities and matters of this world.” This process reached its fullest expression at the giving of the Torah when the Torah was given to the Jewish people as they live in this material world. From that time onward, “the Torah is not in the heavens,” but rather the possession of the Jewish people. After the giving of the Torah, the Torah must be studied by the Jewish people as they exist “souls within bodies” and it is on the basis of their understanding that Torah law will be decided. Similarly, through their observance of the mitzvos, they transform the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

These two dimensions should be reflected in the way in which every Jew studies Torah: The awareness that the Torah transcends human knowledge leads to bittul, “selflessness.”2In a complete sense, this bittul is reflected in the verse, “My tongue will repeat Your sayings,” which is interpreted as follows: “The Torah is ‘Your sayings,’ and my tongue is merely repeating what You have said.” In this context, we can also interpret the verse “G‑d, open my lips and my mouth will recite Your praise,” i.e., although it is a man who is speaking, what he is saying is “Your praise,” G‑d’s words and not his own. “The Divine Presence speaks from his throat.”

On this basis, we can understand our Sages’ statement that we should study the Torah with the same awe, fear, and trembling experienced by the Jews at Mount Sinai. For, although we are lacking all the open miracles of Sinai, the essence of the experience, that a limited human being is perceiving the word of G‑d, is the same.

Conversely, we must also appreciate that the Torah was given to man as he exists within our material world, a soul within a physical body. Accordingly, a person must endeavor to understand the Torah with his own mind and faculties. And when he achieves this, the Torah he studies is considered as his own. He receives a measure of authority over the Torah which he has studied.3

These two thrusts are also reflected in the ultimate purpose of our Torah study: fashioning a dwelling for G‑d in these lower worlds. Here, too, we see two dimensions, that it is a dwelling for G‑d, i.e., a place where He reveals Himself totally, as a person reveals himself without restraint in his own home. This relates to the transcendent dimension of the Torah. Because “the Torah and G‑d are one,” the Torah can reveal His presence in the world.

Simultaneously, as mentioned above, the Torah has undergone a process of descent, enclothing itself in matters of our material world. This enables the dwelling to be part and parcel of our lower world itself, causing its very own framework of reference to serve as a medium to reveal G‑d’s dwelling.

In this context, we can apply our Sages’ expression, “One who enters a country should follow its modes,” to the Torah’s descent into worldly existence. Because the Torah adapts to the modes of existence of our material environment, it has the potential to make them into a dwelling for G‑d.4

Based on these concepts, we can appreciate the significance of the two different narratives of the Ten Commandments in the Torah. The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro reflects G‑d’s speech, granting the Jews the potential for their Torah study to reflect G‑d’s speech.

This concept is reflected in the introductory verse to the Ten Commandments, literally translated as, “And G‑d related all the following to say (לאמר).” The commentaries note that the word laimor, “to say,” appears frequently in the Torah with the intent that the message communicated should be conveyed to others. This meaning is not appropriate in this instance, for the entire Jewish people were present at the giving of the Torah. Nor can the intent be to communicate the message to the Jews of future generations, for all the souls of the Jewish people, even those yet to be born,5 attended at Mount Sinai.

Therefore, the intent of the term in this instance is that G‑d gave the Jews the power to say the words of Torah as He said them, that the words of the Torah studied by a Jew should be “G‑d’s word.”

The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan, by contrast, were spoken by Moshe. This grants a Jew the potential to comprehend the Torah within the context of his own limited human intellect and in a larger sense, to make a dwelling for G‑d within the context of our material world.6

Thus each of the different accounts of the Ten Commandments possesses an advantage lacking in the other. The account in Parshas Yisro reflects the advantage of direct revelation from G‑d, without an intermediaries. All the Jews heard the commandments from G‑d Himself.

In contrast, the description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflects how they are related by Moshe. Although Moshe was “a medium who connects,”7 and “the Divine Presence spoke from his throat,” this still represented a descent.8 And therefore, the giving of the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai represents the ultimate of man’s connection with G‑d.

Nevertheless, receiving G‑d’s word in this manner negates our individual existence. (And thus our Sages relate that after each of the Commandments, the souls of the Jews expired.) Conversely, the second description of the giving of the Ten Commandments reflects the ultimate of a person’s individual existence, that a Jew, like Moshe, can be a medium for the expression of G‑d’s speech.

To express these advantages within the context of the expression “a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds”: The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflects how even the lower worlds within their own context become a dwelling “for G‑d.” There is, however, a limitation although they are a “dwelling for G‑d,” there is a difference between G‑d and His dwelling. To refer to the analogy mentioned above, in a person’s own home, he expresses himself most freely: Although this is true, his home is merely the place where he expresses himself. There is a clear difference between the person himself and his home.

Similarly, in the analogue, although the description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflect how the Jews — as they exist within the framework of worldly existence — become a dwelling for G‑d, there remains, however, a difference between G‑d and His dwelling. The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro, by contrast, reflect how nothing exists aside from G‑d Himself.

The ultimate level of fulfillment is when there is a fusion of both approaches, that G‑d’s essence is revealed within the context of our material world with no limitation whatsoever and that this revelation is internalized within the Jewish people (as opposed to causing their self-nullification). In this manner, a Jew repeats “G‑d’s word” and becomes a channel for the revelation of G‑dliness in the world at large.

In this context, the two narratives of the giving of the Ten Commandments can be seen as two stages in a single process. The narrative in Parshas Yisro reflects the potential for the revelation of essential G‑dliness. And the narrative in Parshas Vaeschanan reveals how this essential G‑dliness becomes internalized within Moshe, within the Jewish people, and within the world at large. In this manner, the revelation at Mount Sinai, becomes relevant to our divine service at all places and in all places.

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above concepts and the date on which Parshas Yisrois read this year, the 20th of Shvat, ten days after the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, and two days before the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe’s daughter, Rebbetzin Chayah Mushka.

Shvat is the eleventh month in the year. As mentioned on previous occasions,9 all existence is structured in a framework of reference of ten. Eleven refers to a level of transcendence above that framework. These two levels are also reflected in the Ten Commandments. The Ten Commandments themselves reflect a set of ten. The first commandment, Anochi, reflects a level of transcendence, “You are one and not in a numerical sense.”

The Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit falls on the tenth day of the eleventh month, i.e., the transcendent quality associated with eleven is drawn down into the limited framework of ten.10 And this is the ultimate goal of the giving of the Torah, that G‑d’s essence be drawn down by the Jews in their Torah study every day.

Surely, the above is relevant to our generation, the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the redemption, for it is in the Era of the Redemption when we will witness the quintessence of the above process, seeing how G‑d’s essence permeates every dimension of existence.

And the Redemption can come immediately. Indeed, miyad (מיד) the Hebrew for “immediately,” is intrinsically connected with the Redemption, for its letters serve as an acronym for the names Moshe, Yisrael, David, the three Jewish leaders associated with the Redemption. Moshe redeemed the Jews from Egypt and our Sages declare, “He was the first redeemer and he will be the ultimate Redeemer.” It is the spreading outward of the wellsprings of the teachings of Yisrael, the Baal Shem Tov, which will bring the Redemption. And similarly, the Mashiach will be a descendant of David, the first anointed king.

Similarly, miyad can reflect the continuity between generations as reflected in the acronym Moshe, Yehoshua, Doram, “Moshe Yehoshua and their generations.” This emphasizes how the concepts symbolized by the three letters are not distant from each other, but rather in direct connection.

Each one of us — man, woman, and child — must take a lesson from the above concepts.11 Since the Ten Commandments were associated with the unity of the Jewish people, at Mount Sinai, they camped “as one man, with one heart,” our application of the lessons they teach should also involve a community, i.e., ten other people. Every individual should seek to convey the totality of the Torah and its mitzvos, for they are all reflected within the Ten Commandments to at least ten other Jews.12

Although the above directive applies to every member of our generation, it is particularly relevant to those present in this “sanctuary in microcosm,” the house of prayer, house of study, and house of good deeds of the Previous Rebbe. Since the Nasi represents the entire generation, this building is beis chayeinu, “the source of our life,” for every person in this generation.

When all the Jews here will serve as a living example of how the Previous Rebbe’s directives should be fulfilled, the influence from this house13 will reach Jews throughout the world. And this will hasten the coming of the time when the synagogues and houses of study in the Diaspora will all be taken to Eretz Yisrael together with the entire Jewish people. May this take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA BESHALACH – SHABBOS SHIRA – TU b’SHEVAT | 12 -19 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 18th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:30 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 19th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:05 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:30 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:34 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
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Sun - Thu Mincha 4:40 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Gala Bar-Mitzvah Kiddush! Mazel Tov to The Herbstman Family! The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Avi and Meirav Herbstsman on the occasion of Menachem Mendel’s Bar Mitzvah!  Mazel Tov to Menachem Mendel!   L’Torah, T’Chupah, v L’Maasim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
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LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
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Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
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SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
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FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (13th of Shevat) of the  Rebbetzin Shterna Sarah Schneersohn, wife of the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Sholom DovBer Schneerson, and mother of the sixth Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak. . 
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MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה 

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
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CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
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CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
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RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
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COMMUNITY NEWS

FRUTICAS (Tu b’SHEVAT) DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration.. Enjoy an incredible Chicken dinner and our traditional Sephardic Fruticas seder all catered by Dalia Amon.  Family price $90.00 or $35.00 per individual non-member. Children under 5 free. RSVP and pay by January 16th by going to 
http://ezrabessaroth.net/support-eb  or pay at the office or call 206-722-5500.www.ezrabessaroth.net  

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.   

Jewish Federation Tu b’Shevat Work Party At Kubota Gardens – MON JAN 21st Info/registration: craigm@jewishinseattle.org

Teen Israel Scholarship Applications – DEADLINE JAN 22nd 
The application deadline for teen Israel scholarships is just over a week away! Give your teen the experience of a lifetime — a journey to Israel that will strengthen your teen's Jewish identity and foster a deeper connection with our Jewish homeland.  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Helping Your Child Find Success in School & Life. Wed Jan 23rd 7 PM
At SHA. Samis Foundation Jewish Day School Scholar-In-Residence, Dr. Michael G. Thompson

Jewish Lawyers - Cardozo Society Networking – THU JAN 24th – 6 PM
Meet new faces, catch up with old friends, and explore new ideas with other Jewish lawyers and law students at a Cardozo Society Networking Happy Hour. Drinks and light snacks. The Alibi Room in Post Alley, 85 Pike St., No 410, Seattle 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Women's Endowment Fund Grants Deadline: FRI JAN 25th 
Applications are open for Women's Endowment Fund (WEF) grants from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. WEF supports programs that empower and improve the lives of women and girls, locally and in Israel. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Jewish Women Connections at the Westin – SUN JAN 27th 11 AM
The largest philanthropic gathering of Jewish women in the Pacific Northwest, featuring guest speaker Sharon Tal, the renowned designer behind re-launch of the legendary Maskit Fashion House. Read Sharon's story in the latest issue of Jewish In Seattle magazine. See and shop a selection of Maskit designs at a post-event Trunk Show!  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Send Your Child to Jewish Camp
The Federation supports formative Jewish experiences through camp scholarships and incentives. Applications are now open for 2019 Jewish overnight camp scholarships. Last year, need-based scholarships made it possible for 263 children to attend. For first-time campers, incentive grants of up to $1,000 are available. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Campus Crash Course Sun Jan 27th 4 pm - 9 pm
Jewish and other pro-Israel students can face BDS initiatives, demonizing language, and other attacks on Israel's legitimacy on college campuses. StandWithUs presents a course that prepares students to turn difficult conversations into something positive.  Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
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SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
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Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
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PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU - SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS BESHALACH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468773/jewish/The-11th-of-Shvat-and-Shabbos-Parshas-Beshallach-13th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

There are several significant dimensions to the fact that this year, Yud Shvat, the day of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, was commemorated on a Wednesday. Among them:

  1. Wednesday is the day on which the luminaries were suspended in the heavens;
  2. Wednesday begins the preparations for the coming Shabbos (on which the service associated with the previous week, and in this instance, the service associated with the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, is elevated to a higher level). This is reflected in the recitation of the verses from Lechu Nerraninah (the beginning of the Kabbolas Shabbos service) in the Psalm of the Day of Wednesday.

The latter concept is particularly appropriate this Shabbos, for it is Shabbos Shirah (the Shabbos of Song), the Shabbos on which the Torah reading contains the song sung by the Jewish people after the crossing of the Red Sea.

Shabbos shares a unique connection to song as reflected in the psalm that begins, “A psalm, a song for the Shabbos day.” In Chassidic thought, it is explained that song is a medium through which one can ascend to higher spiritual levels. For that reason, the elevation of the worlds to a higher spiritual level on Shabbos comes about through song. In particular, this potential is granted on Shabbos Shirah, and from Shabbos Shirah, the potential is drawn down to the other Shabbasos of the year. Thus, it is understood that Shabbos Shirah also allows a unique potential for the elevation of the service of YudShvat.

This Shabbos s also significant because it generates blessing for the day of Tu BeShvat. There are two important dimensions to the latter date: It is the New Year of the Trees and it is also the fifteenth of the month, the day on which the moon shines in its fullness, i.e., the service of this month is expressed in a complete manner. Connecting points to all of the above concepts can be found in the two Torah portions associated with the present Shabbos: Beshallach which is read in the morning service and Yisro, which is read in the afternoon service.

There is a connection between these two Torah readings. Parshas Beshallach marks the completion of the redemption from Egypt which is connected with the giving of the Torah described in Parshas Yisro as it is written, “When you take the people out of the Land of Egypt, you will serve Me on this mountain.” Conversely, Parshas Yisro is connected with the splitting of the Red Sea described in Parshas Beshallach, for it was the news of the splitting of the sea that motivated Yisro to come to visit Moshe.

Both Torah portions also share a connection to the Era of the Redemption. The song sung by the Jewish people after the crossing of the Red Sea contains several references to the Era of the Redemption. For example, the verse “the Sanctuary of G‑d established by Your hands,” which refers to the Third Beis HaMikdash which will be constructed at that time, and the concluding verse, “And G‑d will reign forever and ever.” Similarly, the oath taken by G‑d against Amalek recorded at the conclusion of Parshas Beshallach will be in force until Amalek is wiped out in the Era of the Redemption.

The giving of the Torah described in Parshas Yisro is also associated with the ultimate revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah which will emerge from Me,” in the Era of the Redemption.2

The connection between all of these concepts can be understood better through the analysis of the opening verse of the Torah reading, “And G‑d did not choose the way of the Philistines although it was close.” (In practice, all the subsequent events are connected with this choice. Since G‑d led the people southward, it was necessary for the sea to split, there, they encountered Amalek, and it was because of these miracles that Yisro visited them.)

The Midrash explains that “the way of the Philistines” was an eleven day journey and draws a connection to the verse “an eleven day journey from Choreb.” Instead of taking this short journey, they traveled through the desert for forty years.

The Midrash also relates that eleven has positive significance, referring to “the distinct commandment,... the first of the ten, ‘I am G‑d, your L‑rd.’ ” In Kabbalistic terminology, eleven refers to the level of “one, but not in a numerical sense,” i.e., G‑d’s essence which is above the ten Sefiros.

By not choosing to lead the Jews by this path, G‑d did not intend to remove this influence from the Jews. Instead, His intent was that this transcendent influence be drawn down and made part of their inner being. This was accomplished through the forty year journey through the desert which endowed them with “a knowing heart, eyes that see, and ears that hear.” For it was the internalization of this transcendent potential which prepared them for the entry into Eretz Yisrael.3

The above was accomplished through the forty-two4 journeys of the Jewish people through the desert. Part and parcel of the intent in this journey was to elevate the sparks of G‑dliness enclothed in the material entities with which the Jews used during this journey. These sparks had fallen to low levels, the negative dimension of the number eleven.5Nevertheless, through the efforts of the Jewish people, these negative dimensions can be nullified, and the positive power of these transcendent potentials revealed. Indeed, this service draws down increased energy into the service of G‑d within the context of the world’s limitations, which are alluded to in the Ten Commandments.

Were G‑d to have led the Jews to Eretz Yisrael on the eleven day journey, this transcendent quality would have been revealed from above, but would not have permeated the Jewish people as they exist within their own context. By causing the journey to last forty years, the transcendent quality associated with eleven was drawn down through the service of the Jewish people in elevating the material frame of reference in which we live, thus making it an integral part of our existence.

Based on the above, we can appreciate how the events mentioned in the Torah portions of Beshallach and Yisro serve as a preparation for the ultimate revelation of the Torah in the Era of the Redemption. The Torah to be revealed in the Era of the Redemption was also conveyed in the revelation at Mount Sinai.6 Nevertheless, the concepts to be revealed at that time have remained hidden to the point that they are described as “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me,” i.e., a new entity never appreciated before.7

This concept relates to the contrast between the numbers ten and eleven mentioned above. The giving of the Torah was associated with the Ten Commandments and thus reflects how the Torah enclothes itself within the limits of worldly existence. For this reason, the giving of the Torah is associated with Nigleh, the revealed dimensions of Torah law which provide us with guidelines for our conduct within this world. Conversely, the revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me” is associated with the number eleven, the transcendent dimension mentioned above.

In this context, the wanderings of the Jewish people throughout the centuries can be compared to the journeys through the desert, for the purpose of those wanderings was the elevation of the sparks of G‑dliness contained within the nations in which they lived. Ultimately, this service will lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the land,” and this will be reflected in the wiping out of Amalek.

