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Parasha B’haaloscha 18-25 Sivan 5776

Fri June 24th – Erev Shabbos
Shacharis: 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 8:52 pm

Sat June 25th - Shabbos
Shacharis: 9:30 am  (Latest Shema 9:11 am)
Mincha 8:35 pm /PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 2/ Seuda Slishit
Maariv/Havdala 10:04 pm 

Weekdays
Sunday Shacharis 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Mon-Thu Mincha/Maariv 9 pm /Repeat Shema after 9:55/

KIDDUSH SHABBOS
Kiddush is sponsored this week by CSTL and Rabbi and Mrs. Levitin in honor of the marriage this week of David and Ilana Kintzer!  This Sheva Brachot  Kiddush will feature a catered meal, challah, dessert, and l'chaim for all.  All CSTL members and their guests are invited to attend this joyous event!    Seuda Slishit is sponsored by Mike Weichbrodt in honor of the wedding of Ilana Greenberg and David Kintzer.

Mazel Tov Mazel Tov!
Mazel Tov to the Kavka family on the upcoming wedding of Naomi Kavka to Levy Deitsch.  May Naomi and Levy merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel !
Mazel Tov to the 
Greenberg and Kintzer families on the marriage of David and Ilana Kintzer.  May they merit to build abayis ne’eman b’Yisroel !

Naomi Kavka's Shabbos Kallah June 25th at 7 PM
This Shabbos, J at the home of the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd St. Bubbies, mommies, daughters and granddaughters are all invited. Looking forward, Shrprintze

New Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin - Sundays 10-11 am 
Gemora Baba Basra. Beginning this Sunday the 26th June after 9 am Shacharis

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 

Weekly Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  chanielevitin@gmail.com

CHABAD TEEN CAMP AT EASTSIDE TORAH CENTER 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Girls June 29 – July 10, Boys July 13-24.  www.chabadbellevue.org/camp

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND AND SEWARD PARK!!! (For transportation to/from other areas please speak with Rabbi Kavka.)

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Shlock Rock at BCMH Tue July 5 at 6 pm, 
http://www.eventbrite.com/e/schlock-rock-in-concert-tickets-26049018315

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camps
Boys: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org
Girls: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org 

Shiur by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat Monday, June 27, 
The Seattle community is invited to Sephardic Bikur Holim for a Shiur by Rabbi Riskin. Breakfast at 9:30 am and Shiur at 10:00 am. RSVP by June 23rd to rvspsbh@gmail.com

Mother's Connect - Parenting Workshop July 2 - July 30, 5:30 pm,
“Strengthening our connection to our children, each other and Hashem" at Ashreichem Yisrael, 5134 S Holly Street.  More info: info@ashreichemyisrael.org

36th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug. 7-12
Sheraton Hotel, downtown Seattle. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR B’HAALOSCHA
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2613593/jewish/Behaaloscha.htm © Chabad.org

In tractate Yoma,1 our Sages pose a difficulty: It is written:2 “When the dew descended on the camp at night, the manna descended upon it.” This implies that the manna descended within the camp. But it is also written:3 “And the people will go out and gather [the manna],” from which we can infer that they had to leave the camp to gather the manna. And it is further written:4 “And the people spread out and collected the manna,” indicating that they had to search far and wide.

Our Sages offer the following explanation. The three verses refer to three types of Jews. For the righteous, the manna descended at the entrance to their dwelling. Those of intermediate spiritual stature had to go out of the camp to collect it, and the wicked had to search.

In the same vein, our Sages1 note that the Torah refers to the manna as bread3 and cakes,4 yet also says it must be ground.4 The righteous, they explain, would receive baked bread. Those of intermediate spiritual stature would receive cakes ready to be baked. And the wicked would receive a substance that had to be ground.

“Bread From Heaven”

The Torah refers to the manna as “bread from heaven,”3 or “grain from heaven.”5 Therefore there are opinions among the Rishonim that the blessing recited over manna praised G‑d who “brings forth bread from the heavens.”6

The difference between “bread from heaven” and “bread from earth” is that “bread from earth” requires several types of labor before it can be eaten. Thus with regard to the labors forbidden on the Sabbath, the Mishnah includes the work necessary to prepare bread:7 ploughing, sowing, reaping, and the like. Moreover, even after these labors are performed, the baking of bread produces waste.

“Bread from heaven” is different. All the different labors were not necessary to prepare it,8 nor did it produce waste.9 And this “bread from heaven” was the diet, not only of the righteous, but also of those of intermediate spiritual stature.

(When referring to a person of intermediate spiritual stature, a benoni, the intent is not to speak of a benoni as defined in Tanya,10 but a benoni in the commonly accepted sense of the term — one whose spiritual scales are equally balanced between merit and sin.)

Moreover, the manna also sustained the wicked. And even then, it did not produce any waste. The fact that wicked people — even those who carried the idol fashioned by Michah11 — partook of the manna did not affect the level of the manna itself. Even as it was digested by them, becoming part of their flesh and blood, it retained all its qualities.

And not only did the manna itself remain unchanged, it elevated those who partook of it. Thus our Sages said:12 “The Torah was given solely to those who partook of the manna,” for the manna refined the Jews and made them worthy of the Torah.

The manna had this effect on all 600,000 Jews, making them worthy of receiving the Torah in its entirety: its simple meaning, its allusions, its homilies, and its mystic concepts.13

Partaking of the manna did not change the nature of the wicked immediately; they did not turn to G‑d in teshuvah at that time. For that reason, even after partaking of the manna several times, there were Jews who still had to grind14and cook before eating. Moreover, several of the incidents referred to in the verse:15 “And you tried me these ten times” occurred after the Jews began partaking of the manna.16 Thus we see that the manna’s effect was not complete. Nevertheless, in all instances it definitely had some influence.

