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Newsletter

SHABBOS TZAV 15-22 Adar ב 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Mar 25th 
Shacharis 7 am /SHUSHAN PURIM – No Tachanun/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 7:12 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Mar 26th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 10:08 am/
Mincha 7:00 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 8:17 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon  - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv
 7:20 pm /Repeat Shema after 8:10 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
Kiddush is sponsored this week by Dr Yussi Greenberg, in honor and in memory of the 9th yahrzeit of his mother, Nechama bas Hershel ZT”L (19th Adar).
Seuda Slishit Lite sponsored by Joshua Stein

Children's Program News 
Boys junior minyan shabbos morning from 10-10:30 led by Rabbi Herbstman.  Ages 6 and above Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Simcha’s Shmura Matzah Co-op 
Simcha Brandeis is taking orders for mid April delivery of high quality unbroken ShmuraMatzah.Please contact Simcha at: sbrandeis@gmail.com or 206 633 3896 to place your order.

CSTL Fund Raising through Amazon
Amazon has a program of giving 0.5% of your purchase to the charity of your choice. Congregation Shaarei Tefilah Lubavitch is one of the charities. This is a great way to raise funds for the shul without incurring extra charges or financial burdens.  Go to Amazon Smile:https://smile.amazon.com  to register

Annual Lamplighter Dinner & Auction. Sun Mar 27th (17th Adar Bet) 5 pm
With the dedication of the Berel and Miriam Weiss Early Childhood Center. Honoring long- time parents and volunteers Mr. Joel and Dr. Sarah Baskin. http://www.mmscdayschool.org/ At Hillel.

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND AND SEWARD PARK!!! (For transportation to/from other areas please speak with Rabbi Kavka.)

CSTL SECURITY FEE $75
Due to the concern for the safety of our Shul we have hired a Security guard. The Board has unanimously voted to access all members, families and people who Daven at CSTL a $75 year security fee.  Thank you for supporting CSTL. Mike Weichbrodt

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series – Sunday Mar 27th 10 am
Our speaker will be Rabbi Shimon Emlen who will talk on preparing for Pesach.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

PCC KOSHER BULK FOODS – SUN APR 17th 8 am to 1 pm
Columbia City PCC only.  Under Vaad supervision.

SEATTLE JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL TICKETS ON SALE NOW
Help us "drink up the culture" at the 21st Seattle Jewish Film Festival! Over nine days - April 2-10 - catch 25 films from 11 countries exploring Jewish life and culture around the world. Featuring award-winning directors, absorbing documentaries, witty comedies, and eye-opening stories, this year's festival will touch your heart and feed your soul. www.SeattleJewishFilmFestival.org

Jewish Genealogical Society of WA & Seattle Sephardic Network  Mar 28th 6:30 - 8:00 pm
At Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island, JGSWS & Seattle Sephardic Network will host a "Sneak Preview" on the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Seattle August 7-12, 2016. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Derech Emunah Seattle Girls High School Production Tue Mar 29th 7:30 pm
Derech Emunah Productions presents "Sparks Make Fire", a journey about Women in Jewish History for women only ages 10 & up. Rainier Valley Cultural Center, 3515 S Alaska Street, Seattle. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Cost: Adults/$15  Students/$12. To purchase tickets or for more info: (888) 944-1043 or Productions@derechemunah.com

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camp for Boys/Camp for Girls June 27-August 25. 
More info: www.seattlekollel.org

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM Thu evening May 5th
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director Slawomir Grunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR TZAV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347361/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Tzav.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

On the verse:1 “This is the law of the burnt offering… [It shall remain on] the altar’s hearth throughout the night,” Rashi comments: “This comes to teach that burning the fats and limbs of the sacrifices is permitted throughout the night.” According to Scriptural law, an attempt should be made to burn all the portions of the sacrifice during the day; this is the appropriate time.2 After the fact, however, if the other services associated with the sacrifice were performed during the day, one may burn the fats and limbs at night.

Our Sages3 placed restrictions on several mitzvos fulfilled during the night. Although Scriptural law permits these activities until daybreak, our Sages required that they be performed before midnight in order to “place a distance between a person and sin.”

There is a difference of opinion between the Rambam and Rashi as to whether this decree was applied to the burning of sacrificial fats and limbs. TheRambam maintains4 that the Sages included this in their restriction, while Rashiargues that the Sages left the Scriptural law unchanged.

Rashi’s opinion can be explained on the basis of a distinction between the burning of fats and limbs and the other mitzvos. According to many authorities,5when the Torah explicitly says an activity is permitted, our Sages cannot prohibit it. Since the Torah says the fats and limbs can be burnt “throughout the night,” and states:6 “Do not allow the fat of the festive offering to remain until morning,” the Sages did not institute a prohibition in this regard.

Following this logic, the Rambam s ruling becomes difficult to understand. Several acharonim maintain that the Rambam accepts the above principle.7Why then does he maintain that the Sages restricted the burning of the sacrificial limbs and fats to the hours before midnight?

Two Dimensions of the Consumption of a Sacrifice

On the verse,8 “And if the meat of the peace offering is eaten on the third day,” our Sages9 note that the verb is repeated, האכל יאכל , and comment: “The verse is speaking about two types of eating consumption by man (partaking of the portions of the sacrifice given to the priests and the owners) and consumption by the fire of the altar.” On this basis, the Talmud develops a parallel between partaking of sacrificial meat and burning portions of the sacrifice on the altar.

With regard to consumption of the sacrifices by man, there is also a mitzvahthese portions of the offering should be eaten “on the day it was sacrificed.”10Thus, there are two dimensions to the human consumption of a sacrifice at the appropriate time:

a) The positive mitzvah of partaking of the sacrifice. This is reflected in the blessing recited before eating from an offering.11

b) Eating the sacrifice on the day it was offered precludes the transgression ofnotar, leaving sacrificial meat until the following morning.

These two dimensions are not entirely matching. Several conditions must be met with regard to the priests’ partaking of the sacrifices: e.g., they must be eaten in a manner which befits people of stature;12 they may not be eaten uncooked.13 If these conditions are not met, one has not performed themitzvah.

With regard to notar, by contrast, it makes no difference how one partakes of the sacrifice; as long as the meat does not remain, one has not violated the prohibition.

Parallels to these two dimensions of the human consumption of sacrificial meat exist with regard to the consumption of the fats and limbs by the fire of the altar. Thus burning the fats and limbs of the sacrifice on the altar:

a) is one of the services involved in offering the sacrifices, contributing a positive quality;

b) precludes the sin of notar.

Based on the above, it is possible to explain why at the outset, one should burn the fats and limbs during the day, and only after the fact is it acceptable to burn them during the night.

Therefore, at the outset, the fat and the limbs must be burnt during the day as part of and during the time set aside for the service of offering the sacrifices. If that was not performed, the fat and the limbs must be burnt at night so that the prohibition against notar will be observed.

This enables us to explain the ruling of the Rambam mentioned previously.TheRambam maintains in contrast to the opinion of the Turei Zahav that the principle which holds that the Sages have no power to forbid something which the Torah permits applies only with regard to the observance of mitzvos. When the Torah explicitly states that a mitzvah should be performed, our Sages do not have the power to rule that it should not.

But when a mitzvah is not involved, (and burning the fats and limbs at night is not considered a mitzvah), the Sages do have the power to enforce a restriction. Although the Torah states that these activities can be performed throughout the night, our Sages restricted their performance to the hours before midnight.

Dedicating Our Pleasure to G‑d

The Ramban15 explains that the sacrifice of an animal atones for a person’s improper conduct because the person offering the sacrifice repents, and realizes that whatever is being done to the animal should have been done to him. It is merely that G‑d, in His kindness, allowed the animal to be offered in his stead. It thus follows that all the elements of sacrificial worship have parallels in our own Divine service.

Fat is an analogy for satisfaction.16 And we are commanded:17 “All the fat [should be offered] to G‑d,” implying that a Jew must anchor his powers of pleasure and satisfaction to G‑dliness.

