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SHABBOS KI TISA M’shenichhnas Adar Marbim b’Simcha When Adar Enters – Joy Increases 17-24 Adar א 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Feb 26th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:30 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Feb 27th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:39 am/
Mincha 5:15 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:36 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri 7 am Shacharis
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv 5:45 pm /Repeat Shema after 6:29 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
CSTL proudly presents a gala kiddush this Shabbat in honor of the visit to our shul of Rabbi andRebbetzin Kletenik.  Leah Jaffe is both a kiddush sponsor and the supplier of the tastier items on the menu.  Scott Pollack, Marion Kitz, Yussi Greenberg, Shimon Dershowitz, and Michael and Leslie Weichbrodt are all kiddush contributors.  Rabbi Kavka, Dr Vernon Neppe, Ivan Rothman, and Carl Grossman also contributed. 

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We are saddened to learn of the passing of Barbara Myerson Z”TL. May Barbara's children ElanaMyerson and Aura Ort and the Myerson family be comforted with all the mourners of Tzion andYerushalayim. Shiva will be Tue Mar 2nd, 5-8 pm at the home of Charna and Mira Klein, 6521 36th Ave NE.

SHIVA FOR YONA BEN AVRAHAM BLAUT ZT”L
Rabbi  Aryeh Blaut is sitting Shiva for his father Jonas Blaut (Yona ben Avraham ZT”L) at the home of Arthur and Andrea Levin, 5212 S Morgan Street, Seattle, WA 98118 (meals/food appreciated).  The community is encouraged to learn mishnayos for the memory of Yona ben Avraham ZT 221;L.  Sign up at http://www.lzechernishmas.com/signup.php?id=5333

CSTL Shabbaton with Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik. Shabbat 27 Feb. / 18 Adar Rishon
We are greatly honored to welcome Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik on the Shabbat Ki Tissa, 26-27 February 2016 (17-18 Adar 1) through to  Sunday 28th. They are jointly our Eminent Scholars in Residence. Thank you so much to Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik for their continued kindness and chesedfor making our Northend Community and CSTL even brighter. We greatly appreciate their doing this.  
Friday night, Oneg Shabbat at 8:30 pm at the home of Rabbi Saifo and Frumi Marasow (7201 40th Avenue NE)   Rabbi Kletenik and Rivy Poupko Kletenik will speak on "Why Did Moshe Break The Tablets?"

Shabbos Kiddush Lunch, Rabbi Kletenik will speak on "Wake Up and Smell The Coffee

Shabbos Seudah Shlishit
: Rabbi Kletenik will speak on "A Halachic Perspective On Intellectual Property Rights".

MELAVAH MALKA WITH RABBI AND MRS ZALMY AND SHEINA KAVKA – FEB 27th at 8:30 pm
With gratitude to Hashem, it is our pleasure to invite you to a Melavah Melkah to meet our newly married children, Zalmy and Sheina Kavka !It is also our honor to host Sheina's parents, Rabbi Yosef and Chani LiberowShluchim in Barranquilla, Colombia.  Looking forward to you joining us at our home. - Rabbi Avraham and Mrs. Shprintze Kavka, 4002 NE 72nd Street.

Children's Program News 
Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Annual Lamplighter Dinner & Auction. Sun Mar27th (17th Adar Bet) 5 pm
With the dedication of the Berel and Miriam Weiss Early Childhood Center. Honoring long- time parents and volunteers Mr. Joel and Dr. Sarah Baskin. http://www.mmscdayschool.org/ 

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. For the past 42 years, Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND!!!

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series - Sunday 28th  Feb  / 19th  Adar 1
Featuring Rebbetzin Rivy Poupko-Kletenik, Head of School, Seattle Hebrew Academy   Esther: A Text Study

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST - RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333
rabbi@shalomseattle.org .

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  Began Wed Feb  17th 7.30-9PM.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL was made possible, in part, by a grant for operations from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.   Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

NYHS Gala Dinner and Auction, Sun Feb. 28th 
Honoring Rabbi Bernie and Shirley Fox. Doors Open at 5:00 pm. SHERATON Seattle Hotel, 1400 6th AVE, Seattle, WA  98101    For more information please contact us: www.nyhsgala.org or 206.232.5272 or to to get involved, contact chairs Debra Rettman and Beryl Cohen at gala@nyhs.org

PARENTS' NIGHT OUT, EB KIDS EVENT Motza'ey Shabbat, Feb. 27th
The next "Parents' Night Out" program is.  Have an evening out and let us watch your kids.  Kids will enjoy a FUN scavenger hunt and feature film,, "The Peanuts Movie"! - with snacks and hot chocolate served.    For grades K-5, 7:15-9:30 pm.  Only $5/child, RSVP by noon, 2/26 to rlr62@comcast.net. Questions? Call Rochelle at 206 227-6509

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

https://www.kckoshercoop.com/  
The KCKosherCoop has come to Seattle and the PASSOVER order deadline is less than two weeks away (on 2/25)! This deadline is early because suppliers require orders well in advance for Passover. If you haven't already done so please go to our website (www.kckoshercoop.com) and create a free account so you will receive emails from us about order deadlines and specials. You will also be able to see the current and next order deadline and delivery dates on the top right corner of the website when you log into your co-op account.  All items on the website are kosher for Passover. Be sure to check out our great Passover specials listed online, including $0.99/lb chicken wings, $7.99/22 oz loaf gefilte fish, $1.99/lbchicken in eighths, $2.48/lb chicken leg quarters, $7.94/lb 1st cut brisket (and many more...). If you don't want to purchase a full case you can put items on the Split Products page which will help facilitate sharing of items.  Special Passover Promotion:  No more searching for a lamb shank bone for your sederplate, we'll send you one for free! We are pleased to be able to offer a free Lamb Shank with your order (OU/CRC/Glatt/Beit Yosef/Domestic). To get the lamb shank, just add the $0.00 Lamb Shank that we just put on the Specials page. But there is more! We are also offering a free Bedikas Chometz Set (add the $0.00 set to your order) which includes a feather, spoon, candle, crumb bag, and bracha sheet for your "search for chometz" activity. As always, feel free to contact us with any questions (for fastest response, email us directly at admin@kckoshercoop.com). If you don't see what you're looking for just shoot us an email and we'll try and track it down.For More info:  Facebook Group:  “Kosher Deals in Seattle

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome backRebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13
At the Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org 

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

"The Amazing Life and Courage of Dona Gracia Nasi: Sun Feb 28th 1:00pm-2:00pm 
Author Andrée Aelion Brooks talks about her book on Dona Gracia Nasi  “The Richest Woman in 16th Century Europe”, who built an escape network that saved hundreds of forcibly converted Jews from the Inquisition. Seattle University Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building.https://www.seattleu.edu/searchformeaning/tickets/  

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY PURIM BAKE SALE MARCH 20
The EBLA Purim Bake Sale takes place this year on March 20, 2016, from 9:30 am-1:00pm. Breakfast will be available to purchase, along with Hamentashen, Biscochos, Travados, Baklava and more!  You may pre-order by phoning Selma Amon at 206 721-0533

COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM Thu evening May 5th
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director Slawomir Grunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR KI TISA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347354/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Ki-Sissa.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

On the verse:1 “This is what all… should give: a half-shekel, ” the JerusalemTalmud2 and the Midrash3 comment: “The Holy One, blessed be He, took out a coin of fire from beneath His throne of glory and showed it to Moshe, telling him: ‘This is what [all] should give.’ ”

Tosafos4 explains that the reason G‑d showed Moshe the coin of fire was not because Moshe found it difficult to visualize the coin. Instead, Moshe’s difficulty was: How is it possible that by merely giving such a coin a person could attain “atonement for his soul”?5 The Midrash quotes the verse:6 “A person will give his flesh [to save] his flesh, and everything he owns will he give for the sake of his soul.” And, concludes the Midrash, even this is not sufficient. To satisfy Moshe’s question, G‑d showed him a “coin of fire,” explaining that the coins the Jews would give possess a unique spiritual nature.

On the surface, the concept should not have been so difficult to comprehend, for it had already been established that sacrifices could serve as atonement for sins. Indeed, this concept was communicated directly after the giving of theTorah, before the command to give a half-shekel, as it is written:7 “And upon [this altar], you will sacrifice your burnt offerings and your peace offerings.” At that time, Moshe did not raise any questions.

There was, however, a difference. The half-shekel was to serve as atonement for the sin of the Golden Calf,8 a sin of idol worship. And this caused Moshe to wonder: How can giving a half-shekel atone for so severe a sin?

To explain: The mitzvos can be compared to the limbs and organs of the human body.9 Within the body, there are limbs and organs which are particular in nature, each one receiving its individual life-energy from the soul. Within this grouping, there are two sub-categories, limbs and organs on which one’s life depends, and those on which one’s life does not depend. And then there are organs like the brain and heart, which are general in nature; within them rests our essential vitality, the life-energy for the entire body.10

Similarly, there are mitzvos which are particular in nature, and others which are of general import. For example, the mitzvos “I am G‑d” and “You shall have no other gods” include the entire Torah.11 They are of fundamental importance to the soul, for the Jews’ connection with G‑d depends on them.

Therefore, when G‑d told Moshe that the half-shekel would serve as atonement for the sin of the Golden Calf, Moshe was astonished. He wondered how a half-shekel could become atonement for a soul tainted by idol worship.

