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Shabbos Miketz – Chanukah | 1-8 Tevet 5777

EREV SHABBOS FRI Dec 30th /ROSH CHODESH TEVES/
Shacharis 7 am with Hallel and Musaf
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:08 pm

SHABBOS SAT Dec 31st   /7th DAY CHANUKAH
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 10:05 am
Mincha/ 3:50 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:13 pm /FOLLOWED BY CANDLE 8 of CHANUKAH!

Kiddush and Seuda Slishit.  
Kiddush this week is sponsored by Dr Yussi and Rachel Greenberg, in honor and in memory of the 45th yahrzeit of  Yussi's  father, Yitzchok Pesach ben Avraham Shimshon  Z"L (30th Kiselev).CHULENT BY MENDIE. 
Seuda Slishit Lite.

Children's Program & Avos U'Banim
There will be no children's program or Avos U'Banim this Shabbos at CSTL.
We will resume next week G-d willing. 

Weekday & CHANUKAH Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am with HALLEL /ZOS CHANUKAH
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am 
Sun-Thu  Mincha 4:15 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:08 pm

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazal tov  Mazal tov on the engagement of Sarah Cohen to Chaim Siev from Miami Beach Florida!  May they merit to build a Bayis Ne'eman b'Yisroel !

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CHANUKAH CHABAD EVENTS
NIGHTLY DEC 24th – 31st : SEATTLE CENTER MENORAH LIGHTING 
NIGHTLY DEC 24th – 31st : NORTHGATE MALL MENORAH LIGHTING 
SATURDAY NIGHT DEC 31st 6-8 pm CHABAD HOUSE CHANUKAH PARTY

FABRENGEN ALERT – HEY TEVES – TUE JAN 3rd 
Tevet 5 is celebrated as a day of rejoicing in the Chabad-Lubavitch community. On this date in 1987, U.S. Federal Court issued a decision in favor of Agudas Chassidei Chabad ("Union of Chabad Chassidim") regarding the ownership of the priceless library of the 6th Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn. The ruling was based on the idea that a Rebbe is not a private individual but a communal figure synonymous with the body of Chassidim. The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Rabbi Yoseph Yitzchak's son-in-law and successor) urged that the occasion be marked with time devoted to study from Torah books ("sefarim") as well as the acquisition of new Torah books. 
http://www.chabad.org/calendar/view/day.asp?tdate=1/3/2017 Venue to be announced.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9:00 am Shacharis

Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm 
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE
Info:  
chanielevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ANNUAL DINNER SUN FEB 12th honoring Dr Vernon and Lis Neppe
At Hillel, with Catering by Leah. More info to follow. 
www.CSTLSeattle.org

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com. Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

PJ Library Neighborhood Song & Story: Ravenna Fri, December 30, 11:15am – 11:45am
Ravenna Third Place, 6504 20th Ave NE, Neighborhood Song & Story times are fun, free gatherings where kids and parents enjoy signing, activities and storytelling from the PJ Library’s wonderful Jewish-themed children’s books. Always open to all and available weekdays near you, Neighborhood Song & Story is a great way to connect with Jewish life.

CHABAD HOUSE/JPSI CHANUKAH PARTY – 6 PM SAT DEC 31st 
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE.  
www.ChabadHouseMinyan.org

JCC Free Week of Family/Gym Membership Jan 1st -8th 
Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island. Everyone welcome! Be part of a vibrant community hub for all your fitness, arts and social needs. Start with a FREE one-week trial pass, includes steam room and sauna. Contact: Dayla Wills, 
dalyaw@sjcc.org  

HEY TEVES BOOK  SALES
store.kehotonline.com
www.greenfieldjudaica.com 
www.judaica-world.com
www.eichlers.com

BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT Jan 31st Mar 28th May 23rd Jul 18th Aug 22nd and Dec 5th
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  Email 
Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Seattle Kollel New Year's Learning Mon Jan 2nd 
9:45 am: Bagels & Coffee; 10:00-11:30 am, learning with Rabbi Akiva O'Connor; 10:45 am, learning with Rabbi Bentzie Brand

Jewish Family Service Kosher Food Bank Wed Jan 4th 5-6:30pm. 
Please tell interested community members to RSVP to Esther Magasis at emagasis@jfsseattle.org if they plan on attending. For full details, see our event page or for more info: (206) 861-3146 or 
familylife@jfsseattle.org

Kollel - Trip To Israel for Women ages 45 - 60 -  Feb 26 - March 7
“Jewish Women Inspired – Renew your Wows!”. This trip is geared for all women 45ish – 60ish and for JWRP alumni who want to return to reignite the spark. Join a group of vibrant Jewish women for a fun filled action-packed journey of self- rediscovery & exploration. ABSORB the Beauty of Tiberias  - CRUISE the Kinneret  - TOUR the Mystical City of Tsfat  - TRAVEL to Tel Aviv - Free time for sightseeing and shopping  - WANDER the Historical Alleys of Jerusalem’s Old City -  PARTICIPATE in the Western Wall Experience  - CONNECT to your Ancestry at Rachel’s Tomb -  LED BY Scholar in Residence, Mimi David, experienced Israel tour leader  - MEET and learn from Renowned Jewish Speakers/Fascinating Authors. Land costs - $2400. For more information and to register contact Rooksie David and visit goinspire.com/jewish-women-journey 206-790-1475 / 
rooksiedavid@aol.com

PACO DIEZ CONCERT JAN 29th 7 PM
Seattle Sephardic Network and the Stroum Jewish Community Center are pleased to present  an evening of beautiful Sephardic-inspired music performed by Paco Díez, one of the most widely recognized and important interpreters of Judeo-Spanish music and Sephardic ballads.. At the Stroum Jewish Community Center 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island, Wash. Tickets online for $10 to $15, including discounts for seniors and students, 
www.SeattleSephardicNetwork.org .  For more information, contact Doreen C. Alhadeff at Seattlesephardicnetwork@gmail.com or 206.604.7575.

Jewish Day School Annual Auction & Gala Sun Mar 19th 
Honoring Judy & Jeff Greenstein. Register at: 
www.jds.org

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR MIKETZ
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553793/jewish/After-School-Hours.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The main activity on Chanukah is kindling the Chanukah lights. It is the first thing done publicly, in the synagogue, and precedes the reciting of Hallel (said the next day). Although the blessing on this mitzvah is made before the actual kindling, a blessing is but the preparation to the mitzvah, and is therefore considered part of it. Witness to this is the fact that while the ‘kavanah’ (understanding of and meditation in the mitzvah) of a mitzvah need net be at the time the actual mitzvah is performed, the blessing may be said only immediately prior to the actual performance. Hence, the first activity of Chanukah is the actual kindling of the Chanukah lights.

There is an obvious lesson to be take from this. It is customary, when kindling the Chanukah lights, to use a menorah, an eight-branched candelabrum. Even on the first night, when only one light is kindled, the eight-branched menorah is still used (with the other seven branches left unlit). The reason for this is that when we kindle one light on the first night, in the best way possible, we know then that we cannot stay content with this, but immediately tomorrow we must “ascend in sanctity” and kindle an additional light. This is shown by the presence of the other seven branches on the menorah even when kindling just the first light on the first night. Their presence indicates now, that in the following day, we will kindle yet more lights.

There is instruction in this for a person’s service to G‑d. At the start of one’s service, one cannot do everything required to reach perfection. Simultaneously however, a person must know, even at the start of his service, that there are more things to follow, and that he must continually increase in his service and “ascend in sanctity.” This is the lesson derived from the menorah.

The above applies to a person’s personal service. The essence of the Chanukah lights is the illumination of the darkness of exile, thereby meriting the redemption. It is precisely through the descent into exile that we gain the greatness of the redemption — similar to the concept of the superiority of light which comes specifically from prior darkness.

In addition to one’s personal service, one must also help others, that they may illuminate their souls with the “mitzvah which is a lamp and Torah which is light.” It is explained in Likkutei Torah (Parshas Beha’alosacho) that the menorah (in the Bais Hamikdosh, which had 7 lights) corresponds to the concept of Yisroel. The seven lights of the menorah symbolize the seven general levels in service to G‑d. On Shabbos Chanukah we read about the “menorah made completely of gold.” Of the menorah, Scripture (Bamidbar 8:14) states that: “The menorah was made of a single piece of beaten gold; everything from its base to its blossom consisted of a single piece of beaten gold.” The ‘base’ symbolizes those Jewish souls which are on a lower level, and the ‘flower’ corresponds to those Jewish souls on a more lofty level. Nevertheless, despite such differences, all Jewish souls are on the level of a “menorah made completely of gold” — for everything, from its base to its blossom consisted of a single piece of beaten gold.”

This then is the general concept of kindling the menorah — to kindle and illuminate a Jewish soul with the “mitzvah which is a candle and Torah which is light.” Every Jew is a light. Only some have not yet been kindled. Hence a Jew has the responsibility to ensure that every Jew’s soul is kindled with the “mitzvah which is a candle and Torah which is light.”

The way to do so is indicated by the lesson enumerated before. First one kindles one light — one endeavors to illuminate one category of Jew. Then he adds another light — another category, and so on until all categories, all Jews, are illuminated by Torah and mitzvos. One’s duty is to kindle all the seven lights, so that “the seven lights shall shine towards the center of the menorah.” But, as before, even while beginning with one category, a Jew must simultaneously know that there is further work to be done, that his task is to illuminate all seven categories of Jewish souls.

The fact that all Jewish souls are referred to as “a menorah made completely of gold” indicates that even before a Jewish soul is illuminated with Torah and mitzvos it is intrinsically a pure gold menorah. The Rambam states that the true desire of every Jew is “to perform all the mitzvos and to desist from sin.” Even when he sins it is only because his Yetzer (Evil Inclination) has overpowered him, and when the Yetzer is eliminated, his true desire to fulfill G‑d’s will is revealed.

There are different levels in the work of illuminating a Jew’s soul. There are some Jews whose light is not lit at all, and one’s task is to kindle their light. Then there are those who, while their lights are already kindled, burn feebly. One’s task is then to ensure that their lights burn brightly and illuminate even more strongly.

For example: There are Jews who while otherwise observant of Torah and mitzvos, do not learn Chassidus, the esoteric part of Torah. Such people claim that they are only following in the footsteps of their ancestors who never learned Chassidus. Yet they do things which their grandparents never dreamed of doing! Why is it only in these things that people piously claim to follow their ancestors?

Likewise with putting on Rabbeinu Tam tefillin. The Shulchan Aruch states that a G‑d-fearing person should put on two pairs of tefillin — Rashi and RabbeinuTam. In other things, such people demand recognition and honor for their piety and G‑d-fearing behavior. Why in this case do they adopt a mantle of modesty and disclaim any pretense to being a ‘G‑d-fearing’ person?

Such people must be influenced to have their ‘light’ strengthened and to start learning Chassidus and putting on Rabbeinu Tam tefillin.

Through our service in kindling the lights of Jewish souls, illuminating them so that “all children of Yisroel have light in their dwelling places,” we merit the true and eternal light of our righteous Moshiach in the future redemption.

*

2. The general concept of the Chanukah (and Shabbos) lights is associated with Torah study. Our Sages said (Shabbos 23b) “One who accustoms himself [to keep the mitzvah of] the lights will have sons who are Torah sages.” Rashi explains that “since it is written ‘a mitzvah is a candle and Torah is light,’ then through the mitzvah of the Shabbos and Chanukah lights the light of Torah comes.” In other words, the Shabbos and Chanukah lights correspond to the candlestick, oil, and wick, through which the actual light of Torah illuminates.