A Parallel Between Manna and Shabbos

Based on the above, we can appreciate a ruling in Sefer HaItim17 quoted in the name of Rav Saadia Gaon: When a person finds himself in a distant community on Shabbos, and does not know which Torah portion should be read, he should recite the portion concerning manna. For this portion was related on Shabbos.

On the surface, this ruling is difficult to understand; many portions in the Torah were related on Shabbos. For example, “everyone agrees that the Torah was given on Shabbos,18 and so the person could read the Ten Commandments. Why should he read the portion concerning manna?

The above question can be resolved by clarifying the intrinsic connection between the manna and Shabbos. Just as the manna did not lose its spiritual quality despite the fact that it descended to very low levels, so too theShabbos retains its essential quality even as it descends to very low levels.19

With regard to the verse,20 “And the heavens, the earth, and all their hosts were completed,” the word vayichulu is associated with the word kilayon,21meaning “expiration,” i.e., it is as if the soul of the world expired with love for G‑d.

This does not mean that the world ceases to exist, but rather that the world as it exists became elevated. For that reason, it is a mitzvah to take pleasure in the Shabbos by eating and drinking.22

Nevertheless, the pleasure which a Jew derives from eating and drinking onShabbos —i.e., not only the deed, but the pleasure itself — is a mitzvah. During the week, we should not eat or drink more than is necessary to maintain our bodies. And even then, one should not eat or drink for pleasure, but rather out of necessity, for pleasure makes one more materially oriented. On Shabbos, by contrast, not only does the pleasure not make a person materially oriented (as reflected in the Zohar’s statement:23 “The verse24mentions ‘the waste of your festivals,’ and not ‘the waste of yourShabbosos’”), the pleasure itself becomes a mitzvah.25

The light of Shabbos permeates creation, to the extent that even an utterly wicked person will not lie on Shabbos.26 The intent is not to say that theShabbos prompts him to turn to G‑d in teshuvah. On the contrary, the person remains the same. Nevertheless, he will not lie on Shabbos because the light of Shabbos permeates even the lowest levels.

This explains why a person who does not know which Torah portion to read on a given Shabbos should read the one concerning manna. For every type of influence which is drawn down into the world is drawn down through the Torah. Thus the creation of the Shabbos atmosphere — i.e., that the light ofShabbos should permeate the material realm — is also dependent on the Torah. Accordingly, when we do not know the portion connected with any given Shabbos, we should read the one concerning manna, for it conveys the spiritual theme which characterizes the Shabbos.27

The Ten Commandments, and similarly other portions of the Torah, reflect elevated spiritual levels. They do not, however, reflect how these spiritual lights descend into this world without change.

Two Types of Spiritual Bread

Everything which exists has its source in the Torah. The Torah is described with the analogy of bread.28 Accordingly, the two types of bread, “bread from heaven” and “bread from the earth” have their source in two different dimensions of “bread” within the Torah.

Nigleh, the revealed teachings of Torah law, parallels “bread from the earth,” while P’nimiyusHaTorah, the Torah’s mystic teachings, parallels “bread from heaven.”29

Nigleh is comparable to “bread from the earth” because it is characterized by questions and differences of opinion, and its study involves effort. P’nimiyus HaTorah, by contrast, is compared to “bread from heaven,” because within it, “there are neither unresolved questions... nor differences of opinion.”30

One should not, however, surmise that because P’nimiyus HaTorah is comparable to “bread from heaven” it is intended for only a spiritual elite. The opposite is true; just as the manna was intended for every Jew, even the wicked, so too P’nimiyus HaTorah is intended for everyone.

And their involvement with P’nimiyus HaTorah will not cause them any loss. On the contrary, since, as our Sages taught:31 “Study is great, because it leads to deed,” the study of Chassidus will lead people to turn to G‑d inteshuvah, and become students of the Torah and observers of the mitzvos.Asour Sages promised:32 “the light [of the Torah; i.e., P’nimiyus HaTorah33 ] will point them to the good.”

For this reason, we should not hold Jews back from the study of P’nimiyus HaTorah. On the contrary, we must seek to involve every Jew in this study, for it will lead them to the ultimate truth, to a state in which “he does not lie.” This involves exposing the shades of falsehood which characterize material existence. At that time, there will be no difference of opinion between the G‑dly soul and the animal soul, nor will there be any unresolved questions. We will all follow the path of G‑d, King of this Earth.

Not To Stand In Another Jew’s Way

There are those who claim that people who have not reached the rung of the righteous should not be allowed to study P’nimiyus HaTorah. This is a misguided approach, for bringing a Jew to the study of P’nimiyus HaTorah will motivate him to turn to G‑d in teshuvah. Preventing him from studying, by contrast, causes him to sink even lower.

Were we to ask the person who was rebuffed, why his spiritual state is so low, he could reply, quoting the verse:34 “I was driven away today from attachment to the heritage of G‑d.”

The person who drove his colleague away will himself be subject to examination: How much better and more refined is he than the person he drove away? Moreover, his achievements will be assessed according to the potentials which he himself possesses, and not according to those of the person driven away.

To cite a parallel, Chassidus35 explains that Moshe was “more humble than all the men on the face of the earth,”36 because he made the following calculation: Were another person given the soul which he had been given, and were he to have been granted the same level of Divine assistance that he had been granted, surely that other person would have reached even higher levels.