A Descent for Comprehensive Souls

The above also gives us insight into the interpretation of the verse: “When you take the census of the heads of the children of Israel, according to their number,” offered by the Or HaChayim. The Or HaChayim explains that the verse refers to the premature passing of the righteous “the heads of the children of Israel.” They may pass away before their appointed time because ofpikudeihem literally, “their number,” but in an extended sense meaning “your lack,” as in the verse:12 lo nifkad mimeno ish, “Not one man was lacking.”

All the different interpretations of a verse share a connection.13 What then is the connection between the interpretation offered by the Or HaChayim and the simple meaning of the verse?

The connection revolves around the fact that, according to its simple interpretation, the verse is speaking about the sin of idol worship, a sin which causes a blemish of a general nature. As such, there is a connection to the interpretation of the Or HaChayim. For a sin of a general nature affects the overall connection of Jewish souls to G‑d, as expressed within the comprehensive soul of that generation, the “head of the children of Israel.”

Indeed, we see such a pattern with regard to the sin of the Golden Calf, for it caused a spiritual descent within Moshe, the head of the children of Israel. Even though Moshe was not involved with the sin at that time he was in the spiritual realms G‑d told him:14 “Go down,” interpreted by our Sages15 to mean: “Descend from your greatness.”

We find that the Sin of the Golden Calf also brought about the possibility of death. For the Tablets of the Ten Commandments are associated with freedom,16 and in particular, “freedom from the angel of death.”17 Worshipping the Golden Calf reawakened the influence of the Sin of the Tree of Knowledge, which brought death to the world.

Similarly, sins of a general nature affect the individuals who serve as the “soul” of an entire generation. This relates to the Or HaChayim’ s insights regarding the premature passing of righteous men.

Giving With Inner Fire

To return to the coin of fire, a question arises: Moshe did not have difficulty conceiving of a half-shekel; his difficulty consisted of understanding how the gift of the half-shekel could bring about atonement. How was this difficulty resolved by showing him a “coin of fire”?18

In resolution, it may help to consider the following analogy, attributed by some to the Baal Shem Tov: A man was trained in the art of crafting gold and silver. The master to whom he was apprenticed taught him almost everything, but neglected to mention that before shaping gold or silver, the metal must be heated to make it pliable. The master thought this point was so obvious that it needn’t be taught. The apprentice, however, never grasped it, and consequently was never able to become a successful craftsman.

In the analog applying to our Divine service: Our deeds and observance must be fired with the “warmth” of the G‑dly soul.

On this basis, we can understand how showing Moshe a coin of fire resolved his difficulties. The mere physical act of giving a coin cannot in itself provide atonement for the soul. When, however, the giving is fired by the warmth of the soul’s essence, keeping in mind that “the lamp of G‑d is the soul of man,”19 the half-shekel can serve as atonement for the soul.

At the Essence of the Soul

The deed through which a mitzvah is performed reflects the intent of themitzvah, and its inner dynamic. Accordingly, it must be said that the giving of a half-shekel reflects the spiritual intent of the mitzvah, showing how it is connected with the fire of the soul’s essence. This, however, does not seem to be true. G‑d showed Moshe a coin of fire, but the half-shekel which a Jew gives is a simple coin.

It is not sufficient to attempt to resolve this difficulty by explaining the advantage of tzedakah: that a person gives away money for which he worked with all the powers of his soul and/or with which he could purchase his own life’s necessities,20 and thus show that tzedakah affects the essence of the soul. This is not an adequate explanation of the matter at hand, for it does not differentiate between the giving of the half-shekel and other gifts to charity.

Similarly, it is insufficient to explain that the half-shekalim were significant, because they were used for the adonim, the sockets which formed the base of the Sanctuary. In our Divine service, this refers to the initiative of kabbalas ol, making a commitment to fulfill G‑d’s will that transcends intellect. This initiative stems from the essence of the soul, a level which joins all Jews together. Moreover, in subsequent years, the half-shekel was used to purchase communal offerings, which also express the unity of the Jewish people.

This explanation is inadequate because although it explains the fundamental importance of the utilization of the half-shekalim , it does not explain how givingthe coins expresses the essence of the soul.

Similarly, we cannot argue that the connection between the giving of the half-shekel and the essence of the soul is expressed by the fact that in contrast to the other donations to the Sanctuary, a specific amount had to be given. With the other donations, every person gave according to the generosity of his heart, some giving more than others. With regard to the half-shekel, however, there was a specific command that21 “The rich should not give more, nor should the poor give less.” This points to that level of the soul which is the same in all Jews. When it comes to the revealed powers of intellect and emotion, there are differences between individuals, but all Jews share the same essence.

This concept is not specifically alluded to by the command to give a half-shekel. On the contrary, the same concept is alluded to by all those commandments which require that a single sum be given by all. Accordingly, we are forced to say that it is the half-shekel itself which alludes to the fire of the soul’s essence.

Why a Half and not a Whole?

To explain the above concept: The command to give a half-shekel states: “This is what all… should give, a half-shekel …. A shekel is twenty gerah; a half-shekel [should be given as] an offering to G‑d.”

The verse informs us that we should give a half-shekel, and then, so that we know the amount to be given, the Torah informs us that an entire shekel is twenty gerah, leading to the understanding that the donation to be given by every individual is ten gerah.

An obvious question arises: Why is the elaboration necessary? Why didn’t the Torah merely say to give ten gerah? If for some reason it was necessary to mention that the gift was a half-shekel, the Torah could have said that we should give “a half-shekel, ten gerah. ” Why was it necessary to mention that an entire shekel is worth twenty gerah?

This indicates that both factors are important. A person must give half of an entire shekel. When a person gives ten gerah, he must realize that he is giving half of an entity worth twenty gerah.

This concept, however, requires explanation. In general, the Torah requires that our gifts to G‑d be made from the best and most perfect articles we possess, as intimated by the phrase: “All the choice parts [should be given] to G‑d.”22 Why then does this mitzvah involve only half an entity?

The fact that the sum could have been larger is irrelevant, for every mitzvahhas its purposes and limits. The question is, why a half only? Why not a complete shekel ?

This is particularly true in light of the statements made previously, that the half-shekel serves as atonement for the Sin of the Golden Calf. That sin involved the denial of G‑d’s oneness, and the conception of division between the world and a G‑dlinesswhich is all-encompassing. Accordingly, it would seem appropriate that the atonement follow the pattern of “measure for measure,” and involve giving everything to G‑d. This, however, was not the case. Indeed, the mitzvahof giving half a shekel implies that one must retain a portion for oneself; it is forbidden to give an entire shekel.23

The difficulty is further compounded by the fact that the Torah mentions the weight of a half-shekel with regard to another subject, but there uses a term that implies an entire entity. Eliezer gave Rivkah a golden nose-ring weighing abeka,24 a term which Rashi identifies with a half-shekel. Why then doesn’t the Torah use the term beka, which connotes an entire entity, rather than referring to a half-shekel, an incomplete entity?

Making a Half, Whole

These questions can be resolved as follows: As mentioned previously, the worship of false divinities involves separation from G‑dliness. Accordingly, the half-shekel which atones for this sin must express G‑d’s oneness and demonstrate the united approach demanded of a Jew. This does not mean giving away everything for G‑dliness. That would imply that a person is an entity which exists and which gives away things which rightfully belong to it for G‑d. The mitzvah of giving a half-shekel teaches a deeper commitment.

Alone, a person is a non-entity; he is only half. How does he become complete? By uniting with G‑d.

This approach to Divine service evokes a similar initiative from above. G‑d’s perfection is dependent on the Jewish people, as it were. For that reason, G‑d refers to the Jewish people as Tamasi , “the one who completes Me.”25

The Jews’ connection with G‑d is not a bond between two separate entities; they are one whole. Each alone is merely a half-entity.26 It is only when they come together that they attain perfection.

This is alluded to by the half-shekel. It too is not a complete entity, containing twenty gerah. Instead, it has merely ten gerah, alluding to the ten powers of the soul which a Jew must dedicate to G‑d. When he does, he draws down the second ten gerah, the ten sublime Sefiros which are emanations of G‑dliness.

G‑d Himself is not limited at all, and cannot be defined in any manner. Nevertheless, because of His great love for the Jewish people, He confines Himself in the structure of Ten Sefiros. And from these Ten Sefiros are derived the ten powers of soul that exist within man.27 In this vein, man is call Adam , referring to the phrase Adamah L’Elyon, “I resemble the One Above.”28

Thus the two man’s ten spiritual powers and the ten sublime Sefiros together make up one complete entity. Alone, without the other, each one is incomplete.

This is how the intent of the mitzvah that the coin a Jew contributes must be a “coin of fire,” shining with the fire of the soul’s essence is reflected in the actual giving of the half-shekel. For a half-shekel demonstrates that, together, a Jew and G‑d are a single entity, the essence of a Jew’s soul being connected with G‑d’s essence. At times, there can be blemishes and inconsistencies with regard to the relationship our revealed powers of intellect and emotion share with G‑d. The essence of our souls, however, is unified with G‑d in an essential bond, clinging essence to essence.

This explains how giving a half-shekel can atone for the Sin of the Golden Calf. For all sins, even worshipping false divinities, do not disrupt a Jew’s essential connection with G‑d. This connection remains intact at all times, and when it is revealed (through giving the half-shekel), it revitalizes the connection shared by the revealed powers, uniting them with G‑dliness.29

Establishing a Covenant

This concept is also related to another element of Parshas Ki Sissa, the covenant established between G‑d and the Jewish people. After Moshe begged G‑d to forgive the nation, G‑d agreed to pardon them and promised:30 “I will establish a covenant before all your people.”