We see further the connection between the Chanukah lights and Torah study from the Greeks’ decree which was to “make them (Jews) to forget Your Torah,” and as an outcome of this, also to “violate the decrees of Your will (mitzvos).”1 . Moreover, Chanukah is the miracle of the oil, and “oil” symbolizes the level of Chochmah (Knowledge), which is the idea of Torah study.2

The connection between Chanukah and Torah study explains the custom of the Rashab who, after the kindling of the Chanukah lights, would study Torah near the lights [not using their actual light of course, since this is forbidden]. Hence, the lesson from all the above is that during Chanukah we must increase in our Torah study.

Now is also the appropriate place to once again urge everyone to involve themselves in uniting all Jews through participation in one of the Sefer Torahs being written for this purpose. When a Jew purchases a letter in a Sefer Torah, he thereby unites with hundreds of thousands of Jews in an eternal bond. Although there are several Sefer Torahs, they are really united as one, and thus through purchasing a letter in one of the Sefer Torahs he unites with all Jews. Not only does a

Jew thus unite with all contemporary Jewry, but also with all Jews of all generations, until the generation of Moshe Rabbeinu.

Through Torah, Jews and G‑d become one, in a three-fold bond — Yisroel, Torah, and G‑d. This is the connection to this Shabbos which also comprises three things — Shabbos Parshas Mikeitz, Shabbos Chanukah, and Shabbos Rosh Chodesh. We read from three Sefer Torahs on this Shabbos; and moreover, these three become one (as evidenced by the fact there is only oneHaftorah).

The greatness and necessity of uniting all Jews through the Sefer Torah has never been so urgent as today, when the world situation is in a terrifying decline. We must do our utmost to bring stability to the world, and the first thing to be done is derived from the Mishnah, which states that “the world stands on three things: on the Torah, on prayer, and on deeds of loving kindness.” The main thing is Torah, for, besides being one of the three pillars of the world, through it we know how to conduct ourselves in the other two pillars. Through participation in the writing of a Sefer Torah, the stability of the world is strengthened. This is in addition to the great benefits brought to Jews through this project, as the previous Rebbe said: “Every Jew has a letter in the Torah... This letter gives him strength to withstand all opposition to Torah study. Besides affording him protection, it is also the vehicle through which the blessings from Above in all good things reach him.”

Besides the Torah being one of the three pillars on which the world stands, it also has dominion over the world and can change the world. Through a Halachic rendition in Torah, the world can be changed. A story concerning the famous Ragatchover Gaon illustrates this. His grandson once showed him accounts showing how much tax was owed to the (Russian) government. The total amount was the sum of several different taxes. The Rogatchover, after perusing these accounts, said that a part of the taxes must be paid because such a tax has a place in Torah (and therefore the dictum that “the law of the land is law” applies). However, the other tax need not be paid because it has no place in Torah. Afterwards, notification was received from the government that there was a mistake in the accounts, and only part of the taxes need be paid — precisely that part which the Rogatchover said had a place in Torah!

The lesson from this is that through Torah one can change the world. This applies even to an individual Jew, and even with things that are not life and death matters. For, since it as a Jew’s money, a Halachic decision changes the actual world — even under the Communistic regime which opposed Torah.

Indeed, although in exile, a Jew is still a free man. “The seal of G‑d is truth,” and ever since the exodus from Egypt, G‑d has said of the Jews that “they are My servants.” Since Jews are servants of the King of kings, and “the servant of a king is (like) a king,” it is impossible that Jews should be in servitude (to others). Instead, each and every Jew is a free man, which status is achieved through Torah study — “The only free man is he who engages in Torah study.”

Since the truth is that Jews are free men, they cannot endure the falsehood of exile, but desire that the truth be revealed to the whole world — that “G‑d is One and His Name One.” This is similar to the dictum of the Rebbe Rashab, that a Jew’s soul never went into exile, only his body. Since the body is subservient to the soul, the body is also on a level above exile.

May it be G‑d’s will that all Jews be speedily united in the Sefer Torahs being written for this purpose. Then all Jews, together with the Sefer Torahs, will go to greet our righteous Moshiach, when “I will convert the peoples to a pure language... to serve Him together.” Then we will go together with Moshiach to the Holy Land, the land “which the eyes of the L‑rd your G‑d are upon it from the beginning of the year until the end of the year,” to the holy city of Yerushalayim, where we shall merit to see the kindling of the menorah by “Your holy Kohanim” in the third Bais Hamikdosh.

*

3. Regarding the particular events that will occur in the times of Moshiach, the Rambam writes that “all these and similar things, a person does not know how they will occur until they occur; for these things are concealed in the Prophets...”

On the other hand, in this area there are things on which the Rambam does render a clear Halachic decision. This does not contradict that quoted above, for there are two types of matters in this area: Those which are unclear, “concealed in the Prophets,” and those which have been revealed clearly. For example, the prophecy “a wolf will dwell together with a lamb.” It is unclear whether this is to be taken literally or allegorically. Likewise, if Eliyahu Hanavi will come before the war of Gog and Magog, or before Moshiach’s coming. On both these things the Rambam writes that a “person does not know how they will occur until they occur..”

In regard to the beginning of the redemption however, the Rambam states the clear Halachic decision that the order will be thus: “A king from the house of David will arise... and force all Israel to go in it (the Torah way)... and will fight the wars of G‑d... and build the Mikdosh in its place (and then) gather together the dispersed of Israel.” Then the beginning of the redemption has started — and immediately will be the true and complete redemption.

In the Talmud Sanhedrin (and also Sotah) there is a complete passage dealing with the coming of Moshiach. This too contains some clear statements, and some not explained at all. Besides the Oral Law, the subject of the redemption is also found in the Written Torah. The main place is in Daniel, which brings many “dates” fur the coming of Moshiach. All those who throughout the generations predicted times for Moshiach’s coming based their calculations on Daniel.

At the end of Daniel it states (12:1): “At that time Michael will stand up, the great prince (i.e. chief angel) who stands for the children of your people; and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation till that time; and at that time your people shall be saved, everyone who is found written in the book.”

In other words: Although it will be a “time of trouble such as never was,” Jews need not fear, for “The Guardian of Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps” and “my help is from the L‑rd, Maker of heaven and earth.” Especially since “Michael, the great prince who stands for the children of your people” will be present to plead for the Jewish people.

Nevertheless, the verse continues “at that time shall be saved, everyone who is found written in the book.” The simple interpretation of “the book” is the book of G‑d, the Sefer Torah. Hence, the above phrase refers to all those who have a letter in the Sefer Torah! This lends weight to the urgency of ensuring that each and every Jew purchase a letter in one of the Sifrei Torah — thus ensuring that they are included among those “who is found written in the book” — and therefore “shall be saved.”

R. Saadaya Gaon writes on this verse that: “‘everyone who is found written in the book’ – these are the tzaddikim (righteous people), as it is written: ‘And He wrote in the book of remembrance before Him.’“ Since “all Your people are righteous,” the phrase “all those who are found written in the book” — righteous people, refers to all Jews. But to reveal and effect anew the concept of “written in the book,” every Jew should purchase a letter in the Sefer Torah. For, as explained above, ‘the book’ in its simple meaning refers to the Sefer Torah.

This emphasizes the great importance of having every Jew purchase a letter in a Sefer Torah, and hence the importance of publicizing the above verse to all. May it be G‑d’s will that efforts in this direction be increased many-fold, until all Jews have a letter, and thus “your people will be saved, all those who are found written in the book.” Although there is more than one Sefer Torah, they are all united, and all Jews are thus written in “the book.” Through our efforts and service during the exile (particularly in this area), we merit to have the true and complete redemption through our righteous Moshiach, with kindness and mercy, speedily in our times.

4. In parshas Mikeitz we learn of the famine that was prevalent in all lands, and Yosef’s position as viceroy of Egypt, in charge of all foodstuffs (stored from the ‘seven years of plenty’ that preceded these ‘seven years of famine’). Ch. 41 verse 56 states: “The famine was over all the earth; and Yosef opened all the storehouses and he sold (“vayishbor”) to Egypt.” On the words “And he sold” Rashi comments: “the word ‘shever’ [the root of the word ‘vayishbor’] denotes ‘selling’ and denotes ‘buying.’ Here [in this particular verse] it is used in the sense of ‘selling;’ but in the passage (43:2) ‘Buy (‘shivru’) us a little food, it [the word ‘shivru’] denotes buying. And do not say that it is used only in reference to grain, for regarding milk and wine we find (Yeshayah 55:1) ‘Come, buy (‘shivru’) without money and without price, wine and milk.’“

There are several perplexing points in this Rashi. Rashi, in bringing proofs or passages as examples of similar usage, usually quotes those nearest to the verse under discussion. In this case, Rashi quotes a verse from Ch. 43:2 (“Buy (‘shivru’) us a little food”), when in the verse immediately following ours (i.e. Ch. 41 verse 57) we find an example of a word with the root ‘shever.’ It states “All the earth came to Yosef to buy (‘lishbor’).” We see from this verse that ‘shever’ means to buy. Why then does Rashi quote from a verse several chapters later?

Some commentaries explain that Rashi prefers to quote from the later chapter because it states “buy (‘shivru’) us a little food.” Rashi on our verse explains that the word ‘shever’ is used not only in connection to grain, but also to other foods. Hence he quotes from the verse in Ch. 43 which states “buy us a little food,” and not “a little corn” [as in Ch. 42, verse 3], for Ya’akov’s instructions to his sons were to buy any type of food, not necessarily grain.

However, questions still remain. If Rashi’s intention in quoting from this verse specifically was because it uses the word ‘shever’ in connection to food, there are other verses which do so which precede this verse. In Ch. 42 it states (verse 7) “to buy (‘lishbor’) food”, and (verse 10) “your servants have come to buy (‘lishbor’) food.” Why then quote a verse from Ch. 43?

Indeed, why is it necessary at all to have a quote including the word ‘food’ specifically? Surely from the context of the entire passage of our verse it is self-understood that it is referring to ‘food.’ At the beginning of the passage it states (41:48): “He gathered all the food... and stored the food in the cities, the food of the field... he stored in the city.” Hence, when in our verse it states “Yosef opened up the storehouses and he sold to Egypt” it is obvious that it is referring to the food stored in the cities (quoted above). Why then is it necessary for Rashi to quote a verse which uses the word ‘shever’ in association with ‘food’?

Also puzzling is the continuation of Rashi that “Do not say that it is used only in reference to grain, for regarding milk and wine we find ‘Come, buy without money and without price, wine and milk. ‘“ What difference does it make to our verse that the word ‘shever’ applies also to wine and milk?

Moreover, nowhere in these verses do we find the word ‘shever’ used in connection with ‘grain.’ We find ‘bread’ and ‘food,’ but not ‘grain.’ Why then does Rashi say “Do not say it is used only in reference to grain”?

The explanation of all the above: Rashi’s commentary is directed to the student who has learned Scripture until this verse. When such a student learning our verse reaches the word “vayishbor,’ he tries to remember if he has come across a similar word earlier in his studies. In Ch. 19, verse 9 it states: “They drew near to break (‘lishbor’) the door.” Naturally, a student will then think that in our case, the word ‘vayishbor’ in our verse means Yosef “broke the famine in Egypt.”

A similar usage of this is found in Psalms (104:11): “the wild animals quench (‘yishboru’) their thirst,” meaning they break or quench their thirst. Obviously, in such a case it cannot mean to buy or sell. Why then does Rashi interpret ‘Vayishbor’ in our verse to mean ‘buying’ or ‘selling’ and not the breaking of the famine?

But Rashi cannot do so, “for regarding wine and milk we find ‘Come, buy (‘shivru’) without money and without price wine and milk.’“ In this verse, the word ‘shivru’ cannot mean to break (one’s thirst), for one quenches one’s thirst with water, and not with wine or milk. It must mean to ‘buy,’ and hence Rashi concludes that in our verse it also means to buy. Therefore Rashi says “The word ‘shever’ denotes ‘selling’ and denotes ‘buying.’

