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Lech L’cha 5778 – Shabbos Around The World THE SHABBOS PROJECT | Marcheshvan 7-14, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI OCT 27th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:40 pm

SHABBOS SAT OCT 28th 
Shacharis: 9 am  /GALA KIDDUSH WITH MEAT CHULENT AND BREAD
Mincha 5:41 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 6:38 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush this week is being brought to you in recognition and celebration of Shabbat Around The World.   Dr. Vernon and Lis Neppe are sponsoring this week in recognition of Shabbat Around The World and in gratitude to Tova Cox for her leadership in the CSTL Children’s program. Contributors include Dr. Shimon Dershowitz and Dr. Susan Hankin, as well as Rabbi Sholom-Ber and Mrs. Channie Levitinand Rabbi Abraham and Mrs  Shprintze Kavka.    Dr. Dershowitz is donating honor of the yahrzeits of his parents Efraim Alter ben Shmuel ZT”L and Chana (Tikva) bas Yechezkel Leib ZT”L, both 9 Cheshvan, and in honor of Susan Hankin and her twin Helen’s 70th birthday 5 Cheshvan. Rabbi Mendy is making the delicious MEAT CHOLENT.  Seuda Slishit Lite.

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Fri 7 am
Sun -Tue Mincha 5:40 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:28 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -UP
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – TES MARCHESHVAN – FRI 5 PM
In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah.  In honor of the yahrzeits of Shimon Dershowitz’ father Efraim Alter ben Shmuel ZT”L and mother Chana (Tikva) bas Yechezkel Leib ZT”L, both 9 Marcheshvan

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

ONLINE BEGINNERS' TALMUD CLASS STARTS THIS TUESDAY
More info and registration: 
rabbimeyers@gmail.com

Lomdus With Class at the Kollel Every Wed at 8:00 PM
A well aged whiskey.  A fine cigar.  The scent of rich mahogany. Some things just exude class. The Seattle Lomdus* Society understands this, which is why we're offering our classiest class yet:Lomdus with Class. Rabbi Akiva O'Connor and Rabbi Bentzion Brand would like to invite you to enjoy our signature Lomdus, for another breathtaking season. Keep it classy. //*Lomdus is an analytical style of Torah study, popular in the Yeshiva system. It's focus is to contrast opposing views in the Gemara and Poskim, thereby exposing the deeper understandings of their concepts. Lomdus is often considered the most enjoyable form of Torah study.

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity. 
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

THE MEDRASHA OF SEATTLE WOMEN’S LEARNING OCT 29th and Nov 5th 9 am
Theological Issues of Sefer Bereshit. At Rabbi Meyer’s home 5221 South Brandon.
www.ezrabessaroth.net  rabbimeyers@gmail.com

Weekly Mishmar Parsha Learning Thu 9pm - 11pm
With Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld - 5240 38th Ave. NE. Snacks and Good Conversation. Bring your questions on the parsha for discussion.

Beersheva Hadassah Monday, Nov. 13th, 7 pm
"Pie Making and Ultrasound Marvels: at the Seattle home of Elisheva Loudon, 5245 S Morgan Street.Sue Benyowitz will tell us her story from the Pioneering Ultrasound City of Seattle to being a Pioneering Ultrasound Tech at Hadassah. Jeanne Maimon will demonstrate her apple pie making techniques. Light refreshments. $18 suggested donation.  RSVP
beersheva.hadassah@gmail.com   

Chavrusa Learning Program with Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum  Sun Oct 29 8:50 am
At the BCMH Beis Midrash. All levels welcome. Followed by Shiur at 9:40 am.

Project DVORA Self-Care Group Mon Nov 6th to Dec 11th 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
This is a free six-week workshop for women who have experienced or are experiencing domestic violence. It will spotlight a different form of self-care each week, including exercise, spirituality and tender loving care during the holidays. Location will be at a secure and safe place in Seattle. Register with Project DVORA Domestic Violence Services at (206) 861-3159 .