Making a covenant establishes unity between the principals. A covenant was made by dividing a single entity and having the two principals pass between the halves.31 As we see in Bris Beyn HaBetarim, the covenant established between G‑d and Avraham,32 Avraham and Heavenly fire passed between the halves of slaughtered animals.

This practice raises a difficulty, for the division of an entity seems to reflect separation rather than unity. Nevertheless, the intent of a covenant is to communicate consummate unity. The practice intimates that just as the two halves of the animal are parts of a single whole, so too the two principals of the covenant are half-entities, each complemented by the other.

This was the concept G‑d wished to share with Moshe in connection with the atonement for the Sin of the Golden Calf. By establishing a covenant, He sought to reveal the ultimate oneness between G‑d and the Jewish people, showing the bond between the essence of the soul and G‑d’s essence. Nothing can affect that connection. As G‑d states:33 “Regardless, they are My children; to exchange them for another nation [heaven forbid] is impossible.”

“The deeds of the Patriarchs are a Sign for their descendants”

The covenant between G‑d and the Jewish people began with Avraham, our Patriarch; the covenant established with Moshe represented a higher level.34Similarly, the concept of the half-shekel was first initiated at the time of the Patriarchs, as reflected in the nose-ring, a beka in weight, which Eliezer gave Rivkah, as mentioned above. Since “the deeds of the Patriarchs are a sign for their descendants,”35 our Divine service after the giving of the Torah is dependent on the Patriarchs’ accomplishments.36

Accordingly, the nose-ring which Eliezer gave was associated with the unity of marriage, and in particular, the marriage of Yitzchak and Rivkah,37 which serves as an analogy for the bond between G‑d and the Jewish people. And it intimates that through their Divine service, the Jews can evoke the half-shekelgiven by G‑d, as it were.

Nevertheless, “the deeds of the Patriarchs are [merely] a sign for their descendants;” the true expression of this unity came after the giving of the Torah. Only then was the heavenly decree dividing the spiritual from the physical nullified. Therefore Eliezer did not give Rivkah a half-shekel , but rather a nose-ring of equivalent weight.38

At that time, man’s Divine service did evoke a corresponding influence from G‑d, but the unity was not complete. It was like a relationship in which each partner merely influences the other. It was only after the giving of the Torah39that the half-shekel itself i.e., the concept that each is a half-entity, and only together can they become whole was revealed. For it is the giving of the Torah which made possible the realization of the fundamental unity between G‑d and the Jewish people “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one.”

SHABBOS TEZAVEH M’shenichhnas Adar Marbim b’Simcha When Adar Enters – Joy Increases 10-17 Adar א 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Feb 19th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:20 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Feb 20th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:45 am/
Mincha 5:05 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:25 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri 7 am Shacharis
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv 5:30 pm /Repeat Shema after 6:19 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
Kiddush Lite – No sponsors. Seuda Slishit Lite is sponsored by Adam Minkus.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Saifo and Frumi Marasow on the engagement of their daughter Perel to Levi (ben R' Berel)Gansbourg of Montréal. May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel !

Children's Program News 
Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web sitewww.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Andy Statman concert Mon Feb 22nd 7 PM
Hillel and the Chabad@UW  are bringing Andy Statman to town for a concert on at Hillel. Tickets are $12 online and $15 at the door.  They can be purchased here: http://tinyurl.com/andystatman

CSTL Shabbaton with Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik. Shabbat 27 Feb. / 18 Adar Rishon
We are greatly honored to welcome Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik on the Shabbat Ki Tissa, 26-27 February 2016 (17-18 Adar 1) through to  Sunday 28th. They are jointly our Eminent Scholars in Residence. Thank you so much to Rabbi andRebbetzin Kletenik for their continued kindness and chesed for making our Northend Community and CSTL even brighter. We greatly appreciate their doing this.  Rabbi Kletenik will speak at kiddush lunch: "Wake Up and Smell The Coffee” and at Seudah Shlishit: "A Halachic Perspective On Intellectual Property Rights".

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. For the past 42 years, Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 at www.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND!!!

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series - Sunday 28th  Feb  / 19th  Adar 1
Featuring Rebbetzin Rivy Poupko-Kletenik, Head of School, Seattle Hebrew Academy   Esther: A Text Study

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST -  RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333  
rabbi@shalomseattle.org

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  Begins on Wed Feb  17th 7.30-9PM.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL was made possible, in part, by a grant for operations from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seward Park Mikvah Sat night, Feb. 20, 7:30 pm, 
Transformation Inside and Out, At the home of Jenny Assouline, 5155 55th AVE S. Laura Coughlin, professional Interior Designer presenting: "Small Changes to Make a Big Difference" D'var Torah by Rubissa Sharona Hasson. Topic: "The Power of the Mikveh: Transformation Inside and Out". Cost: $18 / Dairy Melave Malka / Raffle items $5 a ticket.

Jewish Summer Camp Fair Sun., Feb 21st 1:00-3:00 pm, 
At the Jewish Day School, 15749 NE 4th Street, Bellevue.Questions: aadler@jds.org

NYHS Gala Dinner and Auction, Sun Feb. 28th 
Honoring Rabbi Bernie and Shirley Fox. Doors Open at 5:00 pm. SHERATON Seattle Hotel, 1400 6th AVE, Seattle, WA  98101    For more information please contact us: www.nyhsgala.org or 206.232.5272 or to to get involved, contact chairs Debra Rettman and Beryl Cohen at gala@nyhs.org

PARENTS' NIGHT OUT, EB KIDS EVENT Motza'ey Shabbat, Feb. 27th
The next "Parents' Night Out" program is.  Have an evening out and let us watch your kids.  Kids will enjoy a FUN scavenger hunt and feature film,, "The Peanuts Movie"! - with snacks and hot chocolate served.    For grades K-5, 7:15-9:30 pm.  Only $5/child, RSVP by noon, 2/26 to rlr62@comcast.net.  Questions? Call Rochelle at 206 227-6509

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

https://www.kckoshercoop.com/  
The KCKosherCoop has come to Seattle and the PASSOVER order deadline is less than two weeks away (on 2/25)! This deadline is early because suppliers require orders well in advance for Passover. If you haven't already done so please go to our website (www.kckoshercoop.com) and create a free account so you will receive emails from us about order deadlines and specials. You will also be able to see the current and next order deadline and delivery dates on the top right corner of the website when you log into your co-op account.  All items on the website are kosher for Passover. Be sure to check out our great Passover specials listed online, including $0.99/lb chicken wings, $7.99/22 oz loaf gefilte fish, $1.99/lb chicken in eighths, $2.48/lb chicken leg quarters, $7.94/lb 1st cut brisket (and many more...). If you don't want to purchase a full case you can put items on the Split Products page which will help facilitate sharing of items.  Special Passover Promotion:  No more searching for a lamb shank bone for your seder plate, we'll send you one for free! We are pleased to be able to offer a free Lamb Shank with your order (OU/CRC/Glatt/Beit Yosef/Domestic). To get the lamb shank, just add the $0.00 Lamb Shank that we just put on the Specials page. But there is more! We are also offering a freeBedikas Chometz Set (add the $0.00 set to your order) which includes a feather, spoon, candle, crumb bag, and brachasheet for your "search for chometz" activity. As always, feel free to contact us with any questions (for fastest response, email us directly at admin@kckoshercoop.com). If you don't see what you're looking for just shoot us an email and we'll try and track it down.For More info:  Facebook Group:  “Kosher Deals in Seattle

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome back Rebbetzin ChanaBracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

PJ Library® Neighborhood Song and Story
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's PJ Library® Neighborhood Song & Story times have expanded to 12 locations! It's a great opportunity for PJ families to connect with Jewish life through music, stories and fun activities. Locations and Schedule at
http://www.jewishinseattle.org/what-we-do-jkids-early-childhood/pj-library/community .

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13
At the Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org 

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

"The Amazing Life and Courage of Dona Gracia Nasi: Sun Feb 28th 1:00pm-2:00pm 
Author Andrée Aelion Brooks talks about her book on Dona Gracia Nasi  “The Richest Woman in 16th Century Europe”, who built an escape network that saved hundreds of forcibly converted Jews from the Inquisition. Seattle University Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building. 
https://www.seattleu.edu/searchformeaning/tickets/  

Grow Your Legacy in the Jewish Federation LIFE & LEGACY™ Program Info: Mon Feb 22, 11 am-1 pm
Jewish organizations can learn about growing their legacy giving through the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's partnership with the Harold Grinspoon Foundation.At the Mercer Island Community & Event Center.www.jewishinseattle.org

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY PURIM BAKE SALE MARCH 20
The EBLA Purim Bake Sale takes place this year on March 20, 2016, from 9:30 am-1:00pm. Breakfast will be available to purchase, along with Hamentashen, Biscochos, Travados, Baklava and more!  You may pre-order by phoning Selma Amon at 206 721-0533

SAVE THE DATE: EB TO HOST COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director Slawomir Grunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR TEZAVEH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347351/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Tetzaveh.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

The conclusion of the tractate of Chagigah and the entire Order of Mo’ed(Festivals) records a difference of opinion between Rabbi Eliezer and the Sages as to why the Golden Altar and the Copper Altar of the Sanctuary1 were not susceptible to ritual impurity.