However, all is not clear. Why does Rashi interpret ‘shever’ to mean ‘buying’ and ‘selling,’ — when he could have interpreted it to mean ‘do business.’ This includes both buying and selling, and our verse would then read “Yosef did business with Egypt” (selling grain). The advantage in interpreted it thus and not as ‘buying’ and ‘selling’ is that ‘business’ is a general term embracing both these concepts; whereas to interpret one word to mean two contradictory meanings — ‘buying’ and ‘selling’ — is more difficult.

To prove that ‘shever’ cannot mean ‘do business,’ Rashi specifically quotes the verse from Ch. 43 and not any preceding verses. That verse states “Buy (‘shivru’) us a little food.” Ya’akov’s command to acquire “a little food” eliminates any possibility that ‘shivru’ here can mean ‘do business.’ When one does business, one endeavors to do as much as possible. Hence, it must mean to buy — Ya’akov told his sons to go to Egypt to buy (not ‘do business’) a little food, since all their food had been eaten. He asked them not to stay long in Egypt (a prerequisite of doing business) but to hurry back to him. Hence Rashi quotes this verse specifically as a proof that ‘shever’ does not mean to ‘do business.’

But a question still remains. Since the famine affected everything, where did they get things (besides grain) during the famine. To answer this question, Rashi explains that “regarding wine and milk we find ‘Come, buy...” That is, they could also have bought wine, milk etc. Nevertheless, Scripture itself mentions only grain (and not other foods), for grain, from which bread is made, is the main staple of a person’s diet.

This is the reason why Rashi says the word ‘grain’ and not ‘food’ or ‘bread.’ For had he used the word ‘food’ it could mean all types of produce, and the only type of food mentioned specifically in Scripture is grain. Hence the use of the word ‘grain’ by Rashi.

Shabbos Vayeshev – Chanukah Shabbos Mevarchim | Tevet 23 Kislev – 1 Tevet 5777

EREV SHABBOS FRI Dec 23rd  
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:04 pm

SHABBOS SAT Dec 24th  /EREV CHANUKAH
Tehilim for Mevarchim Teves – 7:30 am
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 10:03 am/SPECIAL GALA KIDDUSH /
Mincha/ 3:50 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:08 pm /FOLLOWED BY CANDLE ONE of CHANUKAH!

Kiddush and Seuda Slishit
Rabbi and Mrs. Sholom Ber and Chanie Levitin and family will host a full sit-down Kiddish meal, marking the conclusion of Shloshim since the passing of Rabbi Levitin's sister Sara Tema bas Horav Binyomin Halevi Z”TL. A special presentation by Rabbi Levitin marking the conclusion of Mishnayos Masechet Kiddushin and words of reflection will be shared. The whole community is invited to this event, which will take place after Shacharis. CHULENT BY MENDIE.  Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday & CHANUKAH Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am with HALLEL
Mon- Thu  Shacharis 7 am with HALLEL
Fri Shacharis 7 AM /Note – not early due to late sunrise/ROSH CHODESH
Sun-Thu  Mincha 4:15 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 5:01 pm

BAGELS & TORAH WITH RABBI SB LEVITIN MON DEC 26th FOLLOWING 7 AM SHACHARIS

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV & SHALOM ZACHOR
Mazel Tov to Uri and Avigail London on the birth of their new son. May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupah, and Maasim Tovim!  Shalom Zochar from 7:30 pm FRI DEC 23rd at 4347 NE 56th St (Jennie and Adam Minkus)

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CHANUKAH CHABAD EVENTS
NIGHTLY DEC 24th – 31st : SEATTLE CENTER MENORAH LIGHTING 
NIGHTLY DEC 24th – 31st : NORTHGATE MALL MENORAH LIGHTING 
SUN DEC 25th 5 PM QUEEN ANNE (Q.A. AVE @ CROCKETT) with RABBI SHNAI LEVITIN
MON DEC 26th 5:30 PM BAINBRIDGE (WINSLOW MALL) with RABBI EMLEN
TUE DEC 27th 6 PM U VILLAGE with RABBI SB LEVITIN
TUE DEC 27th 5 PM BERGEN PARK (5420 22nd NW, BALLARD) with RABBI YONI LEVITIN 
WED DEC 28th 4:30 PM WESTLAKE MALL with RABBI SB LEVITIN
WED DEC 28th 4 PM BALLARD SENIOR CENTER  (5433 LEARY NW, BALLARD) with RABBI YONI LEVITIN
THU DEC 29th 5 PM GREENLAKE (7900 E GREENLAKE WAY) with RABBI YONI LEVITIN
THU DEC 29th 5 PM CAL ANDERSON PARK (1635 11th Ave E) with RABBI LEVI LEVITAN

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

MAZEL TOV TO NEW CSTL BOARD
Thank you to all who participated in our shul elections last week. Mazel Tov to our 2017 Board members:  Rabbi SB Levitin, President  Ivan Rothman, Vice President Rabbi Kavka, Treasurer  Meir Zwanziger, Gabbai Shaini Jacob Glick, Gabbai Rishon Yussi Greenberg, President Emeritus Mike Weichbrodt, Secretary Yussi Greenberg, Security Chair Adam Minkus, Education Chair Vernon Neppe, At Large Velvil Rosler, At Large Yechezkel Rapoport, and At Large Gary Stute.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm 
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  
chanielevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ANNUAL DINNER SUN FEB 12th honoring Dr Vernon and Lis Neppe
At Hillel, with Catering by Leah.  More info to follow. 
www.CSTLSeattle.org

THANK YOU TO NEW CSTL VOLUNTEERS
Sarah Dershowitz   is the new gabbai kiddush.  If you would like to sponsor kiddush please contact her at 
sgdersho@gmail.comEliana Kelso  is now distributing fund for tzedakah collected at shul in our "pushkes" at shul.  Moshe Kress is now recording aliyah pledges made on Shabbat.  Please say "thanks for helping" and wish them well when you see them!

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

KOLLEL Chanukah Learning Dec. 26 10:00 - 11:30 am
Leaning and Inspiration with Rabbi David and Rabbi Mollot at the Seattle Kollel

Winter Break Camp SEED Dec. 26 – 30
Boys Camp: Monday-Thursday 8:30-3:30, davening starting at 8:30.  Friday 8:30-1:00. 
Girls Camp: Monday-Thursday 9:00-3:30, and Friday 9:00-1:00
Camp SEED will be running from December 26th through December 30th (M,T,W,Th,and F); the cost is $150 for the full week or $35 per day (scholarships are available). Ages 2nd Grade and up, located at the Seattle Kollel Building. Please sign up at http://www.seattlekollel.com/winter-camp-seed and give your child an incredible, fun winter break! Now your kids will have something to do :)Rabbi Steinfeld  - 206-769-5275

Kollel on Ice Dec. 26 1:00-2:30 PM   
Skate, Schmooze and Enjoy Light Refreshments and Drinks at Highland Ice Arena ,18005 Aurora Ave. N., Shoreline 98133. Bring your family and friends for some ice excitement! All Ages Welcome! $10/Adult   |   $7Child RSVP: 206-722-8289 or 
theseattlkollel@gmail.com. **Adults-- Don't miss Learning at the Seattle Kollel 10am-11:30 am

UPCOMING BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  This year's dates are: January 31st, March 28th, May 23rd, July 18th, August 22nd - affordable al fresco roof terrace party "happy hour" with buffet appetizers and a cash bar, and December 5th.  Email Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Kollel - Trip To Israel for Women ages 45 - 60 -  Feb 26 - March 7
“Jewish Women Inspired – Renew your Wows!”. This trip is geared for all women 45ish – 60ish and for JWRP alumni who want to return to reignite the spark. Join a group of vibrant Jewish women for a fun filled action-packed journey of self- rediscovery & exploration. ABSORB the Beauty of Tiberias  - CRUISE the Kinneret  - TOUR the Mystical City of Tsfat  - TRAVEL to Tel Aviv - Free time for sightseeing and shopping  - WANDER the Historical Alleys of Jerusalem’s Old City -  PARTICIPATE in the Western Wall Experience  - CONNECT to your Ancestry at Rachel’s Tomb -  LED BY Scholar in Residence, Mimi David, experienced Israel tour leader  - MEET and learn from Renowned Jewish Speakers/Fascinating Authors. Land costs - $2400. For more information and to register contact Rooksie David and visit goinspire.com/jewish-women-journey 206-790-1475 / 
rooksiedavid@aol.com

PACO DIEZ CONCERT JAN 29th 7 PM
Seattle Sephardic Network and the Stroum Jewish Community Center are pleased to present  an evening of beautiful Sephardic-inspired music performed by Paco Díez, one of the most widely recognized and important interpreters of Judeo-Spanish music and Sephardic ballads.. At the Stroum Jewish Community Center 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island, Wash. Tickets online for $10 to $15, including discounts for seniors and students, 
www.SeattleSephardicNetwork.com .  For more information, contact Doreen C. Alhadeff at Seattlesephardicnetwork@gmail.com or 206.604.7575.

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

Mercaz Chanukah Party Sun, Dec 25TH 4pm - 8pm
6011A 37th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115. 

CHABAD HOUSE/JPSI CHANUKAH PARTY – 6 PM SAT DEC 31st 
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE.  
www.ChabadHouseMinyan.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

BCMH Chanukah Dinner featuring Chinese Cuisine Sun Dec 25th 5:00 pm
At BCMH. Reservations at: www.bcmhseattle.org

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR VAYESHEV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553793/jewish/After-School-Hours.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

A child is vulnerable to many influences, in the street and home as well as the school. But while the school environment can be controlled, that outside is not so easily regulated. To ensure that children use their time outside school as productively as possible, programs should be arranged for outside school hours.

They who turn many to righteousness [shall shine] like the stars forever and ever (Daniel 12:3)

These are the teachers of young children (Baba Basra 8b)

All your deeds should be for the sake of Heaven (Pirkei Avos 2:12)

Children are susceptible to all influences they encounter, long before they have developed the capacity to discern between right and wrong Those schools which are concerned not only with feeding their students information, but with providing moral training as well, endeavor to inculcate their charges with the morals and ethics necessary to become decent, productive people This development of a child as a complete person, teaching him that there is right and wrong, good and bad, is truly education.

Influence of the Environment

But a child’s mind is constantly working, probing, seeking and absorbing new information Everything a child sees or hears has some effect on him, however subtle or imperceptible And because they lack a developed set of values, children are susceptible and open to the influence of any experience, good or bad.

In short, the education of a child includes much more than the academic information he absorbs in school. Rather, each experience and encounter throughout the entire day teaches something, and true education encompasses twenty-four hours a day, every day.

While parents and educators can control the type of education children have in school, that received outside of school is not so easily regulated. A teacher’s authority extends only to school hours, and a child is in school for six to eight hours at the most. What happens during the rest of the day? What kind of influences is a child subject to when not in school? Good? Bad? Neutral? Is there such a thing as a neutral influence?

Adverse Influences of Home and Street

Outside of school, the two most influential environments are the home and the street Many parents truly try hard to make their homes compatible with the highest of moral standards But even then, there are subtle influences not easily controllable. Television, which is found in many homes, is just one small example. How many parents can honestly say their children watch only shows which are fitting for them? And we must recognize that, unfortunately, there are homes in which there is not even an attempt made to maintain standards.

But the problem is more subtle than just adverse influences that creep into homes. Even if there are no such influences, the lack of positive reinforcement of that learned in school is damaging. There is no such thing as a void in education. If it is not filled with positive experiences, it will be filled by other things.