BCMH Annual Dinner Nov 12
D
inner honorees are Richard & Rena Berger. BCMH Young Leadership Award recipient is Tamar Jacobson. RSVP & submit Journal Ads at www.bcmhseattle.org or for more info:
https://bcmhdinner2017.eventbrite.com

Kollel Avot U'Bonim Motzei Shabbos - 6:30 - 7:30 PM Starts Nov. 11
In the Seattle Kollel Beit Medrash. Boys and Girls learning Torah with their parents. Followed by great snacks and fantastic prizes! Spend some quality time with your child in a beit medrash atmosphere that you won’t find anywhere else! 
https://www.seattlekollel.com/avos-u-banim

NAMI Family-to-Family Class Tue Oct 17th – Jan 9th 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) presents a free 12-week class for adult family and friends of people living with mental illness, providing support and information about serious mental illness. Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, including presentations, discussion and interactive exercises. This Family-to-Family class will also include consideration of Jewish cultural attitudes around mental illness and opportunities to discuss specific Jewish issues that arise when caring for a family member. Facilitated by Rabbi Dov Gartenberg and Steve Krom. JFS Capitol Hill Campus, 1601 16th Avenue, Seattle. RSVP to Talya Gillman or call (206) 861-8784 for more information.

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Northwest Yeshiva High School Admission Exam – Sun Nov 5th 
A required ISEE (Independent School Entrance Exam) for prospective students who are applying to NYHS. More info: 
admissions@nyhs.org  or (206) 232-5272, ext. 515.

Seattle Hebrew Academy Annual Gala Brunch  Sun Dec 3rd 11:30 am
At Block 41 in Belltown. This year's honorees are Heather & Joel Jacobson.
http://seattlehebrewacademy.org

Torah Day School Anual Dinner Sun Dec 17th 5:30 pm
At the Westin Hotel, 1900 5th Ave., Sea. This year's honorees are Dr. Elie & Miriam Levy. More info:
www.tdsseattle.org  

Jewish Family Service Kosher Food Bank Wed Nov 1st 5-6:30pm.
Please RSVP by emailing 
emagasis@jfsseattle.org , or bsindel@jfsseattle.org  before November 1st if you plan to attend, so that we can be adequately prepared.http://www.jfsseattle.org/event/kosher-food-bank-2017/?instance_id=2502

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

GIVE US 23 DAYS  AND WE WILL GIVE YOU A SIYUM! Sun through Thu 8 pm
Tractate Makkos at The SEATTLE KOLLEL will feature a fast-paced Gemara shiur, focused on helping you make a siyum in LESS THAN A MONTH! With Daf Yomi studying Tractate Makkos, there’s no better time to start! 
https://www.seattlekollel.com/daf-yom-makkos.  Starts Nov 7th

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


 REBBE’S SICHO FOR LECH L’CHA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518318/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Lech-Lecha-8th-Day-of-MarCheshvan-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. This Shabbos follows the seventh of MarCheshvan, the day when the last Jew returned home from the pilgrimage to the Bais Hamikdosh on Yom Tov. The furthest point from Yerushalayim was the P’ros River, and it took until the seventh of MarCheshvan to reach there. So that this Jew could reach his home without being hampered by rain, Jews did not ask for rain to come until the seventh of MarCheshvan — although “it would have been fitting to ask for rain immediately after the festival (of Sukkos)” (Ta’anis 10a, Shulchan Aruch Admor HaZoken, Orach Chayim, ch. 117).

The period of time until the seventh of MarCheshvan is thus a continuation of the concept of Sukkos. The Shach explains that if the date on a contract is “after the festival,” it means the 15th day after the festival — the seventh of MarCheshvan — for “every time Israel would go on pilgrimage for the festival, they could only reach their homes after the festival within fifteen days; and as long as they had not crossed over the P’ros River, it seemed to them as if they were still in Eretz Yisroel engaged in the festival’s matters.” From the seventh of MarCheshvan on, a new type of service began — the service of “Ya’akov went on his way.”