To clarify the matter with an analogy: When a person prevents another Jew from studying “the Torah of life,” and particularly when he does not allow him to approach P’nimiyus HaTorah, “the tree of life,”30 he can be considered a spiritual murderer. For he is severing his fellow Jew’s attachment to the living G‑d.37

 Glimmers of Dawn

In general, we see that as we draw closer to Mashiach’scoming, the controversy and accusations against Chassidus have abated. For example, in previous generations there were claims that Chassidus should not be studied at all. Such arguments are no longer advanced. There is, however, a new argument: Chassidus is relevant only to a spiritual elite.

Every degree of concealment is motivated by a Divine intent; indeed, the intent is that the concealment itself lead to a greater revelation. Similarly, in the case at hand, not only shouldn’t these statements lead to distress, they should encourage us to intensify our involvement in the study and dissemination of Chassidus.38

This reinforced dedication will have a positive effect. When the yetzer horasees that the concealment it brought about only caused the study and dissemination of Chassidus to be reinforced, it will see that its efforts were — according to its conception — counterproductive, and will remove that concealment.

May G‑d help that we not be distressed by the challenges, nor by the concealment of G‑dliness which we face. Instead, may these challenges intensify the spreading of Chassidus. This increase inturnhastens the coming of the ultimate Redemption to be led by Mashiach. May it take place speedily, in our days.

(Adapted from Sichos Yud Shvat, 5717 and Sichos Shabbos ParshasBeshallach, 5723)

Parasha Naso 11-18 Sivan 5776

Fri June 17th – Erev Shabbos
Shacharis: 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 8:51 pm

Sat June 18th - Shabbos
Shacharis: 9:30 am  (Latest Shema 9:07 am)
Mincha 8:30 pm /PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 1/ Seuda Slishit
Maariv/Havdala 10:03 pm 

Weekdays
Sunday Shacharis 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Mon-Thu Mincha/Maariv 9 pm

KIDDUSH SHABBOS
Kiddush is sponsored this week by Dr. Norman Share (Natan ben Ya’acov HaCohen), in honor and in memory of the 33rd yahrzeit of his father, Ya’acov ben Yoel HaCohen z”l (10th of Sivan).  Ivan Rothman is a contributor to kiddush, in honor and in memory of the 4th yahrzeit of Norman Manaster (Naftali ben Baruch z”l, 18th of Sivan).  
Seuda Slishit is sponsored by 
Yossi Greenberg in honor of the wedding of Ilana Greenberg and David Kintzer.

Mazel Tov Mazel Tov!
Mazel Tov to the Greenberg and Kintzer families on the upcoming wedding of Ilana Greenberg and David Kintzer.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 

Weekly Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  chanielevitin@gmail.com

CHABAD TEEN CAMP AT EASTSIDE TORAH CENTER 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Girls June 29 – July 10, Boys July 13-24.  www.chabadbellevue.org/camp

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND AND SEWARD PARK!!! (For transportation to/from other areas please speak with Rabbi Kavka.)

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

SEFER TORAH DEDICATION THIS SUNDAY AT 9:30 AM
Join us this Sunday, June 19, from 9:30 - 11:30 am, as we dedicate a new Sefer Torah in honor of Rabbi Bernie & Shirley Fox. The ceremony starts at Congregation Shevet Achim & ends at NYHS. For more information, contact Jack Deleon deleon6123@gmail.com or Melissa Rivkin at mrivkin@nyhs.org

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camps
Boys Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org
Girls Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org 

Seminar with Dr. Dicken Bettinger Sun June 19th 10:30 am-2:30 pm
At Congregation Shevet Achim & Living Judaism. More info: (206) 851-9949; mark@livingjudaism.com orhttp://www.livingjudaism.com/living-with-ease.html

Shiur by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat Monday, June 27, 
The Seattle community is invited to Sephardic Bikur Holim for a Shiur by Rabbi Riskin. Breakfast at 9:30 am and Shiur at 10:00 am. RSVP by June 23rd to rvspsbh@gmail.com

36th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug. 7-12
Sheraton Hotel, downtown Seattle. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Registration is now open for CAMP YAVNEH 2016! 
All divisions of BCMH camps will now be under one name Camp Yavneh with all new programs and activities to supplement the programs you already love! This will include children from pre- school all the way through our new CIT program for 6th and 7th grade and our staff in high school, college and beyond! Register your child at www.campyavnehseattle.com If you are in 8th-12 grade, college or older and would like to work at Camp this summer please contact Ari Hoffman at thehoffather@gmail.com

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR NASO
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2613591/jewish/Naso.htm © Chabad.org

Parshas Naso contains the laws governing a sotah, a woman suspected of immodest conduct. When a man issues a warning to his wife, forbidding her to be alone with a certain man, and she disobeys this warning, she is classified as a sotah.1 Even though she may not have committed adultery, the very fact that she was alone with that man after being warned obliges her to undergo the test described in this Torah reading.

The relationship between a mortal husband and wife mirrors the covenant between G‑d and the Jewish people.2 Accordingly, it follows that the laws regarding a sotah have parallels with regard to the relationship between G‑d and the Jews.3

The commandment:4 “You shall have no other gods in My presence” can be interpreted as G‑d’s warning to the Jewish nation not to seek intimacy with others. Nevertheless, when considering our relationship with G‑d, it is difficult to conceive of something equivalent to being alone with another man. How is it possible to hide from G‑d?; “there is no place where He is not.”5 We are always being watched by G‑d, as it is written:6 “‘If a person will conceal himself in hidden places, will I not see him?’ declares G‑d.”

How then, can the Jews seclude themselves, unseen by G‑d, as it were?

The answer depends on the following concept: Our Sages state7 that with regard to a proud person, G‑d says: “He and I cannot dwell in the same place.” Thus pride brings about concealment from G‑d.8 G‑d is not to be found where a proud person is; it is as if G‑d does not see him. This is alluded to in the extended interpretation of the above verse offered by the Baal Shem Tov: “If a person will conceal himself in hidden places, because of his ‘I,’ I will not see him.”