At that time, we will merit to take possession of Eretz Yisrael in its fullness as a land of ten nations, including not only the lands of the seven Canaanite nations, but also the lands of the Keni, Kenizi, and Kadmoni. Furthermore, Eretz Yisrael will spread out through the entire world, revealing how the world is G‑d’s dwelling.

There is a connection between the above and Shabbos Shirah, “the Shabbos of Song.” As mentioned above, song is a medium of ascent and also a medium for revelation. In this context, we can develop the ideas explained by our Sages that there were nine songs sung by the Jewish people as a whole and in the Era of the Redemption, we will sing the tenth song, “a new song.”

Our Sages continue that the previous songs are referred to as shirah, the feminine form of the word song, while the “new song” of the Era of the Redemption is referred as shir, the masculine form. All the previous songs refer to the efforts of the Jewish people (the feminine dimension, as explained by the commentaries to Shir HaShirim) to ascend to a higher spiritual level and to elevate their environment. In contrast, the song of the Era of the Redemption will be a song of revelation from above8 (the masculine dimension).

The above is particularly relevant to the month of Shvat, for Shvat is the eleventh month of the year (when counting from Nissan, the month of redemption).9 There is a special emphasis on the above on the tenth and the eleventh days of the month. The tenth of Shvat is the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, the day on which “all the deeds, teaching, and service which he performed throughout his life” are elevated to a higher level.10 The positive potential generated on this day is particularly emphasized this year when YudShvat falls on a Wednesday, the day the luminaries were suspended in the heavens, i.e., a day associated with revelation.

The elevated state reached is reflected on the eleventh day when the quality of transcendent revelation is expressed by the monthly cycle and by the daily cycle. All the more unique is the commemoration of these dates in the present year, for this is the 42nd anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, indicating that “the journey through the desert” to elevate the Jewish people and the environment in which they live has been completed and we, the last generation of exile and the first generation of the Redemption, are prepared to enter Eretz Yisrael.

And soon we will merit the singing of the “new song,” the song of redemption, a song of unity and oneness. Indeed, a foretaste of the happiness and joy which will accompany that song can be experienced at present. The confidence that the Redemption is an immediate reality should produce joy and happiness.11

* * *

2. This Shabbos also conveys blessing upon the day of Tu BeShvat, “the New Year of the Trees,” a day which shares a connection with the seven species of produce for which Eretz Yisrael is praised, wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olive (oil), and dates (honey). This is relevant to every Jew, for every Jew is “a cherished land” which can give forth the seven species of produce, i.e., seven different modes of service of G‑d.

It is proper to mention the importance of holding farbrengens on Tu BeShvat in every place. At these farbrengens, it should be emphasized how every Jew is “a cherished land,” and possesses within himself the potential to express a mode of service appropriate to each of the seven types of produce for which Eretz Yisrael is praised.

Each Jew has a treasure store of spiritual potentials that enables him to bring out services representative of these seven services. This also includes the revelation of the secrets of Torah, the service associated with dates, as alluded to in the verse “milk and honey are under your tongue.” And it is through these efforts that we will merit that “a shoot will emerge from the stem of Yishai,” the coming of Mashiach who will take us to Eretz Yisraeltogether with the entire Jewish people. And then we will merit the ultimate fulfillment of the giving of the Torah, the revelation of the “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.”

SHABBOS BO | 5 -12 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 11th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:21 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 12th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:06 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:21 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:26 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM (Earliest Tefilin c. 6:53 am)
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:30 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Shimon Dershowitz for sponsoring cholent in honor ofRabbi Levitin’s Birthday (28th Tevet). The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Saifo and Frumi Marasow on the birth of their new grandchild! 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (5th of Shevat) of the  "Sefas Emes”,  Rabbi Yehudah Leib Alter (1847-1905), the second Rebbe of the Ger Chassidic dynasty. . 
www.chabad.org/calendar

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD SHEVAT WED JAN 16th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi Mendy Levitin, 4027 NE 60th Street.  The sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, passed away on Shabbat morning, the 10th of Shevat, of the year 5710 from creation (1950).  A year later, at t a gathering of Chassidim marking the first anniversary of the passing of the sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, the late Rebbe's son-in-law, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, delivered a Chassidic discourse (maamar) entitled Basi LeGani ("I Came into My Garden"), signifying his formal acceptance of the leadership of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement.
www.chabad.org/calendar

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

TORAH, TEA, AND COOKIES WITH RABBI ROSENFELD – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

BCMH presents "Ladies Kumzits" SAT JAN 12th 8:30 pm
In Yavneh Bldg. More info or to sponsor, contact Aliza Genauer at (201) 745-8156
FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS BO
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468770/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bo-6th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

This week’s Torah reading, Parshas Bo, relates how the Jewish people were redeemed from Egypt, as it is written “And on that selfsame day, all the hosts of G‑d left the land of Egypt.” The potential for this exodus was generated by G‑d’s command to Moshe which is mentioned at the beginning of the Torah reading, “Come to Pharaoh.”1

The Zohar explains that there is also a positive dimension to Pharaoh, “the source for the revelation of all lights.” Furthermore, the word that phrase uses for “revelation,” ispariyuhas the connotation of wildness, referring to an unbounded revelation that cannot be contained.2 Because in his source, Pharaoh represented such an elevated potential, his expression in this world expressed power in a fallen state.

In a different place, the Zohar relates that Moshe was apprehensive about approaching Pharaoh because Pharaoh represented the source of all evil. Therefore, it was necessary for G‑d to tell Moshe, “Come,” i.e., “Come with Me, I will accompany you.” Similarly, it can be explained that contemplating the essential nature of the counterpart of Pharaoh in holiness cast fear and awe upon Moshe. How could he, a limited human approach the essence of G‑d? Accordingly, he needed the reassurance that G‑d would accompany him and facilitate this fusion of limitation and infinity.

Such a fusion is possible only because of G‑d’s essence. Nevertheless, since the light from G‑d’s essence is connected with its source and reveals its source, it draws down the potential for the fusion of opposites to all levels, even to this physical world. And thus, Moshe as he exists, a soul enclothed in a body, could receive the revelation of these infinite levels of G‑dliness.

The above concepts can be understood within the context of the ultimate goal of the exodus from Egypt, the giving of the Torah as it is written, “When you take the people out of Egypt, you will serve G‑d on this mountain.” The ultimate goal of the Torah is to allow for the fulfillment of G‑d’s desire to have a dwelling in the lower worlds. Just as it is in a person’s home that his personality finds expression without restraint or inhibition, it will be in this world, G‑d’s dwelling place, that G‑dliness will be revealed without restraint.

Before the giving of the Torah, there was a decree preventing the spiritual from descending to the physical and the physical from ascending to the spiritual. When G‑d gave the Torah, He nullified this decree, making possible the revelation of the spiritual — and indeed, His very essence, the highest level of spirituality possible — within this world and conversely, the transformation of the material dimensions of this world into articles of holiness. In the fullest sense, this fusion of finiteness and infinity is revealed in the physical person of a Jew, in the union of his body and soul, for “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one.” Since this fusion was the ultimate goal of the exodus, it was reflected in G‑d’s command to Moshe, “Come to Pharaoh,” which served as the catalyst for the redemption.

A similar concept is expressed at the very outset of the Torah’s description of G‑d’s selection of Moshe as the redeemer. Moshe protested, “I am not a man of speech... I am slow-tongued.... Send by means of who You will send.” The commentaries explain that Moshe’s speech defect was representative of the spiritual state of the world. Speech, representative of the Sefirah of Malchus, was in exile and Moshe was unable to awaken this potential. Therefore, he maintained, he was not fitting to bring about the redemption.

From another perspective, in Chassidic thought, it is explained that Moshe’s speech defect stemmed from the fact that his spiritual level — which had its source in the transcendent realm of Tohu — was too high to enclothe itself within the confines of our world; it was impossible for the lights to be enclothed within the vessels. Therefore, he asked G‑d to chose an agent who was capable of internalizing and transmitting revelation within the context of our limited world.

G‑d replied to him, “Who gave man a mouth.... I am G‑d.... I will be with your mouth and direct what you say.” G‑d’s essence possesses the potential to fuse opposites as explained above. Therefore, although Moshe as he exists within his own individual context could not awaken the potential of speech, because “I will be with your mouth,” G‑d’s influence generated the potential for the transcendent revelations of Tohu to be revealed within the finite context of our world. Thus, Moshe’s protest can be understood as being intended at bringing about the fusion of finiteness and infinity associated with the giving of the Torah.3

In this context, we can appreciate Moshe’s apprehension before his confrontation with Pharaoh, “the source for the revelation of all lights.” From his own perspective, Moshe was unable to internalize and transmit transcendent revelation within the context of this world — and such a transmission was necessary for the Redemption from Egypt. Therefore, he needed G‑d to “come with him,” and to reveal the essential potential to fuse opposites. Such a revelation in turn makes possible the revelation of how our material world, and more particularly, the physical body of a Jew, can be a dwelling place for G‑d.

The fusion of finiteness and infinity experienced by Moshe4 became a source of influence leading to a similar fusion to be experienced by the Jewish people at the giving of the Torah.5 This is emphasized by G‑d’s statements “You will be unto Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation,” i.e., even as the Jews exist within the context of this physical world, they will be holy.

Furthermore, the Rabbis associate the expression “kingdom of priests” with the level of High Priest. A High Priest had to be physically healthy without a blemish and wealthy. This indicates the potential for the Jewish people to achieve well-being and prosperity in material terms and still be one with G‑d. The ultimate expression of this fusion will be in the Era of the Resurrection when all the souls of the Jewish people will be enclothed in bodies.6 Indeed, at that time, the soul will derive its nurture from the body.

Based on the above, we can understand why the Torah places such a heavy emphasis on the Jewish people “borrowing” from the Egyptians “utensils of gold, utensils of silver, and garments” and why G‑d performed a special miracle and granted the Jews favor in the eyes of the Egyptians. On the surface, rather than stay one extra moment in exile, they should have left immediately.7 Since, however, the intent is the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds, the fullest conception of this comes when the dwelling is established within the context of those worlds. And this comes, not through breaking the order of natural existence8 — taking the wealth against the Egyptians’ will — but rather, through its transformation — that the Egyptians give their wealth to the Jews willingly.

Nevertheless, the redemption from Egypt did not represent a complete transformation of the material nature of the world. For this reason, it was necessary for the Jews to “flee” from Egypt.9 In contrast, before the ultimate Redemption, our material environment will be refined and therefore “you will not leave in haste, nor will you take flight.” Since “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the earth,” the Jews will approach the Redemption with eagerness, but they will not be pressured by the constraints of this world. Instead, from a state of prosperity experienced within the context of this world, they will proceed to the ultimate well-being and eternal life of the Era of the Redemption.

2. The above concepts are relevant to the commemoration of the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe on Yud Shvat in the coming week. For the Previous Rebbe is the Moshe of our generation and our generation, “the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the Redemption,” is a reincarnation of the generation of the exodus.

Furthermore, in our generation, we have seen a great increase in the efforts to transform the material environment of the world. This is reflected in the efforts to spread the wellsprings of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus outward, the printing of many sacred Jewish texts, and the spreading of the observance of the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants.

And this has had an effect on the world at large. The nations of the world are granting support to the Jews and assisting their observance of the Torah and its mitzvos. Even Russia which for years oppressed the Jewish people and prevented their emigration is now enabling the Jews to conduct their lives as they desire. Moreover, not only are they allowing the Jews to emigrate, they are even assisting them in doing so.

We are at the pinnacle of Jewish history, the time most appropriate for the Redemption to come. And the coming of the Redemption will be further hastened by the commemoration of Yud Shvat, by holding farbrengens in connection with that date, by studying the Previous Rebbe’s teachings, and dedicating ourselves to the activities he promulgated. And this will hasten the fulfillment of the prophecy “Those that lie in the dust will arise and sing,” at which time we will emerge from the exile and proceed to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, and to the Third Beis HaMikdash.

Themes which the Rebbe Shlita developed in this farbrengen were also presented in the essays entitled “A Lifetime Renewed” and “Women, Partners in the Dynamic of Creation.”

 

 

 

 

SHABBOS VA’EIRA Mevarchim Shevat | 28 Teves – 5 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 4th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:13 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 5th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Shevat 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:06 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:13 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:18 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM /ROSH CHODESH MONDAY, SHACHARIS 7 AM (Earliest Tefilin 6:49 am)
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:15 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Yitzchok Rothman for sponsoring cholent in honor and in memory of the 20th yahrzeit of his father, Yehuda ben HaRav Yehoshua Falik (29thTevet). The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Shimon and Meira on the upshern of their son Shneur Zalmen.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 28th Tevet, Rabbi Levitin’s birthday!  Happy Birthday Rabbi Levitin! The 28th of Tevet also commemorates the birthday of Rebbetzin Chana Schneerson, mother of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה    

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

BCMH presents "Ladies Kumzits" SAT JAN 12th 8:30 pm
In Yavneh Bldg. More info or to sponsor, contact Aliza Genauer at (201) 745-8156
FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR MEVARCHIM SHEVAT
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507866/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shmos-23rd-Day-of-Teves-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

Today is the Shabbos on which the month of Shevat is blessed. Thus, blessing is also conveyed on the special day, the tenth of Shevat, the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, when “all of his deeds, Torah, and service, are revealed and shine in revelation from above to below... and ‘bring about salvation in the depths of the earth.’ ” Since the Previous Rebbe is a Nasi, his yahrzeit is relevant to every Jew. Everyone, men, women, and children, should strengthen their commitment to follow the paths which the Previous Rebbe showed us.

Each year, the yahrzeit represents an increase and an elevation. In particular, this year, the fortieth anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s passing, is associated with receiving, “a knowing heart, eyes that see, and ears that hear,” in regard to the Previous Rebbe’s teachings as our Sages taught: “After forty years, one attains [full grasp] of one’s teacher’s knowledge.” The fundamental lesson to be learned from the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit is connected with the date, the tenth of Shevat. The Torah states, “The tenth will be holy, consecrated unto G‑d.” Holiness has two dimensions. On one hand, it implies an aspect of separation as the Zohar states: “ ’Holy’ is a word to itself.” Conversely, it also spreads to other entities. Thus, in regard to certain holy articles, the Torah states: “Everything which touches them shall become consecrated.”

This concept is also reflected in the yud, the letter which is numerically equivalent to ten. The letter yud is only a point, without any form or particular dimensions. Thus, it reflects the essential point which transcends everything. Nevertheless, this point also is associated with the point of concentration which includes everything. To view the concept in spiritual terms: The letter yud is the first letter of (and thus, stands for) the name Y‑H‑V‑H and thus refers to G‑d who is utterly transcendent. Simultaneously, “from the truth of His Being, all existence came into being.” This is reflected in the soul of a Jew (which also is alluded to by the letter yud, representing the quality of Chochmah) and also in the Divine spark which brings into being and grants life to each creation.1

Within a Jew’s soul, the letter yud refers to the essence of the Jewish soul, the pintele yid, which is above all form. This inner dimension, however, pervades and permeates through all our other levels of soul.

Similarly, in all creations, the Divine spark which gives it life is separate and holy. It, nevertheless, grants the entity life, and thus, reflects that entity’s true being.

Based on the above, we can understand why the Messianic redemption is associated with the number ten.2 The Messianic redemption will be the “true and complete redemption,” the era when the quality of truth will be revealed.3 Similarly, the truth of every entity, the Divine spark which maintains its existence, will be revealed. This is connected with the quality of completeness which is also associated with the number ten. In that age, there will be a complete revelation of G‑dliness in all matters.

In this context, we can understand the application of the concept of “ten” in our service of G‑d. The purpose of creation is that a Jew should reveal the aspect of “ten” within his soul, his Jewish spark, and proceed to reveal the aspect of “ten,” the spark of G‑dliness, in the world at large, by spreading holiness — “the tenth will be holy” — throughout the world. The ultimate completion of this service will come in the Messianic age when, “the glory of the L‑rd will be revealed and, together, all flesh will see that the mouth of L‑rd has spoken.”

Based on the above, we can understand the connection between the number ten and the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit on the tenth of Shevat. The two seemingly contradictory aspects explained regarding ten — that it is “holy,” above the other qualities, and, simultaneously, permeates through them all — also applies in regard to a Nasi. The word Nasi has its source in the word naso, “uplifted,” as personified in King Shaul’s being “from his shoulders upward, higher than the entire nation.”

Conversely, “the Nasi is the entire people,” and a king is described as being, “the heart of the entire congregation of Israel.” Just as the heart is the source of each individual person’s life energy, the king is the source of the life energy of the entire people.

Though these qualities apply regarding all Nesi'im, since the Previous Rebbe was the Nasiin the generation which directly precedes the coming of Mashiach, when we “taste” the revelations of the Messianic age, it follows that these qualities were revealed to a greater extent in him. Accordingly, his yahrzeit, the day on which “all of his service is revealed,” falls on the tenth of the month.4

A unique potential to carry out the service of “ten,” to reveal the soul of every Jew and to reveal the “soul” — the Divine life energy — of the world at large, was granted by the revelation of the teachings of Chassidus. This enables us to establish a dwelling for G‑d in this world. This will be realized with the coming of Mashiach which is brought about through the service of spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward.