One might have thought that this refers only to the pleasure derived from material things, for we are taught that one’s involvement in material affairs should be “as if compelled by a demon.”18 But what could be wrong with deriving pleasure from the observance of mitzvos and other holy matters?

We can take a lesson from the burning of fats on the altar. Although partaking of the sacrifices is a mitzvah, we may not eat from them until we have seen to the burning of their fats. This teaches us that we can be sure of having fulfilled a mitzvah in the proper way only after we have given all our satisfaction (including that derived from the mitzvah itself) to G‑d. When a person has not dedicated his satisfaction to G‑d, it is possible that he is fulfilling the mitzvah, not because the Shulchan Aruch orders its observance, but because of the satisfaction it brings.

One must feel energy and vitality in the observance of the mitzvos, observing them not simply out of compulsion, but out of a genuine love for G‑d. The fact that one is able to fulfill G‑d’s will should be the greatest source of pleasure. Nevertheless, care must be taken to ensure that one takes pleasure in fulfilling G‑d’s will, and not from ancillary dimensions of the observance of mitzvos.

Spiritual Satisfaction May Also Present Pitfalls

Based on the above, we can appreciate that the mitzvah of burning the sacrificial fats applies only during the day, and the burning of fats at night is only to compensate for not burning them earlier.

With regard to our Divine service, “day” refers to the times when we are occupied with the study of Torah and the observance of mitzvos, as reflected in the analogy:19 “A mitzvah is a candle, and the Torah, light.” Night and darkness, by contrast, represent times when a person is not occupied with the Torah or itsmitzvos, but with material concerns.

The lesson about dedicating the fat our potential for pleasure and satisfaction to G‑d applies primarily during the day. When it comes to material things, it is obvious that a person should not seek his own pleasure, but should perform “[all his deeds] for the sake of heaven.”20 When it comes to the Torah and itsmitzvos, however, it is possible that a person might feel that his motives are not important; as long as he studies the Torah and performs its mitzvos, it’s okay. And he will rationalize his behavior quoting our Sages:21 “A person should always occupy himself in the Torah and its mitzvos [even] for a selfish intent.”

Such a person has to be taught: The fats must first be offered on the altar.

For example, when one develops a new concept in Torah thought, one experiences great pleasure. That pleasure, however, has to be dedicated to G‑d. As an expression of this dedication, if the new concept is contradicted by one of the Rishonim or Achronim ,22 one must be willing to sacrifice his “fat,” and rethink his idea. For his objective must be to appreciate the true intent of the law, not to demonstrate his own greatness.

To cite a parallel: Rabbeinu Yonah23 explains that a conditional guilt offering is more expensive than a sin offering because a sin offering is brought when one is certain one has transgressed, while a conditional guilt offering is brought when one is in doubt. Since in the latter case one might err and think that atonement is not necessary, the gravity of the situation must be emphasized. Similarly, in the present instance, it is the satisfaction associated with the Torah and its mitzvos enjoyment which appears harmless to which our attention must be directed.

Day and Night in Our Divine Service

Alternatively, it is possible to explain the analogies of day and night on a deeper plane, enabling us to understand why offering the fats during the day is a positive mitzvah, while offering them at night serves merely to preclude sin.

In addition to the interpretation mentioned above, day and night can be seen as analogies for a person’s spiritual state. Day refers to a time when one feels the G‑dly light in his soul. This applies not only when he is involved in the observance of Torah and mitzvos, G‑d’s will and His wisdom,24 but also when involved in material activities. Even in the worldly sphere, he serves G‑d, following the dictum:25 “Know Him in all your ways.” To cite an example,whentzaddikim partake of food, their eating serves a higher purpose than humanity’s ordinary efforts at refinement; “A tzaddik eats for the satisfaction of his soul.”26

Night, by contrast, refers to a condition in which a person does not feel G‑dliness. Therefore his need to engage in material things generates a constant struggle to serve G‑d27 rather than indulge his desires. Moreover, even when he is involved in studying Torah and observing its mitzvos, he must labor to remain properly motivated. For the law is enclothed in mortal intellect, and the mitzvos involve material entities and the potentials of our animal soul. And so it is necessary to strive that one study lishmah, only for the sake of the Torah. Similarly, our observance of the mitzvos must be for G‑d’s sake, and not for our own.

The concept of burning the fats on the altar dedicating our satisfaction to G‑d applies both day and night. But there is a difference. When a person’s Divine service is that of “day,” all the satisfaction he feels not only that derived from observance of the Torah and its mitzvos, but also that which comes from worldly things is an expression of holiness, “know[ing] G‑d in all His ways.”

In contrast, those whose Divine service are on the plane of night, and whose perception is obscured by their animal souls, cannot transform all the pleasure they feel into an expression of G‑dliness. Instead, their Divine service concentrates on breaking their nature, not indulging in superfluous pleasures and desires. They endeavor never to engage in a material activity for the sake of that activity itself; instead, they seek that their intent be “for the sake of heaven.” Thus their “burning of the fats” is of a preventive nature, holding back from indulgence in permitted matters, because for them indulgence in permitted matters all too often leads to indulgence in forbidden matters.

Similarly, with regard to the study of the Torah, since they cannot summon up a genuine commitment to study lishmah, they must struggle to prevent themselves from relying on their mortal reasoning and instead seek out the true intent of the Law. For mortal reason can lead a person to distort the Torah’s intent. Thus here as well and similarly with regard to the observance of mitzvosone’s efforts are aimed at avoiding negative consequences.

A Catalyst For Redemption

There is an advantage to the Divine service of iscafia, breaking evil, over the Divine service of the righteous.

To cite a parallel: the Divine service involved in refining the body and the animal soul is superior to the devotion of the soul before its descent to this world. Although the soul had a more refined and elevated perception of G‑d in the spiritual plane, its accomplishments in this material world are greater.

Similarly, when considering the Divine service of souls on this plane, there is an advantage to the service performed by benonim over that performed bytzaddikim.28

There is also an allusion to this in the verse “Do not allow the fat of the festive offering to remain until the morning.” The phrase “Do not allow,” i.e., to avoid negative influences by refining material entities, prefigures “the morning” the ultimate dawn, the era when “the sun will no longer serve you for the light of day…. Instead, G‑d will be your eternal light.”29

The refinement of the body and the animal soul in this material world will bring about the Future Redemption led by Mashiach.30 May it come speedily, in our days.

(Adapted from Sichos Yud-Tes Kislev, 5711)

SHABBOS VAYIKRA-ZACHOR & PURIM משנכנס אדר מרבין בשמחה 8-15 Adar ב 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Mar 18th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 7:01 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Mar 19th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 10:15 am/
Mincha 6:45 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 8:07 pm 

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon,Tue, Thu - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Wed Shacharis 6:50 am /FAST OF ESTHER/
Sun - Tue  Mincha/Maariv
 7:10 pm /Repeat Shema after 8 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
Kiddush lite – no  sponsor.  Seuda Slishit Lite sponsored by Gary Stute

FAST OF ESTHER & PURIM – WED Mar 23rd  and THU Mar 24th 
Fast of Esther begins Wed 5:31 am 
Shacharis Wed 6:50 am
Mincha Wed 7:00 pm
Fast Ends/Maariv/Megilah  Wed 8 pm
Purim Shacharis/Megilah Thu 7 am
Purim Mincha/Megilah Thu 2 pm
Maariv 8 pm

Children's Program News 
Boys junior minyan shabbos morning from 10-10:30 led by Rabbi Herbstman.  Ages 6 and above Thank you -  Tova

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Audrey Bergman , mother of Carol Strassman. Funeral services were held in Spokane, WA earlier this week.  Shiva will be observed Sun-Tue at the Strassman home, 4846B S Morgan Street, Seattle,

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

TIME FOR MATANOT LA'EVYONIM - PURIM GIFTS TO THE POOR
Donate online at www.CSTLSeattle.org, with Note “Purim Chesed Fund”.  Or contact Jonathan Greene.