And the street. Children cannot be kept in their homes all day. Many hours are spent outside, in the company of friends whose character it is not always possible to screen. In the actual streets, in stores, and in every and any place, a child is confronted by many varied experiences. The behavior of adults as well as other children which they observe may directly contradict that taught in school. The influence of peers can carry greater weight than the teacher’s word, and we cannot be sure that children are always accepting the correct attitudes.

The results can have far reaching consequences. First, there can be direct contradictions between that which a child learns in school and that learned outside Should the latter prove to have the stronger influence, who knows how that child will grow up? We certainly cannot be sure he will be a builder of society, rather than the opposite.

But that is a consequence in the future. There is a far more serious damage which occurs in the present, during childhood. The disparity between school and the outside world can be a bewildering experience which creates inner conflict. A child often finds himself pulled in two different directions, and the resultant turmoil within the mind and soul is far from healthy. Consciously or subconsciously, a young person is assailed by things and actions which bespeak the exact opposite of that taught in school. A tug of war is being waged, and the prize is the child’s soul.

Even if such outside influences are not contrary to anything learned in school, even if they are harmless, valuable time is still being wasted. Everyone agrees that schools are for the purpose of education, and if school hours are used for other pursuits, however harmless, valuable teaching time is being lost So too in after school hours Many hours are frittered away in useless activities, hours which could have been used constructively, to build further on the basis laid in school

Programs for After School Hours

What then should be done? As always, we turn to the Torah for instruction A wonderful passage in the Talmud gives us the key The Talmud (Baba Basra 8b) relates the following “The verse ‘they who turn many to righteousness [shall shine] like the stars forever and ever’ applies to the teachers of young children Such as who, for instance? Said Ray, to such as R Shmuel bar Shilas For Rav once found R Shmuel bar Shilas in a garden, whereupon he said to him, ‘Have you deserted your post?’ He replied, ‘I have not seen this garden for thirteen years [for he was busy teaching children], and even now, my thoughts are with the children ‘ “

What does this passage from the Talmud teach us? When R Shmuel bar Shilas said that “even now, my thoughts are with the children,” he did not mean he was only thinking of them, for that would be of no help to the children. It means that before he left, he arranged that his students would act in the proper manner when he was away — Just as if he had still been with them.

This is the answer It is the responsibility of the school to worry about its students’ welfare even after school hours — “Even now, my thoughts are with the children.” A school worthy of its name, one dedicated to true education, will ensure that its students use their time outside school as productively as possible. Rather than leave them open to other, possibly damaging influences, the school will seek to extend the education given at school to the student’s experiences after school.

Education does not stop at the school gates It is not abusiness, run on a time-clock It is a vocation, a sacred calling, the molding of future generations. In practical terms, schools must arrange programs for their students after school hours.

This does not necessarily mean extra hours of study. Rather, activities which are enjoyable, while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts learned at school. It does not really matter which activities are chosen, as long as they are wholesome, good for the soul as well as the body.

The goal is to ensure that every moment of a child’s life is occupied with positive actions. As part of this program, besides the activities arranged by the school, students should be encouraged to do individual good deeds every day. A suitable inducement would be to arrange contests in these things, awarding prizes to those who excel.

Guided by such a program, children will learn that there should be no distinction between their actions during school and after school studies are not just abstract matters, divorced from the realities of life. No such distinction can be made. Every moment of a child’s life prepares him or her for future adult life, and no dichotomy can be established between the two. It is all one.

Raison d’être of Tzivos Hashem

If the above applies to all children, including non-Jews, it certainly applies to Jewish children, members of Tzivos Hashem — G‑d’s Army. Every Jew from the moment he is born is a soldier in G‑d’s Army, and Jewish children must receive the education commensurate with this status. A soldier is a soldier all the time, as much in the barracks as at the battle front, while eating as while fighting. At all times he is aware that he is in the army, and at all times he must behave as a soldier. A Jewish child is a member of G‑d’s Army not only while in the synagogue or in school, but at home or at play

Thus, special programs for after school hours must be arranged for Jewish children. Though they may be receiving the best Jewish education at school, it is not enough. Influences of the street and other places affect them also, and they too are susceptible to the inner contradictions between that taught in school and that learned elsewhere.

In short, they must be given a truly Jewish education all the time, not just in school. The difference is that in school the education consists mainly of Torah study, whereas after school, the education is mainly in applying what they have studied — how to play Jewishly, to eat Jewishly, even to sleep Jewishly In the words of our Sages “All your deeds should be for the sake of Heaven.” A Jewish child must not think that when he prays he is a Jew, but when he plays he has no identity In play as well as prayer, in eating as well as learning Torah, a Jew is serving G‑d. “In all your ways you shall know Him” — this is the truly Jewish way

Adapted from an address given on 19th of Kislev, 5742

Shabbos Vayishlach – YUD TES KISLEV | 16-23 Kislev 5777

EREV SHABBOS FRI Dec 16th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:00 pm

SHABBOS SAT Dec 17th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:59 am/SPECIAL KIDDUSH FOR 19 KISLEV/
Mincha/ 3:45 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:04 pm

Kiddush and Seuda Slishit
Kiddush this week is a special deluxe kiddush with bread for washing, in honor of Yud Tes Kislev, the "New Year of Chassidism" Rabbi and Mrs Sholom-Ber Levitin and Chabad of the Pacific Northwest are our sponsors.  They had help from co-sponsors Kevin Britt and Elisabeth Rosenthal.  Contributors to kiddush include Drs Shimon Dershowitz and Susan Hankin, Adam and Jenny Minkus, and Goldie Rosencrantz. CHULENT BY MENDIE. 
Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am
Sun-Thu  Mincha 4:00 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 4:53 pm

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD TES KISLEV Sat Dec 17th 7 PM
With renowned Sefad Rabbi Avi Spiegal. At the Eastside Torah Center
www.ChabadBellevue.org .  Featuring a Fish/Quiche Dinner Buffet ($15/person).

FARBRENGEN ALERT at Ashreichem Yisrael Sun Dec 18th 9:30 am
In honor of the 19th of Kislev with Rabbi Sholom Ber Levitin. Men & Women of the community are invited. 
www.ashreichemyisrael.com

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD TES KISLEV Mon Dec 19th 8 PM
Join community Rabbis in Chassidic song, words of Torah, inspiration Delicious Meal, Farbrengen, and L'chaim,  at:Chabad Jewish Russian Center, 1114 NE Perkins Way, Shoreline, WA  
www.SeattleRussianJews.org  Additional parking is available two blocks west on Perkins Way at Shoreline Cooperative Preschool 816 NE 190th St, Shoreline, WA

AVOS U BONIM AT CSTL Motzei Shabbos (Sat. Night) Dec 17th 6:30-7:30 PM
Let us all join together to strengthen our community in the spirit of Torah learning. Learning Program will be for 1 hour. Each Session will conclude with a children's prize raffle a 'Living Torah' Video featured on the big screen. Thank you Rabbi Estrin for providing this each week! Learning material will be provided in Hebrew or English. Please feel free to bring your own.  ~This Program was instituted in loving memory of Brandon Gribin - Rephael Chaim Ben Shmuel~ Thank you to the premier sponsors: Rabbi Avrami and Chavi Gitler. To sponsor Avos U'Banim contact Rabbi Herbstman, 
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

CSTL Annual Meeting & Elections  Sun Dec 18th at 7 PM
Coffee and Refreshments for the Elections. All Members that are current on their dues are encouraged to attend. For info contact Mike.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Pure Food for Healthy Living Sun, Dec 18th 7:30 pm
An exciting social event for women and girls. This is the first in a series of social/educational/fundraising events by and for the women of the community to benefit the North Seattle Mikvah. Admission $18. You don’t have to be from the North End to join!  The Inspiring and Funny Health Instructor and Coach, ABBY LODMER of "Humor Healing Humanity", will be educating and entertaining us with her Raw Food Workshop and Tasting. This will be loads of fun and very healthy! Info: Rachel Rosenfeld 
rachelirosenfeld@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm 
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  
chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIP – Price Increase
The CSTL Board has decided that it is necessary to increase the price for full Kiddush sponsorship to $350, and the price for co-sponsorship to $175.  Contact Mike for more info. 

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,
hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.
Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $1750, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

Mercaz Melava Malka Sat Dec 17th after Shabbos
6011A 37th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115.  S

CHABAD HOUSE/JPSI CHANUKAH PARTY – 6 PM SAT DEC 31st 
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE.  
www.ChabadHouseMinyan.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL AVOS U’BONIM – MOTZEI SHABBOS 6:30 – 7:30 PM
Children learning with their fathers.  Great food & prizes. 
www.SeattleKollel.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

EB LADIES BAKING Dec 19th 
As is the custom, there will be a wonderful lunch around noon for all volunteers and lots of fun and Lashon too. An ongoing thank you to Albie Amon who makes and serves delicious and nutritious lunches on baking days. Again - If you know some handy fellows (or gals) who can come to help with packing and boxing, please bring them along!  Of course, fellows are welcome to join in the baking too. The Ladies will have a bake sale February 26 -- Save the date!!! 

Meleva Malka for Women Saturday night, Dec 17th  7:45 pm
With Rebbitzen Aliza Tanenbaum at the Tanenbaum home, 4825 S Morgan Street,. Topic: "Preparing for Chanukah". Questions? Contact Julie Greene, BCMH Program Director: juliebcmhseattle2003@gmail.com

BCMH Chanukah Dinner featuring Chinese Cuisine Sun Dec 25th 5:00 pm
At BCMH. Reservations at: www.bcmhseattle.org

BCMH Sisterhood Gift Shop
Hannukah is coming soon! Stop by the gift shop for 20% off all Hannukah decorations, toys and games. We also have a large supply of solid olive oil kits and candles. Gift shop hours are 7:00 am - 4:30 pm, Monday - Friday.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Torah Day School Annual Dinner Sunday, Dec 18th  5:30 pm
At the Westin Seattle, honoring grandparents & grand-friends. 
www.tdsseattle.org/

Camp Yavneh 2017 June 26 - August 18, 2017. 
Registration now open! 
www.campyavnehseattle.com

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Mercaz Chanukah Party Sun, Dec 25th, 4pm - 8pm
6011A 37th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115. 

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR VAYISHLACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553791/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayishlach-16th-Day-of-Kislev-5742-1981.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1 “All the days (of the week) are blessed from the preceding Shabbos,” especially the first three days. This year, Yud-Tes Kislev (19th of Kislev — liberation of the Alter Rebbe from imprisonment) is on Tuesday, and hence this Shabbos is the day from which Yud-Tes Kislev is blessed. The quintessence of Yud-Tes Kislev is the propagation of Chassidus, as the Rebbe Rashab writes, that the efforts to spread Chassidus began mainly after Yud-Tes Kislev. Hence this Shabbos (which blesses Yud-Tes Kislev) is associated with the idea of disseminating Chassidus.

Furthermore, the Alter Rebbe was liberated on Tuesday, and this year Yud-Tes Kislev also falls out on Tuesday. On the third day of creation (Tuesday), it is said “it was good” twice — “good for heaven and good for creatures.” This once again emphasizes the connection between Yud-Tes Kislev and the dissemination of Chassidus. Chassidus is the concept of conduct above and beyond the strict letter of the law (corresponding to the idea of the third day having “it was good” doubled); and it is also the idea of working with and influencing ‘creatures’ — “your wellsprings (of Chassidus) shall spread forth to the outside.