Rabbi Eliezer explains that the altars are considered as earth.2 Just as earth cannot contract ritual impurity, so too, these altars. Our Sages, by contrast, state that the reason is that the gold or copper coverings were merely an overlay. As such, they were subordinate to (and considered an extension of) the altars’ inner material, which was not susceptible to ritual impurity.3

The Torah, which was given by an infinite G‑d, is itself infinite. Its lessons are equally relevant at all times and in all places. It has the same strength now, in the darkness of exile, as when it was given to Moshe on Mount Sinai.

One hallmark of the Torah’s infinity is that every concept in it has endless interpretations. In general, these are divided into four categories: pshat the simple meaning, remez an extended meaning or allusion, derush a homily, andsod the underlying mystic concept.4

An allusion derived from the teaching mentioned above provides us with lessons relevant to our daily lives, for in his own place, every person serves as a “sanctuary in microcosm” in which the Divine Presence rests.

There were several sacred articles in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash. Similarly, within our individual “sanctuaries” there are “sacred articles”: our intellect, our feelings, and the like. In these matters, there is the possibility for “ritual impurity;” selfish intent, secular influence, or an unholy thought may creep in. There is even the possibility of sin, doing the opposite of G‑d’s will, and acting in conflict with the directives of the Torah and its mitzvos.

Continuing the analogy, sin makes a person’s “sacred articles” his thoughts or feelings impure. It thus becomes necessary to devise a means whereby that “sacred article” can be returned to G‑d’s sanctuary. For G‑d’s sanctuary every Jewish man, woman, and child must be pure.

With regard to material matters, and similarly with regard to spiritual potential, mankind is divided into the rich and the poor. Gold serves as an analogy for the rich,5 while the poor are associated with copper.6

The core of every Jew’s Jewishness, the pintele Yid, remains intact, regardless of the inner or outer dimensions of his personality. And this aspect of his being has one desire: to fulfill G‑d’s will. As my revered father-in-law, the Rebbe, would say:7 “No Jew desires to nor can he sever his bond with G‑d.”

Accordingly, every Jew can be considered an altar for G‑d. For what is an altar? A place where one slaughters one’s yetzerhora and brings a sacrifice for G‑d.

This concept is relevant to all Jews: both the rich (who can be compared to the Golden Altar), and the poor (who are likened to the Copper Altar). The true desire of every one is to slaughter the yetzer hora and fulfill G‑d’s will.

As mentioned, the altars are not susceptible to ritual impurity. The two rationales given can also be interpreted in the context of our Divine service. The first rationale holds that the altars are considered like the earth. This refers to the quality of humility, as we say in our prayers:8 “May my soul be as dust to all.” Just as everyone treads on the earth, so too a humble person has no self-concern, and no desire other than to fulfill G‑d’s will as expressed in the Torah and its mitzvos.

This is the rationale taught by Rabbi Eliezer ben Horkenus. Rabbi Eliezer was referred to as “Rabbi Eliezer the Great,” and was considered “equivalent to all the other Sages of Israel.”9 Nevertheless, he remained so humble that he “never mentioned a teaching that [he] had not heard from [his] teachers.”10

This approach enabled him to see the inner dimension of every Jew’s character, appreciating the level of which it is said:11 “Israel, the Torah, and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one,” i.e., a Jew’s entire life consists of the observance of Torah and mitzvos. Rabbi Eliezer taught his students that intellect and bittul (self-transcendence) are not opposites, and indeed complement each other, as reflected in his own Divine service: “never mention[ing] a teaching that [he] had not heard from [his] teachers.”

The Sages offer a second rationale, for they feel that Rabbi Eliezer’s approach is too difficult for the general public. They instead thought about a Jew’s external dimension. For it may happen that a person will stumble within his path of Divine service. This is particularly true with regard to a Jew who can be compared to a Golden Altar. Since he is involved with matters concerning gold, he may be distracted, and for a brief time may ignore the fulfillment of G‑d’s will. Similarly, a Jew who can be compared to a Copper Altar may be confronted by financial straits that cause him to violate G‑d’s will. Nevertheless, our Sages maintain that these occasional transgressions cause neither the rich Jew nor the poor Jew to become impure.

The reasoning is that both the gold and the copper are superficial coverings. The inner dimension of every Jew remains immune to impurity. Moreover, this inner dimension is so powerful that the external dimension becomes subordinate to it. In other words: every person will ultimately turn to G‑d inteshuvah and appreciate the Truth. He will grasp that a Jew’s life is solely G‑dliness, and that this G‑dliness can be tapped only through the study of the Torah, and observance of the mitzvos.

Moreover, such conduct is the medium which enables us to receive the blessings which G‑d promises, as it is written:

12

In contrast, the Altars are associated with the middle vector (see also Likkutei Torah, Bamidbar, p. 51a and 60a), and the middle vector “ascends to the inner dimensions of Kesser. ”

This also relates to the Ark, located in the Holy of Holies, which contained the Tablets of the Ten Commandments. The ark was entombed because it is not possible that gentiles would attain power over it.

Nevertheless, a reason must be given why the altars cannot contract impurity. For although they are represented by the middle vector, they are represented by attributes which are limited in nature.

The reason given by Rabbi Eliezer is that they are considered like earth, i.e., they reflect the utter selflessness that characterizes the quality of Kesser(Hosafos l’Torah Or, the beginning of Megillas Esther). There is indeed an explicit verse which identifies the external altar with earth, as it is written: “You shall make an altar of earth for Me.” This is stated explicitly only with regard to the external altar, the level of Malchus, because “the end is rooted at the beginning, and the beginning at the end (Sefer Yetzirah 1:7).” Therefore, in the destruction of the vessels of the World of Tohu, “the earth (alone) became nullified.”

With regard to the altars themselves, the inner altar is identified with Tiferesd’Zaer Anpin, and is thus considered “rich” when compared to the external altar identified with Malchus, of which it is said (Zohar I, 33b): “It has nothing of its own.”

The reason that the altars did not require tevilah (טבילה), which is identified[Siddur Im Dach, p. 159d] with bittul (הביטול), is because they themselves are expressions of bittul. Two reasons are given for this: they are considered like earth, and their surface is subordinate to their inner substance.

Rabbi Eliezer refers to the essence of G‑d, as reflected by the association (Bamidbar Rabbah 19:7) of his name with the verse (Shmos 18:4): אלה-י אבי בעזרי “The G‑d of my father provided assistance for me.” He is called “the Great,” and it is said (Megillah 31a): “In the place of His greatness, there you find His humility.” While looking at the external dimensions of existence, he was able to perceive the inner dimension. Thus the fact that the external substance of the altar was subservient to its inner substance was not significant for him, so he gave another rationale. For according to his conception, the external substance was always batel, for “There is nothing, [but Him] (Devarim 4:39, see the explanation in Tanya, Shaar HaYichud,ch. 6).”

The Sages differ, and the halachah follows their opinion, for “[Torah law] is not in the heavens (cf. Devarim 30:12),” but rather is determined according to the principles which prevail within the spiritual cosmos (Seder HaHishtalshelus). On this level, the external surface of the altar could be susceptible to ritual impurity, except that since it is batel to its inner substance, it is not. This is not the place for further elaboration concerning this matter.

“And if you walk in My statutes and observe My commandments… the land will provide its yield, and the trees of the field will give their fruit.” 

(Adapted from a letter, 15 MarCheshvan, 5711)

SHABBOS TERUMA M’shenichhnas Adar Marbim b’Simcha When Adar Enters – Joy Increases 3 - 10 Adar א 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Feb 12th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:09 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Feb 13th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:51 am/
Mincha 4:55 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:14 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri 7 am Shacharis
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv 5:15 pm /Repeat Shema after 6:08 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
Kiddush Lite – No sponsors. 
Seuda Slishit Lite is sponsored by Avrami Gitler.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Eli and Chaya Estrin on the birth of their new son!  May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We are saddened to inform you of the passing of Chaplain Gary Friedman Chaim Zvi ben Yehuda Leib ZT"L. May his memory be for a blessing.  Donations in his memory can be made at www.JPSI.org

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
May the family of Lorelei Brodsky ZT”L (Sarah bat Chaya) be comforted with all the mourners of Tzion andYerushalayim

Children's Program News 
Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web sitewww.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CSTL Annual Meeting - Thu Feb 18 7:30pm
CSTL is having a meeting to recap the last year and to plan for the new year. in the social hall. Looking forward to seeing you then. Mike Weichbrodt, President

GLOBAL CHILDREN’S GATHERING SUN FEB 14th 2-6 PM AT CSTL
Featuring Children’s Rally – Lunch – Twin from France. Info:  Rabbi Avi Herbstman avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

Melave Malka for Women to hear Mrs. Miriam Karp – Sat Night Feb 13 8:30 pm
Women’s Night Out!  Topic: “The Adar Challenge: Finding The Hidden Joy” At the home of Shprintze Kavka 4002 NE 72nd St. A dairy/parev meal will be served.  To cover costs - a donation is appreciated. RSVP is not required but appreciated 206-522-5321 or shprintzek@gmail.com

CSTL Shabbaton by Rabbi Moshe Kletenik. Shabbat 27 Feb. / 18 Adar Rishon
We are greatly honored to welcome Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik on the Shabbat Ki Tissa, 26-27 February 2016 (17-18 Adar 1) through to the Sunday 28th. They are jointly our Eminent Scholars in Residence. Thank you so much to Rabbi and Rebbetzin Kletenik for their continued kindness and chesed for making our Northend Community and CSTL even brighter. We greatly appreciate their doing this.  Rabbi Kletenik will speak at kiddush lunch: "Wake Up and Smell The Coffee” and at Seudah Shlishit: "A Halachic Perspective On Intellectual Property Rights".