When a Husband Can Withdraw a Warning

Our Sages teach:9 “When a husband withdraws his warning [to his wife], the warning is withdrawn.” It is as if he never issued the warning to begin with.

Our Sages explain,10 however, that a husband has the right to withdraw his warning only before his wife enters into privacy with the man regarding whom she was warned. Once she is alone with him, the warning can no longer be withdrawn, and the woman must drink the bitter waters [if she is discovered together with the man in question].

The rationale is that as long as she has not entered into privacy with the other man, the husband’s warning has not been reinforced by her conduct. Accordingly, since he has authority over his warning, he can withdraw it. When, however, she has already secluded herself with the other man, she is required by the Torah to drink the bitter waters. Her husband has no authority over the Torah’s requirement.

The Jerusalem Talmud10 seems to differ, stating that a husband can withdraw his warning up until the moment the scroll bearing the sotah’scurse is blotted out in the water.

The Rogatchover Gaon11 explains that there is really no difference of opinion between the Jerusalem Talmud andthe Babylonian Talmud. The Jerusalem Talmud is talking about a meeting which would not be forbidden if not for the husband’s warning, e.g., he warned her not to be alone with her father, or with 100 men at the same time. Since such a prohibition is entirely the husband’s,12 if he withdraws his warning, there is no longer any reason for the meeting to have been forbidden.13

A parallel exists with regard to the bond between G‑d and the Jewish people. Since there is no place apart from G‑d, there is, in truth, no possibility for a private relationship apart from Him. When does G‑d allow a person to be “alone,” without Him? When that person’s pride banishes G‑d’s presence, as it is written:14 “All those with haughty hearts are an abomination to G‑d.”

Since the possibility of being apart from G‑d is thus dependent solely on His will, G‑d can always “withdraw His warning” even if it has been transgressed.

Making Torah a Part of One’s Being

Until what time can the husband’s warning be withdrawn (even in those instances when the prohibition is dependent solely on him)? Until the scroll bearing the sotah’s curse is blotted out.

To blot out the letters on the scroll implies that even before they were washed away, the letters and the parchment were not an integral whole. For if they had been an integral whole, it would not be possible to erase them. For example, when letters are engraved in stone, the letters and stone become a single entity. It is impossible to destroy the letters without destroying the stone itself.

There is a parallel in our Divine service. There are Jews who study Torah in a manner resembling engraving, i.e., it is impossible to erase the letters of the Torah from their being; they and the Torah become a single entity.15

In such an instance, even if a Jew becomes separate from G‑d because his pride causes G‑d to seclude Himself, this affects only the external dimensions of the situation. G‑d’s forgiveness can negate these — and indeed all possible — obstacles, and G‑d is “abundant in forgiveness.”16

When, however, the “letters are rubbed out” (i.e., it becomes apparent that the person and the Torah were always two separate entities), it is possible that his self-concern will have permeated his being, and the laws of a sotah will apply to him.

What is required of a sotah? To bring a meal offering of barley, which is referred to by our Sages17 as “animal fodder.” This meal offering is a tenth of an ephah in measure, the size of offering brought by the most indigent.18 In the spiritual context, this means that a person realizes that he is “impoverished with regard to knowledge,”19 like an animal20 which has no knowledge at all.

When a person wipes away his self-consciousness to such an extent, he becomes pure, able to resume his relationship with G‑d. Indeed, he reaches a higher level than that attained previously, as implied by the promise:21 “And she will be acquitted, and will bear offspring.” Our Sages22 interpret this to mean: “If she would have given birth with difficulty, she will give birth with ease.”

Implied is also a spiritual parallel, for “the offspring of the righteous” — and ‘Your nation are all righteous’23 — “are mitzvos and good deeds.”24

Indeed, the person will proceed to the highest levels, for “In the place wherebaalei teshuvah stand, perfectly righteous men are not able to stand.”25

(Adapted from Sichos Yud-Beis Tammuz, 5717)

Parasha Bamidbar - Shavuot 4-11 Sivan 5776

Fri June 10th – Erev Shabbos
Shacharis: 7 am 
Mincha/Candles 8:48 pm 
Maariv 9:48 pm /COUNT OMER #49/

Sat June 11th - Shabbos
Shacharis: 9:30 am  (Latest Shema 9:10 am)
Mincha 8:30 pm /PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 6/ (Seuda Slishit 
at HOME)
Maariv 10 pm / Candles after 10 pm from existing flame 
All-Night Learning from 11:30 pm to 2:43 am (Alot haShachar 72 variable minutes)

Sun June 12th – Shavuot Day 1
Shacharis10 am  (Sunrise 5:11 am) /Special Dairy Kiddush
Mincha 8:40 pm 
Maariv 9:10 pm / 
Yahrtzeit and Yom Tov Candles after 10 pm from existing flame

Mon June 13th – Shavuot Day 2
Shacharis: 9:30 am  /YIZKOR/No Kiddush
Mincha 8:00 pm /FOLLOWED BY FARBRENGEN/
Maariv/Havdala 10:01 pm

Weekdays
Tue - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Tue-Thu Mincha/Maariv 9 pm

KIDDUSH SHABBOS
Kiddush is sponsored this shabbos by Meir Zwanziger and the children of Jack and Molly Zwanziger.  They are sponsoring to honor the visit of their parents to Seattle this week, and to honor the occasion of their parents' 36th wedding anniversary (June 15th).   Seuda Slishit at home.

KIDDUSH – 1st DAY SHAVUOS 
Thank you to Mrs. Chanie Levitin for sponsoring our Special Dairy Kiddush featuring Cheese Cake and Ice cream, in honor of Zman Matan Toroteinu, Shavuos.