PURIM AT CSTL “PURIM AROUND THE WORLD” – WED MAR 23rd 8PM
Maariv/Megillah reading 8pm.  Followed by exquisite meal prepare by master chef, Jonathan Greene.  Children's Entertainment. Magic, face painting and balloon making!  Dancing and drinks for purchase at the bar.  Please RSVP RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com $10/adult $7/child $42/family Thank you to Rabbi Herbstman for organizing this. 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

MITZVOT OF PURIM
Listening to the Megilah by Night (Wed) and by Day (Thu) – see schedule of readings above
Gifts to the Poor (by Day Thu) – contact Jonathan Greene
Gifts of Food to Friends (by Day Thu) – at least 2 kinds of food to one person
Purim Meal (by Day Thu)

Simcha’s Shmura Matzah Co-op 
Simcha Brandeis is taking orders for mid April delivery of high quality unbroken Shmura Matzah.Please contact Simcha at: sbrandeis@gmail.com or 206 633 3896 to place your order.

Annual Lamplighter Dinner & Auction. Sun Mar 27th (17th Adar Bet) 5 pm
With the dedication of the Berel and Miriam Weiss Early Childhood Center. Honoring long- time parents and volunteers Mr. Joel and Dr. Sarah Baskin. http://www.mmscdayschool.org/ 

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks at www.campganisraelseattle.org. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND!!!

CSTL SECURITY FEE $75
Due to the concern for the safety of our Shul we have hired a Security guard. The Board has unanimously voted to access all members, families and people who Daven at CSTL a $75 year security fee.  Thank you for supporting CSTL. Mike Weichbrodt

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series – Sunday Mar 27th 10 am
Our speaker will be Rabbi Shimon Emlen who will talk on preparing for Pesach.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  //ON BREAK //.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

BISTRO NIGHT AT THE SUMMIT – TUE MAR 22nd 
Kosher fleishig prix fix deluxe dinner. Reservations and for more information: chrise@summitatfirsthill.org.

SEATTLE JEWISH FILM FESTIVALTICKETS ON SALE NOW
Help us "drink up the culture" at the 21st Seattle Jewish Film Festival! Over nine days - April 2-10 - catch 25 films from 11 countries exploring Jewish life and culture around the world. Featuring award-winning directors, absorbing documentaries, witty comedies, and eye-opening stories, this year's festival will touch your heart and feed your soul.
www.SeattleJewishFilmFestival.org

Jewish Genealogical Society of WA & Seattle Sephardic Network  Mar 28th 6:30 - 8:00 pm
At Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island, JGSWS & Seattle Sephardic Network will host a "Sneak Preview" on the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Seattle August 7-12, 2016. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Derech Emunah Seattle Girls High School Production Tue Mar 29th 7:30 pm
Derech Emunah Productions presents "Sparks Make Fire", a journey about Women in Jewish History for women only ages 10 & up. Rainier Valley Cultural Center, 3515 S Alaska Street, Seattle. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Cost: Adults/$15 Students/$12. To purchase tickets or for more info: (888) 944-1043 or Productions@derechemunah.com

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camp for Boys/Camp for Girls Approx June 27-August 25. 
More info: www.seattlekollel.org

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.
www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT March 22nd
Bistro reservations are taken by email only.  For all (evening) bistros there is a window of seating times running from 7:30pm to 8:15pm. The all inclusive price includes appetizer, dinner and dessert, server gratuity, and of course a wide selection of wine and beer.  Bistros sell out quickly, there is limited capacity so please reserve immediately to ensure your place.  The Summit at First Hill's kitchens and dining areas are supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff.

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome back Rebbetzin ChanaBracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY PURIM BAKE SALE MARCH 20
The EBLA Purim Bake Sale takes place this year on March 20, 2016, from 9:30 am-1:00pm. Breakfast will be available to purchase, along with Hamentashen, Biscochos, Travados, Baklava and more!  You may pre-order by phoning Selma Amon at 206 721-0533

COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM Thu evening May 5th
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director Slawomir Grunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR VAYIKRA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347356/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Pekudei.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

The Book of Vayikra concerns itself primarily with the sacrificial offerings1 which were one of the central services carried out in both the Sanctuary and the BeisHaMikdash.2

The Torah is eternal.3 Its laws and even its stories can provide Jewish men and women of every generation with guidance relevant to their everyday life. This also applies to the laws regarding the sacrifices and the other aspects of theBeis HaMikdash.

The command4 “And they shall make Me a Sanctuary,” requiring the Jews to construct the BeisHaMikdash has a specific goal, as the verse continues: “I, (G‑d), will dwell within.” Moreover, the verse does not use the singular form of the word “within,” which would imply that the indwelling is merely within the physical structure of the Sanctuary and the Beis HaMikdash , but rather the plural form, indicating that G‑d dwells within each and every Jew.

Therefore even when the physical Beis HaMikdash is destroyed because of our sins, every Jew should conduct his home as “a Sanctuary in microcosm.”5 By infusing holiness into his conduct in this manner, he brings about atonement for all the sins he committed in the past, and makes his home fit for G‑d’s Presence. This in turn will bring Divine blessings wherever necessary.

“G‑d desires the Heart”6

As mentioned above, one of the central aspects of the service in the Beis HaMikdash were the sacrificial offerings. Every day began and ended with the daily offering, which was brought before all other sacrifices in the morning, and after all the sacrifices before nightfall.7

Among the lessons taught by the daily offering is that G‑d does not necessarily ask a Jew to give all his resources to Him. For the daily offering consisted of only one sheep and a small amount of oil, wine, and salt. Moreover, this was a communal offering purchased with funds to which every individual contributed a tiny amount once a year. And yet this minimal amount was able to bring G‑d’s blessings for everything the Jewish people needed.

For G‑d does not demand that a Jew give away everything he owns. What G‑ddoes demand, however, is that gifts be made with all one’s heart.8What is most important is not the amount which one gives9 how much energy, money, or other good things but how one gives.

If a gift is made with all one’s heart, even if (for whatever reason) the sum is not great as the daily offering involved only a small portion from each category:10from the animal kingdom, a sheep; from the plant kingdom, a small amount of wine and oil; and from inanimate matter, salt since one gives with all one’s heart, with vitality and joy, this fulfills G‑d’s intent and draws down His positive influence.

Setting the Tone

The daily sacrifice was brought twice a day, once in the early morning and once before nightfall, and yet it was referred to as the korban tamid, “the continuous offering.” This implies11 that the sacrifices brought throughout the day were influenced by the daily offering. Indeed, for that reason, it was offered before all the other sacrifices.

This also teaches a lesson in regard to the conduct of a Jewish home. As the day proceeds, various factors some concerning the soul and others concerning the body pervade the home environment. The common trait shared by all these concerns is that G‑dly light is not directly obvious in them. For even matters that concern the soul must be carried in a manner that conforms with mortal intellect. This can at times lead a person away from the correct path and bring him to do the opposite of G‑d’s will.

For this reason, at the very beginning of the day, a person makes a total and all-encompassing commitment to G‑d, saying: Modeh Ani “I thankfully acknowledge You, living and eternal King….” As soon as he arises in the morning, he thanks G‑d for returning his soul. He refers to G‑d as “King,” implying that, as befits a commitment made to even a mortal king, he is willing to devote himself with all his heart, even to the extent of giving up his life.

Making this commitment at the beginning of the day has an effect on the hours that follow which the individual uses for his personal affairs. They become permeated with the thanks and commitment expressed in ModehAni. Accordingly, the person’s efforts are accompanied by G‑d’s blessings.

This lesson is also communicated by the daily offering. When we start the day with a sacrifice, which in the personal sense means giving oneself over to G‑d, the act becomes tamid, “continuous.” It is not confined to the moment when the commitment is made, but continues throughout the entire day.