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series - Sunday 28th  Feb  / 19th  Adar 1
Featuring Rebbetzin Rivy Poupko-Kletenik, Head of School, Seattle Hebrew Academy   Esther: A Text Study

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST -  RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333  
rabbi@shalomseattle.org

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  Begins on Wed Feb  17th 7.30-9PM.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL was made possible, in part, by a grant for operations from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome back Rebbetzin ChanaBracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

PJ Library® Neighborhood Song and Story
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's PJ Library® Neighborhood Song & Story times have expanded to 12 locations! It's a great opportunity for PJ families to connect with Jewish life through music, stories and fun activities. Locations and Schedule at http://www.jewishinseattle.org/what-we-do-jkids-early-childhood/pj-library/community .

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

"The Amazing Life and Courage of Dona Gracia Nasi: Sun Feb 28th 1:00pm-2:00pm 
Author Andrée Aelion Brooks talks about her book on Dona Gracia Nasi  “The Richest Woman in 16th Century Europe”, who built an escape network that saved hundreds of forcibly converted Jews from the Inquisition. Seattle University Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building. https://www.seattleu.edu/searchformeaning/tickets/  

Grow Your Legacy in the Jewish Federation LIFE & LEGACY™ Program Info: Mon Feb 22, 11 am-1 pm
Jewish organizations can learn about growing their legacy giving through the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's partnership with the Harold Grinspoon Foundation.At the Mercer Island Community & Event Center.www.jewishinseattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NYHS Gala Dinner and Auction, Sun Feb. 28th 
Honoring Rabbi Bernie and Shirley Fox. Doors Open at 5:00 pm. SHERATON Seattle Hotel, 1400 6th AVE, Seattle, WA  98101    For more information please contact us: www.nyhsgala.org or 206.232.5272 or to to get involved, contact chairs Debra Rettman and Beryl Cohen at gala@nyhs.org

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13th 
Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org  

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


TERUMA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347350/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Terumah.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

Parshas Terumah relates G‑d’s command to take gold and silver and other articles (13 different substances according to some commentaries,1 or 15 according to others2) and construct a sanctuary for G‑d. Together with the command:3 “And they shall make Me a Sanctuary,” G‑d promises: “I will dwell within.”

G‑d cannot be limited by physical location. Nevertheless, He promises to reside within a Sanctuary to be built within this material world, a building with a specific size and location. This applies not only to the Beis HaMikdash in Jerusalem, which remained in the same place from the time of its construction, but also to the Sanctuary which traveled with the Jews in their journeys through the desert. Although the Sanctuary was moved from place to place, wherever it was erected, there the Divine Presence rested.

This seems difficult to understand. G‑d is not bound by the limitations of space, and exists everywhere, as it is written:4 “I fill the heavens and the earth.” Why then did He command that a specific place be established for His Presence to dwell?

While it is true that G‑d is everywhere, it is possible that His existence will not be felt within the world. For G‑dliness can be felt only through Divine service. This service need not be confined to a specific locale; wherever a Jew serves G‑d, he draws down His influence.5 Seemingly, the Divine service performed in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash could be performed in other places, drawing down G‑d’s Presence everywhere. Why was it necessary that this service be performed only in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash?

Two Dimensions to the Sacrificial Offerings

One of the services,6 indeed, one of the fundamental services, performed in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash was sacrificial worship. Even in the Beis HaMikdash , there were two dimensions to such worship: a) the physical activities involved in offering an animal on the altar; and b) the spiritual counterpart of these activities,7 which today is accomplished through prayer, as our Sages commented:8 “The pray ers were instituted in place of the daily offerings.”

Both of these dimensions are connected with the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash. Sacrifices could be offered only in these places, as the Mishnahstates:9 “At the time the Sanctuary was erected, [the offering of sacrifices] at private altars became forbidden.” And similarly, after the construction of theBeis HaMikdash in Jerusalem, it became forbidden to offer sacrifices in any other spot.10

Similar concepts apply to prayer, the spiritual counterpart of the sacrifices. We may pray in any place, with the exception of an open valley,11 for it is hard to concentrate in such open spaces.12 Nevertheless, wherever we pray, we must always face the Beis HaMikdash, “the gate of heaven.”13 For it is through theBeis HaMikdash that our prayers ascend, as it is written:14 “They shall pray to You towards their land.” In the Diaspora, we should face Eretz Yisrael. In Eretz Yisrael, we should face Jerusalem, and in Jerusalem, we should face the Beis HaMikdash.15

This raises a question: Prayer is described16 as “service within the heart,” a spiritual activity. Why should it be associated with a specific place?

It can be explained that the actual offering of the sacrifices had to be associated with a specific place, for this involved placing an animal on the altar, and there were several conditions for this service. Moreover, even the spiritual influence drawn down through the sacrificial offerings was associated with the material realm, as reflected in the verse:17 “And fire emerged from before G‑d, and consumed the burnt offering.” Since even the spiritual influence aroused by the sacrifices was associated with this material realm, it is easier to accept the premise that the sacrificial offerings must be limited to one place.

(Even so, an explanation is still required, for the spiritual influence aroused by the sacrifices could seemingly also have been expressed in another place. Thus in the eras when it was not forbidden to offer sacrifices on private altars, it was possible to offer them in different places at the same time.)

With regard to prayer the spiritual dimension of the sacrifices the limitation to a specific place is more difficult to understand. Prayer is an entirely spiritual service. Aside from his own person, the individual praying is not involved with any material entity at all. His objective is to bring himself close to G‑d, and to draw his powers and senses closer to G‑d18 by devoting himself to Him in prayer and supplication.

Moreover, the fundamental element of prayer is the intent within the heart, a person’s spiritual efforts. It is true that one must also verbalize the words,19 but this is also associated with the heart’s intent, for “saying [words of prayer] aloud arouses one’s intent.”20

Prayer also has an effect within the material world.21 For through our prayers, we arouse G‑d’s influence and motivate Him to answer our supplications: healing the sick, granting prosperity, and the like. Nevertheless, this does not detract from the spiritual dimension of prayer, because with our physical eyes we cannot see the result of our prayers. With regard to the sacrifices, however, it was possible to actually see the heavenly fire on the altar.

Accordingly, the question remains: Since prayer is entirely a spiritual matter, why must it be associated with one specific place?

A Level Above the Infinite

The resolution of the above questions depends on a well-known spiritual principle:22 “The attributes which are highest in potential descend to the lowest levels.” The very fact that G‑d’s indwelling is associated with a specific material place the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash indicates that its source is a level so lofty that it is revealed on a very low rung.

To explain: G‑d is infinite. He is not bound by either the limits of finite space or the limits of transcendence. Just as it is improper to say that G‑d can be confined in a specific location, so too it is improper to say that He transcends space. For transcendence is also a definition that implies a limit; it is above space, and not within space.23 G‑d, by contrast, is above all definitions and limits, and manifests Himself in all mediums. And when space and transcendence, finiteness and infinity combine, when we see the merging of opposites, the power of G‑d’s essence is revealed. For He is truly omnipotent,24and can fuse contrary trends. This fusion creates a setting in which the Divine Presence rests.

This is the new development that occurred within the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash. On one hand, the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash were limited by the confines of our material world. The curtains, the boards, the sockets, and the other elements of the Sanctuary all had specific measurements.25 Similarly, a precise width and length was specified for the BeisHaMikdash , and for the utensils used in both structures. Moreover, these measurements had to be adhered to exactly. As with the other laws of the Torah, even a slight deviation would disqualify them.

Nevertheless, together with this emphasis on precise measurements, an element of G‑dliness which transcended limitation was overtly revealed in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash , demonstrating a fusion of limitation and transcendence. As the Mishnah relates,26 there were ten ongoing miracles in the Beis HaMikdash. And in the Holy of Holies (the essential element of the Beis HaMikdash27), there was an open miracle. “The space of the ark itself was not included in the measurement [of the chamber’s length].”28 The ark was two and one half cubits long.29 There were ten cubits from the western wall to the ark of the Holy of Holies, and ten cubits from the ark to the eastern wall of the Holy of Holies, and yet the length of the entire chamber was 20 cubits. This revealed the power of G‑d’s essence, which is able to fuse space and transcendence.

For this reason, both the sacrificial offerings and our prayers are connected with the Beis HaMikdash. For the purpose of these spiritual endeavors is to establish a connection with the level of G‑dliness that is above all forms of description. It cannot even be described by the term “unlimited.”30

To relate to this level of G‑dliness, it is necessary for the Divine service which establishes the connection to be associated with a limited material place. Were our prayers and the sacrifices not confined to a specific place, they would relate only to that dimension of G‑dliness which transcends limitation, but not to G‑d’s essence. How is G‑d’s essence expressed? In the fusion of limitation and transcendence.31

(For this reason, even during those periods of time when it was permitted to offer sacrifices on private altars, those sacrifices did not possess the advantage of sacrifices offered in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash. This is reflected by the fact that the sacrifices offered in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdashwere governed by many more laws and limitations. Moreover, there were certain sacrifices offered in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash which could never be offered on private altars.)32

The Contrast Between the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash

On this basis, we can also understand why the Beis HaMikdash was on a higher level than the Sanctuary.33 The Sanctuary was not located in one specific place, but traveled with the Jewish people through the desert, as it is written:34 “And I [the Divine Presence] journeyed in a tent.” Moreover, the primary component of the Sanctuary was wood, from the plant kingdom (the sockets were made of metal, but they merely served as a foundation). The structure thus did not incorporate the lowest levels, inanimate matter, and therefore cannot be said to have drawn down the highest levels of light, compared to the Beis HaMikdash.