In particular, the Previous Rebbe brought about an increase in this service by:

a) Having the teachings of Chassidus translated into other languages;

b) Spreading Chassidus in America, “the lower half of the world,” where these efforts were broadened and expanded in a manner which incomparably surpassed the efforts in the previous generations.

The Previous Rebbe’s name itself also alludes to such activities. His first name, Yosef, is connected with the service of, “May G‑d add on to me another son;” i.e., transforming a person who is an “other,” estranged and cut off from his Jewish heritage into a “son.” This involves revealing the yud, the spark of holiness, within the person.

His second name, Yitzchok, is connected with the service, “Whoever hears will laugh with me,” spreading happiness and joy. True joy comes when the happiness permeates an individual’s entire personality and spreads to his surrounding environment. Thus, this involves not only the joy of the soul, but also the joy of the body; not only joy connected with Torah and mitzvos, but joy in every aspect of a person’s life.

2. Based on the above, we can understand the service which is appropriate on the Shabbos on which the month of Shevat is blessed: The blessing of the new month and its sanctification have to be reflected in the service of each particular Jew5 and motivate him to express new blessing and new holiness. Each month, his service must be renewed according to the particular nature of the month.

Since the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit is the most significant day of the coming month, it follows that the service of Shevat is connected with the concept of “ten” explained above. A Jew must reveal the aspect of “ten” in his soul and in the world at large. This will cause, as we declare in the monthly blessings, “the Holy One, blessed be He, to renew” the month for blessing.6

We conclude those blessings by stating, “Let us say. Amen.” “Amen” expresses the quality of completion and thus reflects how the quality of yud will permeate through the totality of existence.7 The effect will be all-encompassing, influencing even the lowest levels as evident by the fact that we omit the prayer Av HaRachmim (connected with undesirable events) and proceed directly to Ashrei, “Happy are those who dwell in Your house,” connected with the Messianic Bais HaMikdash, the ultimate expression of “G‑d’s house.”

The above is enhanced by the fact that Shevat is blessed in the month of Teves, the tenth month. Thus, the service of “ten” connected with Yud Shevat receives its blessing from the tenth month. This month also reflects the two contrasts of ten. On one hand, it is connected with the service of “the tenth will be holy,” which emphasizes separation and transcendence. Conversely, there is also an emphasis that this quality permeate through all existence. Thus, the month is described as, “the month where the body derives pleasure from the body.” The term “body” can be interpreted, in a spiritual context, to refer to G‑d’s essence. Thus, that expression means that Teves is the month when G‑d’s essence derives pleasure from the service that we carry out with our bodies.

The above is also enhanced by the fact that, this year, Rosh Chodesh Shevat falls on Shabbos.8 Shabbos grants us greater potential to reveal holiness and to have that holiness permeate every aspect of the world (the two aspects of “ten” mentioned above). In an ultimate sense, these qualities will be realized in “the era which is all Shabbos and rest for eternity,” the Messianic age.

Similarly, added influence is brought about by this week’s Torah portion, parshas Shmos. That portion begins: “These are the names of the children of Israel who came into Egypt together with Yaakov. Each man came with his household.”

Egypt, associated with boundaries and limitations, is symbolic of exile. Nevertheless, there, “the names of the children of Israel” are revealed. This refers to “the names of the children of Israel on the earthly plane, for throughout the duration of the Egyptian exile, the Jews “did not change their names,” and also, to the sublime spiritual names — including the name Y‑H‑V‑H — which are revealed in the names of the Jewish people.

The Jews came “with Yaakov.” “Yaakov” (יעקב) can be broken up into Yud eikev (י עקב), i.e., the source of the soul, the yud (the reflection of the name Y‑H‑V‑H), is drawn down throughout the totality of an individual’s personality, until it effects even its heel (eikev).

“Each man came with his household.” This led to the perpetuation of the Jewish people. Because they came as families, they “were fruitful, became prolific, and multiplied very much.” They raised children to proceed to “Torah, chuppah, and good deeds,” encouraging them to build Jewish homes of their own.9

The conclusion of the Torah portion is also connected with the above themes: Mosheprotested to G‑d: “From the time I came... to speak in Your name, this people’s situation has deteriorated. You have not saved Your people [as of yet].” This brought about G‑d’s reply, “I revealed Myself to the patriarchs....” Furthermore, it prompted the revelation of the name Y‑H‑V‑H (to which the patriarchs were not privileged) within the boundaries and limitations of the world (Egypt), ultimately, leading to the redemption from Egypt and the giving of the Torah.

Similarly, each Jew possesses an attribute of Moshe within his soul which protests to G‑d. “From the time... I [began] speaking in Your name... (i.e., practicing Torah and mitzvoswhich reveal ‘G‑d’s names’ within the world), You have not saved Your people.”10

This prompts a twofold reply from G‑d:

a) “I revealed Myself to the patriarchs...” This revelation is not only an event of the past, but rather a present factor. The patriarchs endowed their spiritual heritage to their descendants. Thus, G‑d’s revelation to the patriarchs is an active force influencing our own behavior.

b) He promises the revelation of the name, Y‑H‑V‑H, which will come in the Messianic redemption. Then, we will emerge from exile (Egypt) and merit the revelation of “the new Torah which will emerge from Me.”

* * *

3. This Shabbos is also unique in that it follows the yahrzeit of the Rambam on the 20th of Teves11 and precedes the yahrzeit of the Alter Rebbe, on motzaei Shabbos, the 24th of Teves. The Alter Rebbe, the founder of Chabad Chassidism, opened a new path which allowed the teachings of Pnimiyus HaTorah which were previously hidden to be comprehended through the powers of understanding and thus, reveal G‑dliness within the context of this material world.

This quality is alluded to in his name, Schneur (שניאור) which can be broken up into two Hebrew words (שני אור) that mean “two lights,” i.e., the light of Nigleh (the revealed legal realm of Torah study) and the light of Pnimiyus HaTorah.12 The Alter Rebbe’s second name, Zalman, shares the same letters of the word L’zman and is thus, connected with the concept of time. Furthermore, since this name is not Lashon HaKodesh, it relates to the gentile nations. Thus, the combination of the two names implies that the two lights of Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah will be drawn down within the context of our world.

After the Alter Rebbe opened this path of service, it was continued by the Rebbeim who succeeded him and thus, is also alluded to in their names. Thus, the Mitteler Rebbe’s name DovBer fuses together both the Hebrew and Yiddish words for “bear” in a single word.13 Our Sages describe a bear as “overladen with meat.” Thus, the Mitteler Rebbe’s name implies drawing down the revelation of G‑dliness to the level of one who is “overladen with meat.”

This service was continued by the other Rebbeim. Thus, the Rebbe Rashab’s name was Sholom DovBer, i.e., in addition to the fusion of Dov and Ber, the concept of Shalom, “peace,” was introduced.

The Previous Rebbe carried this service further. Thus, his first name, Yosef, refers, as explained above, to the transformation of a person who is estranged (achar) into a “son.”14His second name, Yitzchok, refers to an all-encompassing joy, a happiness that effects both the body and the soul.

The power to carry out these services was derived from the Alter Rebbe who revealed how to connect G‑dliness to the world through Torah and how to fuse together the teachings of Nigleh (which involve the refinement of worldly matters) with those of Pnimiyus HaTorah(“the Tree of Life [which has no connection] to the forces of evil”).

The concept of establishing a connection between G‑dliness and the world is also expressed in the opening phrase of the Alter Rebbe’s two major works, the Tanya and the Shulchan Aruch. The Tanya is based on the verse, “It (referring to the full scope of Torah) is very close to you.” Similarly, the Shulchan Aruch begins, “Yehudah ben Taima declares...” The name Yehudah contains the name Y‑H‑V‑H. This attribute becomes “ben Taima,” which refers to a constant revelation; a person constantly expresses the G‑dliness within him.

A similar concept can be explained in connection with the Rambam who begins the Mishneh Torah with the letter yud and states that, “The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of wisdom is to know that there is a Primary Being and that all the entities... came into being from the truth of His Being.”

Similarly, this concept is connected with the date of his yahrzeit, the 20th of Teves, for twenty is twice ten. Twenty is also (numerically equivalent to and thus) connected with the level of Kesser, a level which transcends the world entirely and yet is revealed in a manner which, “brings about salvation in the midst of the earth.”

The yahrzeits of these teachers should inspire us to establish fixed programs of study that focus on their works; in particular, strengthening the commitment to the daily study of the Mishneh Torah (preferably three chapters a day) and establishing a fixed program of study in the Tanya and the Alter Rebbe’s Shulchan Aruch. (In this context, it is worthy to mention the custom of the Chassidim of the previous generations who would study a chapter of Tanya every day before davening Shacharis.)

This service should prepare us to proceed to Yud Shevat with renewed energy, establishing a connection with the Previous Rebbe by studying his teachings and following his directives which involve the spreading of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus outward. In particular, added potential to carry out this service is granted in the present year, the fortieth year after his passing when we receive, “a knowing heart and eyes that see...” and it is possible to, “attain a [full grasp] of one’s teacher’s knowledge.”

This service, in turn, will hasten the coming of the Messianic redemption and the advent of the era when, “Those that lie in the dust (including the Rambam, the Alter Rebbe, and the Previous Rebbe) will arise and rejoice.” May it come now, in the immediate future.

SHABBOS SHEMOS | 20-27 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 27th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:06 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 28th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:04 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:06 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:11 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Thank you to Avram and Tamar Rosenfeld for sponsoring this week’s kiddush in honor of the birth and bris of their son, their first child.  A delicious meat cholent is made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Tamar and Avi Rosenfeld on the birth of their new baby boy on Erev Shabbos Vaheyi.  Bris planned for 8:30 am Friday morning at BCMH.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 20th Tevet, yahrzeit/maldado of Rabbi Moses ben Maimon, Talmudist, Halachist, physician, philosopher and communal leader, known in the Jewish world by the acronym "Rambam" and to the world at large as "Maimonides", who passed away in Egypt on the 20th of Tevet in 1204 (4965).   
www.chabad.org/calendar

FARBRENGEN ALERT - TUE JAN 1st – CHOF DALED TEVES
The founder of Chabad Chassidism, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi (1745-1812), passed away on the eve of the 24th of Tevet, 5573, at approximately 10:30 PM, shortly after reciting the Havdalah prayer marking the end of the Shabbat. The Rebbe was in the village of Peyena, fleeing Napoleon's armies, which had swept through the Rebbe's hometown of Liadi three months earlier in their advance towards Moscow. He was in his 68th year at the time of his passing, and was succeeded by his son, Rabbi DovBer of Lubavitch. 
www.chabad.org/calendar  Venue to be announced

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEMOT
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507865/jewish/20th-of-Teves-Yahrtzeit-of-the-Rambam-5750-1990.htm ©SichosInEnglish

 The 20th1 of Teves2 commemorates the yahrzeit of the Rambam. Thus, it is connected with “all of his deeds, teachings, and service which he accomplished throughout his life... which are revealed and shine in an open manner from above to below, ‘bringing about salvation in the midst of the earth.’ “

Surely, this applies to the Rambam whose text, the Mishneh Torah, is structured “for the small and for the great... in order that, at first, a person will study the Written Law and then, he will study this text and from it, he will know the entire oral law without requiring any other text.”3 This text includes the entire Oral Law, describing the fulfillment of even those mitzvos that are applicable only when the Bais HaMikdash is standing.

In particular, this receives emphasis at present when the custom of studying a portion of the Mishneh Torah each day has spread throughout the international Jewish community. Particularly, this applies for those who follow the desirable practice of studying three chapters a day in order to conclude the study of the Mishneh Torah in a single year. This emphasizes the parallel to the Torah itself which is also completed in a single year. In this manner, each person will have “in his pocket,” the knowledge of practically applicable halachah for every year, he will review the entire Mishneh Torah.

Thus, each year the study is completed and begun anew as we say in the prayer recited after completing a portion of Torah study, “Just as You have assisted me and enabled me to conclude ----, so may You assist me to begin other tractates and texts and conclude them....” Since a Divine blessing is required for this study, it is appropriate to connect it with giving to tzedakah which encourages such blessings.

2. Based on the Rambam’s principle that, “Most of the laws of the Torah are intended to... correct our characters and straighten our deeds,” it is appropriate to derive a lesson of that nature from one of the laws from the portion of the Mishneh Torah associated with the present day.

Today’s portion of study concludes Hilchos Chametz U’Matzah, the laws associated with the celebration of the Pesach festival. The final law in those halachos states: A person who slept in the midst of the meal and then awoke should not begin to eat again. If, however, some members of a company slept in the midst of the meal, they may eat again. If they all fell into a sound slumber and then awoke, they should not eat. If they all [merely] dozed, they may eat.

This refers to our service in the present age, Ikvesa DiMeshicha, the era immediately before Mashiach’s coming. In the time of exile, the state of the Jewish people as a whole is described as sleep. Neverthe­less, there are Tzaddikim who do not sleep, who are always awake.

Our halachah teaches that even when a person does sleep (not merely dozes) in exile, since when he awakes he becomes aware that there are others who have not slept, he can consider himself as part of their group and continue the Seder as if there was no interruption.

The daily portion of study also includes the Rambam’s text of the Haggadah that teaches, “No desert is served after the Pesach.” This implies that after the Pesach, the Messianic redemption, nothing else, no other matter or service will follow. Rather, it will be an eternal redemption which will never be followed by exile.

This is particularly relevant at present when, to quote the Previous Rebbe, all that is necessary is for us to “stand prepared to await Mashiach’s coming.” This is also relevant to the Mishneh Torah which concludes with the description of the Messianic age, when, “the world will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the sea covers up the ocean bed.”

SHABBOS VAYECHI | 13-20 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS DEC 21st 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:02 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 22nd 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:01 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:02 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:06 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 14th Tevet, known at “Purim Hevron” On this day in 1824, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob came to the rescue of the Jewish community of Hebron, after an evil Pasha imprisoned its leaders and threatened to sell the entire Jewish population into slavery.  The Sephardic community of Hebron would celebrate this day to mark the great miracle which occurred.
http://en.hebron.org.il/news/382   www.chabad.org/calendar

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Thank you to Yitzi & Shaindy Heisler for co- sponsoring kiddush and cholent this week, in honor of their daughter.  Thank you to  Rabbi Shimon and Meira Emlen for co-sponsoring kiddush and cholent this week in honor of the upcoming 1st birthday of their daughter, Devorah Leah. Rabbi Mendy Levitin is making the delicious meat cholent!! Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYECHI
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553907/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayechi-13th-Day-of-Teves-5741-1980.htm © SichosInEnglish.

1. The Tzemach Tzedek, when a young child, learned the verse “And Ya’akov lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years.” His teacher told him that those seventeen years were the best years of Ya’akov’s life. The Tzemach Tzedek asked his grandfather, the Alter Rebbe, how it is possible that the best years of Ya’akov’s life were those spent in Egypt, a place called the “depravity of the earth?” The Alter Rebbe answered as follows: On the words, “And Yehudah he (Ya’akov) sent before him, to Yosef, to show the way before him,” our sages comment, that Yehudah’s mission was to establish a house of study so that the tribes would be able to learn Torah in Egypt. When one learns Torah he comes closer to G‑d, thus making it possible for Ya’akov to “live” also in Egypt. The seventeen years Ya’akov spent in Egypt were truly “lived,” that life being similar to the “abundance of light that comes from (prior) darkness.”

This is similar in concept to Asarah B’Teves, the fast of the tenth of Teves (which occurred in the preceding week). The 10th of Teves was the day that Nevuchadnezar, the evil king of Babylon, laid siege to Yerushalayim. It thus marks the beginning of the destruction of the Bais Hamikdosh. Teves is the tenth month; and thus this occurred on the tenth day of the tenth month. The number ten is always associated with holiness,1 and that such an event should be on the tenth of the tenth is an awesome descent.

This descent was, however, for the purpose of the abundance of light that would later emerge from the darkness of the descent. And this is the similarity with the above story about the Tzemach Tzedek. The siege of Yerushalayim is similar to Egypt, the exile of Egypt being the forerunner of all later exiles. As our sages have said: “All kingdoms are called by the name Egypt, since they oppress Yisroel” [In Hebrew ‘Egypt’ is the same word as ‘oppress’]. The ultimate aim and reason for this oppression is the “abundance of light that comes from darkness,” just as, through coming to Egypt, Ya’akov truly “lived.”

That which occurred to Ya’akov is instructive for every Jew, for his life in this world; for our forefathers were the choicest of all men, and Ya’akov the choicest of the forefathers.2Ya’akov’s raison d’être was to “live” in Egypt — to reveal the abundance of light that comes from prior darkness. So too with us — our raison d’être is to achieve “life,” specifically in a place similar to Egypt. This means that, even though there was also “light” before the exile, in the time of the Bais Hamikdosh, nevertheless, it is precisely in the time of exile that we achieve that abundance of light that comes only from darkness.3

In concrete terms, this means that we must conduct ourselves in the time of exile with true “life.” Our Torah learning (“they are our life and the length of our days”) and our fulfillment of Mitzvos (“and live in them”) must be with vitality, with life, extending even to the lowest matters.4

In our times the prerequisite for the above is the study of Chassidus, the inner part of the Torah. Although in previous generations this was not a necessary prerequisite, and the study of the inner portion of the Torah was only for special individuals, nowadays it has been revealed for all. Indeed, in our times it is an absolute must — in order that our Torah and fulfillment of Mitzvos be in the fitting manner.