Bringing the daily sacrifice involved sprinkling its blood on the altar and offering its fats on the fire burning there. Blood serves as an analogy for vitality, warmth, and energy, while fat serves as an analogy for satisfaction (for indeed satisfaction leads to an increase in the body’s size).12 The implication is that a Jew’s day must begin with a firm commitment to devote his energy to the altar, i.e., to holy matters, and they will be his source of satisfaction. G‑d will then help him carry out this resolution, and this will cause the entire day to be filled with His blessings.

Turning in Teshuvah

The Midrash says13 that the daily sacrifice atones for certain sins which a person committed before the sacrifice is offered. For G‑d gives a person who transgresses an opportunity to rectify his conduct. Throughout a person’s life, he will face difficulties and challenges, and it is possible that he will not overcome a particular challenge. But when he renews his commitment to G‑d, proclaiming with his whole heart: “I thankfully acknowledge You, living and eternal King….” which as mentioned above parallels the daily sacrifice this atones for his earlier conduct.

From the Alter Rebbe onward, Chassidus provides us with profound explanations regarding teshuvah. When a Jew stumbles in his Divine service, heaven forbid, he should not despair or become depressed. On the contrary, he should strengthen his commitment, try to correct his blunder, and compensate for what he failed to accomplish, hoping that G‑d will accept his teshuvah.14

The expression “I thankfully acknowledge You, living and eternal King….” embodies this pledge of teshuvah. It involves the engraving in one’s mind and heart of one’s thanks and commitment to G‑d a firm resolution that one’s “blood and fat,” one’s energy and satisfaction, will be directed to holiness alone.

When this commitment is made, G‑d forgives one’s previous trespasses and grants the person His blessings, satisfying his and his family’s needs in material and spiritual matters.

This spiritual parallel to the daily offering will lead to the ultimate and most essential blessing: that Mashiach will come and rebuild the Beis HaMikdash. He will take us out of our inner, personal exile and out of exile in the world at large, leading us to our Holy Land.15 Then we will actually see the daily sacrifice being offered in the Beis HaMikdash. May this take place speedily, in our days.

(Adapted from Sichos 28 Iyar , 5722)

The Conditional Guilt Offering

The conclusion of Parshas Vayikra mentions the conditional guilt offering which a person would bring when he was unsure if he had committed a sin. (To give an example, a person had two pieces of fat before him, and ate one of them. On being informed that one of the pieces wasn’t kosher, the person is obligated to bring an animal sacrifice referred to as an ashem tolui, a conditional guilt offering.)

There is a difference of opinion among our Sages as to whether or not a person who slaughters an animal designated for this offering outside the Beis HaMikdash is liable for kareis [if he slaughters it intentionally] or is required to bring a sin offering [if he slaughters it unintentionally], as one is liable for slaughtering an animal designated for other sacrifices outside the Beis HaMikdash (shechutei chutz, in Talmudic terminology).

Rabbi Meir holds the person liable, while the Sages do not. Their rationale is that since the conditional guilt offering is brought because of a doubt, it is possible that the person never sinned at all. Accordingly, it is not appropriate to hold him liable for slaughtering the animal outside the Beis HaMikdash , because it is possible that there was no obligation to bring the sacrifice in the first place. In his Mishneh Torah,16 the Rambam rules according to the Sages’ opinion.

There is another difference of opinion among our Sages concerning a conditional guilt offering.17 This involves a person who prepares a conditional guilt offering, but resolves the doubt discovering whether he sinned or not before the sacrifice is slaughtered.

In this instance, the offering is not sacrificed. Rabbi Meir maintains that the designated animal should “go out to pasture with the herd,” i.e., the animal loses its sanctified status. The Sages maintain that the animal should “pasture until it contracts a blemish;” that the animal retains its sacred nature. As such, it cannot be redeemed until it contracts a blemish which disqualifies it for use as a sacrifice.

In this instance as well, the Rambam rules18 according to the Sages, giving the rationale that “A person’s heart is contrite because of his sins. Because he designated the animal as a sacrifice because of a doubt, he decided in his heart to consecrate it.”

The question arises:19 According to the Sages’ opinion (and the Rambam’sruling) that even when a person discovers that he definitely did not sin, the animal involved remains consecrated because of the decision he made in his heart, it appears that when a person is in doubt, the animal designated for the sacrifice should be considered consecrated. As such, it is difficult to understand the first ruling of the Sages (and the Rambam) mentioned previously, that even if the designated animal was slaughtered outside the Beis HaMikdash, the usual prohibitions do not apply.

This difficulty can be resolved as follows. There are two dimensions to the sanctification of sacrifices:

The first is relevant to man how the person must conduct himself with regard to the animal he consecrated. In this regard, it is sufficient to know that he made a decision in his heart to consecrate it. This applies even if the person later resolves the doubt as to whether or not he had sinned.

The second is relevant to the Torah’s abstract criteria. In this context, an animal designated as a conditional guilt offering is consecrated only when a person indeed sinned, although he himself is in doubt about the matter. When he is unsure as to whether or not he sinned, he can gain atonement via a conditional guilt offering. (When, by contrast, a person knows he has sinned, atonement comes through a sin offering.)

Accordingly, the rationale that “A person’s heart is contrite because of his sins, [and] he decided within his heart to consecrate [the animal],” is significant only with regard to the aspect of the consecration that affects man.20 With regard to the Torah’s abstract criteria, however, the animal is considered a sacrifice only when the person actually sinned.21 Since it is possible that he did not sin, and thus according to the Torah’s abstract criteria, the animal is not considered consecrated, he would not be liable for kareis for willfully slaughtering it outside the Beis HaMikdash. Therefore he is not required to bring a sin offering if he slaughtered it outside the Beis HaMikdash without knowing of the prohibition, because only “when the penalty for willfully transgressing [a prohibition] iskareis , is one required to bring a sin offering for [its] unwitting transgression.”22

The Value of Money

There is another concept associated with the conditional guilt offering. Although a sin offering is brought when one knows that one has sinned, and a conditional guilt offering is brought when one is in doubt about the matter, the conditional offering is more expensive than the sin offering. Ordinarily, the minimal value for a sin offering was a danka, while the minimal value for a conditional guilt offering was two selaim, worth 48 danka.23

Rabbi Yonah explained24 this as follows: Fundamentally, the atonement brought about by a sacrifice comes from the person’s feelings of teshuvah. When a person knows he has sinned, he is naturally aroused to sincere feelings of regret. But when a person is unsure, we have to seek means to inspire such feelings. For this reason, the conditional guilt offering cost more than a sin offering.

This rationale is, however, insufficient. For although teshuvah is necessary, it is not the only element involved. The actual offering of the sacrifice has the power to bring atonement and remove the blemishes created by sin. Thus the different kinds of sacrifices were ordained according to the nature of the blemish created.

This leads to the conclusion that the reason a conditional guilt offering cost more than a sin offering was not merely to inspire sincere teshuvah, but also because a conditional guilt offering must atone for a greater blemish. This raises a question: How is it that the blemish created when one is unsure is greater than that created when one is certain of having sinned?

Subconscious Motivation

This question can be resolved as follows: In general, sacrifices atone for sins committed unintentionally,25 for even a commandment violated unknowingly requires atonement.26 Although the person did not intentionally sin, the fact that his unconscious thoughts led to such behavior is an indication that he is spiritually lacking. For if he was not lacking, he would not have sinned, even unintentionally, as it is written:27 “No evil shall befall the righteous.”

A person is held responsible and therefore must bring a sacrifice for a sin committed unintentionally because it is his fault that he sinned. Before committing the sin, he conducted himself in a beast-like manner. This strengthened his animal soul, leading to his unintentional commission of a sin.