In contrast, the Beis HaMikdash was restricted to a specific place, and was constructed primarily of stone, inanimate matter, i.e., it extended to the lowest levels. Within these limitations was manifest the truly unlimited power of G‑d’s essence, a power which cannot be confined by any limitations, to the extent that it can be connected with a clearly defined, specific place within our material world.35 In this limited world, and particularly within its lowest levels, inanimate matter, a dwelling can be established for G‑d’s essence.

For these reasons, the Sanctuary served as a temporary dwelling for G‑d, while the Beis HaMikdash became His permanent home.

Each Person a Sanctuary

On this basis, we can understand our Sages’36 interpretation of the verse: “And they shall make Me a Sanctuary, and I will dwell within.” The verse does not use the singular form of the word “within,” which would imply that the indwelling is within the structure of the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash , but rather the plural form, indicating that G‑d dwells within each and every Jew. When a Jew makes his physical environment a Sanctuary for G‑d by studying the Torah, performing mitzvos, and infusing holiness into the mundane entities with which he comes in contact, he makes himself a resting place for G‑d’s Presence.

And indeed, in a certain way, the indwelling of G‑d’s Presence within each Jew surpasses the indwelling of His Presence in the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash. For although the Beis HaMikdash was built in a physical place, and with inanimate objects, it can hardly be considered as “lowly” when compared to the world at large. When a Jew brings holiness into inanimate objects in the world at large, he fulfills the ultimate intent for the creation of the world that G‑d should have a dwelling in this material plane, “below which there is no lower level.”37 There he fashions a resting place for G‑d’s essence.

Therefore it is this type of Divine service38 which will lead to the building of the Third Beis HaMikdash , where G‑d’s true infinity will be manifest to an even greater degree than in the First and Second Batei Mikdash.39

Holiness in Everything We Do

Our present endeavor to “make a Sanctuary for Me,” i.e., every Jew’s efforts to infuse holiness into his environment, must follow the same pattern as the construction of the sanctuary. It must encompass one’s gold and silver and all the 13 (or 15) different substances from which the Sanctuary was constructed. In the Sanctuary, these materials became holy. It is the same with regard to the Sanctuary a Jew makes from his worldly possessions: they also must become holy.

It is not sufficient for a Jew to conduct himself in a manner which differs from that of a non-Jew with regard to restrictions, such as observing the prohibitions against deception or infringement of a colleague’s rights. The ultimate purpose of his work is to make a positive contribution, so that even within his commercial activity, he sees and hears G‑dliness. Not only will his efforts be conducted “for the sake of heaven,”40 using material entities for a spiritual purpose, but the materials themselves will become holy. This happened in the Sanctuary, where the substances used to build it themselves became part of G‑d’s resting place.

This reflects the approach of “Know G‑d in all your ways.”41 Not only should one’s conduct be directed toward bringing about the knowledge of G‑d; in everything one does, one should know G‑d. To cite a parallel: eating onShabbos is a mitzvah.42

This concept should be extended with regard to eating during the week, and to all the other physical activities one performs; not only should they be performed “for the sake of heaven,” they themselves should be expressions of the knowledge of G‑d. The table at which a person eats should be “the table which is before G‑d”;43 it should be holy like the altar was holy.44 Similar concepts apply with regard to all material activities.

The Order of the Book of Shmos

On this basis, we can also appreciate the connection between Parshas Terumah and the parshiyos Yisro and Mishpatim which precede it.45 For theseparshiyos develop a common theme.46 ParshasYisro speaks about the giving of the Torah, which established a connection between the spiritual and the material. ParshasMishpatim expands this concept, as reflected in our Sages’ interpretation47 of the verse:48 “And these are the judgments,” “These complement those which came before (the Ten Commandments),” formishpatim communicate a G‑dly code of law that is to be applied in our everyday life.

But there is still a limitation. The mishpatim reflect how spirituality can be connected with material existence at the time of the fulfillment of a mitzvah. Parshas Terumah reflects how material existence can become suffused with holiness for all time. When material substances are used in the construction of a Sanctuary, they themselves become holy, as reflected in the path of service indicated by the verse “Know Him in all your ways.” Moreover, this connection continues forever, as implied by our Sages’ statement:49 “Whenever the word li(‘Me’) is mentioned, an ongoing bond is implied.”

Extending this concept, we can see the sequence of all the parshiyos in the Book of Shmos , and the pattern of ascent which they follow. The first parshiyosspeak about the Egyptian exile and the exodus; these served as a preparation for the giving of the Torah. Afterwards, parshiyos Yisro and Mishpatim tell about the giving of the Torah and its laws, which make possible a connection between the spiritual and the physical. The parshiyos from Terumah onward50 show how G‑dliness can permeate every aspect of material existence, as expressed in our endeavors to “Know Him in all your ways.”

(Adapted from Sichos Shabbos Parshas Shemini, 5722)

SHABBOS MISHPATIM - Mevarchim Adar א 26 Shevat – 3 Adar א 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Feb 5th  
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:57 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Feb 6th  
Tehilim for Mevarchim Adar א  7:30 am
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:56 am/
Mincha 4:45 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:03 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon, Thu - Fri 7 am Shacharis
Tue-Wed 6:50 am Shacharis /Rosh Chodesh Adar
  א/
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv 5:00 pm /Repeat Shema after 5:58 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
There are two sponsors of this week's kiddush.  Dr. Norman Share is sponsoring in honor and memory of the 6thyahrzeit of his brother, Zvi Le’ev ben Ya'acov ha Cohen (22nd Shevat).  
Rabbi and Mrs. Kavka are also sponsoringkiddush, on the occassion of the visit of Sarale and Naftali to Seattle and in honor of their engagement!
Seuda SlishitLite is sponsored by 
Shimon Dershowitz in honor of the 15th Yartzeit of Stanford Poll ZT”L

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Abraham and Shprintze Kavka on the Engagement of Sarale and Naftali. May they build a bayisne’eman b’Yisroel!

Children's Program News 
We are beginning new program led by Rabbi Herbstman.  We will have a Boys Junior Minyan for 6 years old and up starting this Shabbos morning.  It will be from 10:00 until 10:30. This program will offer a child-centered approach to Shabbos davening with songs, warmth, meaning, and of course... Mitzvah dollars!! We are planning to meet the first Shabbos of each English month.  We will be meeting in the Social Hall at 10 sharp.  Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP!
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web sitewww.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FINAL 5776 Avos U'Banim Hakhel Edition - -This Sat Night Feb 6th  7:00 pm
Thanks to our generous sponsors this week: Chani and Shuky Meyer. Additional prizes will be offered this week with a delicious spread of bagels, lox and more... NEW~Thanks to an unbelievably generous sponsor  Seforim have arrived which will be included in the raffle!!!!~NEW This Motzei Shabbat (Feb 6th 7:00 pm) I am so excited invite you to the final night of Father and Son Learning at CSTL.We will also feature a short Living Torah video on the Big Screen.  I will provide materials in English and Hebrew.  Please feel welcome to bring your own materials if  you would prefer. Please come and join in our efforts to build our community in the spirit of Torah learning.  ~This Program was instituted in loving memory of Brandon Gribin - Rephael Chaim Ben Shmuel~  Rabbi Avi Herbstman

GLOBAL CHILDREN’S GATHERING SUN FEB 14th 2-6 PM AT CSTL
Featuring Children’s Rally – Lunch – Twin from France. Info:  Rabbi Avi Herbstman avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

CSTL Shabbaton by Rabbi Moshe Kletenik. Shabbat 27 Feb. / 18 Adar Rishon
More to follow but please note the date.

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series - Sunday 28th  Feb  / 19th  Adar 1
Featuring Rebbetzin Rivy Poupko-Kletenik

RABBI LEVITIN WEEKLY CLASS:  JEWISH LAW – SUNDAYS 8-9 AM 
Shulchan Aruch Hilchot Netilas Yadayim – Laws of Washing the Hands.  At CSTL.

JEWISH HISTORY WITH CHANI LEVITIN – TUESDAYS  7:30 pm
Second Temple and Onward.  At the Home of Rabbi and Mrs. Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE.  ChanieLevitin@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST -  RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333  
rabbi@shalomseattle.org .