CHILDRENS PROGRAM – FIRST DAY OF SHAVUOS – SUN JUN 12th 10am-12pm
For both the younger and older groups.  There will be Shavuous Jeopardy for  mitzvah dollars downstairs run by Rabbi Herbstman.  Upstairs there will be songs and games run by Marave Herbstman   Afterwards there will be a children's kiddushand story with Rabbi Emlen and yummy ICECREAM sundaes!!!!!! There will be no program on Monday. For more info contact Tova Cox.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 

Shavuot Learning at CSTL
11:30 pm to 12:30 am Reading for the 613 commandments with Michael Levin
12:30 to 1:30 am Rabbi Alter Levitin
1:30 am to 2:30 am Dr Yussi Greenberg on the Teshuvot of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein.
2:30 am – 3:00 am Rabbi Mendy Levitin

Weekly Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  chanielevitin@gmail.com

CHABAD TEEN CAMP AT EASTSIDE TORAH CENTER 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Girls June 29 – July 10, Boys July 13-24.  www.chabadbellevue.org/camp

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND AND SEWARD PARK!!! (For transportation to/from other areas please speak with Rabbi Kavka.)

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camps
Boys Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org
Girls Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org 

Shiur by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat Monday, June 27, 
The Seattle community is invited to Sephardic Bikur Holim for a Shiur by Rabbi Riskin. Breakfast at 9:30 am and Shiur at 10:00 am. RSVP by June 23rd to rvspsbh@gmail.com

36th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug. 7-12
Sheraton Hotel, downtown Seattle. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Registration is now open for CAMP YAVNEH 2016! 
All divisions of BCMH camps will now be under one name Camp Yavneh with all new programs and activities to supplement the programs you already love! This will include children from pre- school all the way through our new CIT program for 6th and 7th grade and our staff in high school, college and beyond! Register your child at www.campyavnehseattle.com If you are in 8th-12 grade, college or older and would like to work at Camp this summer please contact Ari Hoffman at thehoffather@gmail.com

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHAVUOS
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2613544/jewish/Shavuos.htm © Chabad.org

Sleeping Soundly

The Midrash states1 that the Jews slept the entire night before the giving of the Torah, “because sleep on Shavuos is pleasant and the night is short.... Not even a flea bit them.”

When G‑d came to give them the Torah, He found the Jews in deep slumber, and had to rouse them. This is alluded to in the verse:2 “Why did I come when no one was there? I called, and there was no answer.”

To compensate for the nation’s slumber on the night before the giving of the Torah, it is customary to remain awake on the first night of Shavuos, studying the Torah.3

All the stories in the Torah serve as lessons for us in our Divine service. This is especially true with regard to any story which casts the Jews in an unfavorable light. The Torah is careful not to speak deprecatingly even about a non-kosher animal.4 So if it tells a story which portrays the Jews unfavorably, we can assume that this is done only because a unique lesson can be derived from that story.

The lesson in this case is apparent: that we should compensate for our ancestors’ conduct by staying awake the entire night of Shavuos. To communicate this lesson, however, it would have been enough to summarize the story. The fact that our Sages added phrases such as: “Sleep on Shavuos is pleasant and the night is short.... Not even a flea bit them,” indicates that these particulars contain lessons aside from the one which encourages us to remain awake on Shavuos night.

In Anxious Expectation

It is well known5 that the promise that they would receive the Torah 50 days after their exodus from Egypt awakened a strong desire within the Jews. With great anticipation, they counted the days until the Torah would be given. This is the source for the mitzvah of counting the omer.

Now, if seven weeks beforehand the Jews could hardly wait to receive the Torah, we can assume that their desire increased as they approached the actual date. They knew G‑d was going to give the Torah on the next day. How then was it possible for them to sleep?

Moreover, their counting for 49 days prepared them for G‑d’s great gift. On each of these days they became more refined, and more worthy to receive the Torah. And on each of these 49 days, they drew down one of the 50 Gates of Understanding. Thus on the forty-ninth day, they had completed drawing down the 49 gates — the maximum possible through the Divine service of mortals for the fiftieth gate was to be opened by G‑d at Mt. Sinai.

When one considers that the Jews had a burning desire for the Torah even while under the influence of Egypt’s 49 Gates of Impurity, we can understand how overwhelming this desire must have become by the time they had refined themselves in drawing down the 49 Gates of Understanding,6 making themselves worthy of G‑d’s priceless gift.

With such a great desire, does it make sense that the people would go to sleep?!

We are forced to conclude that even while sleeping, they did not take their minds off the giving of the Torah. Indeed, they went to sleep in preparation for the event.

This is also indicated by the fact that the fleas did not bite them. If going to sleep was a deviation from the Torah, G‑d would not have wrought a miracle to enable them to sleep so soundly. The fact that He did implies that this sleep was also part of the nation’s preparation.

Reaching Upward

To explain: The Alter Rebbe writes7 that no matter how high a level of understanding a person achieves, or how deep an attachment to G‑dliness, since each soul exists within a body, there is no way that a mortal can attain the kind of connection to G‑d that the soul enjoyed in its incorporeal state. The human body simply cannot bear that degree of connection.

When a person sleeps, the soul disengages itself from the body to a certain degree and “ascends” to the spiritual realms,8 leaving only a trace of vitality in the body.9 Therefore the sleeper’s soul can grasp a higher level of G‑dliness than it can while it is awake and functioning within the body.

For this reason, those people who devote themselves arduously to the study of Torah during the day receive revelations regarding their study at night.10 At times, matters left unresolved during the previous day become clear by morning, based on the revelation experienced by the soul while the body was asleep.