The dissemination of Chassidus, the concept of Yud-Tes Kislev, has a special association with the Tanya (the magnum opus of the Alter Rebbe on Chassidus), referred to by the Lubavitcher Rebbeim as the “Written Law” of Chassidus. Just as Chassidus is for all Jews, so too the Tanya is written for everyone, both those whose service is in the category of “heaven” and those of the category of “creatures.” On the front page of the Tanya, the Alter Rebbe writes that the Tanya is “based on the Scriptural text ‘But the thing is very near to you, in your mouth and in your heart, that you may do it’ — to explain well how it is very near...” “The thing is very near to you” refers to the spiritual service of all Jews. Even to those whose service is in the category of “creatures,” of low spiritual standing, the ‘thing is still verynear.’ To those who service is more lofty (“heaven”), and consequently greater effort is demanded to rise yet higher, this extra effort is also ‘very near to you.’

The Tanya is not only the “Written Law’ of Chassidus Chabad, but of Chassidus in general; for Chassidus Chabad is Chassidus explained in a framework of comprehension and understanding. Furthermore, the Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Chassidus, only spoke Torah, and did not write it down. Those books which contain his teachings were written by his disciples. The Chassidus of the Baal Shem Tov was in the form of Oral Law, not the Written Law. The Alter Rebbe however, in addition to expressing his teachings orally, also wrote the Tanya himself. He wrote it with the utmost precision and meticulousness, and it took 20 years to complete. Hence the Tanya is the written book of Chassidus, and thus is the “Written Law” of both Chassidus Chabad and Chassidus in general.

Tanya, the “Written Law” of Chassidus, is similar to the “Written Law” of Torah in general (i.e. the five books of Moshe — the Pentateuch). Our Sages said that “there is nothing that is not alluded to in the Written Torah” — all concepts of Torah, even those things in existence before the Giving of the Torah, are included in the Written Law. The Torah existed even before Mattan Torah (Giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai), as for example, we find that Avraham studied Torah. The difference is that before Mattan Torah the concepts of Torah were in oral fashion, and at Mattan Torah they were given in written form.

Before Mattan Torah, there was a decree that the ‘upper’ (worlds) could not descend to the lower, and the Torah could not descend below in the form of deed — the Written Law; hence the Torah was only in oral form. When the decree was abolished (at Mattan Torah), Torah descended below in the form of deed — the Written Law. Although this was a descent for the Torah, its effect produced a greater elevation. For the Torah had to be drawn down from the loftiest spheres to be able to effect the joining of the lower to the upper.

So too with the “Written Law” of Chassidus. Before the Tanya, Chassidus in general existed in the mode of the Oral Law. Through the Alter Rebbe writing the Tanya, the teachings of Chassidus now existed in the mode of the Written Law. And just as everything, including that before Mattan Torah, is included in the Written Torah, similarly, the teachings of the Baal Shem Tov that existed beforehand (the Oral Law) are included in the Tanya. Although the revelation of Chassidus in written (and printed) form is a descent, it produced a greater loftiness than before — for there is a great advantage in learning from a book rather than orally; especially since its printing ensured that it would endure for all generations.

Before the Tanya was printed in its present form, it had been disseminated in the form of ‘pamphlets’ (kuntreisim). The Alter Rebbe writes in his introduction to the Tanya that the decision to publish these ‘kuntreisim’ in book form was because “the kuntreisim have been disseminated among all our faithful by means of numerous transcriptions by the hands of various scribes, (and) the multitude of transcriptions brought about an exceedingly great number of copyists’ errors.” Hence it was decided to publish them free of all errors and thoroughly checked.

If not for the copyists’ errors, the Tanya would have remained in its original form, as kuntreisim. The Alter Rebbe knew and approved of the wide dissemination of these kuntreisim, and if not for the errors, the Tanya would not have been printed. Thus we see that the ‘Written Law’ of Chassidus existed even before the printing of the Tanya in its present form.

Aside from the correction of the mistakes, the Tanya in its present form differs in other respects from the original kuntreisim. The Alter Rebbe, before giving it to be printed, checked and edited the kuntreisim, resulting is some changes from its original. This first edition of the Tanya (i.e. as written in the kuntreisim before being edited by the Alter Rebbe) is also the “Written Law” of Chassidus, and also holds an extremely lofty position. For if not for the problem of errors in transcription, the Tanya would have remained in its first original edition (in kuntreisim form, without editing). Furthermore, comparisons between the two different editions (original and present forms) provide valuable insights and understanding in learning the Tanya.

The printing of the original kuntreisim in book form is therefore a valuable project. This has now been accomplished with great effort, and has just now been finished before this Shabbos (and therefore before Yud-Tes Kislev). The Alter Rebbe greatly wanted that the Tanya (in its present edited form) be printed before Yud-Tes Kislev (the 19th), but for various reasons it was finished only on the twentieth. Hence we see the greatness of the completion of the project to print the Tanya in its original form before Yud-Tes Kislev, and even before the Shabbos on which Yud-Tes Kislev is blessed.

Besides this distinction of Yud-Tes Kislev of this year, this year it is on a Tuesday, similar to the original Yud-Tes Kislev. In addition, Lag B’Omer this year is also on a Tuesday. Lag B’Omer is the anniversary of the passing away of Rashbi (Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai). Rashbi is the author of the Zohar, which is the revelation of the esoteric. This is the connection to the Alter Rebbe and Yud-Tes Kislev, when Chassidus Chabad, the revelation of the esoteric in a framework of comprehension and understanding, began in earnest.

The project to print the Tanya in its original edition was started only a short while ago. Normally, it would have been impossible to finish it before Yud-Tes Kislev. But through the greatest of effort and dedication on the part of those working on this project, it was finished. And the finished product is handsome indeed, both in its content, and its external appearance (the actual printing, binding etc.). In the short time it took, this is verily something above human limits!

There is a lesson in this for one’s G‑dly service. The dissemination of Chassidus is the preparation to the future redemption. When Jews invest efforts in the dissemination of Chassidus (printing of the Tanya) in such a way, speedily and beyond normal limits, they have the right to demand that G‑d bring the redemption speedily, beyond normal limits!

May it be G‑d’s will that the true and complete redemption through our righteous Moshiach come speedily, when all of us, “with our youth and our elders, our sons and our daughters,” will go out from exile.

2. Tanya is relevant to all Jews, including the original edition, and also the differences between the original and the revised (present) edition. One of the differences is found in the Introduction to Tanya, also written by the Alter Rebbe. In its present form it states “Listen to me, you who pursue righteousness, who seek the L‑rd.” In the original edition it has only “Listen to me” without the continuation “you who pursue righteousness, who seek the L‑rd.” Another difference is in Ch. 1, which starts “It has been taught [Niddah, end of Ch. 3]: An oath is administered to him...” In the original version, the words ‘Niddah, end of Ch. 3’ are not enclosed in brackets. Yet another difference in Ch. 1 is the continuation of the above, which in the present (revised) version states “This requires to be understood, for it contradicts the Mishnaic dictum [Avos Ch. 2] ‘And be not wicked in your own estimation.’“ In the earlier version, the reference to Avos Ch. 2 is not brought.

The explanation of these differences is as follows. The words “You who pursue righteousness, who seek the L‑rd” (found only in the second edition), refer to the general fulfillment of mitzvos (“pursue righteousness”) and prayer and Torah study (“seek the L‑rd”). The earlier, first version of the Tanya reflects and corresponds to the first phase of a person’s service, that of simple acceptance of the yoke of heaven. Therefore it states simply “Listen to me” and leaves out “pursue righteousness and seek the L‑rd.” For in the simple acceptance of the yoke of Heaven (“Listen to me”) there is no division as yet into the three branches of service, whether fulfillment of mitzvos (“pursue righteousness”), Torah study or prayer (“seek the L‑rd”). It is a pure submission of will to G‑d.

The second, edited version of the Tanya reflects and corresponds to a loftier level of service (after the beginning service of the original version). Simple acceptance does not now suffice, but all three branches of service must now be emphasized, each in its own unique way. Hence, in the second version, it states “pursue righteousness and seek the L‑rd,” reflecting the three branches of Torah, prayer, and mitzvos.

This difference between the two editions of the Tanya (simple acceptance of the yoke of heaven and more advanced service) explains the differences found in the 1st chapter. In the beginning phase of service, simple submission of will, it is impossible to differentiate between a reference and the actual thoughts, to be able to say that the thoughts, which need to be comprehended and understood, are the main thing, while the reference is secondary. At the beginning of one’s service, exemplified by the first edition of the Tanya, no such differences can be made — the reference is part of the entire thing (not secondary). Hence the reference “Niddah, end of Ch. 3,” is not in brackets. But in the loftier service exemplified by the second edition of Tanya, where the service is not just that of simple acceptance but of comprehension and understanding, such differences between the actual thoughts (the main thing) and the reference (secondary) can and are made. Hence the reference is enclosed within brackets to show it is secondary.

Likewise with the reference to “Avos Ch. 2”. The reference to Avos indicates that it refers to something associated with Mili d’Chassidusa — words of piety [Pirkei Avos is not Halachah, juridical analyses, but moral teachings]. When one is at the beginning stage of service (the first edition of Tanya), there are no differences between a mitzvah, Halachah, or ‘words of piety.’ Everything is accepted with simple submission, and is fulfilled with self-sacrifice. Hence in the first edition the reference to ‘Avos Ch. 2’ is omitted.

In the loftier service exemplified by the second edition, one must recognize the difference between one thing and another — that there are differences between Torah and ‘words of piety.’ Hence the reference to ‘Avos Ch. 2’ is included.

Although the Tanya in general is associated with words of piety, there are differing degrees within it. As we see from the teachings of the Lubavitcher Rebbeim, who, while requiring involvement in all things (of Torah), laid different stresses on different things. Similarly, each of the Rebbeim emphasized a different thing. The Mitteler Rebbe for example, emphasized and required of his Chassidim that they talk of the highest concepts in Chassidus. The Alter Rebbe’s stress was laid on bringing back Jews to their religion. In our case, in Tanya itself, there are differing degrees, and those of ‘words of piety’ are different from others. The loftier service requires that these differences be recognized and understood — and hence included in the second edition of the Tanya.

* * *

3. Rashi is the commentator par excellence on Scripture, and if there is something unclear in Scripture, he will always comment on it. In this week’s parshah, Vayishlach, there is something that seems to be extremely puzzling and yet Rashi gives no explanation. In Bereishis Ch. 32, Scripture describes Ya’akov’s preparation to meet his brother Esav, and tells of Ya’akov ferrying his family over the Yabok river. It states (32:23): “He (Ya’akov) rose up in that night, and took his two wives, his two handmaids, and his eleven children, and passed over the ford of Yabok.”

Previously, in parshas Vayeitze (31:17), Rashi explained that Ya’akov, unlike Esav, set his sons before his wives — “He put the males before the females. Esav, however, put the females before the males, as it is stated, ‘And Esav took his wives and his sons’ etc.” Why then does Rashi not make some comment to explain why in this case he put the females before the males — “his two wives and his two handmaids and his eleven sons?”

The answer lies in the fact that this all happened during the night — “He rose up in that night.” Night is a time of danger, unsuitable for travel. Ya’akov however, since he had to flee, had no choice but to move his family during the night, and not wait until morning. Since night is a dangerous time, Ya’akov could not first take across his children, and leave them alone on the other side. First of all he had to take across his wives, adults; for then, when he would afterwards take across his children, they would not be alone, but would have their mothers ready and waiting for them. [See Sicha of Shabbos Parshas Vayeitze, 5742 pp 10-13 for further clarification.]