The seventh of MarCheshvan, then, is the boundary line between two seasons. To which season does the day itself belong to? (This question applies to all boundaries — e.g., in space, does a boundary line belong to the area it encloses or to the outside area?) From our above analysis, we conclude that the seventh of MarCheshvan is the beginning of and belongs to the new season, the service of which is “Ya’akov went on his way.” For since rain is requested on the seventh, it follows that the last Jew reached his home already on the sixth — for if not, how could rain be requested?; the rain would hinder his journey. Thus he must have already reached his home on the seventh, and the last day of his journey was the sixth.

The above sheds light on a passage in the Zohar which states (Shemos, Tosfos, p. 275a) “From Elul until the sixth of MarCheshvan ... are days of letters.” These days are specially auspicious for success in matters associated with letters — letters of Torah, etc. Now, if the seventh of MarCheshvan is special, why does the Zohar say that this period is until the sixth of MarCheshvan? However, as explained previously, the seventh of MarCheshvan is the start of a new season, whereas the season of Tishrei extends until the sixth of MarCheshvan.

This idea, that this period is one of “days of letters,” is peculiarly associated with the month of Elul (and not just an extension of Tishrei). And this is why the Zohar emphasizes “From Elul until the sixth of MarCheshvan,” and does not mention Tishrei. What is special about Elul? The Alter Rebbe (Likkutei Torah, parshas Re’ey 32b) brings a parable “to a king, whom, before he comes to the city, the inhabitants of the city go out to greet him and receive him in the field.” That is, in Elul, G‑d, the King, is in the field, easily accessible to all.

The Zohar alludes to this by calling this period “days of letters.” “Letters” in Aramaic is “Asvon,” which is cognate to the word “asa” in the phrase “asa boker — the morning comes.” It refers to the idea of bringing something from its true place to another place. (Just as letters bring a person’s thoughts — which belong in the brain — to the “outside.”)

This is the idea of “the king in the field.” The king’s true place is in his palace in the capital city. When he is in the field, he has gone out from his true place — the same concept as letters, “asa boker.”

We can go further and posit that this concept of the “king in the field” is present also in the month of MarCheshvan (until the sixth). Thus the common theme of all these days (“from Elul until the sixth of MarCheshvan”) is that the king is in the field (“days of letters”).

The most startling part of this idea is that it applies also to the days after Rosh Chodesh MarCheshvan whereas it is more easily understood in regard to the days of Tishrei itself, including the latter part of the month. The king in the field in Elul is the concept of the revelation of the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy. Now, the revelation of these attributes is in a much loftier fashion on Yom Kippur than in Elul, for then, the King is actually in His palace. A result of this is that the revelation of G‑dliness (of the “King”) extends until the end of Tishrei, for, as we see, we do not say tachnun from Erev Yom Kippur until the end of Tishrei. Thus the revelation of the King in Elul extends also to the end of Tishrei. After Rosh Chodesh MarCheshvan, however, we do say tachnun (since the effect of Yom Kippur has ended) — and thus, to say that the revelation of the King (the concept of Elul) is present even in these days, is a novel idea.

To sum up: Both the sixth and seventh of MarCheshvan possess distinction. The sixth of MarCheshvan is the conclusion of the season of Tishrei; more particularly, it is an extension of, and shares a common theme with, the month of Elul. The seventh of MarCheshvan is the start of a new season, the service of which is “Ya’akov went on his way.”

2. The service of “Ya’akov went on his way” comprises various steps, and is, in general, service to G‑d in mundane pursuits compared to the service of Tishrei, which is service associated with festivals. The first step in this service is on Motzoei Yom Kippur, when we begin to engage in the preparations to Sukkos, Sukkahand the four kinds — fulfillment of mitzvos. Yom Kippur, in contrast, is the service of Torah, for on it, the latter set of tablets were given. The difference between Torah and mitzvos is great, for Torah is the words of G‑d, and “Are not My words as fire?” Mitzvos, in contrast, are enclothed in physical objects. Thus service of mitzvos, compared to Torah study, is considered as the service of “Ya’akov went on his way.”