This is why the Jews went to sleep before the giving of the Torah. They wanted their souls to become disengaged from the realm of corporeal experience and thus be able to grasp even higher spiritual levels. This, they thought, would better prepare them for the revelations to be experienced at the giving of the Torah.

This is implied by the Midrash’swords: “Sleep on Shavuos is pleasant and the night is short.” The more a person labors to refine himself while awake, when the soul is fully enclothed in a body, the higher the level of revelation experienced during sleep. After the counting of the 49 days, the “night” grew “short”; only a little of the world’s darkness remained. For all the preparatory work had been completed, and the great revelation was imminent. At such a time, “sleep is pleasant,” for very high levels can be reached.

Moreover, the spiritual peaks which the Jews reached by sleeping that night affected their environment to the extent that no other living beings disturbed their slumber.11

The Purpose of the Giving of the Torah

But G‑d was not pleased with the sleep of the Jewish people before their receipt of the Torah, for this was not the proper manner in which to approach the event.

As mentioned on many occasions,12 the giving of the Torah was a new development in comparison to the observance of the mitzvos by the Patriarchs. After the giving of the Torah, the mitzvos would have a permanent effect on the physical substances with which theywere performed, imbuing them with holiness.

The peak of our Divine service is achieved, not by abandoning the body, but by involving it.13 It is through such efforts that a connection is established with G‑d’s essence; this cannot be achieved by a non-corporeal soul. Indeed, the advantage of Divine service carried out within the body is so great that G‑d and the Heavenly Court make themselves dependent on the rulings of a mortal court. G‑d tells us: “You have triumphed over Me, My children,”14 for “the Torah is not in the heavens.”15

Since the purpose of the giving of the Torah was to accentuate the advantage of the Divine service performed while the soul is enclothed within the body, the preparatory service must parallel that objective; not to sleep and rise above the body, but to work with it. (This applies even though, at that time, before the giving of the Torah, there was still a decree separating the material from the spiritual.16 )

 No Man Can Remain an Island

There are those who ask: “Why must I have anything to do with the darkness of the world? Why must I become involved with material things? I would rather cut myself off from all that and devote myself to studying Torah and perfecting my Divine service undisturbed by others.”

Such people are saying that they have approached the level of Shavuos, when the “night” — the darkness of our world — is “short.” They want to reach the highest peaks (for “the sleep of Shavuos is sweet”) and not be disturbed by the “fleas” in their environment.

They must know that even before the Torah was given — indeed, on the very day it was given — such an approach was contrary to G‑d’s intent. And indeed, we are still compensating for this error today, as we strive to make a dwelling for G‑d in this lower world. Surely, this applies after the giving of the Torah, when our efforts must involve setting aside time to share with other Jews, even if they are on a lower level. And we must realize that we ourselves will also benefit from this sharing, as we are taught: “From my students, [I received] more than from all others.”17

This is the reason we do not sleep on Shavuos, the night before we receive the Torah. It is not merely to compensate for the shortcoming of our ancestors. It is because staying awake is part of the preparation for receiving the Torah.

The proper approach is to involve ourselves with the body, the animal soul, and one’s portion in the world. In this manner, one prepares oneself to receive the Torah with a joy that continues throughout the year.

(Adapted from Sichos Chag HaShavuos, 5722)

A Cherished Day

My revered father-in-law, the Rebbe, relates18 that the Baal Shem Tovcherished the second day ofShavuos. Every year on the second day he would hold a special feast and linger with his chassidim.19

The Maggid of Mezeritch, the Baal Shem Tov’s successor, explained the reason for the Baal ShemTov’s behavior. The second day of Shavuos was the first complete 24-hour day after the Jews received the Torah. The Maggidwould add: “In particular, this is true according to the opinion of Rabbi Yossi,20who maintains that the Torah was given on the seventh of Sivan. This is a wondrous dimension.”21

On the surface, the two rationales given by the Maggid are contradictory. If the day is so dear because it was the first day after the giving of the Torah, then according to Rabbi Yossi, this dearness should characterize the eighth of Sivan? But if the dearness results from the fact that the Torah was given on that day (according to the Sages who maintain — as the Alter Rebbe rules in his Shulchan Aruch22 — that the Torah was given on the sixth day), it is thefirst day of Shavuos which should be cherished?
 

Phase Two

The cherished nature of the first 24 hours after the holiday of Shavuos can be explained as follows: As mentioned above, the giving of the Torah empowered every Jew to refine and elevate the world.23

In actuality, however, these efforts began after the giving of the Torah. The giving itself was a revelation from above — “And G‑d descended on Mount Sinai,”24 independent of man’s efforts.

Man’s labor of refinement, which was the fundamental purpose of the giving of the Torah, began after that event. This explains the dearness of the second day of Shavuos. On this day began man’s endeavors to elevate the material.

This is reflected in the fact that the second phase of the dynamic — Moshe’s ascent of Mount Sinai to receive the physical tablets of the Law (symbolic of the elevation of the material realm) — began on the seventh of Sivan.25

Moshe’s Initiative

Based on the above, we can also appreciate why according to Rabbi Yossi, who maintains that the giving of the Torah took place on the seventh of Sivan, the seventh is a cherished day. Even according to his approach, the phase of ascent began on the seventh of Sivan.

To explain: Our Sages26 state that Rabbi Yossi maintains that Moshe “added another day (of preparation for the giving of the Torah) on his own initiative, and the Holy One, blessed be He, consented.”

G‑d told the Jews to refrain from marital relations for two days, the fourth and fifth of Sivan,27 and so the giving of the Torah could have taken place on the sixth. Moshe, however, added another day on his own initiative, telling the Jews to separate for three days.28 G‑d accepted this, and thus it was not until the seventh of Sivan that the Torah was given.