Two parables are given for the reason that it is specifically in our times that Chassidus must be learned and disseminated so widely, even to the point of squander. During a war, the king will squander all his treasures to ensure victory. Similarly, now is the time when all our spiritual treasures (i.e. Chassidus) must be “squandered” to achieve victory (i.e. the redemption). Another parable is that of a king whose son is extremely unwell. The king will take the rarest gem in his crown of jewels, grind it to a powder, and feed it to his son in the hope that perhaps one drop will be absorbed and heal his son. So too, nowadays Chassidus must be disseminated as widely as possible to resuscitate the ailing body of Jewry, even if most of it will not reach its objective and be squandered.

The realization that exile is the medium through which we can achieve the abundance of light that can come only from prior darkness, disposes of all (our) doubts and questions regarding the exile. As in another parable, where the king’s son is sent away by his father to test him, the exile [where we, the King’s children, have been sent] serves as a medium to draw out the strength of the Jewish people, and so produce the abundance of light. Especially since most of the difficulties of the exile are more imaginary than real, stemming from the Evil Inclination.5 The realization of this encourages us to strive with all our might to produce the abundance of light that comes from the exile.

The very fact that we find ourselves in such a dark exile proves that we have the strength to produce the abundance of light, which in turn gives us the encouragement to be truly “alive” during the exile.

This then is the directive for all: To effect the concept of “Ya’akov lived,” through the spreading of the wellsprings of the Baal Shem Tov as they are explained and amplified in Chassidus Chabad, and to ensure that they reach to “outside,” all Jews, everywhere. Especially we must carry out the mission laid upon all of us by the Previous Rebbe — the spreading of Judaism.

Through the spreading of the wellsprings of Chassidus we achieve the fulfillment of the promise given to Ya’akov: “I will also surely bring you up again,” the “also” referring to the ultimate redemption. And then, through our efforts in all the Mitzvah campaigns, “immediately we will be redeemed,” and, “with our youth and our elders, our-sons and our daughters,” we will go to receive our righteous Moshiach, speedily in our times.

*

2. Because we are still in the month of Teves, there is a connection with Chanukah. There are various ways in which one can fulfill the Mitzvah of kindling the Chanukah lights. The basic minimum in Halachah is to kindle one light each night for the entire household. A more choice manner is for each member to kindle one light. And the choicest manner of all to fulfill the Mitzvah is to add an extra light each night.6

Spiritually, the basic minimum — one light — indicates the concept of Chanukah as it is in the seminal stage; it then becomes differentiated and expanded — one light for each person and a leading up to eight lights. This is similar in concept to Tefillin: The Tefillin of the hand, which must be put on before the Tefillin of the head, contain the four Parshiyos (sections) of the Torah that constitute the Tefillin in one single compartment. The Tefillin of the head, on the other hand, has a different compartment for each section. The reason for this difference, is similar to the difference between “back” and “front.” In the “back,” as in the nape of the neck, there are no distinguishing features — nose, eyes, ears, mouth; everything i3 the same. Whereas in “front,” as in the front of the face, these features are distinguishable.7

There is a lesson for us from the above regarding the fulfillment of Mitzvos. There are two parts in a Mitzvah — the actual deed and the kavannah, the concentrated meaning of the Mitzvah. First and foremost is the actual deed, for no matter how lofty one’s thoughts and comprehensions of the Mitzvah, without the actual deed the essential part is lacking. The above two concepts — the seminal point and the later expansion — are also found in a Mitzvah. Through the actual simple performance of a Mitzvah one grasps the Essence Above, thus grasping all the concepts (as they are in the Essence). The various concepts included in the Essence then become revealed with the concentrated understanding and comprehension of the Mitzvos, which, depending on the depth of understanding, are differentiated into different levels.

Likewise in Torah. The entire Torah is included in the Ten Commandments, and the Ten Commandments themselves are included in the first word “Anochi,” which itself is included in the first letter (the “Aleph”) of the word “Anochi.” Thus the letter “aleph” is the seminal point which includes the entire Torah. Afterwards, the Torah is distinguished and separated into its various particular laws and details.

Yet another instance is prayer. Before praying a Jew must include himself in and associate himself together with all other Jews; this is the concept of Ahavas Yisroel — the love of a fellow Jew. Thus, before prayer a Jew is bound together with, and included with, all other Jews — this is the same concept as the seminal point in which the later particulars are included. Afterwards a Jew must expand this into the differing levels and “rungs” of prayer, leading up to the Shemoneh Esreh where he stands “as a servant before his Master.”

3. The idea of kindling the Chanukah lights in the choicest manner possible provides the answer to those who question why it is specifically in our times that we make the concept of “love your fellowman as yourself” such a crucial issue. That it is an important matter is unquestionable: Hillel Hazaken, and later Rabbi Akivah, stressed its central position in Judaism. But if its importance demands that such a tumult as to make a campaign out of it be made — then surely it should have been more prominent in the times of Hillel and R. Akiva, or at least in the times of the Baal Shem Tov or the Alter Rebbe. Why now do we make such a fuss and initiate a whole campaign about it?

Despite these type of questions we see that the Previous Rebbe did instruct us to involve ourselves in this — — to speak to others and influence them regarding it with the greatest of enthusiasm. This instruction holds no matter in what language — as long as the full concept of “love your fellowman as yourself” is spread.

And the answer for those who question why it is specifically now that we should make such a campaign comes from the Chanukah lights. In the times of the Talmud, the custom was to kindle only one light each night for the entire household. Kindling more than one each night is referred to in the Talmud as fulfilling the Mitzvah in the choicest manner — for those who are especially zealous. Many generations later, the Ramah, whose decisions are binding on us till this very generation, states that to kindle the lights in the manner referred to in the Talmud as especially choice, and done only by those especially zealous, (i.e. adding one light each night), is nowadays a “simple, unquestioned custom,” for all Jews.8 Likewise with the idea of Ahavas Yisroel. Nowadays, following the directive of the Previous Rebbe, it has become a “simple, unquestioned custom” for everybody to be totally involved in Ahavas Yisroel.

The explanation for this is as expounded above. These concepts were always present, but in a concealed, seminal form. Only later, when they become revealed do they become expanded and differentiated.

4. The inner, esoteric portion of Torah is called the soul of the Torah, comparable to the soul of a person. Just as a person’s soul gives light and vitality to his body, even though a Jew’s body without it is still complete and holy, so too the inner portion of the Torah gives illumination and vitality to the revealed portion. Thus the inner portion, Chassidus, is comparable to a light, and just as nowadays the Mitzvah of the Chanukah lights is observed in the choicest manner possible, (the expansion of the previous bare minimum of one light a night), so too today, Chassidus must be learned in as expanded a manner as possible, with the greatest involvement and enthusiasm.

The illumination that comes from the soul must be completely revealed in all things. For example, the physical act of giving Tzedakah, or the kindling of the Shabbos and Chanukah lights, must be done with the strength and illumination of the soul. And the illumination should be to the degree that “the skin of his face sent forth beams” [said of Moshe when he came down from Mt. Sinai with the two tablets].9 Also, as the Talmud Yerushalmi (Shabbos Ch. 8 Halachah 1) relates of R. Yehudah that his face shone because he had discovered a new matter in Torah.10

The lesson from “the choicest manner” becoming a “simple, unquestioned custom” teaches us that everything should be done in the choicest manner. For example, when learning Torah or giving Tzedakah, do not put a limit on your efforts or your generosity.11 Instead, taking the lesson from Chanukah, everything should be done in the choicest manner possible — transcending all limits.

SHABBOS VAYIGASH | 6 -13 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 14th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 3:59 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 15th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:57 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 3:59 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:03 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon, Wed– Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Tue Shacharis 6:50 AM /FAST OF 10th TEVES BEGINS 6:11 AM 
Sun,Mon,Wed, Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv
Tue Mincha 3:45 PM, Maariv/Fast Ends 4:55 PM /FAST OF 10th TEVES

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of Hey Teves, Chabad Holiday of Books!

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Mr Paul  and Tamar Azous  and Mr Eli and Elana  Duban for co-sponsoring this week’s meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
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Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
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SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – WED DEC 19th 7:30 PM
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LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
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Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
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TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
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Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
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CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
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CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
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RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
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COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

BNEI AKIVA - MOSHAV A’LEVY OPEN HOUSE IN SEATTLE WED DEC 19th 7 PM
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Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
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SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
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Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
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WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
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SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
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LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
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SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
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REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYIGASH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507828/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayigash-5th-Day-of-Teves-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

The beginning of this week’s parshah speaks of the encounter between Yehudah and Yosef — Vayigash eilav Yehudah [“And Yehudah approached him”]. This event can be interpreted on three different levels.

a) From Yehudah’s perspective: Yehudah was under the erroneous impression that Yosef was an Egyptian, second in command only to Pharaoh. His approach towards Yosef therefore was as one who wished to convince a non-Jewish ruler to release Binyamin.

b) In actuality: In truth, Yehudah was not dealing with a non-Jewish ruler, but with the tzaddik, Yosef.

c) In the spiritual realms above: “Yehudah” is the name used to refer to every Jew (as we are called, “Yehudim”). The word “eilav” refers to the essence of G‑d, as the Sifri explains on the verse (Devarim 4:7), “All who call to Him (eilav)” — “To Him, not to His attributes.” The word “approach” stands for prayer, through which a Jew becomes attached to and unified with G‑d.

We have explained on many occasions that all interpretations of a single event are connected with one another. We will therefore explain the connection between these three explanations, and also the practical implication and lesson contained therein regarding how to help us serve G‑d better.

We must first explain the relevance of the first of these three interpretations. Yehudah’s approach was based on a misunderstanding of the situation, based on his inability to identify Yosef. His approach nevertheless provides an eternal lesson for us.

This is because the Torah is eternal, and everything written in it is also eternal. This can be seen clearly from the Rogachover’s analysis of Moshe’s oath to never return to Egypt, which was later annulled in order to allow Moshe to take the Bnei Yisrael out. If one would make an oath today “like Moshe’s oath,” it would nevertheless be valid. The reason for this is that once something is written in Torah, it acquires eternal significance. Similarly in our case, since Yehudah’s misimpression was recorded in the Torah, it is of everlasting importance.

Furthermore, the lengthy account in the first part of the parshah is exclusively according to Yehudah’s mistaken impression. This shows us that not only can we derive a lesson from his perspective, but that it contains the lesson of primary importance.

What is this lesson? Yehudah thought that he was dependent upon the approval of a non-Jewish ruler in order to help Binyamin. This is similar to the status of the entire Jewish people in exile, when we depend on the kindness of the non-Jewish nations around us in order to lead our lives as Jews in peace and comfort.

The reality of the situation, though, was that Yehudah was really not dependent on a non-Jew at all. This ruler, as he found out later, was really Yosef, and therefore a Jew was really in charge. The same applies to the Jewish people in exile. Although it appears that the non-Jewish nations are in control, in reality the Jew is the baal habayis of the world, and he has the ability to influence the nations to carry out his will.

How does the Jew acquire such an amazing power? This is because he has attached himself to G‑d. His strength is therefore not his alone, but that of G‑d Himself. And G‑d, who is the “King of all kings,” guides the nations of the world to act according to His will and the will of the Jewish people.

With this we can understand the connection between the three levels of interpretation listed above. Even when the Jewish people are in exile (“a”), it is revealed that it is the Jew who is really in control (“b”). And how does the Jew acquire this power? — through his connection with G‑d (“c”).

This lesson (that even in exile, the Jew is baal habayis over the world) is especially stressed on Shabbos Vayigash. In addition to reading the first part of the parshah — as we do on the previous Shabbos, Monday and Thursday — we read the entire parshah, as well as the beginning of Parshas Vayechi at Minchah.

Later in the parshah, Pharaoh himself tells Yosef that he is giving “the choicest part of the land of Egypt” for him and his family. In the end of the parshah (in today’s portion), the land is actually given to them, “as Pharaoh commanded.” The last verse of the parshahconcludes, “And Yisrael lived in Goshen in the land of Egypt, and they inherited it and multiplied in great numbers.” This statement is followed in Parshas Vayechi by the verse, “And Yaakov lived in the land of Egypt for 17 years,” meaning that the best years of his life (“17” equaling the numerical value of “good” — tov) were those years spent in Egypt. These verses show that the nations themselves provided the Jews with great prosperity, even in exile.

All other exiles stem from, and are compared to the Egyptian exile. From all this we learn that even when we are in exile, the nations themselves will provide for all of our needs, both material and spiritual.

Ultimately, of course, this is insufficient. Although we have all good things both materially and spiritually, the main thing is missing — we are still in exile! Everything is insignificant when compared to the tremendous pain of exile! Parshas Vayechi is therefore followed by Shmos, which is the parshah and the book which deals with redemption.

2. Until now we have discussed the lesson of Parshas Vayigash vis-à-vis our status in exile. The main lesson, however, regards how this is a preparation for redemption.

This can be understood in view of another explanation given in Chassidus of the approach of Yehudah to Yosef, Vayigash eilav Yehudah. It is explained that the difference between Yehudah and Yosef is analogous to that between the earth and the heavens, inanimate objects and plant life, action and study. Which is higher, the aspect of Yehudah or that of Yosef? The verse which begins our parshah implies that Yosef is higher than Yehudah, since he must be approached. On the other hand, the Haftorah (Yechezkel 37:19,24)implies that Yehudah is higher: “I took the stick of Yosef...and placed upon it the stick of Yehudah...and my servant Dovid [from the tribe of Yehudah] will rule over them.”

In reality both are true, but in two different eras. During the time of exile, Yosef (the heavens, plant life, study) is higher, but in the Messianic Age, the superiority of Yehudah (the earth, inanimate objects, action) will be revealed.

The advantage of the realm of action is hinted to in G‑d’s statement regarding the world (Isaiah 43:7), “It is for My glory that I have created it, formed it, and also made it (af asisiv).” These three expressions (created, formed and made — borosiv, yetzartiv, asisiv) correspond to the three realms of Beriah, Yetzirah and Asiyah. These in turn correspond to the three realms of human activity — thought, speech and deed.

There is a great difference between the lowest of these three realms and the higher two. Thought and speech are similar in that they both are connected with the thinker and the speaker. Action, however, primarily deals with the object being acted upon. Similarly, there is a qualitative difference between Asiyah and the more spiritual realms of Beriah and Yetzirah. This is the significance of the word “also,” or af (“also made it”), which separates the first two expressions from the third. This separation highlights the fact that the realm of action (Asiyah) cannot be compared with the other two.

The same point can be seen in the shape of the Hebrew letter hay. The hay is composed of three lines which represent thought, speech and action. There is a space, however, between one of the lines and the other two. This sole line corresponds to action, which is distinct and removed from thought and speech.

This all brings out how much higher the aspect of Yosef is over that of Yehudah. There is, however, a tremendous advantage which Yehudah has over Yosef — an advantage which can be clearly seen by the comparison with Asiyah. Although it is the lowest of the worlds, Asiyah is the ultimate purpose for the creation of all the worlds. And this goal is to make a dwelling place for G‑d specifically through the realm of action.

According to this, the gap between the third aspect and the other two is for the opposite reason. Asisiv cannot be grouped with the other two because it is far superior, to the extent that the reason for the existence of the other two is solely for the existence of the third. This is also conveyed by the word af mentioned above, even in the plain meaning of the verse (“I also made it”), which is that the word af comes to add something much greater.

The same can be said for the third line of the letter hay, which transforms the letter dalet to a hay. The letter dalet stands for poverty (dalus), and the one line transforms it into the letter hay, which is contained in G‑d’s name.

These two extremes of low and high are characteristic of exile in general. On the one hand we see that the world gets lower and lower the longer we are in exile. Simultaneously, though, there is a continuous addition of Torah and mitzvos which brings us closer and closer to redemption.

This duality of exile is also seen in the usage of the word af. The Midrash (Eichah Rabbah1:57) says,

“The Jewish people were hit with the word af, as it is written (Lev. 26:41), ‘I will also (af)walk with them sporadically.’ They were also comforted with the word af, as it is written (Ibid. 26:44), ‘Yet, also (af) then, when they are in the land of their enemies, I will not abhor them nor spurn them....’ ”

The Alter Rebbe explains that the word af itself indicates something negative. The positive side of af comes only when the negative has been reversed and transformed into something positive, a process which we perform via our G‑dly service in exile.

With this we can understand how the prosperity of Yaakov and his family in Egypt represents not just the positive side of exile, but the preparation for redemption.

In general, serving G‑d despite the difficulties of exile shows the tremendous strength of the bond between the Jewish people and G‑d. The special type of service described in Parshas Vayigash represents a transformation of the negative side of exile (Pharaoh, Egypt, etc.) to the positive, as Pharaoh himself gave the choicest land to them. It is this transformation which is the preparation for redemption.

This is actually not just the preparation for redemption, but part of the redemption itself — the transformation of exile itself to redemption (from golah to geulah). All of this will be revealed when Mashiach comes, and we will see how all the difficulties of exile were brought upon us only to make the revelations of redemption that much greater.

This transformation of exile through the assistance of the non-Jewish nations to Jews has been seen in our generation in a large measure. The reason for this is that before redemption, we are given a “taste” of what the redemption will be like; and the closer we get, the greater the revelations are.