This reflects a further point. A person’s unconscious behavior what he does without thinking is often a powerful indicator of his nature, reflecting his fundamental concerns and sources of pleasure. A tzaddik derives pleasure from G‑dliness, therefore his deeds involve good and holiness. When, by contrast, a person unknowingly commits a sin, this indicates that undesirable factors are his source of pleasure.

Indeed, from a certain perspective, the blemish generated by committing a sin unknowingly can be considered more severe than that resulting from the conscious commission of a sin. The fact that a person consciously performs a deed says nothing about the extent of his involvement. There are times when he does something willingly, but his heart and mind are elsewhere. But when an act is performed without conscious volition, it reveals something about a person’s true nature, telling us about the inner “I” that lies deeper than his conscious self. Instinctively, this inner “I” directs his conduct, leading him to perform certain deeds unconsciously.

Food for the Soul

The above also enables us to understand a statement of the AriZal28 that a person who is careful not to eat even the slightest amount of chametz onPesach can be confident that he will not sin throughout the year to come.

On the surface, this statement is problematic. Man has been given free choice, and thus has the ability to determine his own conduct. How is it possible to say that his taking care not to eat chametz for eight days will cause free choice to be taken away from him?

The resolution is that the AriZal is speaking about sins committed unknowingly. Although a person did not partake of chametz on Pesach, it is possible that he will willfully perform a transgression, because he retains his free will. But his care in not eating chametz will affect his inner nature, endowing it with a tendency toward holiness.29 As a result, he will not be subconsciously drawn to sin.30

What Brings a Person Pleasure?

The above also helps us understand why the Talmud31 chooses to discuss the conditional guilt offering by using the example of a person in doubt as to whether he ate a piece of non-kosher fat. There are other situations which could have been used to illustrate this concept. Why does the Talmud choose this particular example?

As explained above, a person is obliged to bring a conditional guilt offering when he is in doubt as to whether or not he unknowingly committed a sin. As stated, the unknowing violation of a prohibition can be interpreted as a subconscious expression of the satisfaction a person feels in undesirable matters. In other words, whenever a person is in doubt as to whether or not he has committed a transgression, his doubt is an external manifestation of an inner dilemma: What are his sources of satisfaction? Is it permitted things which bring him pleasure, or does his inner self find satisfaction in forbidden things?

To underscore this concept, when the Talmud seeks to illustrate a situation in which a conditional guilt offering is required, it uses an example involving fat, for fat serves as an analogy for satisfaction.

From a certain perspective, the blemish created by an unknowing transgression is greater than that generated by a voluntary sin. Similarly, being in doubt as to whether one committed a transgression can be worse than knowing one has transgressed. When a person knows he has committed a sin unwittingly, he realizes that he is in need of spiritual improvement; the transgression makes him aware of an inner involvement with evil. But when a person is not definitely aware that he has sinned, his positive self-image can remain intact and he may not appreciate the need for change.32 This shows an even deeper connection with evil, for the person does not even realize something is amiss.

When a person knows he has unwittingly committed a transgression, his fundamental nature remains good; the deed runs contrary to his true self. For this reason, he is conscious that he has transgressed G‑d’s will. He senses the evil within his act, and realizes that this is not who he really is; it is merely the animal soul which drew him after evil. When, however, a person does not realize that he has committed a transgression, this is a sign that the sin does not disturb him; it does not run contrary to his being. For this reason, he does not even notice the sin.

So when a person does not know whether or not he has committed a sin, he must bring a conditional guilt offering a sacrifice which is much more expensive than a sin offering. For the conditional guilt offering must remove a more serious blemish.

Man’s Conception, and G‑d’s

Based on the above, we can understand that when a person is in doubt as to whether or not he violated a commandment, this uncertainty is an indication of a serious spiritual lack. This applies even if he did not actually sin (and therefore is not liable for retribution). The very fact that he has a doubt indicates that he shares a connection with evil. For if he did not share such a connection, he would not have any doubt about whether he had sinned.33 If he is not bothered by the doubt, and remains happy with his spiritual state, believing that his desire for pleasure is centered only on permitted matters, this indicates that his spiritual state is in some ways worse than that of a person who definitely committed a sin, either willingly or unknowingly.

Based on the above, we can resolve the apparent contradiction between the decisions of our Sages mentioned above. When speaking about an individual’s spiritual state, a conditional guilt offering is required from a person who is in doubt as to whether he committed a sin, even when in fact he did not.34 For this reason, our Sages maintain that even if it later becomes clear that a person didnot sin or that he definitely did we can be assured that he “decided within his heart to consecrate [the animal].” And therefore it remains consecrated until it incurs a disqualifying blemish.

This applies, however, only with regard to his personal efforts to rectify his spiritual failings. With regard to the Torah’s abstract criteria, “deed is most essential.”35 Punishment is meted out only for actual transgression of the Torah’s commandments.36 Therefore if in fact a person did not violate a transgression (even though he may have a spiritual connection with the sin involved), he is not liable for punishment.

This is what motivated our Sages (and the Rambam) to rule that one is not liable for sacrificing a conditional guilt offering outside the Beis HaMikdash. Since it is possible that the person did not actually sin, according to the Torah’s abstract criteria, a sin offering is not required. For this reason, he is not held liable for sacrificing it outside the Beis HaMikdash.

(Adapted from Sichos Simchas Torah, 5712)

SHABBOS PEKUDEI - CHAZAK 1-8 Adarב 5776

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Mar 11th 
Shacharis 6:50  am /ROSH CHODESH ADAR  ב/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:51 pm

SHABBOS - SAT Mar 12th  
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:24 am/
Mincha 5:35 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:57 pm  
/SPRING CLOCKS FORWARD ONE HOUR SATURDAY NIGHT/  

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri 7 am Shacharis
Sun - Thu  Mincha/Maariv
 7 pm /Repeat Shema after 7:50 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
Kiddush lite – no  sponsor.  Seuda Slishit Lite sponsored by Emanuel Khaimov

Children's Program News 
Boys junior minyan shabbos morning from 10-10:30 led by Rabbi Herbstman.  Ages 6 and above Thank you -  Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web sitewww.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

TIME FOR MATANOT LA'EVYONIM  - PURIM GIFTS TO THE POOR
Donate online at www.CSTLSeattle.org, with Note “Purim Chesed Fund”.  Or contact Jonathan Greene.

PURIM AT CSTL “PURIM AROUND THE WORLD” – WED MAR 23rd 8PM
Maariv/Megilah Reading followed by Seuda catered by Jonathan I Greene.  Dancing with DJ Dave.  Thank you to Rabbi Herbstman for organizing this.  RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Smicha Celebration and Honored Guest at CSTL SUN MAR 13th  
Please join us and the noted Torah Scholar Rabbi Nachman Wilhelm, the Dean of the Online Institute for Rabbinical Studies, on Sunday afternoon, March 13th, for inspiring words of Torah and the presentation of Simcha's  Smichacertificate followed by buffet lunch and assorted l'chaim. Info:  sbrandeis@gmail.com

Simcha’s Shmura Matzah Co-op 
Simcha Brandeis is taking orders for mid April delivery of high quality unbroken Shmura Matzah.Please contact Simcha at: sbrandeis@gmail.com or 206 633 3896 to place your order.

Annual Lamplighter Dinner & Auction. Sun Mar 27th (17th Adar Bet) 5 pm
With the dedication of the Berel and Miriam Weiss Early Childhood Center. Honoring long- time parents and volunteers Mr. Joel and Dr. Sarah Baskin. http://www.mmscdayschool.org/ 

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks at www.campganisraelseattle.org. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND!!!

CSTL SECURITY FEE $75
Due to the concern for the safety of our Shul we have hired a Security guard. The Board has unanimously voted to access all members, families and people who Daven at CSTL a $75 year security fee.  Thank you for supporting CSTL. Mike Weichbrodt

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series – Sunday Mar 27th 10 am
Our speaker will be Rabbi Shimon Emlen who will talk on preparing for Pesach.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

L'Chaim for Ora (Melissa Eng) and her chatan Craig Fryman. SatMar 12 8pm - 10:30 PM
Please join us in celebrating Craig and Ora's engagement is welcome! At the Home of Rachel and Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld, 5240 38th Ave. NE.  http://evite.me/KDnzffkfEh

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST -  RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333  
rabbi@shalomseattle.org .