Vayetzei | TES/YUD KISLEV 9-16 Kislev 5777

EREV SHABBOS FRI Dec 9th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 3:59 pm

SHABBOS SAT Dec 10th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:54 am/
Mincha/ 3:45 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:00 pm

Kiddush and Seuda Slishit
Kiddush Lite – No sponsor.. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am
Sun-Thu  Mincha 4:00 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 4:53 pm

FARBRENGEN ALERT – TES/YUD KISLEV
Please join us for a farbrengen in honor of Tes/Yud Kislev, birthday, yahrzeit, and festival of Liberation of the Rebbe, Dov Ber of Lubavitch (1826), Kislev 9 is both the birthday and day of passing of Rabbi Dov Ber of Lubavitch, son of and successor to the founder of Chabad Chassidism, Rabbi Schneur Zalman·of Liadi. Rabbi Dov Ber was known for his unique style of "broadening rivers" -- his teachings were the intellectual rivers to his father's wellspring, lending breadth and depth to the principles set down by Rabbi Schneur Zalman. 
www.chabad.orgVENUE TO BE ANNOUNCED

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel tov to Rabbi Shnai & Chaya Levitin and the entire Levitin family on the birth of a baby boy! May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupah, and Maasim Yovim!

AVOS U BONIM AT CSTL Motzei Shabbos (Sat. Night) Dec 10th , 6:30-7:30 PM
Let us all join together to strengthen our community in the spirit of Torah learning. Learning Program will be for 1 hour.Each Session will conclude with a children's prize raffle a 'Living Torah' Video featured on the big screen. Thank you Rabbi Estrin for providing this each week! Learning material will be provided in Hebrew or English. Please feel free to bring your own.  ~This Program was instituted in loving memory of Brandon Gribin - Rephael Chaim Ben Shmuel~ Thank you to the premier sponsors: Ilana and Michael Levin. To sponsor Avos U'Banim contact Rabbi Herbstman, 
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

CSTL Annual Meeting & Elections  Sun Dec 18th at 7 PM
Save the date.  Contact Mike for more information.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIP – Price Increase
The CSTL Board has decided that it is necessary to increase the price for full Kiddush sponsorship to $350, and the price for co-sponsorship to $175.  Contact Mike for more info.

WEEKLY CLASS ON PRAYER WITH RABBI EMLEN – TUE EVE
Prayer is very important!  Please join Rabbi Emlen for a practical and inspiring class focusing each week on a single prayer. At the Green’s Shimon.Emlen@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Pure Food for Healthy Living Sun, Dec 18th 7:30 pm
An exciting social event for women and girls. This is the first in a series of social/educational/fundraising events by and for the women of the community to benefit the North Seattle Mikvah. Admission $18. You don’t have to be from the North End to join!  The Inspiring and Funny Health Instructor and Coach, ABBY LODMER of "Humor Healing Humanity", will be educating and entertaining us with her Raw Food Workshop and Tasting. This will be loads of fun and very healthy! Info: Rachel Rosenfeld 
rachelirosenfeld@gmail.com

Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm 
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  
chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,
hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
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COMMUNITY NEWS

FARBRENGEN IN HONOR OF TES/YUD KISLEV – SHABBOS VAYETZEI –Dec 10th
At the Chabad House Minyan following 10 am Shacharis.  4541 19th Ave NE.

Mercaz Melava Malka Sat Dec 17th after Shabbos
6011A 37th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115.  S

CHABAD HOUSE/JPSI CHANUKAH PARTY – 4 PM SUN DEC 25th
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE.  
www.ChabadHouseMinyan.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL AVOS U’BONIM – MOTZEI SHABBOS 6:30 – 7:30 PM
Children learning with their fathers.  Great food & prizes. 
www.SeattleKollel.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

EB LADIES BAKING Dec 12th  & 19th 
As is the custom, there will be a wonderful lunch around noon for all volunteers and lots of fun and Lashon too. An ongoing thank you to Albie Amon who makes and serves delicious and nutritious lunches on baking days. Again - If you know some handy fellows (or gals) who can come to help with packing and boxing, please bring them along!  Of course, fellows are welcome to join in the baking too. The Ladies will have a bake sale February 26 -- Save the date!!! 

HALACHOS OF CHULENT - Tue Dec 13th  7:30 - 8:15 pm, 
A new series of Halacha classes begins with Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum at BCMH

Meleva Malka for Women Saturday night, Dec 17th  7:45 pm
With Rebbitzen Aliza Tanenbaum at the Tanenbaum home, 4825 S Morgan Street,. Topic: "Preparing for Chanukah". Questions? Contact Julie Greene, BCMH Program Director: juliebcmhseattle2003@gmail.com

BCMH Chanukah Dinner featuring Chinese Cuisine Sun Dec 25th 5:00 pm
At BCMH. Reservations at: www.bcmhseattle.org

BCMH Sisterhood Gift Shop
Hannukah is coming soon! Stop by the gift shop for 20% off all Hannukah decorations, toys and games. We also have a large supply of solid olive oil kits and candles. Gift shop hours are 7:00 am - 4:30 pm, Monday - Friday.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Torah Day School Annual Dinner Sunday, Dec 18th  5:30 pm
At the Westin Seattle, honoring grandparents & grand-friends. 
www.tdsseattle.org/

Chanukah Breakfast and Kids' Carnival Sunday, Dec 11th  10:00 -11:30 am
At Northwest Yeshiva High School. Cost: $7/person or $20/family, RSVP to chairs Shiri Finkelstein and Miriam Levy at Chanukah@nyhs.org 

Camp Yavneh 2017 June 26 - August 18, 2017. 
Registration now open! 
www.campyavnehseattle.com

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm - 11pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Mercaz Chanukah Party Sun, Dec 25th, 4pm - 8pm
6011A 37th Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115. 

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DVAR TORAH FOR YUD KISLEV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553790/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayeitze-9th-Day-of-Kislev-5742-1981.htm  | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Tes Kislev (the 9th of Kislev) is the day on which the Mitteler Rebbe was both born and passed away. In general, these two things are associated: The Alter Rebbe writes in Tanya (Iggeres Hakodesh 28): “All the efforts of man which his soul toiled during his life-time,... becomes revealed and radiates in a manifest way from above downwards at the time of his passing.” In other words, all man’s service, from birth on, is elevated on the day he passed away. This elevation is greatly increased when it is the same day as his birthday. For on a birthday, a person’s ‘mazal’ is on the ascendancy. This then is the special distinction of Tes Kislev.

To clarify further: The Talmud (Rosh Hashanah 11a) states that “the Holy One blessed be He sits and completes the years of the righteous from day to day and from month to month, as it says ‘The number of your days I will fill.’” Thus the case of Moshe Rabbeinu, who said (Devorim 31:2) “I am a hundred and twenty years old today,” on which Rashi comments “Today my days and years are completed; on this day I was born and on this day I will die.” Moshe was born and died on the seventh of Adar. This Talmudic saying refers to allrighteous people, all of whom G‑d ‘completes’ their years. However, while this is true in spiritual terms, seldom do we find it in actual years and days. Only some Tzaddikim had their years actually completed, such as Moshe Rabbeinu (born and died on 7th of Adar), and in the later generations, the Mitteler Rebbe (born and died on 9th of Kislev).

There is a lesson in this for us. We cannot be content in merely thinking of talking of lofty things, but must put them into practice. This is the lesson from Tes Kislev. The idea of G‑d filling the years of a righteous person was, in the case of the Mitteler Rebbe, not just spiritual, but in actual practice.

This lesson is for all Jews. Those Jews who are not so religious must know that it is not enough that “All Yisroel have a share in the world to come, as it states ‘All your people are righteous.’” That is in spiritual terms. But a Jew must also be righteous in practical terms, actually keeping Torah and mitzvos.

Likewise, those Jews who consider their main field to be in intellectual endeavors, must know that ‘deed is the essential thing’ — one’s G‑dly service must have emphasis on deed. Intellectual comprehension and deep concentration about prayer, mitzvos, etc. is indeed a very lofty thing. But it must be secondary to actual deed.

Similarly, when attempting to draw others closer to Judaism, it is not enough to just speak with others, hoping one’s words will have the desired effect. We must do everything possible to ensure that our words will leave an effect on the other’s deeds.

One’s efforts in all these things must not be limited and confined, but beyond all limitations — “with all your might.” One must strive “with all your might,” rising beyond normal limits, not just in thought or speech, but also in deed. Since such a service is required of a Jew, it is certain that every Jew has the ability to fulfill it.

In practical terms. Today, Tes Kislev, is an auspicious time to redouble efforts in our work. Tes Kislev is the day before Yud Kislev, the festival of liberation of the Mitteler Rebbe. We must continue to spread Chassidus, the very concept of Yud Kislev and Yud-Tes Kislev (liberation of the Alter Rebbe). Likewise, since Chanukah follows soon after, we must work in the Chanukah campaign.

In other words: We find ourselves in the period of Yud and Yud-Tes Kislev, the idea of these festivals being the propagation of Chassidus. Hence, in addition to the spreading of Judaism in general, there is now added emphasis on spreading Chassidus in particular. Thus the two lessons we learn from Tes Kislev, that 1) service must be with “all your might” and 2) it must be primarily in deed, apply mainly to the idea of Yud Kislev — the spreading of Chassidus.

When the service of “all your might” permeates deed, then one’s service is in the form of ‘redemption:’ One ‘redeems’ his abilities and powers from constraints and limits, freeing them for good deeds. This redemption is the preparation to the true and complete redemption of the future through our righteous Moshiach, speedily in our times.

*

2. The festivals of liberation of Yud Kislev and Yud-Tes Kislev both celebrate the liberation of Chabad leaders from imprisonment by the (same) government. Yud-Tes Kislev (liberation of the Alter Rebbe in 5559) preceded that of Yud Kislev (liberation of the Mitteler Rebbe in 5587) by 28 years. The imprisonment of the Alter Rebbe was much more severe than that of the Mitteler Rebbe, and consequently the liberation and its celebration is that much greater. Nevertheless, in the days of the year, Yud Kislev (10th of Kislev) precedes Yud-Tes Kislev (19th of Kislev). For the very greatness and loftiness of Yud-Tes Kislev requires appropriate preparation to celebrate it properly — that preparation being Yud Kislev.

In general, man’s service is always to strive higher. For instance, one’s service must first be “with all your heart and all your soul,” and then one can reach the level of “with all your might.” In each of these types of service themselves, there are varying degrees, ranging from the basic level to the most intense — and the proper method is to start from the lowest level and move to the highest.

So too in this case. Both these liberations were beyond natural limits, in a miraculous form. Nevertheless, there are differences, and that of Yud-Tes Kislev is loftier than Yud Kislev. Since one starts from the lower level and moves to the higher, Yud Kislev is celebrated before Yud-Tes Kislev. After such a preparation, we can reach the loftier level of Yud-Tes Kislev.

But if Yud Kislev is the prior preparation to Yud-Tes Kislev, why did Yud Kislev occur 28 years after Yud Tes Kislev? How could Yud-Tes Kislev occur without the preparation of Yud Kislev? However, the preparation of Yud Kislev was needed only when the darkness (of exile) increased. Beforehand, in the intervening 28 years, Yud-Tes Kislev could be properly celebrated without prior preparation. But then the darkness increased, to the extent that there could even be such a thing as the imprisonment of the Mitteler Rebbe. The Alter Rebbe had been freed by the government, which had in effect acknowledged and allowed the propogation of Chassidus. Yet afterwards, the Mitteler Rebbe could still be imprisoned — indicating the increasing darkness in the world. This is the reason why now we need Yud Kislev as a preparation to the proper celebration of Yud-Tes Kislev.