We see this in particular regarding the Previous Rebbe, who after being hounded by the Russian government, came to this country, where he was free to keep Torah and mitzvos.Now after the “Year of Miracles” (shnas nissim) and in the “Year in Which ‘I Will Show You Wonders’ ” (shnas niflaos arenu) that same government is allowing — and even assisting — Jews to leave their difficult situation in exchange for freedom. In this way they are experiencing a taste of redemption even during exile, similar to the prosperity of Yaakov even though he was in Egypt. As mentioned above, the reason for this is because we are standing on the very threshold of the redemption.

This same point also finds expression in this particular time — the Shabbos immediately following Chanukah. The Chanukah Menorah is lit only after it becomes dark outside. The lighting of the Menorah represents how every Jew helps illuminate the darkness of exile through Torah and mitzvos. In addition, the Menorah is lit facing the outside, representing the transformation of the darkness of the world to light and holiness.

3. As mentioned above, the superiority of the realm of action will be revealed in the Messianic Age. Therefore, in view of our proximity to the redemption, we must add even more in concrete action.

One of the main aspects of redemption is the building of the Third Beis HaMikdash. This is closely connected with this Shabbos in two ways: 1) It is the Shabbos after Chanukah, which is connected with the Chanukah (inauguration) of the Beis HaMikdash, and 2) Parshas Vayigash and the advantage of Yehudah over Yosef, which corresponds to that of inanimate objects over plant life. This matches the advantage of the Beis HaMikdash over the Mishkan, since the former is made of stone, whereas the latter consisted of wood.

Therefore, our preparation for building the Beis HaMikdash should involve something similar, i.e. building new houses (and adding to existing houses) which will be used for Torah, prayer and gemilus chassadim — “miniature sanctuaries” (mikdash me’at). This means both public buildings and private dwellings, including the rooms of even small children. They should all be made into homes in which Torah, prayer and gemilus chassadim penetrate and fill every corner.

This idea is contained in the well-known term, Bayis Molei Seforim, a “home filled with books.” Every home should contain not just a Siddur and Chumash, but a large number of holy books. Furthermore, the holy content of the books should fill and penetrate the entirehome, even the areas which are empty of books. And although the house contains other objects as well, they are all secondary and nullified to the books. Even more so, the effect of the books is felt even outside the home, just like the mezuzah, which protects its owner both in the home and outside.

This is connected with the Fifth of Teves, which is a particularly auspicious time for holy books: when the Federal Court issued a favorable ruling regarding the library of the Rebbeim. May it be G‑d’s will that the job be completed and that all writings of the Rebbeim be returned home. And those who have been involved in this until now should continue until they are totally successful, in the words of our Sages, “To the one who began the mitzvah we say, ‘Finish it!’ ” And G‑d, who tells us that He also fulfills all the mitzvos,should Himself finish what He started and ensure their success.

And may all our positive resolutions regarding buildings of holiness hasten even more the arrival of Mashiach, and may we be lead by Yaakov Avinu and the Previous Rebbe and all the tzaddikim to the Holy Land immediately.

Shabbos Miketz Rosh Chodesh Teves - Chanukah | 29 Kislev - 6 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 7th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 3:59 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 8th /ROSH CHODESH/
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:53 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 3:59 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 5:03 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM /ROSH CHODESH/
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor Chanukah!

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite Thank you to Alter and Debbie Levitin for sponsoring this week’s meat cholent. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Ben Dershowitz on the 20th anniversary of his Bar Mitzvah at Chabad House! May he grow in Torah and Maasim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – WED DEC 19th 7:30 PM
Winter Scarf Making at the Mod Apartments.  mherbstman@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה 

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

18ый Ежегодный Ханукальный Вечер -SUN DEC 9th 4:00 PM
Chabad Jewish Russian Center 1114 NE Perkins Way, Shoreline WA 98155 . Design your own t-shirt. Hot Donuts, Latkes, Lechaim. RSVP 
rabbi@shalomseattle.org

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.   

Mercaz Chanukah Jam Sun, Dec 9th from 4pm - 8pm
Stop by Mercaz's annual Chanukah bash! Light up dance party, poker, kids movie, donut decorating, latkes - we'll have it all!  Our Annual Poker Tournament fundraiser will have the same rules as last year. There will be an $18 buy in, half the proceeds go to Mercaz and the winner will keep the other half.  Suggested Entrance Cover: A canned good for a donation to JFS Foodbank! $8 donation per person, $18 per family. Everyone is welcome. Give what you are able! Pay at the door or at: 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/chanukah-party.html

BNEI AKIVA - MOSHAV A’LEVY OPEN HOUSE IN SEATTLE WED DEC 19th 7 PM
More info and RSVP: 
www.MoshavAlevy.org/openhouse

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR MIKETZ
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507826/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Mikeitz-Shabbos-Chanukah-28th-Day-of-Kislev-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

In connection with Chanukah candles, our Sages relate, “One who regularly [lights] candles will have sons who are Torah scholars.” Rashi associates this statement with the verse, “For a mitzvah is a lamp and Torah is light,” explaining that the ‘lamp’ of the mitzvahof Shabbos and Chanukah candles brings the ‘light’ of Torah.”

The commentaries question what is the rationale that associates Chanukah candles with sons who are Torah scholars. Although Rashi cites a prooftext from the Tanach, that prooftext merely indicates that a connection exists, it does not explain that connection. Furthermore, the association with the prooftext is seemingly problematic. How is it possible to say that the “lamp of mitzvah” will bring the “light of Torah,” when a lamp is less powerful than light?1

mitzvah is like a lone and single light, limited in its scope. In contrast, the Torah is unlimited.2 Furthermore, “study is great because it brings to deed.” Thus, it is difficult to understand: Why does Rashi explain that the “lamp of mitzvah” leads to the light of Torah. If anything, the opposite is true, the light of Torah brings one to the mitzvos.3

There is another difficulty with Rashi’s statement: On the surface, the phrase, “a mitzvah is a lamp” relates to all the mitzvos. Why does Rashi limit it to the Chanukah and Shabbos candles?

These difficulties can be resolved through a deeper understanding of the mitzvah of Chanukah candles. Although, on an apparent level, the miracle of the military defeat of the Greeks was a greater miracle, our Sages associated the commemoration of the Chanukah with the kindling of candles to emphasize how the essence of the war and the Jews’ victory was spiritual. The Greeks sought to wipe out, not the Jews as a people, but rather, the Jew’s observance of Torah and mitzvos, “to make [the Jews] forget Your Torah and make them violate the decrees of Your will.”

Similarly, the Jews’ victory reflects the victory of “the lamp of mitzvah” and “the light of Torah” as they are reinforced by a commitment of mesirus nefesh. Thus, since the Chanukah candles represent a renewal — and an enhancement — of the commitment to Torah and mitzvos as a whole, through the lamp of this mitzvah comes, “the light of Torah,” sons who study Torah. This “light of Torah” leads to the fulfillment of all the mitzvos for “study is great because it leads to deed.”

Further explanation is, however, required. Ultimately, any mitzvah, even a mitzvah which — like Chanukah candles — relates to Torah and mitzvos in their totality, is merely a “lamp” which is limited when compared to “the light of Torah.” In particular, this limitation is seen with regard to the mitzvah of Chanukah candles which are associated with a specific time, the eight days of Chanukah, and within those days, with a limited time in which they are required to burn. If so, how is it possible for a limited mitzvah of this nature to bring about “the light of Torah,” sons who are Torah scholars.

This difficulty can, however, be resolved by a comparison between the Chanukah candles and the candles lit in the Menorah of the Beis HaMikdash. In regard to the kindling of the Menorah, the Torah commands us to “keep the lamp burning continuously.” Although the mitzvah was for the Menorah to burn only at night, “from the evening until the morning,”4since it was lit each afternoon, it can be considered as “burning continuously.”

We see a similar concept in regard to the korban tomid (the daily sacrifice offered each morning and afternoon). Literally, this phrase means “a continuous offering.” In this instance as well, since the offering was always brought in the morning and the evening, it could be considered “continuous.”

There is, however, a deeper dimension to the use of this term. The implication is that since these mitzvos are always fulfilled at the required time, their influence is continuous, having an effect throughout the entire day.5

There are other examples of this principle: When one wears a garment that requires tzitzis,the obligation to fulfill the mitzvah of tzitzis applies throughout the entire day. The mitzvahis fulfilled for the entire day by donning a garment and reciting the blessing at one particular time and then one continues to wear the garment throughout the day.

A second example: We are obligated to give tzedakah continuously throughout the day, whenever we meet a poor person (even when we meet the same poor person several times a day). Nevertheless, we find that — to help the poor people — our Sages established certain times for tzedakah to be given.

A more inclusive example: We are obligated to study Torah every moment of the day and night. Nevertheless, the overwhelming majority of the Jews fulfill this mitzvah by studying at fixed times throughout the day. Only unique individuals like Rabbi Shimon bar Yochaiand his colleagues are on the level of Torasom Umanosom (“Torah study is their livelihood”) and thus, study Torah the entire day. Most people fulfill the charge, “This Torah shall not depart from your mouths” by studying “a portion in the morning and a portion in the evening.”6

These examples reflect that although the observance of these mitzvos is limited to a specific time, when they are fulfilled at that time, the influence of that mitzvah continues throughout a greater period. The same concept can apply in regard to the entire year; for example, although the mitzvah of dwelling in a sukkah is observed for merely a short period, seven days, its influence continues throughout the year.7

The same applies in regard to Chanukah candles. They — like the candles of the BeisHaMikdash with which they are associated — are “a constant lamp.” Furthermore, the Chanukah candles possess an advantage over the candles of the Beis HaMikdash for as the Ramban explains, “the Chanukah candles will never be nullified and are fulfilled at present even while we are in exile.” In contrast, the fulfillment of the mitzvah of lighting the candles of the Beis HaMikdash was nullified with the destruction of that structure.

Thus, although the mitzvah of lighting Chanukah candles is associated with a limited time — eight days — and also, a limited time of day — the half hour when the candles must burn, their influence continues throughout the entire eight days of Chanukah, throughout the entire year, and indeed, throughout the entire continuum of time.

This concept itself requires explanation: Why should a mitzvah which is limited in the times (and places) when it must be fulfilled have an influence which is unlimited?8

This difficulty can be resolved within the context of a larger scope: Each Jew’s soul, even as it is enclothed in the body, is an “actual part of G‑d from above.” Just as G‑d Himself is unlimited, “the actual part of G‑d” enclothed within the body is also unlimited.9 Therefore, it is difficult to understand: How can a Jew be asked to serve G‑d in a limited manner?10

The explanation of this concept is as follows: A Jew’s service of G‑d is by nature unlimited. We should serve G‑d with every aspect of our being, in every situation in which we are found. Nevertheless, since we live within a world of limitation, our service of G‑d, i.e., performance of mitzvos, also takes on the limits of the world at large. This, however, applies only to the actual performance of the mitzvos, the bond with G‑d established through the performance of the mitzvos is above all limitation.11

The unlimited dimension of the mitzvos is expressed, not only by the fulfillment of all the mitzvos together, but rather, by the fulfillment of each individual mitzvah. Therefore, “a person who is in the midst of fulfilling one mitzvah is not obligated to fulfill all the other mitzvos” and, indeed, is considered to have fulfilled the other mitzvos as well. This is because G‑d’s will is expressed in each mitzvah, not as a particular element of a general category, but rather as an expression of the essence which connects one to His essential will as it exists above all limitations.

The infinite dimension of the mitzvos is further enhanced when a Jew fulfills the mitzvah as an expression of his unlimited desire to cling to G‑d, to love Him, “with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your might.”12 Thus, a Jew’s soul which is “a lamp of G‑d” is unlimited and it finds expression in the continuous performance of mitzvos whose inner dimension is unlimited.

The limitations of the actual performance of the mitzvah do not confine the unlimited potential of the Jewish soul. From this, we can infer that the influence generated by a mitzvah is also unbounded and therefore, continues even after the actual performance of the mitzvah has ceased.

Nevertheless, the unlimited dimension that exists within the performance of the mitzvos is not revealed on the limited plane of material existence. This is the uniqueness of the Chanukah candles. They reveal the continuous influence and unbounded potential of the mitzvos in an openly perceivable manner.

This is reflected in the perceivable light produced by the Chanukah candles which reveal in a manifest way how the performance of mitzvos contributes light to the Jewish home. Light, even light in this material world, is related to — and representative of — G‑d’s infinite light. This is expressed in the fact that one can continue lighting one candle from another ad infinitum.

Furthermore, each night of Chanukah, we add another candle, showing how we are constantly adding light, transcending even the limitations of holiness.13 In addition, the Chanukah candles are placed, “at the outside of the entrance to one’s home,” indicating how the light of holiness should not remained contained within one’s home and family, but should shine into the world at large. This shows the unbounded nature of the light of the Chanukah candles, and reflects how they extend beyond the limits of holiness.14 This is further emphasized by the fact that they are lit at night and shine into the darkness, indicating how the light of holiness shines into the darkness of the world.

The unlimited nature of the Chanukah lights is further emphasized by the fact that eight candles are lit15 (in contrast to the seven lit in the Beis HaMikdash). Seven represents a complete cycle of the natural world. Eight, in contrast, represents a step above that order. Since the Chanukah candles reflect an unlimited potential, they have the power to draw down the light of holiness into the darkness of the world, into the public domain, the area “at the outside of the entrance to one’s home.”

The potential for the Chanukah candles to have an unlimited effect stems from the fact that the miracle of Chanukah came as a result of the Jews’ mesirus nefesh, their willingness to give themselves over to holiness without reservation. This commitment made it possible for the infinite potential of “the lamp of mitzvah” and “the light of Torah” to be revealed.

Based on the above, we can understand why a person who is meticulous in his observance of the mitzvah of Chanukah candles will merit sons who are Torah scholars. Since the mitzvah of Chanukah candles brings a revelation of the infinite light of Torah,16this infinity is expressed in that the light of Torah is revealed, not only for oneself, but also, for one’s children. Indeed, in this context, the word “sons” can be interpreted as “descendants,” i.e., the revelation of the light of Torah continues in future generations as well.

Furthermore, it can be explained that the mitzvah of Chanukah candles brings out the infinite dimension that exists in all the mitzvos, revealing how they: a) draw G‑dliness down into this world; b) follow a pattern of continued growth; c) shine “the lamp of mitzvah and the light of Torah” at the outside of the entrance of one’s home, projecting this light into one’s surrounding environment.

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above and this week’s Torah portion, ParshasMikeitz. The word mikeitz means “At the conclusion of,” and thus expresses the concept of limitation. Indeed, Torah Or interprets mikeitz as relating to the limits that exist within Torah study. Yosef who reflects the potential for increase without any limitation allows the infinite dimension of Torah to be revealed. When, however, Yosef is “forgotten,” the Torah appears to be limited, and Yosef remains limited, confined in jail.17 Nevertheless, this is only a temporary situation, and ultimately, Yosef “leaves prison to rule,” and is given the potential to reveal his true unlimited nature.

This lesson is relevant for every Jew, for Yosef is also used as a name for the people as a whole. Thus, Yosef’s imprisonment in jail can reflect each Jew’s confinement in a physical body in this material world. Here, “those imprisoned by the king,” i.e., each Jew whose soul is sent into this world by G‑d, King of kings, “are confined.” This, however, is not a Jew’s true place and he can “leave prison to rule,” to take control over his environment.

Based on the above, we can interpret our Sages’ statement, “One who goes to a city should adopt its customs” as follows: When the soul descends within the limits of the body and the material world, it should accept those limits, but not because they confine the soul, but rather because the soul is on a mission, to elevate and refine the world.

The same applies to the concept of “the law of the land is your law.” A Jew must submit to the law of the land, not because it has real power over him, but because by doing so, he can elevate it and use it as a medium to spread righteousness and justice throughout the world, influencing the entire populace to accept the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants. In this manner, the Jews and Torah will take control of the world at large. It will be revealed how following the laws of the Torah will bring benefit to any country which does so. This will hasten the coming of the time when it will be revealed throughout the world that, “the sovereignty will be the L‑rd’s” in the Era of the complete Redemption.

* * *

3. In this context, a lesson can be derived from the special Torah reading associated with Chanukah, the sacrifices offered by the fourth of the Nesi’im, the Nasi of Reuven. Reuven was Yaakov’s firstborn. A firstborn is by nature, a leader, one who influences his brothers, an example whose conduct they emulate. Similarly, the word Nasi means “prince” or “leader.” Thus, a reading connected with the Nesi’im and in particular, the Nasi of Reuven, reflects the leadership potential each Jew possesses, the ability to influence the world at large.

The fourth day of Chanukah also contributes an additional concept. Four alludes to the four corners of the world and makes each person realize that these are his responsibility. His service must encompass all four corners of the world, making the world like a closed memwhich will prevent the intrusion of any undesirable elements.

It is human nature that when a person who is involved in a particular issue confronts any new concept, he immediately looks for the connection it shares with the idea with which he was originally involved. A Jew must constantly be involved in the yearning and desire for the coming of Mashiach. “Each day, we must wait for him, that he come.” Therefore, it is natural for a Jew to look for a connection to Mashiach’s coming in every event or concept which he encounters. This also applies regarding Chanukah. Since the Chanukah miracle took place in the Beis HaMikdash, its commemoration arouses an even greater yearning for the era when the Menorah will be kindled again in the Third Beis HaMikdash.