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  //ON BREAK //.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today for The Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book. Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

SEATTLE JEWISH FILM FESTIVALTICKETS ON SALE NOW
Help us "drink up the culture" at the 21st Seattle Jewish Film Festival! Over nine days - April 2-10 - catch 25 films from 11 countries exploring Jewish life and culture around the world. Featuring award-winning directors, absorbing documentaries, witty comedies, and eye-opening stories, this year's festival will touch your heart and feed your soul.www.SeattleJewishFilmFestival.org

Jewish Genealogical Society of WA & Seattle Sephardic Network  Mar 28th 6:30 - 8:00 pm
At Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island, JGSWS & Seattle Sephardic Network will host a "Sneak Preview" on the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Seattle August 7-12, 2016. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Derech Emunah Seattle Girls High School Production Tue Mar 29th 7:30 pm
Derech Emunah Productions presents "Sparks Make Fire", a journey about Women in Jewish History for women only ages 10 & up. Rainier Valley Cultural Center, 3515 S Alaska Street, Seattle. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Cost: Adults/$15 Students/$12. To purchase tickets or for more info: (888) 944-1043 or Productions@derechemunah.com

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camp for Boys/Camp for Girls Approx June 27-August 25. 
More info: www.seattlekollel.org

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT March 22nd
Bistro reservations are taken by email only.  For all (evening) bistros there is a window of seating times running from 7:30pm to 8:15pm. The all inclusive price includes appetizer, dinner and dessert, server gratuity, and of course a wide selection of wine and beer.  Bistros sell out quickly, there is limited capacity so please reserve immediately to ensure your place.  The Summit at First Hill's kitchens and dining areas are supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff.

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome back Rebbetzin ChanaBracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13
At the Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org 

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY PURIM BAKE SALE MARCH 20
The EBLA Purim Bake Sale takes place this year on March 20, 2016, from 9:30 am-1:00pm. Breakfast will be available to purchase, along with Hamentashen, Biscochos, Travados, Baklava and more!  You may pre-order by phoning Selma Amon at 206 721-0533

COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM Thu evening May 5th
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director Slawomir Grunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR PEKUDEI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347356/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Pekudei.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

As with all the concepts in the Torah, the division of the parshiyos is the result of precise and purposeful choice. Every Torah reading communicates a particular concept. It is not the size of the readings that determines their division, but rather their content. Similarly, the name of the Torah reading was not selected merely because it comes at the beginning of the reading. Instead, the name communicates the theme of the reading, and for that reason, it features at its beginning.

The Zohar1 says there are 53 (גן in Hebrew) Torah readings. This number is precise, and applies every year. Even in a year when certain Torah readings are coupled (as the reading Vayakhel and Pekudei often are), there are still 53 readings. For the parshiyos are divided by theme, and these themes are communicated every year. It is just that there are years when the themes of twoparshiyos are read in separate weeks, and other years when two themes are communicated in the same week.

This concept applies with regard to the parshiyos Vayakhel and Pekudei. Even in the years when they are read on the same Shabbos, they communicate separate themes. Both speak about the construction of the Sanctuary and its utensils, but each has a different focus.

In this, these two parshiyos differ from the parshiyos Terumah and Tetzaveh.Terumah and Tetzaveh relate G‑d’s commands to build the Sanctuary.Vayakhel and Pekudei, by contrast, relate how those commands were fulfilled, and how the Sanctuary was actually built.2 Just as the parshiyos Terumah andTetzaveh communicate two different themes, as reflected in the fact that they are always read on two separate Shabbosos , so too, Vayakhel and Pekudeicommunicate different themes, although they both relate to the same general subject, the construction of the Sanctuary.

Phases in a Sequence

The difference between the theme of Parshas Vayakhel and the theme ofParshas Pekudei can be explained as follows: Parshas Vayakhel relates howMoshe gathered the Jews together and told them of G‑d’s command to build the Sanctuary and its utensils. It also tells how the Jews willingly accepted this command and carried out G‑d’s will.

Parshas Pekudei relates how Moshe made a reckoning of how all the gold, silver, and other items donated toward the construction of the Sanctuary were to be used, how the Sanctuary and its utensils were to be anointed with the fragrant oil blended for this purpose, how the sacrifices were to be offered, and concludes by stating that these sacrifices aroused a response from above: “G‑d’s glory filled the Sanctuary.”3

Thus it can be explained that Parshas Vayakhel centers on man’s Divine service how the Jewish people dedicated their financial resources, labor, and souls to the construction of the Sanctuary. They donated thirteen4 (or according to other commentaries fifteen)5 kinds of substances for its construction. They labored tirelessly to build it, and, moreover, this labor was an expression of an inner commitment as reflected in the terms used to describe their efforts: “…whose heart motivated him… whose spirit inspired him to give,”6 and “…wise of heart.”7

But these endeavors, however great, represented merely the efforts of man.Parshas Pekudei introduces an infinitely higher dimension, the revelation of G‑d’s glory.8

The efforts of the Jewish people described in Parshas Vayakhel also brought about a revelation of G‑dliness from above for every one of our endeavors in Divine service evokes influence from above. Nevertheless, the Divine influence evoked by the activities described in Parshas Vayakhel cannot be compared to the revelation of G‑dliness drawn down by the Divine service of anointing the Sanctuary and offering the sacrifices described in Parshas Pekudei: “G‑d’s glory filled the Sanctuary.”

To cite a parallel in the realm of halachah: Our Sages teach:9 “Designation [of an article to be used for a mitzvah] is itself significant.” Nevertheless, the G‑dly influence drawn down by designating an entity cannot be compared to the influence drawn down by the actual observance of the mitzvah.10

This concept is reflected in the differences between the construction and the preparation of the utensils for the Sanctuary described in Parshas Vayakhel and the sanctification of those utensils through anointment or through use in the sacrificial worship.11 Certainly, the revelation from above which was generated by the preparation of the utensils cannot be compared to the revelation described in Parshas Pekudei, at which time the utensils were anointed and used.

On this basis, we can appreciate the sequence of the parshiyos which describe the Sanctuary and its utensils.12 ParshasTerumah mentions G‑d’s command to build the Sanctuary and its utensils an arousal from above which precedes and generates strength for the arousal from below. More particularly, this stage has two phases: the command to build the Sanctuary as recorded in Parshas Terumah, and the command to fashion the priestly garments, as recorded inParshasTetzaveh.13

Parshas Vayakhel relates Moshe’s instructions to the Jewish people, and describes how they were fulfilled, i.e., man’s endeavors and the concomitant arousal from below. And Parshas Pekudei refers to a higher level of arousal from above which comes after the arousal from below.14

Transcendence in Time

Although the Divine influence associated with Parshas Vayakhel cannot be compared to that associated with ParshasPekudei, in most years, due to the pressures of time, the two parshiyos are coupled together. In one week, we must integrate spiritual influences which would ordinarily be expressed in two.15

This does not imply that we must rise above the concept of time entirely, for this would conflict with the purpose of the Sanctuary, which was intended to create a “dwelling [for G‑d] in the lower worlds.”16 Instead, the intent is to stretch those limits, so that within a world limited by time, it becomes possible to appreciate an influence which transcends time.

A Foretaste of the Future

This introduction of an element of temporal transcendence, i.e., fusing the higher realms with the lower realms, is expressed in the fusion of the parshiyos Vayakhel and Pekudei. The fundamental element of Parshas Vayakhel is the Divine service of man, while the fundamental element of Parshas Pekudei is the influence from above. Fusing the two serves as a foretaste and a preparation for the revelations of the Era of the Redemption, when “I will make your windows of rubies,”17 which our Rabbis say18 refers to a fusion of the influence from above with man’s Divine service.