An example: In regards to prayer, the Torah proper requires only the recital of Shemah and only a small amount of prayer. In the first Bais Hamikdosh, people’s minds were more open to G‑d’s wonders, and did not need much prayer. In the second Bais Hamikdosh, the Anshei Knesses Hagedolah (Men of the Great Assembly) saw that men’s minds had become less perceptive, seeing only the physical, and therefore instituted the Shemoneh Esreh (Eighteen Blessings). As the darkness in the world increased, after the times of the Mishnah and Talmud, more prayers were added. As a preparation to the Shemoneh Esreh, the Blessings on the Shemah, Psukei d’Zimrah (Verses of Praise) etc., were added.

Likewise, many new customs were added in later generations, after the times of the Mishnah. For in the earlier generations, when the darkness was not so intense, they did not need extra sanctity. But as the darkness increased, we need more things connected with the light of holiness, the light of Torah and mitzvos, to offset and annul the darkness.

So too in our case. The earlier generations could properly celebrate Yud-Tes Kislev without preparation. Now, when the darkness of exile has intensified, we not only need the extra light of Yud Kislev to annul the increasing darkness, but we need Yud Kislev as preparation to attain the lofty level of Yud-Tes Kislev.

3. Indeed, the fact that Yud Kislev serves as a preparation to Yud-Tes Kislev indicates that in some respects Yud Kislev is greater than Yud-Tes Kislev. As in all cases of cause and effect, the cause has properties loftier than the effect — and thus can produce the effect. Yud Kislev is the ‘cause’ of Yud-Tes Kislev (for without it serving as a preparation, we could not reach the level of Yud-Tes Kislev), and thus contains properties greater than Yud-Tes Kislev.

The imprisonment of the Alter Rebbe was more severe than that of the Mitteler Rebbe: the Alter Rebbe was incarcerated in prison, whereas the Mitteler Rebbe’s imprisonment was more similar to house-arrest. Nevertheless, the very fact that the Mitteler Rebbe was arrested at all, indicates the intensity of the darkness then prevalent in the world. For the Alter Rebbe’s release was such that even the government recognized his righteousness, and all realized the great miracles wrought by G‑d. Moreover, the Alter Rebbe had been designated as an ‘honored citizen for generations,’ for his help in the war against Napoleon. Yet the Mitteler Rebbe was still arrested.

The purpose for the increasing intensity of darkness is to reveal the greater light that comes specifically when prior darkness is converted to light. Or in other words, one reaches loftier heights by first going through a descent. This then is the distinction of Yud Kislev over Yud-Tes Kislev. Through the greater descent (increasing darkness) in the Mitteler Rebbe’s imprisonment (coming after the Alter Rebbe’s miraculous liberation), greater heights were reached than on Yud-Tes Kislev (comparative to the intensity of the darkness). In addition, the greatness of Yud Kislev effects an increase in the greatness of Yud-Tes Kislev (since, as explained before, it is the preparation and cause to Yud-Tes Kislev). Hence, although Yud-Tes Kislev is the ‘Rosh Hashanah of Chassidus,’ one should not minimize the importance of Yud Kislev; for through the proper celebration of Yud Kislev, Yud-Tes Kislev is celebrated even more joyously.

There is a lesson in this for each and every Jew. When a Jew sees Divine Providence in matters that concern him (similar to open miracles), he knows that his success is not due to his own efforts, but to G‑d. This refers to success in physical things and also spiritual things (liberation from one’s previous low spiritual standing). But, it can happen that he once again falls low in his spiritual standing, and his G‑dly soul is once again imprisoned. He may then think that all hope is lost, and there is nothing he can do about it; he will leave it to G‑d to free him. For although this second imprisonment is not as bad as the first (similar to the difference between the Alter Rebbe and the Mitteler Rebbe), and he has not sunk so low this time, nevertheless, that it happened at all after G‑d rescued him the first time, indicates a very great fall.

The lesson from Yud Kislev is that a Jew must know that the purpose of this great fall is for the later ascent he must and can make — that he should now reach a level much higher then previously. He must not despair and therefore do nothing, relying on G‑d — for it depends on the person, and through his service he will reach an infinitely higher level.

A Jew cannot say “We cannot do naught but rely on our Father in heaven.” Our Sages said that when people will say this, it is one of the signs of the darkness of the exile just prior to Moshiach’s coming. Another such sign is that disrespect will increase. Why should such a saying be a sign of the great darkness of the exile, similar to such bad things as increase in disrespect? Isn’t it a good thing when a Jew wishes to “rely on our Father in heaven?” But the previous Rebbe explained that a Jew must do everything he can and then G‑d helps him. But when a Jew does not wish to do all that he can in his G‑dly service, but instead says “We can do naught but rely on our Father in heaven” — such a state of affairs is truly a sign of great spiritual darkness! This is the lesson from Yud Kislev: The imprisonment of the Mitteler Rebbe after the liberation of the Alter Rebbe indicates that it is loftier than even Yud-Tes Kislev.

In practical terms: A Jew need not be affected by the increasing intensity of the exile, but the very reverse: since its purpose is for an ultimately greater ascent, a Jew must work ever harder to abolish the darkness of exile. The greater the darkness, the greater will be the future revelation. Hence every Jew must increase in his observance of Torah and mitzvos, especially in those things currently appropriate — the spreading of Chassidus (the concept of Yud and Yud-Tes Kislev), the Chanukah campaign, and uniting all Jews through purchasing a letter in a Sefer Torah.

As explained above, one’s service must be “with all your might,” beyond all limits, permeating every aspect of a person (thought, speech and deed). And just as the Mitteler Rebbe’s years were literally ‘completed’ by G‑d (birth and death on the same day, Tes Kislev), so too all our work must be put into actual effect. Then, while still in exile, we ‘taste’ the revelations of the future, and will speedily merit the true and complete redemption through our righteous Moshiach.

*

4. Of Ya’akov’s departure from Lavan with all his family, Scripture states (Bereishis 31:17): “Ya’akov rose up, and set his sons and his wives on the camels.” On the words ‘his sons and his wives’ Rashi comments: “He put the males before the females. Esav, however, put the females before the males, as it is stated (36:6) ‘Esav took his wives and his sons, etc.’”

Rashi does not explain why Ya’akov put the males before the females, and Esav the reverse. Commentators explain that the reason can be understood simply from Scripture (and Rashi) learned before this verse — and therefore Rashi need not even mention it. Esav was steeped in lust, as stated previously (Bereishis 28:9): “Esav went to Yishmael and took Machalas the daughter of Yishmael, in addition to his other wives,” on which Rashi comments “he added wickedness to his (previous) wickedness, for he did not divorce the first (wives).” Likewise, on verse 26:34, Rashi comments: “Throughout the forty years (before he married) Esav would seize other women from the possessions of their husbands and do violence to them...”

Ya’akov was the exact opposite. He was (25:27) “a scholarly, plain man, dwelling in tents (of the Yeshivah);” and he did not marry until he was 84 years of age. Hence, it is obvious why Esav put the females before the males — because he was extremely lustful; whereas Ya’akov, who was the epitome of morality and purity, put the males first.

However, there are a few unclear points in Rashi’s commentary. 1) The verse states “Ya’akov rose up and set his sons and his wives.” Rashi writes that “He put the males before the females.” Why the change from sons and wives to males and females?

2) Rashi only offers commentary when something is difficult at that point, not when a difficulty arises because of a verse further on in Scripture. In this case, when a student, to whom Rashi addresses his commentary, learns this verse, there is no problem why Ya’akov set the males before the females. Obviously this is the proper moral behavior for someone like Ya’akov. A question only arises when later we see that Esav acted differently. Surely then, Rashi’s comment noting the difference in behavior between Ya’akov and Esav should not be here, but later, when we learn of Esav’s behavior (in parshas Vayishlach 36:6).

3) Rashi in his comment says “Esav however, put the females before the males, as it is stated, ‘Esav took his wives and his sons’ etc.” when Rashi writes ‘etc.,’ he means to direct our attention to the continuation of the verse. In our case, the rest of the verse is “Esav took his wives and his sons and his daughters...”This seems to contradict Rashi’s previous words. He has just stated that “Esav put the females before the males,” and yet in the actual verse we see that he put his sons (males) before his daughters (females)?!

Indeed, had Rashi not changed the terminology of the verse, there would be no problem. Had he quoted from the verse and said that “Esav, however, put the wives before the sons” there would be no problem, because wives do not mean daughters. But now that Rashi says “Esav, however, put the females before the males,” and adds on ‘etc.’ — this ‘etc.,’ which is the continuation of the verse which speaks of the sons before the daughters, contradicts Rashi’s assertion that Esav put the females (including daughters) before the males!

4) Our verse speaks only of Ya’akov’s wives and sons, and omits any mention of Dinah, Ya’akov’s daughter. Why doesn’t Rashi comment on this?

The answer to these questions is as follows. Rashi makes the comment that he does to answer a question that a student learning this verse would naturally ask. We learn from this verse that Ya’akov first seated his sons and then his wives. Is this not contradictory to the concept that a child must honor his mother? Ya’akov endeavored to educate his children in the right way, including the mitzvah of honoring one’s parents. To seat the son before the mother seems to contradict this.

The question is not on Ya’akov’s sons themselves. They, having the duty to honor their father Ya’akov, could not disobey him and refuse to be seated before their mothers. The question is on Ya’akov. How could he do this knowing it contravened the education he gave to his sons about the mitzvah of honoring one’s mother (to let her be seated first)?

To answer this question, Rashi, instead of writing “He put the sons before the wives,” states “He put the males before the females.” Ya’akov placing his sons before his wives did not reflect at all on dishonor to one’s mother, for the emphasis here is on placing males before females — moral conduct. Ya’akov’s conduct had nothing to do with his wives and his sons as mother and son, but merely as female and male.

Now we understand why Rashi makes no comment on the omission of Dinah, Ya’akov’s daughter. For Rashi has interpreted ‘wives’ to mean ‘females,’ which includes all females — his wives and daughter.

Likewise, it is now clear why Rashi here says “Esav, however, put the females before the males.” We could think that the reason why Esav put his wives before his sons was because he wished to educate his sons in the mitzvah of honoring one’s parents. Rashi therefore tells us that this was not the reason, but in fact the opposite: “Esav put the females (not as mothers) before the males” — because he was steeped in lust. It had nothing to do with mother and son, but rather female and male.

This is also the reason why Rashi adds the word ‘etc.,’ thus indicating the continuation of the verse “Esav took his wives and his sons and his daughters.”The reason Esav put his wives before his sons was because he was steeped in lust. This, however, applied only to his wives, and he was not so immoral as to be steeped in lust in regard to his daughters.

*

5. Yud Kislev (and the day before, Tes Kislev) this year are on the same days of the week as when the original liberation occurred. Tes Kislev on Shabbosparshas Vayeitze and Yud Kislev on Sunday of parshas Vayishlach. While there are lessons to be learned every year from Tes and Yud Kislev (as explained previously), it has special force when they fall out on the same day of the week as in the original occurrence. In addition, consonant with the Alter Rebbe’s dictum that we must ‘live with the times,’ meaning to live according to the lessons derived from the weekly parshah, there must be some directive to be drawn from parshas Vayeitze and parshas Vayishlach.

The beginning words of the parshah, “Vayeitze Ya’akov,” means “Ya’akov went out.” ‘Going out’ is the idea of exile, when Jews have ‘gone’ from their true standing into exile. Every Jew is the only son of G‑d, the King of kings, and the true place of a Jew is together with his Father, the King. Father and son are one essence, and when the son leaves the Father, it is automatically exile.

This descent into exile is for the purpose of the greater heights that can be reached only through first going through exile. As it states later in the parshah (30:43), that after Ya’akov ‘went out’ from Be’er Sheva into the exile of Charon (Lavan), “he became exceedingly wealthy;” he reached these great heights (wealthy (also) in spiritual terms) specifically through undergoing exile (“Ya’akov went out”).