Similarly, there is a connection between the above and this week’s portion, Parshas Mikeitz. When a Jew hears the name mikeitz, because he is constantly yearning for Mashiach’s coming, he immediately associates it with the word keitz which refers to the time of Mashiach’s coming. Similarly, when he hears the vision of the Menorah mentioned in the Haftorah, he immediately associates it with the Menorah of the Beis HaMikdash.

This is enhanced by the fourth light of Chanukah which alludes to the fourth redemption and heightens our expectation of the time when we will, “kindle lamps in Your Holy courtyard,” with the coming of Mashiach. May it be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Vayeshev Mevarchim Teves - CHANUKAH | 22-29 Kislev, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  NOV 30th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:02 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 1st 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Tevet – 7:30 AM
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:47 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:02 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 5:04 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the 24th of Kislev, yahrzeit of Rabbi Chaim Chizkiya Medini, head of the rabbinical court and main yeshiva in Hebron. He is best known for his monumental, universally-acclaimed 18-volume Talmudic and halachic encyclopedia, S'dei Chemed (the only non-Chabad book ever published by the official Chabad publishing company). Even the Arab inhabitants of Hebron accepted him as a holy man. After his burial they tried to steal his body and bury him in a mosque, but were unsuccessful. 
http://www.ascentofsafed.com/cgi-bin/ascent.cgi?Name=rebbeBios

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Thank you to Yussi and Rachel Greenberg for sponsoring kiddush in honor of their first grandchild Meital Miriam Kintzer. May we see her grow in Torah, Chupah and good deeds!  It is sponsored as well in honor of Akiva's finishing his first year in the Israeli Army and getting to come home to Seattle for leave. May he have a safe service!..  Thank you to Rabbi Mendy Levitin for making this week’s meat cholent. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Chana and Gavriel Plotke on the birth of their granddaughter! May they merit to raise her to Torah Chupa and Maasim Tovim!

CHANUKAH ON ICE – SUN DEC 2nd  – 3 PM
Highland Ice Arena, 18005 Aurora Avenue North, Shoreline WA.
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/channuka-on-ice-2018-tickets-53023641138 
velvilrosler@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – WED DEC 19th 7:30 PM
Winter Scarf Making at the Mod Apartments.  mherbstman@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

LADINO DAY AT UW DEC. 5 at 7 PM
Ladino Day will be held at 7pm on Wednesday, December 5th at the University of Washington, Kane Hall 130. Ladino Day 2018 will showcase a creative initiative to bring Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) traditions to future generations. Paris-based author François Azar will discuss his two new collections of Sephardic folktales, "Bewitched by Solika" and "The Jewish Parrot"--written in both Ladino and English--and the significance of storytelling and art in Sephardic culture. Members of Seattle's "Ladineros"a Ladino-speaking group will help bring these stories to light. More info at https://jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/sephardic-folktales-francois-azar-ladino-day-2018/

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYESHEV
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507823/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayeishev-21st-Day-of-Kislev-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

This Shabbos completes the three day continuum1 that began Yud-Tes Kislev, the Rosh HaShanah of Chassidus (for the redemption began after midday on Yud-Tes Kislev, and was continued on Chof Kislev). This year, these days lead directly into Shabbos which elevates and adds completion to the days of the previous week and, in particular, to those days which directly precede it.

There is also an intrinsic connection between Yud-Tes Kislev and Shabbos. Shabbos is characterized by rest and is representative of the ultimate state of rest and peace that will be revealed in the Era of Redemption. Similarly, Yud-Tes Kislev represents a redemption and a state of rest after the difficulties of the imprisonment and a foretaste of the ultimate redemption.2

These concepts also relate to Parshas Vayeishev which, as Rashi relates,3 is connected with Yaakov’s “desire to live in prosperity,” i.e., in a situation of rest and comfort. Similarly, there is a connection to the concept of redemption for the difficulties Yaakov experienced previously (with Lavan, Eisav, and in regard to Dinah) parallel the concept of imprisonment.

In particular, there is a connection with Yaakov, the third of the Patriarchs, with the Alter Rebbe, the third in the chain of the revelation of Chassidus. Both Yaakov and the Alter Rebbe are connected with Torah study, both the study of Nigleh, the revealed dimensions of Torah law, and Pnimiyus HaTorah. This is indicated by the Torah’s description of Yaakov as “a dweller of tents.” The use of the plural form is interpreted as a reference to “the tent of Shem and the tent of Ever,” which reflect the teachings of Nigleh and those of Pnimiyus HaTorah. Similarly, the Alter Rebbe’s name Shneur is interpreted as referring to “two lights,” the light of Nigleh and the light of Pnimiyus HaTorah.

Furthermore, “Yaakov’s dwelling (Vayeishev) in the land of his fathers” was paralleled by the Alter Rebbe’s efforts to bring into a settled form (hisyashvus), the teachings of his predecessors, the Baal Shem Tov and the Maggid. The Alter Rebbe internalized their teachings in the powers of Chochmah and Binah (“wisdom” and “understanding”). This allowed those teachings to be “spread outward.”

It is through these efforts that we will merit the ultimate prosperity which will come in the Era of the Third Beis HaMikdash, in the ultimate redemption, which is associated with Yaakov, the third of the Patriarchs. This will be “a heritage that has no boundaries,” as appropriate for Yaakov to whom was given the promise, “And you shall spread westward, eastward, northward, and southward.”

The combination of the influences of Shabbos and Parshas Vayeishev will hasten the revelation of the era which is “all Shabbos and rest forever.” The immanence of the era of the Third Beis HaMikdash receives greater influence this year since this Shabbos is the third day after Yud-Tes Kislev.

2. To explain the above concepts in greater depth: After Rashi states that Yaakov “desired to live in prosperity,” he relates how Yaakov was immediately forced to confront the sorrow connected with the sale of Yosef. Thus, Yaakov’s desire to live in prosperity was not fulfilled in the events related in this Torah portion.

This raises a question: Why is the Torah portion given a name (which as Chassidusexplains reflects its content and life energy) that relates to Yaakov’s desire to live in prosperity when the main body of the Torah reading (from the second verse onward), describes the factors which led to Yosef’s descent into Egypt, his being sold into slavery, and the sorrow this caused Yaakov? On the surface, this narrative reflects the very opposite of “living in prosperity.”

Furthermore, the connection with Yud-Tes Kislev, “the festival of redemption,” mentioned above also is problematic. On the surface, the main body of the Torah reading deals with the events which brought about the Jews’ descent into Egypt, the very opposite of the concept of redemption.

These difficulties can be resolved through the explanation of another problematic point in the Torah reading. On the second verse of the Torah reading, “These are the chronicles of Yaakov: Yosef...” Rashi explains that indeed the story of Yosef represents “the chronicles of Yaakov,” for Yaakov invested the essence of his being in his relationship with Racheland this connection was transferred to Yosef.

This leads to another question: Between the narrative of the sale of Yosef and the description of what occurred to him in Egypt, the Torah relates in detail the chronicles of Yehudah, his marriage, and his siring of children. On the surface, what connection do these events have with “the chronicles of Yaakov, Yosef,” the narrative of the story of Yosef.

This leads to the conclusion that, as will be explained, the mention of Yehudah’s siring of children is intrinsically related to the narrative of Yosef. It represents the key to explaining how the descent to Egypt is fundamentally good and leads to the ultimate state of “prosperity,” thus, developing the theme of Vayeishev.

To explain: The Midrash relates:

The brothers were involved in the sale of Yosef.... Yehudah was involved in marrying a wife.... The Holy One, Blessed be He, was involved in creating the light of Mashiach [who would be born from Tamar]... Before the first power to subjugate the Jews [Pharaoh] was born, the [progenitor of the] ultimate redeemer [Poretz, Mashiach’s ancestor] was born.

This reflects the connection between the narratives of Yehudah’s children and Yosef’s descent into Egypt. Yehudah’s siring of Poretz reflected how “the cure preceded the blow.” Before the descent of the Jews to Egypt which was the ultimate result of the sale of Yosef, the “light of Mashiach,” Poretz, Mashiach’s direct ancestor, was born.4

Furthermore, not only does the birth of Peretz reflect the positive resolution of the difficulties resulting from Yosef’s sale, it shares an intrinsic connection to — and brings out the inner meaning of — the narrative of Yosef’s chronicles.

The name Yosef is related to the concept of “increase,” an addition in the realm of holiness, as reflected by Rachel’s prayer when naming him, “May G‑d add to me another son.” Furthermore, his service involves the transformation of undesirable qualities into good. In this context, Chassidus interprets Rachel’s prayer as an intimation that Yosef has the power to transform “another,” a person who is estranged from his Jewish roots, into a “son.”

Thus Yosef reflects an infinite potential, a capacity that knows no boundaries: On the lowest levels, the undesirable is transformed into good and on the highest levels, there is always a potential for a further increase. This reflects the quality of Poretz whose name means “break through;” Poretz represents breaking through boundaries, going beyond all limitations.5

Thus, the birth of Poretz contributes a potential to break through barriers, a potential which is fundamentally related to Yosef’s descent into Egypt. The ultimate concept of unbounded increase (Yosef) is fundamentally expressed when one breaks through (Poretz) the boundaries of Egypt, the limitations of the lowest dimensions of this material world.

The service of both Poretz and Yosef involves transcending all limitations, even those which exist in the sphere of holiness. Nevertheless, in a complete sense, the unlimited aspect of their service is expressed when it is carried out within the limitations of “the nakedness of the land,” and despite the undeveloped nature of such surroundings, one continues to increase, breaking through barriers.

Thus, Yosef — in contrast to his other brothers who were shepherds, i.e., isolated from the material concerns of this world — became involved in the material affairs of the land of Egypt and took a leadership role in them6 and, nevertheless, remained totally at one with G‑dliness, clinging to Him completely. Moreover, he was ultimately able to refine the Egyptians as well, compelling them to accept circumcision. The potential for Yosef to carry out this service was contributed by the birth of Poretz which introduced the concept of breaking through barriers into existence.

In this context, we can understand the intent of the Jews’ descent into exile. The purpose for this descent is to reach an increase (Yosef) as our Sages stated, “The Holy One, blessed be He, exiled Israel among the nations for the sole purpose of having converts added to them.” In a very literal sense, this refers to actual converts, a clear example of a person who was “other” becoming a “son.” In an expanded sense, it means attracting and elevating the sparks of G‑dliness which are enclothed in the material substance of the world.

The service of Yosef, i.e., the increases made in exile, is enhanced by the service of Poretz, breaking through limitations. Even though the Jews are in exile and have descended within the darkness of the lowest levels of this material world, they are able to carry out their service — both in adding holiness and in refining the world — in a complete manner. In this way, they break through the limitations of the world and the limitations of exile. Within the darkness of exile (גולה), they reveal the Alef, which stands for G‑d, Alufo Shel Olam, “the L‑rd of the world,” and thus, transform the exile into redemption (גאולה), revealing G‑dliness which transcends the world, making this lowly world a dwelling for Him.

Thus, as the Midrash emphasizes, while everyone was involved with their private concerns, G‑d was involved in “creating the light of Mashiach,” bringing Poretz, the power to break through limitations, into the world. In this way, He prepared the possibility for the sale of Yosef, the first stage of the Jews’ descent into exile, to bring about an unbounded increase and ultimately, lead to the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds.

In this context, we can understand the connection between the sale of Yosef into Egypt and Yaakov’s desire to “live in prosperity.” Since, “He fulfills the desire of those who fear Him,” surely, G‑d would fulfill the desire of Yaakov, “the chosen of the Patriarchs.” G‑d’s fulfillment of Yaakov’s desire came in two forms: the limited prosperity Yaakov enjoyed for nine years in the land of Canaan before the sale of Yosef, and the higher dimension of prosperity, he enjoyed for seventeen7 years in the land of Egypt.

This allows us to comprehend the connection between the two opening verses of the Torah reading: “And Yaakov dwelled...” which, as Rashi explains, reflects Yaakov’s desire to live in prosperity , and “And these are the chronicles of Yaakov: Yosef....” From Yaakov’s own perspective, the prosperity he enjoyed in “the land of his fathers” was sufficient. Indeed, this is the natural place for a Jew to enjoy prosperity. However, the “chronicles (toldos in Hebrew which also means “offspring”) of Yaakov,” the extension and increase of his service brought about by Yosef required a progression to a higher level of prosperity, the prosperity realized through the transformation of Egypt, the lowest levels of the world. In this way, the Jews broke through the limitations of the world and revealed a prosperity that transcends the limitations of nature. Furthermore, this began the process which will lead to the ultimate prosperity that will be realized through the “light of Mashiach.”

On the basis of the above, we can appreciate the connection between Parshas Vayeishevand Yud-Tes Kislev. The verse, “And Yaakov dwelled in the land of his fathers,” can be interpreted as a reference to the Alter Rebbe’s presentation of the teachings of the Baal Shem Tov and the Maggid (his spiritual “fathers”) in a settled (hisyashvus) manner, i.e., as they can be internalized within our intellectual powers.

“The chronicles (‘offspring’) of Yaakov: Yosef,”8 refers to the increase in the spread of Chassidus by the Rebbeim who succeeded the Alter Rebbe, until this service was brought to its fulfillment by the Previous Rebbe, Yosef,9 who transferred the center for Chassidicteachings to America, “the lower half of the world,” and from there, spread Chassidusthroughout the world at large. In the forty years since his passing, we have broken through barriers (Poretz), spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus, “westward, eastward, northward, and southward,” and preparing the world for the coming of the descendant of Poretz, the Mashiach.

* * *

3. The celebration of Yud-Tes Kislev this year is enhanced by several unique dimensions. Firstly, this is a year when, “I will show you wonders.” Although the previous year was “a year of miracles,” this year, G‑d will “show,” openly reveal, the “wonders” He performs.10

Secondly, this year marks the 192nd anniversary of the Alter Rebbe’s redemption in 5559. 192 is numerically equivalent to the word קבץ which means “collected.” This implies that we have completed the task of collecting the sparks of G‑dliness throughout the world (the purpose for G‑d’s dispersing the Jews in exile).

Similarly, 192 is numerically equivalent to the word קצב which means “measure.” The full measure of the task of spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward has been completed and it is time to receive the reward for this service, the coming of Mashiach.

In connection with this, the Tanya11 (the “Written Torah of Chassidus”) was printed again and distributed to men, women, and children. This was intended to emphasize the complete state reached in the tasking of spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward and our anticipation of the coming of Mashiach. Then the promise related in the well-known chapter of Tehillim which we recite this year, “I found David, My servant, I have anointed him with holy oil,” will be fulfilled with the coming of Mashiach.

4. This, the Shabbos following Yud-Tes Kislev, is an appropriate time to accept positive resolutions in regard to increasing our study and spreading of the teachings of Chassidusin addition to those resolutions accepted on Yud-Tes Kislev. Surely, this involves the study of the Tanya as divided in Chitas.

This increase should also be coupled with an increase in the study of Nigleh (the revealed dimensions of Torah law). In this context, it is worthy to mention the custom associated with Yud-Tes Kislev12 — and mentioned in the Tanya — of dividing the Talmud among each community of Anash. Each individual should take a tractate to study. Ideally, each individual should study the entire Talmud himself. Since this is not possible at present, by dividing the Talmud’s study among an entire community, it is considered as if each individual has studied the entire Talmud himself.13

Surely, there are many places where the study of the Talmud was divided on Yud-TesKislev itself. Those communities which did not do so then, should carry out this custom as soon as possible. [Similarly, in this context, it is worthy to mention the importance of taking part in the study of the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah according to its annual cycle. This allows each individual to conclude the study of the entire Oral Torah in a single year.]

Similarly, in connection with our Sages’ interpretation of the verse from Tehillim associated with Yud-Tes Kislev, “He redeemed my soul in peace,” it is proper to make an increase in the three pillars of Torah, service of G‑d, and deeds of kindness.” All of this should be carried out in a manner of a “continuing activity,” with continued growth, extending into the coming days, including the days of Chanukah.

There is a connection between Yud-Tes Kislev and Chanukah: The Chanukah miracle concerned oil which is used as a metaphor for Pnimiyus HaTorah which was revealed on Yud-Tes Kislev. Similarly, the Chanukah candles are placed “at the outside of the entrance to one’s home” which corresponds to the efforts to spread the wellsprings of Chassidusoutward which began on Yud-Tes Kislev. Indeed, in regard to the Alter Rebbe’s own redemption, it was not until the third day of Chanukah that he returned from Petersburg to Vitebsk where he was among Chassidim.

May the above activities hasten the coming of Mashiach and may we merit — even before Chanukah — the building and the dedication of the Third Beis HaMikdash. May it be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Vayetzei | 8-15 Kislev, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  NOV 16th
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:13 PM

SHABBOS - SAT NOV 17th  
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:35 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:13 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 5:14 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the Tes Kislev, birthday and yartzeit of the Mitteler Rebbe, and Yud Kislev, the Miteler Rebbe's Chag Hageula.