(Adapted from Sichos Shabbos Parshas Vayakhel-Pekudei, 5721)

A Command and a Promise

There is another concept that can be derived from the combination of Parshas Vayakhel and Parshas Pekudei. In between G‑d’s command to Moshe to build the Sanctuary and its utensils (as related in the parshiyos Termuah andTetzaveh) and the implementation of these commands (as related in theparshiyos Vayakhel and Pekudei), interruptions are possible (for example, the narrative of the Golden Calf, as related in Parshas Ki Sissa).19 But nothing comes between Moshe’s command to the Jewish people (Parshas Vayakhel) and their fulfillment of it (Parshas Pekudei). Indeed, the two are so closely connected that in most years the parshiyos are combined.

“We follow the majority”;20 even in the exceptional instances when Parshas Vayakhel and Parshas Pekudei are read separately, alluding to an involvement by the yetzer hora causing a delay of several days, the initiative will not be thwarted. Nothing will interpose, and ultimately, the intent will be brought to fruition. For a concept that is revealed by Moshe and also by “the extension of Moshe in every generation”21 will surely be accomplished.

For every one of Moshe’s commands to the Jewish people contains a promise that the command will be fulfilled.22 The Jews will surely respond with the appropriate Divine service, and this will cause “the glory of G‑d to fill the Sanctuary.”23

(Adapted from Sichos Shabbos Parshas Vayakhel-Pekudei, 5722)

SHABBOS VAYAKHEL - SHEKALIM Mevarchim Adar II - When Adar Enters – Joy Increases 24 Adar א – 2 Adar ב 5776

 

EREV SHABBOS - FRI Mar 4th 
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Mincha 5:25 pm  /Seuda Slishit Lite 
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Children's Program News 
Boys junior minyan shabbos morning from 10-10:30 led by Rabbi Herbstman.  Ages 6 and above Thank you - Tova

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web sitewww.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PURIM AT CSTL “PURIM AROUND THE WORLD” – WED MAR 23rd 8PM
Maariv/Megilah Reading followed by Seuda catered by Jonathan I Greene.  Dancing with DJ Dave.  Thank you to Rabbi Herbstman for organizing this.  RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Smicha Celebration and Honored Guest at CSTL SUN MAR 13th  
Please join us and the noted Torah Scholar Rabbi Nachman Wilhelm, the Dean of the Online Institute for Rabbinical Studies, on Sunday afternoon, March 13th, for inspiring words of Torah and the presentation ofSimcha's  Smicha certificate followed by buffet lunch and assorted l'chaim. Info:  sbrandeis@gmail.com

Simcha’s Shmura Matzah Co-op 
Simcha Brandeis is taking orders for mid April delivery of high quality unbroken Shmura Matzah.Please contact Simcha at: sbrandeis@gmail.com or 206 633 3896 to place your order.

Annual Lamplighter Dinner & Auction. Sun Mar27th (17th Adar Bet) 5 pm
With the dedication of the Berel and Miriam Weiss Early Childhood Center. Honoring long- time parents and volunteers Mr. Joel and Dr. Sarah Baskin. 
http://www.mmscdayschool.org/ 

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4ththrough Friday August 5th. For the past 42 years, Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 at www.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND!!!

CSTL SECURITY FEE $75
Due to the concern for the safety of our Shul we have hired a Security guard. The Board has unanimously voted to access all members, families and people who Daven at CSTL a $75 year security fee.  Thank you for supporting CSTL. Mike Weichbrodt

CSTL Sunday Breakfast Series – Sunday Mar 27th 10 am
Our speaker will be Rabbi Shimon Emlen who will talk on preparing for Pesach.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
From 10 AM at the Shaarei Tefillah Library.

Third Annual JEWISH RUSSIAN RETREAT – MAR 11th -13th  /WITH SPECIAL GUEST -  RABBI M FARKASH/
At Alderbrook Resort and Spa. In Russian and English at one of the most beautiful corners of Pacific Northwest. 3 days and 2 nights filled with interesting speakers, programs for kids, tasty food. Delicious food, exiting speaker in English and Russian, Jewish Kleizmer Band. Full time kids program for all ages. 
http://www.seattlerussianjews.org/tools/events/register_cdo/eventid/4333  
rabbi@shalomseattle.org

JLI “COURSE OF WHY” WITH RABBI BOGOMILSKY at CSTL  Began Wed Feb  17th 7.30-9PM.
Are you ready to give your Judaism the intellection you know it deserves? Are you prepared to tackle the quizzical, queer, and seemingly-unanswerable questions about Jewish belief and practice? Then signup today forThe Jewish Course of Why. Controversial and intriguing unanswered questions. This course comes with an educational book.  Thereafter for 5 Wednesdays.  www.myJLI.com or call 206-290-6301

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL was made possible, in part, by a grant for operations from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.   Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Inaugural Whisky Jewbilee Seattle, March 8, 7:00 - 10:00 pm
The Whisky Jewbilee is a Kosher catered premium whisky event focused on fine spirits and cigars. More info:http://whiskyjewbilee.com/tickets-seattle

Jewish Genealogical Society of WA & Seattle Sephardic Network  Mar 28th 6:30 - 8:00 pm
At Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island, JGSWS & Seattle Sephardic Network will host a "Sneak Preview" on the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Seattle August 7-12, 2016. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Derech Emunah Seattle Girls High School Production Tue Mar 29th 7:30 pm
Derech Emunah Productions presents "Sparks Make Fire", a journey about Women in Jewish History for women only ages 10 & up. Rainier Valley Cultural Center, 3515 S Alaska Street, Seattle. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Cost: Adults/$15  Students/$12. To purchase tickets or for more info: (888) 944-1043 or Productions@derechemunah.com

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camp for Boys/Camp for Girls Approx June 27-August 25. 
More info: www.seattlekollel.org

Affordable Kosher Passover Depot at BCMH - Grand Opening Sun Mar 27th 
A one-stop shop for your Passover needs in Seattle! Located in the BCMH Social Hall in Seward Park. Passover Depot will be filled with Kosher for Passover wines, fresh items, dry goods and much more.www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot  

BISTRO NIGHTS AT THE SUMMIT March 22nd
Bistro reservations are taken by email only.  For all (evening) bistros there is a window of seating times running from 7:30pm to 8:15pm. The all inclusive price includes appetizer, dinner and dessert, server gratuity, and of course a wide selection of wine and beer.  Bistros sell out quickly, there is limited capacity so please reserve immediately to ensure your place.  The Summit at First Hill's kitchens and dining areas are supervised daily byVa'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff.

MIDRASHA TO HOST SPECIAL CLASSES AND INTERACTIVE SEUDA
Ezra Bessaroth's Midrasha of Seattle Women's Institute of Torah Studies is pleased to welcome back RebbetzinChana Bracha Siegelbaum on Shabbat day, March 12th. Additional program sponsorships available at the $36/$72 and $108 levels. The program includes an additional Sunday morning, March 13th breakfast and women's class. See the poster below for details. The pre-Purim Megilat Esther Series continues this Sunday morning at the Meyers home, with breakfast at 9 am followed by the shiur at 9:15 am

Jewish Day School Auction & Gala March 13
At the Hyatt Regency, Bellevue. Honoring Jill & Chuck Friedman. Register by Feb. 19, 2016 at www.jds.org 

SEATTLE JEWISH THEATER AT Ezra Bessaroth APR 10th 
Please join us for a presentation of Morning Star.  Tickets are $3 in advance, or $5 at the door.  Contact Susan, office@ezrabessaroth.net, or 206 722-5500. 