Our service in exile must be similar to Ya’akov’s, who said “I have served with all my might” (31:6) to the extent that “sleep was snatched from my eyes” (31:40). As the Alter Rebbe states in Shulchan Aruch: “A person must serve with all his might, for Ya’akov Hatzaddik said ‘with all my might I have served your father.’” When a person’s service in exile is in such a manner, he reaches the level of being “exceedingly wealthy.”

The beginning words of parshas Vayishlach, “Vayishlach Ya’akov Malochim,” means “Ya’akov sent angels (to Esav).” These angels accomplished their mission of influencing Esav (not only not to hate Ya’akov, but also) to the extent of “he kissed him.” Some authorities say this means he kissed him wholeheartedly; but even according to those who say it was not wholeheartedly, the fact that everyone saw Esav kissing Ya’akov is enough to cause the world to fear and respect Ya’akov.

In spiritual terms, in our G‑dly service, “Vayishlach — he sent” refers to the refinement and elevation of this world; not only to ensure that the world should not impinge on holiness, but to convert the world itself to G‑dliness (similar to Esav not only not hating Ya’akov but actually kissing him). Then we will have the revelation of the future when “Deliverers will go up to Mount Zion to judge the mount of Esav.”

The lesson from this is that even while still in exile (“going out” from one’s true place), before the redemption , one must not despair, but instead increase in Torah and mitzvos, the light of which annuls and converts the darkness of exile. It is precisely through our G‑dly service in exile which brings us to the level of being “exceedingly wealthy,” a level infinitely higher than before the descent into exile — till we merit to reach the revelations of the future redemption.

Our service in exile should be in the manner stated in our parshah (32:2-3): “The angels of G‑d met him (Ya’akov)... and he called the name of that place Machanaim.” ‘Machanaim’ means ‘two camps,’ referring to the angels of Eretz Yisroel, and those outside of Eretz Yisroel. This teaches us that a Jew must convert the place in which he finds himself into ‘Eretz Yisroel.’ ‘Eretz’ comes from the word “rotzon — desire, will” for the land desires to do the will of its Creator.

As before, through such service we reach the level of “exceedingly great,” and even while in exile “all the children of Israel had light in their dwelling places.” And then, very soon, we merit to have the true and complete redemption through our righteous Moshiach.

Shabbos Toldos | 2-9 Kislev 5777

EREV SHABBOS FRI Dec 2nd   
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:01 pm

SHABBOS SAT Dec 3rd  
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:49 am/
Mincha/ 3:50 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:03 pm

Kiddush and Seuda Slishit
Kiddush is sponsored this week by Mrs. Shprintze and Rabbi Avraham Kavka, in honor and in memory of the yahrzeit of Mrs. Kavka's mother, Fayga bas Bluma and Hersh Meilech A”H. Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am
Sun-Thu  Mincha 4:05 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 4:53 pm

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
The community would like to wish its sincere condolences to Rabbi Levitin, Mrs. Kornfeld, and their mother, who are mourning the loss of their sister and daughter, Mrs Soro Tema Gerlitzky a"h. May they be comforted with all the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim

CSTL Annual Meeting & Elections -  Sun Dec 18th at 7 PM
Save the date.  Contact Mike for more information.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

WEEKLY CLASS ON PRAYER WITH RABBI EMLEN – TUE EVE
Prayer is very important!  Please join Rabbi Emlen for a practical and inspiring class focusing each week on a single prayer. At the Green’s Shimon.Emlen@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Pure Food for Healthy Living Sun, Dec 18th 7:30 pm
An exciting social event for women and girls. This is the first in a series of social/educational/fundraising events by and for the women of the community to benefit the North Seattle Mikvah. Admission $18. You don’t have to be from the North End to join!  The Inspiring and Funny Health Instructor and Coach, ABBY LODMER of "Humor Healing Humanity", will be educating and entertaining us with her Raw Food Workshop and Tasting. This will be loads of fun and very healthy! Info: Rachel Rosenfeld 
rachelirosenfeld@gmail.com

Simple Truths Course - Mon Dec 5th 7:30-8:30 pm
At CSTL with Chanie Levitin. 
www.MyRCSociety.com In a sand-swept Sinai some three and a half millennia ago, the Jewish nation received the Torah from G-d. Ever since, Jews the world over have passionately dedicated themselves to its study. From eras ancient to modern, our people have endured tremendous sacrifices to study Torah, sometimes even surrendering their lives in this pursuit. What is the value of Torah, and why does Judaism venerate its study above all else? This lesson explores the role of Torah study in Jewish life.

Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm 
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  
chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIP – Price Increase
The CSTL Board has decided that it is necessary to increase the price for full Kiddush sponsorship to $350, and the price for co-sponsorship to $175.  Contact Mike for more info.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,
hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEW

SEATTLE KOLLEL AVOS U’BONIM – MOTZEI SHABBOS 6:30 – 7:30 PM
Children learning with their fathers.  Great food & prizes. 
www.SeattleKollel.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

EB LADIES BAKING AGAIN! Dec 5th, 12th  & 19th 
As is the custom, there will be a wonderful lunch around noon for all volunteers and lots of fun and Lashon too. An ongoing thank you to Albie Amon who makes and serves delicious and nutritious lunches on baking days. Again - If you know some handy fellows (or gals) who can come to help with packing and boxing, please bring them along!  Of course, fellows are welcome to join in the baking too. The Ladies will have a bake sale February 26 -- Save the date!!! 

HALACHOS OF CHULENT - Tue Dec 13th  7:30 - 8:15 pm, 
A new series of Halacha classes begins with Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum at BCMH

DEC. 8TH BOOK LAUNCH EVENT Thu Dec. 8th 7:30 pm
Join us at SBH on at for the launch of Rabbi Ilan Acoca's new book "The Sephardic Book of Why: A Guide to Sephardic Jewish Traditions and Customs"

Meleva Malka for Women Saturday night, Dec 17th  7:45 pm
With Rebbitzen Aliza Tanenbaum at the Tanenbaum home, 4825 S Morgan Street,. Topic: "Preparing for Chanukah". Questions? Contact Julie Greene, BCMH Program Director: juliebcmhseattle2003@gmail.com

LEGO MAN SUN DEC 4th  11:00 am - 1:00 pm
BCMH is hosting LEGO MAN, Professional LEGO builder, Dan Parker and we are serving KRISPY KREME DONUTS!  For ages Pre-K - 8th Grade, at Yavneh Youth Bldg - on other side of the BCMH parking lot.  For those parents in need of childcare (SHA Gala Brunch is at the same time), we are offering an After Care program from 1:00 - 3:30 pm. Please send your child with a Kosher bagged lunch if they are staying for After Care program.  The LEGO MAN only (11 am-1 pm): $10/Child, The LEGO MAN plus After Care (11 am-3:30 pm): $25/Child,.  Parents must register for After Care by November 30th.  This event is open to the entire community!  Questions? Please contact Ari Hoffman - thehoffather@gmail.com.

AJC LUNCHEON WED DEC 7th NOON
2016 AJC Seattle Global Advocacy in Action Luncheon  The Future of World Jewry, Featuring Jeffrey Goldberg, Editor-in-Chief for the Atlantic.  Wednesday, December 7, 2016 Westin Seattle, 1900 5th Ave., Seattle, WA 98101.  Kindly RSVP  by November 30, 2016.   A minimum $180 donation per guest is requested at the event to support AJC's crucial work in the United States and abroad.   *All dietary laws observed.   For additional information please contact the AJC Seattle office at seattle@ajc.orgor 206-622-6315.

BCMH Chanukah Dinner featuring Chinese Cuisine Sun Dec 25th 5:00 pm
At BCMH. Reservations at: www.bcmhseattle.org

BCMH Sisterhood Gift Shop
Hannukah is coming soon! Stop by the gift shop for 20% off all Hannukah decorations, toys and games. We also have a large supply of solid olive oil kits and candles. Gift shop hours are 7:00 am - 4:30 pm, Monday - Friday.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Torah Day School Annual Dinner Sunday, December 18th  5:30 pm
At the Westin Seattle, honoring grandparents & grand-friends. 
www.tdsseattle.org/

Chanukah Breakfast and Kids' Carnival Sunday, December 11th  10:00 -11:30 am
At Northwest Yeshiva High School. Cost: $7/person or $20/family, RSVP to chairs Shiri Finkelstein and Miriam Levy at Chanukah@nyhs.org 

Camp Yavneh 2017 June 26 - August 18, 2017. 
Registration now open! 
www.campyavnehseattle.com

Seattle Hebrew Academy Annual Gala, Sunday, December 4, 11:30 am,
Showbox SoDo . Honoring Sonny & Gena Gorasht. Reservations at 
www.seattlehebrewacademy.org

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm - 11pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR TOLDOS
http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/62001/jewish/Isaacs-Wells.htm | Based on the teachings of the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M Adapted by Rabbi Yanki Tauber. © Chabad.org

Three Torah sections—Lech Lecha, Vayeira and Chayei Sarah—chronicle the life and deeds of Abraham. An even greater number are devoted to the life of Jacob. Isaac is the central figure in only one—the Parshah of Toldot. We read of the “Binding of Isaac” in Vayeira, but there the story is told wholly from Abraham’s perspective. Similarly, the greater part of Chayei Sarah is about how a wife is found for Isaac, but Isaac himself is not at all involved in the process. Eliezerdoesn’t even mention him by name when he proposes the match—he’s simply “the son of my master.” This scarcity of information about Isaac is even more striking in light of the fact that he was the most long-lived of the three Patriarchs (Isaac lived 180 years, as opposed to Abraham’s 175 and Jacob’s 147).

Even in Toldot, we are hard-pressed to find some clues to Isaac’s identity and personality. The first part of Toldot relates the birth and early years of Jacob and Esau. The latter part is about how the aged and blind Isaac has his plans to bless his elder son Esau foiled by Rebecca and Jacob. It is only in the middle part of Toldot (Genesis 26) that we encounter an active Isaac. We read how he relocates to Gerar, how he farms the land (the only one of the Patriarchs to do so), and how he digs wells.

In fact, the one activity of Isaac’s on which the Torah elaborates at some length is his well-digging. We are told how he reopened the wells originally dug by Abraham, and we are given a detailed account of a series of wells of his own which he dug—the names he gave them, and his struggles to retain control over them.

But it is precisely this lack of notoriety which defines the essence of Isaac. The Kabbalists equate Abraham with the sefirah (divine attribute) of chessed, “loving-kindness,” and Isaac with the sefirah of gevurah, “restraint.” Abraham was the very embodiment of kindness, generosity and concern for one’s fellow. He was the ultimate extrovert—constantly giving of himself, constantly extending himself to G‑d, to his fellow man, to the world. Isaac was his father’s diametric opposite: he was awe to Abraham’s love, restraint to Abraham’s expansiveness, self-effacement to Abraham’s self-assertion.

From Abraham we inherited the charitableness and social commitment that is the hallmark of our people. Isaac bequeathed to us the fear of Heaven in the heart of the Jew--his self-censoring discipline, his silent sacrifice, his humble awe before the majesty of his Creator.

Abraham’s love of G‑d and humanity took him on a journey from the self outward—a journey etched in the roads of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Canaan. Isaac never left the boundaries of his homeland. For his was an inward journey, a journey into the depths of self, to the essence within.

Thus Isaac is portrayed as a farmer and a well-digger. Isaac was a farmer, one who has learned the profound secret of the seed: that growth and profit come only when you allow yourself to disintegrate and become one with the soil from which you have come. Isaac was a digger of wells, boring through the strata of emotion and experience in search of the quintessential waters of the soul. Boring deeper than feeling, deeper than desire, deeper than achievement, to the selflessness at the core of self.

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