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Chabad of King County is sponsoring this week's kiddush, in honor of the 9th of Kislev, the Birthday and Yahrtzeit of the Mitteler Rebbe, Rabbi Dovber, OBM, the second Rebbe of Chabad and Erev Yud Kislev, the day celebrated as the liberation of Rabbi Dovber from Czarist imprisonment..  We will also have a delicious meat cholent, sponsored by Dr. Vernon and Liz Neppe and made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin..  Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:20 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur Beginning Nov 18th 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18th  
At Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: NOV 28th  , 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

LADINO DAY AT UW DEC. 5 at 7 PM
Ladino Day will be held at 7pm on Wednesday, December 5th at the University of Washington, Kane Hall 130. Ladino Day 2018 will showcase a creative initiative to bring Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) traditions to future generations. Paris-based author François Azar will discuss his two new collections of Sephardic folktales, "Bewitched by Solika" and "The Jewish Parrot"--written in both Ladino and English--and the significance of storytelling and art in Sephardic culture. Members of Seattle's "Ladineros"a Ladino-speaking group will help bring these stories to light. More info at https://jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/sephardic-folktales-francois-azar-ladino-day-2018/

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYETZEI
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507821/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayeitzei-7th-Day-of-Kislev-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

This week’s Torah portion concludes with the verse, “And he named the place, Machanayim (literally, ‘two camps’).” Rashi explains that Yaakov gave this name because he saw the merging of two camps of angels, the angels from the Diaspora and the angels from Eretz Yisrael.1

“The deeds of the Patriarchs are a sign for their descendants,” and provide us with guidelines regarding our own conduct. Thus, the above narrative teaches us the following lesson: Each Jew has two dimensions within his being — the soul and the body — which correspond to Eretz Yisrael and the Diaspora respectively.

A Jew’s soul is “actually a part of G‑d,” which has descended from “a high roof to a low pit,” to this material world to enclothe itself in the body. Even as it exists within the body, the soul is, as we emphasize in our morning blessings, “pure.” Thus, it parallels Eretz Yisraelwhich is a land of holiness and purity. In contrast, the body is “a snake skin,” a material entity and parallels the Diaspora which is an impure land.

A Jew’s service must encompass both these spheres. He must carry out “the service of the soul,” activity in the realm of holiness which resembles Eretz Yisrael” and also, “service with the body,” which like the Diaspora, involves entities which must be endowed with holiness through our efforts. Since an angel is created from every positive deed which a Jew carries out, we each have two camps of angels: one camp of angels that are involved with holiness (Eretz Yisrael) and one camp of angels that are involved with worldly matters (the Diaspora).

The fact that Yaakov named the place Machanayim conveys a further lesson. A Jew’s service can effect the nature of the place in which it is carried out. Naming a place indicates that one takes control of it and can, therefore, convey the name which reflects the entity’s life-force and nature. By naming the place Machanayim, Yaakov (and similarly, the Jewish people who perpetuate his heritage) reveals how the influence of the two camps of angels permeates through even the material substance of the worlds.

An additional explanation relevant to the above concept can be derived from the fact that the name used for G‑d in the expression “the angels of G‑d,” is E‑lohim. E‑lohim refers to G‑d as “the Almighty, the master of all potential and power.” Thus, the angels described as “the angels of E‑lohim,” are angels that result from service that requires strength and power to be performed, indeed, strength and power that transcends man’s natural abilities.

This relates to the Alter Rebbe’s interpretation of the phrase, “a servant of G‑d (E‑lohim)” in Tanya as one who goes beyond his nature and exerts energies above the norm.

To apply this concept in the realm of the service with the animal soul (i.e., the Diaspora, the refinement of the worldly): In Torah Or, the Alter Rebbe relates the word ya’avod, in the verse, “You shall work for six years,” to the concept of oros avudim, “processed hides.” Our Sages consider the processing of leather as a difficult and undignified work.2 Parallels exist in our efforts to refine the animal soul. In a manner closely resembling the processing of leather, great efforts are required to refine the coarse and material nature of the animal soul.

Similarly, in regard to the service of the soul (i.e., Eretz Yisrael, the realm of holiness), in Tanya, the Alter Rebbe explains that the title “a servant of G‑d” is conveyed only upon a person who breaks his nature and goes beyond his normal pattern. Even a person who “studies his subject matter 100 times,” “who has never committed even a minor sin and has fulfilled all the mitzvos possible for him to fulfill including Torah study,” never once negating this mitzvah, may not be worthy of being called “a servant of G‑d,” because he does not work to break his nature and transcend his normal habits.

Thus, the concept of work involves strenuous effort that requires power and strength beyond man’s natural capacity. This, in turn, elevates the object of one’s service above its normal level. Thus, in regard to the animal soul, this involves a change in and a refinement of its basic materialistic nature. In regard to the G‑dly soul,3 it produces a similar change, lifting it above its normal level of service. From a level of limited holiness, one proceeds to an unlimited point of service which requires an effort parallel to that required in processing leather.

To clarify this point: Even in regard to the service of refining the body and the animal soul, the emphasis is not placed on this refinement in and of itself, but on making a commitment that requires a person to go beyond his limitations and nature. (Since the nature of the body, however, is materially oriented, going beyond its limits involves refinement of that nature.)

Thus, even when this service of refinement has been completed, the service of self-transcendence must continue. Nevertheless, since the service of refinement is no longer necessary, the manner in which a person goes beyond his limits is expressed in an unlimited increase in the service of holiness.4

The concept of unlimited and unbounded service is also reflected in the actual service of refining the body and the animal soul. There are two dimensions to this: a) an unlimited range of areas in which this service is expressed. Furthermore, each activity leads immediately to a further act. b) An unlimited scope of refinement. After one has completed the work of refinement on one level, one proceeds to a higher and deeper level of refinement.

These two dimensions are reflected in the two “signs” which the Torah gives for a kosheranimal,5 split hooves and the chewing of the cud. Both these signs are connected with a twofold nature. In regard to split hooves, the animal’s foot is separated in two portions. Similarly, chewing the cud involves regurgitating the food and swallowing it again, a twofold process of ingestion. A twofold nature reflects a totally unbounded dimension. The repetition implies a cycle which continues, constantly increasing and reaching higher levels.

This unlimited dimension is expressed in two dimensions: a) Split hooves — when one proceeds to perform in the world at large, one’s progress is twofold in nature. This implies that immediately one activity will be followed by another. b) Chewing the cud — by regurgitating its food and chewing it again, the animal allows for better digestion. Homiletically, this implies that a person will not remain satisfied after carrying out one level of refinement, but rather will seek to continue further, reaching higher and more developed levels.

In this context, we can explain the significance of the name Machanayim, “two camps.” This name reflects, not only the joining of the camps of angels from Eretz Yisrael and from the Diaspora, but also a twofold — and thus unbounded — approach to service. The fact that Yaakov carried out his service both in the Diaspora and in Eretz Yisrael (both mundane and holy matters as above) indicates that both dimensions of his service were motivated by a commitment to serve G‑d beyond his individual nature. This implies two concepts: a) that the emphasis in his service of refinement was not for refinement in and of itself, but as a reflection of his commitment to go beyond his individual nature. b) That after he completed this work of refinement, he did not remain satisfied with a limited service in the realm of holiness, but served G‑d beyond his natural limits in this realm as well.

To emphasize this point, the angels of Eretz Yisrael met him while he was in the Diaspora. Even though he had not entered Eretz Yisrael, the angels which are associated with service in the realm of holiness came to greet him.6

Directly after Yaakov was met by these camps of angels, he sent, as the Torah relates in the beginning of Parshas Vayishlach, “emissaries7 to Eisav, his brother, to the land of Seir,the field of Edom.” Not only did Yaakov involve himself in a twofold service, elevating his surrounding environment and rising higher in the realm of holiness, he sought to refine and elevate even the lowest aspects of existence, Eisav and the field of Edom.

This concept can be related to the concept of kosher animals mentioned previously. There are four species of animals (the camel, the rabbit, the hare, and the pig) that possess only one of the two signs of kashrus (split hooves and chewing the cud). Our Sages explain that these four species correspond to the four exiles in which the Jews have been forced to linger. The fourth species, the pig, corresponds to the exile of Edom.

There is a difference between the pig and the other species. The other species chew their cud, but do not have split hooves. In contrast, the pig has split hooves, but does not chew its cud.8

Our Sages point to an aspect in which the pig is more reprehensible than the other three species. The pig lies down and lifts up its split hooves as if to say, “See, I am pure.” Similarly, Eisav and Edom cover up their undesirable traits and portray themselves as good. For this reason, the exile of Edom has been longer and more severe than the other three exiles.

Nevertheless, through our efforts in the work of refinement, Edom will also be elevated. This is alluded to in our Sages’ comments that in the Messianic Era, the pig will become a kosher animal (for, then, it will also chew its cud). Similarly, they have associated the Hebrew word for pig (חזיר) with the word חזרה, “return.” After the “pig,” the exile of Edom,“the crown will be restored to its owners as it is written, ‘And saviors will ascend the Mount of Zion to judge the Mount of Eisav and the sovereignty will be the L‑rd’s.’ ”

2. This Shabbos falls in the month of Kislev, the third of the winter months. Thus it parallels Sivan, the third of the summer months, the month associated with the giving of the Torah. Furthermore, in this context, there is an advantage to Kislev over Sivan which reflects the service of transcending one’s nature mentioned above.

Among the differences between the winter months and the summer months is that the summer months emphasize revelation from above (the service of the righteous), while the winter months emphasize work and effort on the part of man (baalei teshuvah). Therefore, the winter months are the rainy season which our Sages associate with the service of man.9

There is another dimension of the winter season which is signifi­cant; the nights are longer. Our Sages explain that “night was created for Torah study alone.” Similarly, the Hebrew word for winter, choref shares the same root as the Hebrew charifus which refers to acute in­tellectual analysis. Thus the winter, and in particular, Kislev is associated with man’s efforts to toil and work in Torah study.

Furtherance, as Sivan, Kislev is also associated with “the giving of the Torah.” In this instance the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah, for the service of “spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward” began on Yud-Tes Kislev, the “Rosh HaShanah of Chassidus.”Thus, Sivan is connected with the giving of the revealed aspects of Torah, Nigleh; while Kislev is associated with the giving of Pnimiyus HaTorah. (This also relates to the difference between the summer and winter mentioned above. The revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah is associated with the service of teshuvah which begins in Tishrei10 and characterizes the service of the winter as a whole.)

Based on the above, we can draw a connection between the parshiyos, Vayeitzei and Vayishlach and Kislev, the month in which they are read. Both these portions describe the service of Yaakov, the third of the Patriarchs. Similarly, Yaakov is associated with the service of Torah study. Even the refinement of the world which he accomplished was achieved through the medium of Torah.

This relates to one of the explanations of the connection between the Torah and the number three based on our Sages’ statement, “The Torah was given for the sole purpose of establishing peace in the world.”

Peace is associated with the number three, i.e., two conflicting opinions and a third influence which resolves the conflict. Similarly, the number one is associated with G‑dliness. The number two is associated with the world and the division its creation appears to have brought about. The number three, however, is associated with the Torah which resolves this apparent division and establishes peace between G‑d and the world.

Thus, there is a connection to Parshas Vayeitzei which, as explained above, reflects Yaakov’s service of going beyond his nature both in the service of Torah study (the angels of Eretz Yisrael) and the refinement of his environment through Torah (the angels of the Diaspora). Similarly, there is a connection to Parshas Vayishlach for the transformation of Eisav to which it alludes is accomplished through Torah study. The Torah is the medium to bring about this transformation of darkness to light.

3. There are several practical directives resulting from the above, first and foremost, for every individual to increase11 his study of the Torah, going beyond his limits.12 This applies both to people who are employed in Torah professions and to businessmen. Every individual must increase his study of Torah, both Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah. Similarly, the increase must be qualitative as well as quantitative, reaching a higher and deeper level of study. The above is particularly appropriate this year, a year when, “I will show you wonders.” Our behavior must be wondrous in nature, going beyond our individual limits.13

There is also a connection with Parshas Vayishlach which contains an obvious allusion to the sending of shluchim. Thus, it relates to the International Conference of Shluchim which was held last week. Since Shabbos represents the completion of the service of the week, it is obvious that this Shabbos can be used to enhance and increase the resolutions to spread Torah and Chassidus that were made at that Conference.

These activities will hasten the refinement of the world and herald the coming of the age when, as the Rambam writes in the conclusion of the Mishneh Torah,14 “In that Era, there will be no hunger or war... and the occupation of the entire world will be solely to know G‑d.”

Furthermore, in microcosm, this state can be reflected in the last moments of exile despite the fact that, as the Yalkut Shimoni15 declares, “nations challenge each other... and all the nations of the world panic and are filled with consternation.” Even in such circumstances, the Jews can study Torah with peace and security, confident in G‑d’s assurance that, as the Midrash continues, “All that I have wrought, I have performed only for your sake,” awaiting the time when, “Mashiach will stand on the roof of the Beis HaMikdash and proclaim, ‘Humble ones, the time for redemption has come.’ ”

Shabbos Toldos | 1 -8 Kislev, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  NOV 9th   
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:21 PM

SHABBOS - SAT NOV 10th  
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:29 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:21 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 5:21 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:20 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the Chodesh Kislev

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite.  Rabbi Alter and Debbie Levitin are sponsoring cholent this week in honor of the Uncle Moshe and Aunt Ruti Weiss.  Cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim KickOff this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors Chani & Shuky Meyer. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:20 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
5240 38th Ave NE 

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur Beginning Nov 18th 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama Beginning MON NOV 12th
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

Bas Mitzvah Class for Girls Ages 10 & 11 Begins NOV 11th 10:15 AM
Given by Aliza Tanenbaum, BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Contact Aliza Tanenbaum if you are interested.

Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State MON NOV 12th 7:15 PM
JGSWS presents Molly Bullard, Speaker & Owner o Seattle Photo Organizing at LDS Factoria Bldg. Topic: "Preserving Memories: How to Organize & Turn Your Family Memorabilia into a Personal Archival Project". More info: 
www.jgsws.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18th  
At Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: NOV 28th  , 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR TOLDOS
https://www.sie.org/ © SichosInEnglish.org

This week’s Torah reading begins: “These are the offspring of Isaac,” referring to Jacob and Esau.  Isaac was a completely righteous man. Early in his life, he was prepared to be offered as a sacrifice to G‑d on Mt. Moriah and even afterwards, when a ram was offered in his place, he was still considered holy, like a sacrifice. For that reason, unlike the other Patriarchs, G‑d did not let him leave Israel. He was holy and had to live in a holy land.

One of his sons, Jacob, emulated his holi-ness. He was “a dweller of tents,” choosing to frequent the prominent houses of study of the age. But his other son, Esau, was a hunter, a man of violence and passion. And yet Isaac loved Esau.

Digging  Below the Surface

Some say Esau was able to deceive him. In Isaac’s presence, he appeared holy and then afterwards, he did what he wanted. But that makes our Patriarch look some-what shallow. Moreover, it runs contrary to one of the basic themes of Isaac’s life work. Isaac was a digger of wells. What’s the secret of a well-digger? Not to accept what you see on the surface, but to dig deep down, to keep clearing away the dirt until he finds the water of life.

Isaac did that not only with wells, but with every experience in his life. He would probe to the depths and appreciate the in-ner core. Now if he did that with every-thing, wouldn’t he do that with his own son?  So if Esau wasn’t fooling him, why did he love him?

Why Yitzchak Wanted to Bless Esau

For precisely that reason. When digging deeply, it depends how deep you dig. If you dig past the surface, you will be able to see a person’s passions and drives — not all of that is pleasant. But if you really love a person, you won’t stop there. You’ll dig deeper until you find the essential core of G‑dliness that person has. For every person’s soul is an actual part of G‑d. In some, it shines openly. In others, it’s hid-den and in certain people, it’s very hidden. Since Isaac loved Esau, he didn’t look at his less favorable dimensions; he focused on the good that was deep inside of him.

That also enables us to understand why he wanted to give the blessings to him. Isaac was constantly struggling to motivate Esau to live up to his spiritual potential. He felt that by pouring so much positive energy into him, he could arouse the good inside and enable it to dominate his personality.

In fact, however, the blessings were given to Jacob. For the work of revealing the good in Esau could not be accomplished in a brief period of time. That indeed is the purpose of our efforts throughout the spir-itual history of the world, including this final exile, referred to as the “the exile of Edom,” another name of Esau. We are striving to reveal this spiritual energy, the “sparks” invested in worldly experience which is associated with Esau.

Tasting Mashiach - Seeing the Good

The final consummation of these efforts will come in the Era of the Redemption.  The powerful spiritual energies which Esau possesses will surface and be given appropriate expression.  At present, alt-hough we are aware how our Divine ser-vice refines the material realm, the fruits of those efforts are not visibly evident. In the Future, “the glory of G‑d will be revealed and all flesh will see”; the positive effects of the thousands of years of effort mankind has dedicated to the refinement of material existence will be apparent. 

Although it is in the Future when this Di-vine service will reach complete expres-sion, we have the potential to experience a foretaste of that Future era at present: to look at every entity as it exists above the fluctuations of time, in its true and perfect state. This perception serves as a guiding light, inspiring and directing us in our task of refinement and hastening the coming of the age when this spiritual reality will be fully manifest in our material world with the coming of Mashiach.