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILIARY PURIM BAKE SALE MARCH 20
The EBLA Purim Bake Sale takes place this year on March 20, 2016, from 9:30 am-1:00pm. Breakfast will be available to purchase, along with Hamentashen, Biscochos, Travados, Baklava and more!  You may pre-order by phoning Selma Amon at 206 721-0533

COMMUNITY YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM Thu evening May 5th
Ezra Bessaroth is honored to present a special program on this year's Yom HaShoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day, Thursday evening May 5th. The program - the Northwest Premier of "Karski and the Lords of Humanity" - will feature a special pre-screening hors d'oeuvres reception - for sponsors - with the film's Director SlawomirGrunberg and screenwriter E. Thomas Wood. Stay tuned in upcoming newsletters for information on how you can purchase tickets and participate as a sponsor.

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Rosenfeld  THU 9-11 PM
Parsha Learning and Discussion.  Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE, Snacks served

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SICHO FOR VAYAKHEL
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2347355/jewish/Lekutei-Sichot-Vayakhel.htm
Adapted from the Works of the Lubavitcher Rebbe | Translated by Rabbi Eliyahu Touger © Chabad.org

In Parshas Vayakhel, the Torah relates how all the Jews men, women, and children1 donated toward the construction of the Sanctuary with unlimited generosity. Indeed, they gave more than what was required.

With regard to the gift of the half-shekel used for the adonim, the sockets which formed the Sanctuary’s base, by contrast, we find the amount was limited to a half-shekel, and the people were warned: “The rich should not give more, nor should the poor give less.”2

Similarly, there was a limit with regard to the givers. Only men participated.3Moreover, even with regard to the men, there were restrictions. The donation was required only from those “20 years old and up.”

(Similarly, with regard to the half-shekel given every year for the purchase of communal offerings in the time of the Beis HaMikdash , and our commemoration of those half-shekel donations today, the obligation is incumbent only on adult males. Adults may also give on behalf of their children, but there is no obligation on the child.4)

This differs from donations given to the Sanctuary as a whole. Donations collected for that purpose were not limited; there was no specific entity or amount that had to be given. Instead, everyone gave according to the generosity of his heart. Indeed, there was not even a limitation with regard to the total amount which was to be given. For we see that the Jews gave more than was necessary for the construction of the Sanctuary.5

And the donors included the entire Jewish people men, women, and children. Indeed, as reflected by the verse:6 “And the men brought in addition to the women,” the donations of the men were subordinate to those of the women. And the women were first in making their donations, giving before the men did.

Moreover, the women fashioned their gifts with exquisite care, “spinning [the wool while it was] on the goats.”7 And this involved a gift of a higher quality, for unlike the men, who gave only inanimate matter, the women also gave live animals.

Gifts of Atonement

Why the entire nation participated in donating to the Sanctuary can be explained as follows: The construction of the Sanctuary came in atonement for the Sin of the Golden Calf.8 This was a sin of a general nature, which affected even young children.9 (Young children are never punished for transgressions they perform, with one exception: communal idolatry. Thus with regard to an irhanidachas, a city condemned to be destroyed because of the idol worship of its inhabitants, all those living in the city, even children, are to be put to death.10) Since the sin of the Golden Calf affected the entire Jewish people, the atonement for it also had to be general in scope, including even children.11

This explanation, however, raises a question: The half-shekel was also intended to atone for the Sin of the Golden Calf.12 Why then was the donation of the half-shekel restricted to males above the age of twenty, while the entire nation donated to the Sanctuary as a whole?

We are forced to conclude that there were two elements to the atonement for the sin of the Golden Calf: a) one to be accomplished through the deeds of adult men, and b) one to be accomplished by the Divine service of the entire nation.

Our Response to G‑d’s Unity     

The scope of the prohibition against worshipping false divinities involves more than an utter denial of G‑d.13 On a more subtle level, the worship of false divinities can include thoughts that other powers exist , but are subservient to Him. And on an even more subtle level, even when one concedes that there isno source of power aside from G‑d, if one conceives of any other independent existence, one is worshipping other gods, as it were.

The opposite of the worship of false divinities is the appreciation and the feeling that: “there is nothing else aside from Him.”14 This is reflected in Avraham’s praise of G‑d15 as א-ל עולם. Were the phrase to have read: א-ל העולם , it would be translated as “L-rd of the world,” implying that the world is a separate entity, over which G‑d rules. א-ל עולם implies that there is no separation between G‑d and the world; the world is nothing more than a radiation of G‑d’s power.16

This appreciation should evoke a response from the Jewish people, a resolve that “all your deeds should be for the sake of Heaven.”17 Since the person appreciates that G‑d is not only the Master of the world, but that the world is no more than an expression of His power, it is natural that each person desire to dedicate himself entirely to G‑d’s service. Not only is he willing to give up his personal concerns to fulfill G‑d’s will (an approach which would result from the concept of G‑d as “L-rd of the world,” i.e., G‑d is Master over him and all his concerns), he has no personal concerns. From the outset, his entire life is dedicated to G‑dliness.

The Alter Rebbe adds18 a further dimension, citing the verse:19 “G‑d is the L-rd…; there is nothing else (אין עוד).” The world has no independent existence; it cannot even be referred to as "עוד" , which implies a subsidiary entity, as indicated by our Sages’ rhetorical question:20 יהודה ועוד לקרא “Does a verse [from the Torah require] any secondary support from [the custom of the Land of]Yehudah? ” Having such an appreciation of G‑d’s oneness evokes a consummate commitment to Divine service, spurring a person to “Know Him in all your ways.”21 Even his involvement in worldly matters becomes an expression of his Divine service. Not only will he perform an act for the sake of heaven (this implies that he is performing a secondary act for the sake of a greater purpose; in such an instance, the secondary act, though negligible when compared to the total picture, still holds some importance), his personal matters will themselves be expressions of holiness.22

For this reason, the construction of the Sanctuary serves to atone for the Sin of the Golden Calf. The construction of the Sanctuary brought about the indwelling of the Divine Presence within each and every individual, as it is written:23 “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary, and I will dwell within” “within each and every individual.”24 G‑d dwells within every individual through his efforts to make his personal environment a Sanctuary for G‑d.

This atones for the sin of the Golden Calf, for these efforts manifest G‑d’s unity in a manner which negates the possibility that other divinities even exist.

The Need for Preparation

In our Divine service, our progress moves from less difficult rungs to more accomplished ones. Thus we must proceed from acting “for the sake of Heaven” to “know[ing] Him in all our ways,” making it possible for the Divine Presence to dwell within each of us.

Just as in an individual sense these phases of Divine service follow a sequence, so too there was a sequence in the construction of the Sanctuary. The adonimserved as a foundation and a starting point for the construction. To cite the parallel in our daily Divine service: The kabbalas ol, the acceptance of G‑d’s yoke, expressed through Modeh Ani, begins our Divine service every day. But this does not represent the true depth of our appreciation of the oneness of G‑d. As such, it does not serve as complete atonement for the Sin of the Golden Calf, for it does not entirely negate the concept of existence outside G‑dliness.

Before beginning these two phases of Divine service (“All your deeds shall be for the sake of Heaven” and “Know Him in all your ways”), one must ready oneself. A person must direct all his energies to the service of G‑d with these two goals in mind. Moreover, he must always remember the ultimate goal: that G‑d’s essence dwell within the essence of every Jew.

These preparatory efforts must stem from the essence of our souls, the point of our being which we all share equally. And it must pervade all our powers. This implies that the service must be performed by a person whose every potential is revealed, for only then can he direct them to these goals.

On this basis, it is possible to resolve the question posed at the outset: The erection of the Sanctuary began with the placement of the adonimTheseadonim were made from: a) the donations given by those who were twenty25and above, who have all their potentials revealed, and b) all the donations toward the adonim were of an equal size.

After this preparatory stage of service was performed by the 600,000 adult males26 a number inclusive of the entire Jewish people27 it was possible for the nation as a whole: men below the age of twenty, women, and children, to bring their donations to the Sanctuary according to the generosity of their hearts.

(Adapted from Sichos Shabbos Parshas Shemini, 5722)

 

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