Thus, according to Rabbi Yossi, the designation of the seventh of Sivan as the day of the giving of the Torah depended on the willingness of the Jewish people to add another day of preparation. Thus it reflects mortal efforts toward ascent.

For this reason, according to Rabbi Yossi, the day of the giving of the Torah itself is cherished, while according to the Sages it is the day after the giving which is cherished. And thus Rabbi Yossi considers the seventh day of Sivan — the second day of the holiday of Shavuos — a cherished day.29

Indeed, according to Rabbi Yossi, the dearness of the seventh of Sivan is even greater than it is according to the Sages. To refer to the Maggid’s statement, it possesses “a wondrous dimension.” According to the Sages, the uniqueness of the seventh of Sivan is characterized by a single positive thrust, ascent. According to Rabbi Yossi, by contrast, the second day of Shavuos possesses two positive qualities: revelation from above (for it is the day of the giving of the Torah), and ascent, (as reflected in the Jews’ initiative in adding a day of preparation). The fusion of both qualities indeed adds “a wondrous dimension.”30

A Congruence of Motifs

Based on the above, we can appreciate the precision of the wording used by my revered father-in-law, the Rebbe, that the Baal Shem Tov would cherish the second day of Shavuos. On the surface, the reason he cherished the day was not because it is the second day of Shavuos, but because it is the seventh of Sivan, which according to our Sages is the first day after the giving of the Torah, and according to Rabbi Yossi, the day of the giving.

The explanation is as follows: the second day of Shavuos possesses an advantage with regard to the first. The observance of the first day is mandated by Scriptural Law; as such, the day possesses an inherent sanctity. The observance of the second day, however, is mandated by Rabbinic law, i.e., the day in its own right is an ordinary weekday, but the Jewish people caused it to be endowed with holiness.31 Thus the second day of a festival possesses a dimension of holiness similar to that described above with regard to the second day of Shavuos, the seventh of Sivan. It reflects an elevation of the worldly plane.32

Where No Doubt Exists

As is true with regard to all concepts explained in P’nimiyus HaTorah, the relationship between the observance of the second day of the festivals and the seventh of Sivan is also reflected in Nigleh, the revealed dimension of Torah law.

There is a more severe aspect to the observance of the second day of Shavuosthan there is to the observance of the second day of other festivals. The observance of the second day of other festivals was instituted because of a doubt. In places distant from Jerusalem, the day sanctified as RoshChodesh (on which depends the timing of the festivals) was not known with certainty, and therefore Jews observed every festival for two days.

This does not apply with regard to Shavuos, for the observance of Shavuos is not dependent on a particular day of the month, but rather on the conclusion of the counting of the omer.33 This in turn depends on the declaration of Rosh Chodesh Nissan. By Shavuos, the day consecrated as RoshChodesh Nissan was known throughout the world. Thus the second day of Shavuos was not observed because of doubt, but “so as not to differentiate between one festival and another.”34 For this reason, our Sages ordained that the second day of Shavuos be observed as a festival, despite the fact that there was never a doubt as to the day the holiday was to be celebrated.35

The inner reason for this law is that the second day of Shavuos and the seventh day of Sivan share the same spiritual thrust. Therefore, this day was always characterized by a unique spiritual significance because of the special qualities it possesses, as explained by the Maggid, and interpreted regarding the views of the Sages and Rabbi Yossi. This draws down greater power with regard to the observance of that day as a festival. This applies when the months are established according to a fixed calendar and the second day of Shavuos always falls on the seventh of Sivan. Moreover, even when the calendar was dependent on the sighting of the moon, in most years36Shavuos was celebrated on the sixth of Sivan, for an effort was made to see that the testimony of the witnesses confirmed the dates arrived at by calculations.37 

When the Baal Shem Passed Away

The dearness with which the Baal Shem Tov held the second day of Shavuos found expression at the time of his passing. The Baal Shem passed away on the first day of Shavuos, 5520.38 In such an instance, halachah prescribes39that the person be buried on the second day of the holiday.40

Burial was also very significant for the Baal Shem. It is related41 that the Baal Shem stated that he had the potential to ascend to heaven in a tempest as didEliyahu, but desired to fulfill the Divine decree:42 “You are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

The advantage of returning to dust over ascending to heaven in a tempest echoes the advantage of the second day of Shavuos. For instead of the upward thrust of ascending to heaven, the emphasis is on a return to the earth.

 The Baal Shem Tov’s Mission

It has been explained43 that every teaching from the Baal Shem Tov expresses the essence of his being. The Baal Shem Tov’s mission was to reveal the teachings of Chassidus which underscore the importance of elevating the material world.44 For this reason the Baal Shem Tov cherished the second day of Shavuos, for as mentioned, this elevation is the motif of the Divine service associated with that day.

(Adapted from Sichos Chag HaShavuos, 5720)

Parashat B’hukosai – Mevachim Sivan - Chazaq 26 Iyar – 5 Sivan 5776

Fri June 3rd – Erev Shabbos
Shacharis: 7 am
Mincha/Candles 8:43 pm
Maariv 9:44 COUNT OMER #42/

Sat June 4th - Shabbos
Tehilim for Mevarchim Sivan 8:00 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:10 am/

Mincha  8:20 pm /Pirke Avos Chapter 5/Seuda Slishit 
Maariv/Havdalah 9:58 pm /COUNT OMER #43/

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 am
Mon, Wed -Fri Shacharis 7 am
Tue Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH SIVAN/
Sun-Thu Mincha 9:00 pm
Sun-Thu Maariv and Sefira 9:46 to 9:49 pm /COUNT #44-#48/

YOM YERUSHALAYIM – Sun Jun 5th
The Old City of Jerusalem and the Temple Mount were liberated during the 1967 Six-Day War. The day is marked in Israel as “Jerusalem Day.” (www.chabad.org/calendar).  Many congregations (not including CSTL) have special services on this date. The Chief Rabbinate of Israel has ruled that YomYerushalayim shacharis include recitation of Hallel, and with the shabbos version of Psukei d’Zimra.