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  Begins on Thu Feb  11th 7.30-9PM.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Begins on Thu Feb  11th. Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL was made possible, in part, by a grant for operations from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Hana's Suitcase – Jan 21-Feb 7
The Seattle Children's Theatre stages a multi-media presentation of the true story of "Hana's Suitcase." When a child’s suitcase from Auschwitz bearing the name "Hana Brady" arrives at the Holocaust Education Centre in Tokyo, the center's curator embarks on a relentless search to uncover the story of Hana and her fate. Matinee and evening times,http://www.sct.org/

Casino Night at BCMH, Saturday Night, Feb. 6
Must be 21 and over to attend. Cost: $36/person or $50/per couple or with a friend. RSVP in advance & get double the chips. More info: http://www.bcmhcasinonight.eventbrite.com

PJ Library® Neighborhood Song and Story
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's PJ Library® Neighborhood Song & Story times have expanded to 12 locations! It's a great opportunity for PJ families to connect with Jewish life through music, stories and fun activities. Locations and Schedule at 
http://www.jewishinseattle.org/what-we-do-jkids-early-childhood/pj-library/community

Small Agency Sustainability - Grant Applications Open
Small agencies serving the Jewish community in Western Washington are eligible to apply for the Federation's Small Agency Sustainability grants, which provide up to $5,000 in operational support for organizations with an annual operating budget of $200,000 or less. Applications are due on Thu, Feb 18.

Project DVORA: Domestic Violence Outreach, Response & Advocacy
Project DVORA will create the conditions in the Jewish community to support loving, safe and respectful relationships; and build the capacity in the community to respond to domestic abuse.  Contact Brook, 206-861-3181 for latest information and programming.

"The Amazing Life and Courage of Dona Gracia Nasi: Sun Feb 28th 1:00pm-2:00pm 
Author Andrée Aelion Brooks talks about her book on Dona Gracia Nasi  “The Richest Woman in 16th Century Europe”, who built an escape network that saved hundreds of forcibly converted Jews from the Inquisition. Seattle University Vachon Gallery-Fine Arts Building. https://www.seattleu.edu/searchformeaning/tickets/  

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP
Sephardic Adventure Camp 2016 registration is NOW OPEN!  For more information or to register, please go to our website at www.sephardicadventurecamp.org  This summer SAC will be held August 2nd - 18th at our new location, Camp Roganunda, located in the Wenatchee National Forest, just east of majestic Mt. Rainier!  Don't miss out on the fun! 

BCMH SUMMER CAMP
Special Announcement regarding BCMH Camps for Summer 2016! All divisions of BCMH camps will now be under one name Camp Yavneh with all new programs and activities to supplement the programs you already love! This will include children from pre school all the way through our new CIT program for 6th and 7th grade and our staff in high school, college and beyond! If you are in 8th-12 grade, college or older and would like to work at Camp this summer please contact Ari Hoffman at thehoffather@gmail.com Camper Registration coming soon!

Jewish Federation Summer Camp at  www.jewishinseattle.org
to learn about how OneHappyCamper and our scholarship programs can help your child get to camp this summer.Jewishovernight camp offers endless activities-singing, rock climbing, you name it. Your campers will return home confident and invigorated, sure of themselves and proud of their heritage.

Grow Your Legacy in the Jewish Federation LIFE & LEGACY™ Program Info: Mon Feb 22, 11 am-1 pm
Jewish organizations can learn about growing their legacy giving through the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle's partnership with the Harold Grinspoon Foundation.At the Mercer Island Community & Event Center.www.jewishinseattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NYHS Gala Dinner and Auction, Sun Feb. 28th 
Honoring Rabbi Bernie and Shirley Fox. Doors Open at 5:00 pm. SHERATON Seattle Hotel, 1400 6th AVE, Seattle, WA  98101    For more information please contact us: www.nyhsgala.org or 206.232.5272 or to to get involved, contact chairs Debra Rettman and Beryl Cohen at gala@nyhs.org

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13th 
Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org  

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


MISHPATIM
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347347/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Beshalach.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe  | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

On the verse:1 “These are the judgments which you shall place before them,” our Sages and Rabbis offer several interpretations of the Hebrew לפניהם , translated as “before them.”

a) Judgments must be passed “before them,” i.e., a dispute between Jews must be settled before Jewish judges who rule according to Torah law, and not before gentile magistrates. Even when the secular law is no different than that of the Torah, litigation must be brought before a Rabbinic court.2

b) לפניהם shares a connection with the Hebrew word, פנים , which has several meanings, including “inner dimensions.” In this context, the verse instructs us that when teaching a student these judgments, one should expose him to their inner meaning.3 He should not be taught the laws as a dry canon, but should be shown the motivating principle behind them. Moreover, instead of telling a student: “This is the law. Discover the motivating principle yourself,” the concepts should be taught in a manner which sits well within the student’s understanding.

c) The Alter Rebbe explains4 that “inner dimensions” refers to the student. The Torah’s judgments are Divine knowledge, and this knowledge must be implanted in the inner dimensions of a Jew’s soul. Within our spiritual makeup, we have a number of different levels, some revealed and some hidden. The Torah must permeate even the most hidden of our spiritual potentials.

Like all concepts in Chassidus, the above is also alluded to in Nigleh, the revealed dimensions of Torah law. Commenting on the above verse, theJerusalem Talmud5 associates the word tasim, rendered as “place,” with the Hebrew word simah, meaning “treasure-store,” referring to the hidden secrets of the Torah. And the secrets of the Torah arouse the hidden, inner dimensions of the soul.6

As mentioned on several occasions, when our Sages offer different interpretations of the same word in the Torah, all the interpretations share a connection.7 Similarly, with regard to the concepts mentioned above, the different interpretations of לפניהם share a connection.

The common ground underlying these interpretations can be understood by considering the connection between the directives implied by the word לפניהםand the mitzvos that are referred to as mishpatim. As is well known,8 themitzvos of the Torah are divided into three categories: chukimeidus, andmishpatim. These three categories reflect the differing degrees to which a particular mitzvah can be fathomed by our reason and logic.

The mitzvos described as chukim do not have a rationale that can be grasped by reason. Instead, they are observed in obedience to G‑d’s will. They are, as the Midrash relates,9 “statutes which I have ordained, decrees which I have issued,” to be observed even though one does not understand.

Eidus, by contrast, are mitzvos whose rationale can be grasped. Had the Torah not commanded them, we would not have proposed these observances on the basis of our own logic. Nevertheless, once the Torah has given such commands, we can comprehend their rationale.

Mishpatim represent the category of mitzvos which are mandated by even mortal intellect alone (i.e., our reason not only accepts the observance of these practices, it requires their observance). In this vein, our Sages said:10 “If Heaven forbid the Torah had not been given, we would have learned modesty from a cat, and [the prohibition against] theft from an ant.” For even without the Torah’s commandment, our own minds would have dictated the observance of this type of mitzvah.

Questions thus arise: Why is it with regard to mishpatim that the Torah mentions the concept of לפניהם , with all of its interpretations? Why are these lessons more closely associated with mishpatim than with eidus and chukim?

An explanation can be given according to the first interpretation of לפניהם. For only with regard to mishpatim is it possible for gentile judges to rule in the same manner as Jews. With regard to eidus, and surely with regard to chukim, there is no need to forewarn against approaching non-Jewish judges, for it is obvious that such people have no understanding of these things. Their rulings have no connection to subjects which transcend human intellect. But since mishpatiminvolve matters that fall within the scope of human intellect, it is possible that gentiles will rule in the manner the Torah prescribes. Therefore it is necessary to say that a Jew must bring all disputes before a Jewish court.

The second interpretation, however that when teaching a student, one should expose him to the motivating principles behind the laws, so that he will understand them thoroughly seems more appropriate for eidus and chukim. Our unaided intellect does not obligate the observance of eidus, and chukimare entirely above our conceptual grasp. Accordingly, it is necessary to emphasize that when teaching a student, these concepts should be conveyed in a manner that facilitates internalization.

This message appears unnecessary with regard to mishpatim. In that realm, it is obvious that the instruction should be conveyed in a manner to which a student can relate.

Neither does interpreting לפניהם as “to your inner dimensions” seem to relate tomishpatim. In order to observe the mishpatim, it is seemingly unnecessary to arouse the inner dimension of our souls, for these mitzvos are obligated by our intellect. Since chukim, by contrast, transcend the dictates of intellect, their observance must be spurred by the inner dimension of the soul. Without such inspiration, observance of these mitzvos will be a function of duty alone. Ifthesemitzvos are not internalized, a Jew will carry them out only because he must; without inner vitality. For him to internalize these mitzvos and be motivated to perform them with vigor, one must involve the inner dimensions of one’s soul, which transcend intellect.

Faith Does not Exclude Intellect

Our Sages state11 that “deed is most essential,” emphasizing that the actual observance of a mitzvah is of fundamental importance. For example, with regard to the mitzvah of tefillin and “the entire Torah is equated with tefillin”12were a person to have in mind all the spiritual intentions associated with themitzvah, but fail to actually bind tefillin to his head and arm, he has not performed the mitzvah, and is placed in the category of “a skull on which tefillinhave not been placed.”13 If, by contrast, a person were to put on tefillin even without considering the intent, he fulfills the mitzvah. This applies even when a person is advanced enough to be capable of directing his intent, yet fails to do so. Although he fulfills the mitzvah in a perfunctory manner, he must recite a blessing beforehand, and mention G‑d’s name and His sovereignty.14 The lack of higher intention does not detract from the fact that the mitzvah has been observed. The same applies with regard to other mitzvos, because “deed is most essential.”

Nevertheless, this emphasis on deed is not meant to exclude thought or feeling. On the contrary, G‑d intends all the mitzvos to permeate our characters, encompassing all the potentials which we possess.15 A mitzvah should affect not only one’s powers of deed and speech, but also one’s powers of thought and emotion, and even the encompassing powers of will and pleasure.