Based on the teachings of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. Adapted from Keeping in Touch, Vol. 3, Eli Tougher

Shabbos Chayei Sarah – Mevarchim Kislev | 24 MarCheshvan – 1 Kislev, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  NOV 2nd   
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:31 PM

SHABBOS - SAT NOV 3rd 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Kislev 7:30 AM
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:25 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:31 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 6:30 PM /CLOCKS FALL BACK ONE HOUR SATURDAY NIGHT/

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Wed Shacharis 7 AM 
Thu-Fri Shacharis 6:50 AM /ROSH CHODESH KISLEV/
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:30 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 4 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the Shabbos Mevarchim Kislev

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite.  Mr and Mrs Eli Duban are sponsoring the cholent this week in honor of the birthday of their son JJ Duban. Cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  .yonilevitin@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – /NOT THIS WEEK
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:40 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a fullרפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel MON NOV 5-26, 8-9 PM
"
The Philosophy & Laws of Blessings", Brachos with Rabbi Yehuda Bresler. www.seattlekollel.com/upcoming-events

Seattle Kollel Beginning MON NOV 12th Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama. 
More info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com or (206) 369-1215

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU PM
5240 38th Ave NE 

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

Mercaz Cider Pressing Party SUN NOV 4th 1:30 – 3:30 PM
Bring your apples and empty juice containers and instruments to play some music. We'll have apple crisp, snacks and tea. Dress for the outdoors but we will have a canopy up as well. 
www.mercazseattle.org

PREPARING FOR KINDERGARDEN – WED NOV 7th 5:15 PM
At Seattle Hebrew Academy            
www.seattlehebrewacademy.org

Bas Mitzvah Class for Girls Ages 10 & 11 Begins NOV 11th 10:15 AM
Given by Aliza Tanenbaum, BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Contact Aliza Tanenbaum if you are interested.

Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State MON NOV 12th 7:15 PM
JGSWS presents Molly Bullard, Speaker & Owner o Seattle Photo Organizing at LDS Factoria Bldg. Topic: "Preserving Memories: How to Organize & Turn Your Family Memorabilia into a Personal Archival Project". More info: 
www.jgsws.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18th  
At Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: NOV 28th  , 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th 5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR CHAYEI SARAH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507936/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Chayei-Sarah-27th-Day-of-MarCheshvan.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

The International Conference of Shluchim begins this Shabbos, Parshas Chayei Sarah,and will be continued during the following days which are associated with Parshas Toldos.Since everything which occurs is ordained by Hashgachah Protis and a Jew should derive a lesson in the service of G‑d from everything he sees or hears, it follows that these two Torah portions contain lessons relevant to this conference and the responsibility of a shliach.

Indeed, a major portion of Parshas Chayei Sarah concerns a shlichus, Avraham’s charging Eliezar with finding a bride for Yitzchok, and Eliezar’s execution of that mission. The following portion, Parshas Toldos describes the offspring of Yitzchok and Rivkah and thus, reveals the intent of that mission. Since Eliezar’s mission is described at length in the Torah, we can conclude that it is not merely an isolated historical event, but rather, contains directives of a greater scope that apply in all times.

The lessons which we can derive from this narrative can be understood on the basis of a basic question: Why is this narrative described in such great length in the Torah?1 The objective of Eliezar’s mission, the marriage of Yitzchok and Rivkah, is described briefly while the description of the mission, the preparations for it, and the negotiations it required, is elaborate and detailed.

The concept can be explained as follows: Eliezar’s mission in arranging for the marriage of Yitzchok and Rivkah reflects — in microcosm — the mission of every Jew, to make a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds. Rivkah was like “a rose among the brambles,” living in Padan Aram together the wicked Besuel and Lavan. Eliezar’s mission involved removing her from there and bringing her to Yitzchok to become his wife. Thus, it reflects our service of refining the material nature of the world and transforming it into a dwelling for G‑d.

On a very basic level, the wedding between Yitzchok and Rivkah, the first Jewish wedding, is representative of the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in this world since it represents the establishment of a Jewish home. This allows for fulfillment of the commandment, “Be fruitful and multiply, fill up the earth and conquer it.” It gave Yitzchok the opportunity to produce “offspring” (Toldos), which refers in a simple sense to Yaakov and Eisav, and in an extended sense, to “the essential offspring of the righteous,” “their good deeds.”

Since Eliezar’s mission reflects such an all encompassing objective, the Torah relates all the details of the mission so that a Jew can derive lessons from it regarding his service in making a dwelling for G‑d in this world.

To explain: The objective of establishing a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds involves two particulars: a) the establishment of a dwelling — i.e., that G‑d will reveal Himself in this world as a person reveals himself in his own home. In his home, a person reveals himself without any inhibitions, so, too, in this world, G‑d will reveal Himself openly as the verse declares, “Your teacher will not conceal Himself any longer.” b) The fact that dwelling will be in the lower worlds emphasizes that it will relate to the creations of this world on their level. Not only will G‑dliness be revealed from above to below, but rather, the world as it exists within its own context will recognize G‑dliness. Although the world was created in a manner that it does not appreciate G‑dliness,2 its nature will be transformed until it — within the context of its own existence — will become G‑d’s dwelling.

Accordingly, these two thrusts must also be reflected in the service which creates the dwelling for G‑d: a) Since the dwelling must be within the context of the lower worlds, it cannot be established by G‑d through a revelation from above. Rather it must be accomplished through the service of the Jews, who act as G‑d’s shluchim within this world. This leads to a further point, since the Jews are creations of this world, their activity as shluchim [— which involves forgoing their individual identities and accepting a self-image as G‑d’s shluchim —] is not only a preparation and a means to establish a dwelling for G‑d, it, itself, is a reflection of that dwelling.

To emphasize this concept, the narrative of Eliezar’s mission which serves as a paradigm for shlichus, describes in detail how Eliezar fulfilled the mission with which he was charged. b) To transform the world into a dwelling for G‑d, i.e., a place of Divine revelation, it is necessary for the Jews to recognize that they are merely shluchim. They must be conscious that it is the power of G‑d who charged them with this mission and not their individual potential that allows the mission to be successful. To emphasize this point, our narrative elaborates on how Eliezar was charged by Avraham with his mission, how he took an oath, stressing how the shliach’s activities are carried out with the power of the one who appointed him.

The latter concept can be clarified within the context of the three perspectives with which the Torah authorities (See Lekach Tov I) of the latter generations have defined shlichus:

a) The shliach is an independent identity and the deeds which he accomplishes are recognized as his. It is merely that through the performance of these deeds, the obligations of the person who charged him with the mission are fulfilled.

b) When the shliach performs a deed, it is considered as if it was performed by the person who charged him with the mission. Though in regard to his other affairs, the shliach is an independent entity, in this regard, the one who charged him is fully responsible for the deed the shliach performed.

c) The shliach is considered as an extension of the one who appointed him. “A shliach is considered as if he is the person who appointed him.”

The relationship between a Jew (the shliach) and G‑d (the one who appointed him) is defined in the third manner. The Jew’s establishment of a dwelling in the lower worlds is possible because he is “a part of G‑d,” i.e., like the one who appointed him. Service is necessary, however, to reveal this quality. A person must work on himself to transcend his individual self and identify with G‑d’s will. It is not sufficient for him to perform a G‑dly act [a mitzvah] although he remains a separate and individual identity. Rather, he must be totally given over to G‑d to the extent that every aspect of his personality — even those involved with physical activities — is given over to G‑d.

For this reason, the appointment of the shliach by the one who sends him is of such importance. The appointment of shluchim implies that the person appointing them gives them powers.3 In terms of our fulfillment of the shlichus with which we have been charged by G‑d, this concept fuses two opposite thrusts. On one hand, a Jew feels himself as an independent entity, a soul and a body, who has a personality of his own and, must realize that he personally was granted unique potentials to achieve particular objectives in the service of G‑d. Nevertheless, while carrying out this service, his own personality must be totally nullified to the extent he is totally identified with G‑d who appointed him as His shliach.

2. The above concept provides the basis for the connection between the narrative of Eliezar’s mission and the name of the parshah, Chayei Sarah (“the life of Sarah”). Though the name of an entity expresses its fundamental content, in this instance, the connection between Sarah’s life and the events related in the parshah is difficult to understand. All those events occurred after Sarah’s death.

Nevertheless, since, as our Sages declared, “Since his descendants are alive, he is considered as if he is alive,” we can understand that the fullest expression of Sarah’s life took place after she departed from this world and yet the heritage of good and holiness which she had established was perpetuated through the marriage of Yitzchok and Rivkah. When was Yitzchok satisfied with his bride? When “he brought her into the tent of Sarah his mother.” Our Sages interpret this as meaning that Rivkah resembled Sarah. All the spiritual services which Sarah fulfilled were carried out by Rivkah. Hence, this marriage reflects the ultimate expression of “Sarah’s life.”

In particular, the expression used by the Torah in describing Sarah’s age, “one hundred years, twenty years, and seven years,” is significant. “One hundred” refers to the transcendent powers of will and pleasure, “twenty” refers to our intellectual powers, and “seven” to our emotions. Afterwards, the verse concludes “the years of Sarah’s life,” which our Sages interpret to mean that “all are equal for the good.” This reflects how all the soul’s powers are unified into a single point, brought together through the bittul of yechidah, the essence of the soul, which is above all division. Nevertheless, this essential point of soul permeates through all the soul’s powers and unites them in this all-encompassing bittul.

To relate this idea to the concept of shlichus described above: As mentioned, our fulfillment of the mission to make this world a dwelling for G‑d involves the fusion of two opposites: a) the shliach using all of his powers (his will and pleasure, intellect, and emotion in the fullest way possible. b) the shliach giving himself over to G‑d entirely, focusing all his powers on a single goal, the fulfillment of G‑d’s will.

We derive the power to fuse these two opposites from Sarah, our Matriarch. She endowed us, her descendants, with the potential for the essence of the soul to permeate every aspect of our personality (“all are equal for good”) and to unify will and pleasure (“one hundred years”), intellect (“twenty years”), and emotion (“seven years”) in this all encompassing bittul.

The dedication of our potentials to this shlichus with the bittul described above enables us to refine our world and make it a dwelling for G‑d. We are able to reveal how “all the entities in the heavens and the earth... came into existence from the truth of His Being.”

Based on the above, we can understand the statement that shliach (שליח) plus ten (representing the ten powers of the soul) is numerically equivalent to Mashiach (משיח). When a person dedicates all of his ten powers to the fulfillment of the mission to make this world a dwelling for G‑d, he reveals the spark of Mashiach he possesses within his soul. Each entity possesses a point of Mashiach which represents the essence of that entity, the level of yechidah that transcends all distinctions. Simultaneously, the level of yechidahpermeates through all of these different entities.4

Through revealing the aspect of Mashiach which relates to him, each individual hastens the actual coming of Mashiach as alluded to in the Rambam’s statement that with one mitzvah, each Jew has the potential to tip the balance of the entire world and bring complete salvation.

3. Based on the above, we can understand the connection between the parshiyos, Toldosand Chayei Sarah. As mentioned, Parshas Chayei Sarah revolves around the marriage of Yitzchok and Rivkah. The ultimate goal of that — and every other marriage — is to produce Toldos, “offspring.” Chassidus explains that the birth of a child reveals “the power of Ayn Sof (‘G‑d’s infinity’).”

Similarly, the spiritual dimensions of our service which are represented by that marriage, the mission to make this world a dwelling for G‑d, are intended to reveal “the power of Ayn Sof” throughout the world through their Toldos which, as our Sages state, refer to a person’s “good deeds” which are “the essential offspring of the righteous.”

These activities are also related to bringing about “offspring” in another context. The Previous Rebbe explained that the mitzvah to “be fruitful and multiply” means that “one Jew must make another Jew,” i.e., influence another Jew to express his Judaism.5Furthermore, the influence one exerts on others must be complete, powerful enough to motivate that person himself to go out and spread Judaism to other people.

In this context, each word in the verse, “These are the offspring of Yitzchok the son of Avraham,” is significant. Our Sages explain that the word “these” refers to an entity which is openly revealed. The “offspring” refers to a new entity; “of Yitzchok,” produced by Yitzchok and reflecting his nature which is associated with producing joy and happiness as reflected in Sarah’s explanation of the name she gave him, “Whoever hears will rejoice with me.”

“The son of Avraham” implies that it is openly apparent — to the extent that the facial characteristics of Yitzchok and Avraham were identical — that he is a descendant (and the heir to the heritage of) “the father of many nations,” the person who is involved with spreading the service of establishing a dwelling for G‑d throughout the world at large.

The Hebrew word Toldos (“offspring”) is plural, referring to Yaakov (the service of “doing good”) and Eisav (the service of “turning away from evil”). The establishment of a dwelling for G‑d involves both these services. Furthermore, in an ultimate sense, since Eisav is also a son of Yitzchok and Rivkah, the service he connotes does not involve merely the negation and rejection of evil, but rather, its elevation and refinement.6 The establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds requires both the service of Yaakov, “a straightforward person, a dweller of tents” (the service of Torah and mitzvos), and Eisav, “a man of the field” (the service of refining and elevating the material substance of the world). This will lead to the era when, “I will come to my lord in Seir,” when Eisav will be elevated and prepared to accept the Messianic redemption.

On the basis of the above, we can understand the sequence of the parshiyos from Lech Lecha to Toldos. Lech Lecha refers to the bittul that motivates a journey from one’s previous state. This prepares a person for Vayeira, a revelation of G‑dliness. Chayei Sarahinvolves the expression of this revelation through every element of our personalities which gives a person the potential to produce Toldos, “offspring” and establish a dwelling for G‑d in this world.

4. The above concepts are fundamentally related to the International Conference of Shluchim which begins this Shabbos. All Jews are shluchim of G‑d to establish a dwelling for Him in this world. Particularly, when an individual is appointed as shliach of the Previous Rebbe, his role in fulfilling the shlichus with which he has been charged by G‑d receives greater emphasis. Surely, this applies when shluchim from all over the world have gathered together. Each of their missions must relate to two of the points mentioned above: a) Each shliach must use his full potential (all of his ten powers) for the sake of the fulfillment of the mission. b) Each shliach must be totally given over to the one who appointed him, the Previous Rebbe, and thus, standing in the place of the one who appointed him.

The fusion of these two contradictory points relates to a similar fusion of two opposites: a conference (unity) of shluchim (who are many). This is particularly relevant in regard to an international conference where shluchim are gathered from all over the world — this is especially significant when this conference is held in a Shul which is a house of study — for the sake of strengthening their commitment to the fulfillment of their shlichus to spread Yiddishkeit, Torah, and goodness throughout the world. The general nature of this shlichus, however, must be interpreted in an individual manner by each shliach in order to influence his particular country and situation.

By gathering together in such a conference, all the shluchim receive greater strength and potential to carry out this mission. In particular, additional power is granted this year, the fortieth year after the Previous Rebbe’s passing.7 Our Sages explain that after forty years, a student attains a full grasp of his teacher’s knowledge.8 Thus, the fact that forty years have elapsed since the Previous Rebbe’s passing implies that we are granted the potential to reach a higher rung in the fulfillment of the mission to make this world a dwelling for G‑d. This must be reflected in the two aspects of shlichus mentioned above: The shliach’s bittulmust be more complete and encompassing. Simultaneously, that bittul must inspire him to dedicate all of his potentials to the fulfillment of his mission.

In application of the above: The intent of the conference of shluchim should be to strengthen each other to spread ahavas Yisrael (“the love of our fellow Jews”) and achdus Yisrael (“the unity of the Jewish people”). The first step in accomplishing that objective is spreading love and unity among the shluchim themselves. Though they come from different places with different missions particular to their individual situation, they join together in one conference with a single goal.

The unity established in this conference through praying, studying, and accepting resolutions together should continue to have an effect when each shliach returns home. In his own individual circumstances, he should feel connected to the other shluchim and to the one who appointed them.

This unity will grant the shluchim the potential to spread unity among the Jews in the countries in which they dwell. Through these efforts, the entire world will become united in the fulfillment of G‑d’s will; the Jews, through the performance of the 613 mitzvos and the gentiles, through the observance of the seven universal laws given to Noach and his descendants.

To strengthen the unity among the shluchim, it is proper to print a book to serve as a constant reminder of this conference. This book should include: pictures of all the participants in the conference including their families, new Torah concepts that were authored by the participants in the conference, and a record of the speeches and resolutions made during its interim. Also, Torah concepts and resolutions that emphasize the unique nature of the present year, the fortieth year after the Previous Rebbe’s passing should also be included. When a shliach returns to his own community and opens this publication, he will remember this conference. This will inspire him to further efforts in fulfilling his mission.

This is also an appropriate opportunity to reiterate the suggestion made regarding gathering people together in every community each Shabbos to study Torah and focusing that study on a common subject, the weekly Torah portion. Similarly, it is important to emphasize the study of the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah which was completed in the previous week.9 It is proper to organize siyumim (celebrations in honor of the summation of study) in communities throughout the world. Rabbis and community leaders should be encouraged to attend these gatherings which will bring honor to the Rambam and honor to the Torah as a whole. Through spreading the study of the Rambam — a text which includes “the entire oral law” in a manner that can be understood by “those of lesser stature as well as those of greater stature” — throughout the world, the Jewish people become united in a bond of Torah.

May these efforts hasten the fulfillment of the prophecy with which the Rambam concludes his text, “And the earth will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the sea covers up the ocean bed,” with the coming of Mashiach. May it be now, immediately.

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