SHAVUOS ALL NIGHT LEARNING – Motzei Shabbos June 11th
Program to follow

SHAVUOS – Sun Jun 12th and Mon Jun 13th
Special events for Adults and Children!

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush this Shabbat is sponsored in honor of three occasions of note.  Rabbi Shmuly and Mrs. Chaya Levitin are co-sponsoring in honor of birth of their daughter Myriam! Rabbi Levi and Mrs. RivkahLevitin are co-sponsoring in honor of the birth of their daughter Rivka!  Mrs. Channie Levitin is also co-sponsoring, in honor and in memory of the 5th yahrzeit of her father, Rabbi Berel Weiss (R. YissocharDov ben R. Yonah, 27th Iyar).    Seuda Slishit is sponsored by Shmueli Tennenhaus.

PIRKEY AVOT WITH RABBI EMLEN – TUE 7:30 pm
Pirkei Avos of the week following the Maharal's explanation. Both men and women and welcome to join. Graciously hosted by the Meyer family at the home of Shuky and Chanie 6223 43rd Ave NE

Weekly Women’s Class on Jewish History with Chani Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At the home of Rabbi & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE, info:  chanielevitin@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CAMP GAN IZZY REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - REGISTER TODAY
Conveniently located right here in the heart of Seattle’s North End. The season now runs from Monday, July 4th through Friday August 5th. Camp Gan Israel Seattle has been providing the Jewish children of Greater Seattle a special summer day camp experience that integrates healthy active fun, field trips and friendships with the richness, excitement and warmth of Jewish values, tradition and culture. Fun that lasts a summer…memories that last a lifetime.  Questions? Call or text Rabbi Abe Kavka at (206.730.2775) or info@campganisraelseattle.org . Register your kids, ages 2½ to 12 atwww.campganisraelseattle.org  for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. NOW OFFERING TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM MERCER ISLAND AND SEWARD PARK!!! (For transportation to/from other areas please speak with Rabbi Kavka.)

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Ivan Rothman, Gabbai Kiddush,hardcastle101@hotmail.com . Please inform Ivan by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $300, co-Sponsor $150, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

NCSY 10th Annual Basarfest, Sunday, June 5, 5:00 pm 
at Sephardic Bikur Holim. Buy tickets at www.seattlencsy.com  .  $50 Lyft credit free with registration.

Seattle Kollel SEED Learning Day Camps
Boys Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org
Girls Tentative: June 27-August 25. More info: www.seattlekollel.org 

Shiur by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat Monday, June 27, 
The Seattle community is invited to Sephardic Bikur Holim for a Shiur by Rabbi Riskin. Breakfast at 9:30 am and Shiur at 10:00 am. RSVP by June 23rd to rvspsbh@gmail.com

36th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug. 7-12
Sheraton Hotel, downtown Seattle. More info: www.iajgs2016.org

Registration is now open for CAMP YAVNEH 2016! 
All divisions of BCMH camps will now be under one name Camp Yavneh with all new programs and activities to supplement the programs you already love! This will include children from pre- school all the way through our new CIT program for 6th and 7th grade and our staff in high school, college and beyond! Register your child at www.campyavnehseattle.com If you are in 8th-12 grade, college or older and would like to work at Camp this summer please contact Ari Hoffman at thehoffather@gmail.com

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR B’HUKOSAI
Adapted from Likkutei Sichos, Vol. III, p. 1012ff  by Malka Touger
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2420839/jewish/Bechukosai.htm
© Chabad.org

This parshah begins with the many blessings which HaShem has in store for Jews who fulfill His commandments. “I will give you these blessings,” saysHaShem, “Im bechukosai tailaichu — If you will proceed in the path of My laws.”

We are used to people promising things, “If..., then...” Our teachers tell us: “If you do well in the test you can have extra recess tomorrow.” Our parents promise: “If you behave well, we’ll go on a family trip next week.”

When people say “If,” it usually means they know we can either do what they want or not do what they want. But when HaShem says “If” it means more than that. It’s more like a heartfelt request. It’s as if He is saying: I know that living a life of Torah and mitzvos is good for you. If only you would do that, and follow My path...

And it’s more than a request. It’s a promise that we will have the power and strength to fulfill HaShem’srequest. We really want to do what HaShem wants, but we might think that it is too hard. So HaShem says: “If you will,” meaning “I assure you that you will.” This gives us the power to do so. It’s as if HaShem is saying: I promise that you will indeed follow My mitzvos, and when you do, I will bless you.

The term that HaShem uses for mitzvos in this pasuk is chukosChukos comes from the Hebrew root Chakuk, which means “engraved.” When we write something, the word that is written and the material upon which it is written remain two separate things. We can erase a word from a piece of paper, for example. But when something is engraved, the word that is engraved and the material upon which it is engraved become one thing, like a stone that has a word engraved upon it.

HaShem wants us to learn, understand and fulfill words of Torah as if they were engraved upon our hearts and have become part of ourselves.

Have you ever watched a person engraving something on stone or metal? Engraving takes much more effort than writing. So it is no wonder that in thispassuk, Im bechukosai tailaichu, Rashi says a Jew should labor in Torah. As we labor in Torah, making its words a part of ourselves, they will accompany us all the time. It’s our lifelong mission, and that’s why the Torah says tailaichu — you shall always continue going in this way. This is the lifelong path of a Jew.

(Adapted from Likkutei Sichos, Vol. III, p. 1012ff)

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