This does not apply only to those mitzvos which naturally depend on understanding and the feelings of the heart, e.g., the mitzvos of love, fear, faith in G‑d, knowledge of G‑d, and the like. Even mitzvos dependent on deed must permeate every aspect of our personalities, including our deepest potentials, especially the potential of pleasure. For every mitzvah must be observed with happiness and joy ,16 as alluded to in the verse:17 “All the choice parts should be given to G‑d.”

Accordingly, not only the mishpatim, but also the chukim must be fulfilled with a commitment that encompasses our minds as well as our bodies. They should not be regarded as mere imperatives required of us because we must perform G‑d’s command even when it appears to be without reason or purpose. Instead, the mitzvos must permeate every dimension of our being. Since G‑d gave these commandments, even the chukim should be made a part of our thought processes.

This is not meant to imply that we should simply admit man’s inability to grasp the rationale for the chukim , and be satisfied that G‑d, who commanded their observance, has a rationale for them. This attitude indicates that a person is still lacking in kabbalas ol; he has not transcended the limits of his intellect. On the contrary, his observance is motivated by his trust that the chukim embody and reflect great wisdom.

The proper way is to observe the chukim with kabbalas ol, the acceptance of G‑d’s yoke, without any rationale whatsoever.18 This approach does not require the denial of one’s intellect. On the contrary, one’s kabbalas ol must have so much strength and vitality that it influences one’s intellect and spurs it to accept this path. One’s mind should appreciate that it is necessary to fulfill G‑d’s will without wondering why.

On this basis, we can appreciate the precision of our Rabbis’ wording:19 “It is a decree… you have no permission to question its observance.” On the surface, the Rabbis should have said: “You have no permission not to observe it.” Why is “questioning” mentioned?

The explanation is that the mere observance of such mitzvos in deed is not sufficient. Instead, one must develop a thoughtful commitment to their observance, to the extent that one does not question. This goes beyond the advice that a person who occasionally thinks the chukim are of no value should dismiss the thought immediately, as stated in Tanya20 with regard to other concepts. The intent is rather to say that a person who observes chukimproperly does not question ; he proceeds with a single-minded commitment that knows no doubt.

Such a person observes the chukim without a rationale for his observance, not even relying on the explanation that G‑d surely has a rationale. His entire personality is permeated with simple faith and kabbalas ol, to the extent that this affects his thinking processes, and he does not question. His commitment has pervaded his thoughts to such an extent that no other approach even occurs to him.

According to this explanation, it is clear that to observe the chukim properly, one must arouse the inner dimensions of one’s soul the third explanation ofלפניהם mentioned above. For it is this potential that enables the chukim to be accepted within the framework of our intellect and emotion. Without the influence of this inner dimension, a person will not be able to reach the single-minded commitment described above. It is possible that he will observe thechukim with kabbalas ol, but his observance will lack vitality.

When, however, a person arouses the inner dimensions of his soul, he derives a satisfaction in his Divine service which transcends the limits of knowledge. This enables him to internalize the Torah’s laws, and make them a part of the way he thinks and feels.

With regard to mishpatim, by contrast, the lessons of לפניהם are seemingly not applicable. For the mitzvos classified as mishpatim can be understood by the intellect, and thus a person will naturally derive satisfaction from their observance. Why is it necessary for a person to arouse his soul for the observance of these mitzvos?

An Outgrowth of the Revelation at Sinai

The above question can be resolved by first explaining another statement of our Sages. On the verse: “And these are the judgments,” our Sages comment:21 “These complement those which came before.” The mishpatimcome as a continuation of and a corollary to the Ten Commandments, for themishpatim were also given at Mount Sinai.

As mentioned previously,22 the Ten Commandments represent a fusion ofmitzvos from both extremes of the spiritual spectrum. The first mitzvos express the deepest concepts of Divine unity, while the latter convey basic dictums such as “Do not kill” and “Do not steal”23 which can be grasped even by undeveloped mortals. This fusion emphasizes that the correct observance of “Do not kill” and “Do not steal” must stem from the awareness that they are also G‑d’s commandments; they were dictated by the same One who declared: “I am G‑d your L-rd.”24

By saying: “These complement those which came before,” our Sages are implying that the mishpatim were given on Mount Sinai as a continuation of the giving of the Torah. As such, they must be observed not only because they make sense, but because they too were given by G‑d.

This is highlighted by the first interpretation of לפניהם , which forbids reliance on gentile courts, even when their decisions resemble those rendered by a Torah court. For their decisions are not associated with the revelation of “I am G‑d your G‑d.” Their rulings are not expressions of the laws of the Torah. Therefore we are forbidden to seek them out, for every dimension of a Jew’s life must be guided by the Torah.

This also relates to the Alter Rebbe’s interpretation of לפניהם as referring to the inner dimensions of the soul. The intent is that the study and practice ofmishpatim should be motivated not only by mortal intellect, but rather by the inner depths of the soul, as with the study and practice of chukim.

And similarly, with regard to the mishpatim, an effort must be made to internalize their observance [the second interpretation of לפניהם], not only as compelled by mortal intellect, but as an expression of the depths of the soul. For as mentioned above, a Jew’s G‑dly core must affect the full range of his character, allowing even these spiritual concepts to become part and parcel of his thought processes.25

Based on the above, we can appreciate the interrelation between the three interpretations of לפניהם , and the fact that these concepts are taught in connection with mishpatim in particular. Since mishpatim are mitzvos which can be comprehended by our intellect, it is necessary to emphasize that this understanding alone should not motivate their observance, but rather that they should be kept because they too were given at Sinai. Thus the mishpatim too must be observed with a kabbalasol inspired by the inner depths of the soul (the Alter Rebbe’s interpretation).

Accordingly, it is forbidden to bring judgments to a gentile court (the first interpretation), for their rulings are based solely on mortal intellect. And although the observance of mishpatim should be motivated by kabbalas ol, thiskabbalas ol should be internalized within our thinking process (the second interpretation) through the arousal of the soul’s inner potential.

The Drawbacks of Relying on Mortal Intellect Alone

There are two reasons for not relying on mortal intellect in observing themishpatim:

a) Were the observance of these mitzvos to depend on concepts that could be understood by our animal souls, there would be a tendency towards spiritual descent, as implied by our Sages’ statement:26 “Today, it (the yetzer hora) tells a person ‘Do this.’ Tomorrow, it tells him ‘Do that’… until it tells him ‘Go worship false divinities.’ ”

My revered father-in-law, the Rebbe, would explain27 that at first the yetzer hora does not have the boldness to entice a Jew to sin. Therefore it begins by telling him to perform a mitzvah “Today, it tells a person ‘Do this,’ ” i.e., something which the Torah itself commands. But when a person fulfills amitzvah because his animal soul deems it beneficial to do so, and not because G‑d commanded him to do so in the Torah, he severs his connection with G‑d. From then on, it is possible to descend lower and lower. “Tomorrow, it [will] tell him ‘Do that’ ” and ultimately, “it [will] tell him, ‘Go worship false divinities.’ ”

b) Moreover, when a person fulfills a mitzvah only because of the dictates of mortal wisdom, his observance lacks a fundamental awareness of the connection established (for the word mitzvah relates to the word tzavsa, meaning “connection”) with “I am G‑d, your L-rd.” He does not appreciate that his observance is an expression of the Torah’s mandates.

A Thrust Toward Outreach

As mentioned previously, the fusion of the two extremes in the Ten Commandments teaches a twofold lesson:

a) To borrow the wording of the Midrash,28 “the higher realms descended to the lower realms.” In the analog, the spiritual power embodied in the commandments “I am G‑d” and “You shall have no other gods”29 must descend and be felt in the observance of the commandments “Do not kill” and “Do not steal.” Even these mitzvos should be observed because they were commanded by G‑d Himself.

b) “The lower realms ascended to the higher realms.” In the analog, the term “lower realms” refers to people who by nature are even less developed than animals, and thus do not learn the prohibition against theft “from an ant…” They must be commanded “Do not kill” and “Do not steal” by G‑d Himself. Even such individuals must meditate and “ascend to the higher realms,” developing their faith and knowledge of G‑dliness in order to establish a connection with “I am G‑d, your L-rd.”

These two directives are emphasized again at the beginning of ParshasMishpatim, which as mentioned above is a continuation of the giving of the Torah. As stated previously, the observance of mishpatim must be inspired by the inner depths of the soul. This reflects “the descent of the higher realms to the lower realms.”30

Simultaneously, there must be “the ascent of the lower realms to the higher realms.” Students who have a minimal knowledge of the Torah and who do not have the ability to make distinctions must be shown how to study, with the lessons prepared “as a table set before a person, ready for him to eat from.”31

Moreover, this can also refer to those who are lowly with regard to their moral development, such as litigants who occasionally advance false arguments. (Although the word לפניהם , “before them,” refers to the judges, since it is speaking about judgments, it also relates to the litigants.) These lowly individuals must be exposed to the “treasure stores” of pnimiyusHaTorah, the Torah’s inner, mystic core.

This exposure will awaken the inner dimensions of the soul, a level on which all Jews are “worthy,”32 potentially fit to receive these treasures. Although the inner dimension of the soul may be hidden from such people, we are obligated to help them reveal it. And this is accomplished by exposing them to the Torah’s treasures.

This arouses the inner dimension of their souls, and motivates this inner potential to permeate their conscious powers of thought and feeling. And it also affects their deeds, leading to the observance of the mitzvos with energy and vitality.33

(Adapted from Sichos Shabbos Parshas Mishpatim, 5722)

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