A second and lower step is on Motzoei Simchas Torah, the conclusion of the festivals of Tishrei. At this point, the service of “Ya’akov went on his way” in mundane pursuits begins. That is, on Motzoei Yom Kippur, the going on one’s “way” is in relation to mitzvos (compared to Torah). The going on one’s “way” on Motzoei Simchas Torah is in relation to actual mundane matters (compared to holy matters: the festivals etc.).

Yet a lower step is after the month of Tishrei, for until then, we still do not say tachnun, even after Simchas Torah. It is a period still connected to Tishrei, and thus, the transition from Tishrei to MarCheshvan (when tachnun is said), is yet a lower step in the service of “Ya’akov went on his way.”

In MarCheshvan itself, the period until the seventh of MarCheshvan is still somewhat connected to Tishrei, for until then “it seemed to them as if they were still in Eretz Yisroel engaged in the festival’s matters.” The seventh of MarCheshvan therefore marks the beginning of the last, and lowest, step in the service of “Ya’akov went on his way.”

Because this service of “Ya’akov went on his way” is in actual mundane pursuits — and not the performance of mitzvos compared to Torah study (as on Motzoei Yom Kippur) — it is the lowest level. Nevertheless, since descent is for the purpose of ascent, it follows that the greater the descent, the greater will be the corresponding ascent. Thus, through the service of “Ya’akov went on his way,” a Jew reaches the ultimate heights.

This is the greatness of the seventh of MarCheshvan. Because it begins the lowest step (which leads to the ultimate heights) of the service of “Ya’akov went on his way,” it has two special features: 1) It is the initial break-through of this type of service for the entire year. 2) Because it is the initial break-through for the whole year, it encompasses all the particulars of the year’s service.

The greatness of the seventh of MarCheshvan leads to an understanding of the greatness of this Shabbos which follows it. On Shabbos, all matters of the previous week are elevated, to the degree of delight — the highest level. Thus all the great concepts of the seventh of MarCheshvan are elevated yet higher on the following Shabbos. Moreover, the matters of the sixth of MarCheshvan (the conclusion of the season of Tishrei) are also elevated on this Shabbos to the level of delight.

In addition to this greatness of the Shabbos which follows the seventh of MarCheshvan — which is present every year — special distinction accrues when Shabbos immediately follows the seventh of MarCheshvan, without any intervening weekdays, as this year. Immediately after the start of the service of “Ya’akov went on his way,” it is elevated to the level of delight.

Moreover, when the seventh of MarCheshvan is on Friday, it has the distinction of “G‑d saw all that He had done, and it was very good.” On all the other days of creation it states “G‑d saw it was good.” [On Tuesday, “it was good” was said twice, once for Tuesday, and once for Monday, when “it was good” was not said]. “Very (good)” refers to something which transcends all limits — even the limits of “G‑d saw that it was good.” This applies not just to the works created on Friday, but to all the six days of creation, as stated “G‑d saw all that He had done and it was very good.”

The greatness of the first Friday is repeated every week, particularly when Friday has special distinction — for example, this year it has the greatness of the seventh of MarCheshvan. In such a case, the idea of “G‑d saw all that He had done and it was very good” certainly applies, including that “it was very good” in relation to the previous day, the sixth of MarCheshvan.

Indeed, when the seventh of MarCheshvan is a Friday, as this year, that Friday is unique compared to all other Fridays. Of the creation in general it states “which G‑d created to function;” and “to function” indicates that man’s service is necessary to bring the creation to its fullness. When the seventh of MarCheshvan is on Friday, the idea of “to function” is already present, for the seventh of MarCheshvan is the start of man’s service for the entire year.

3. In addition to the above, there is another matter associated with this week’s parshah, Lech Lecha. “Lech Lecha,” which means “Go,” emphasizes its association with the idea of “Ya’akov went on his way,” both referring to the idea of movement. The coincidence of the ideas of “Ya’akov went on his way” with “Lech Lecha” on the same Shabbos — together with the fact that something in Torah is a lesson for every Jew — teaches that the service of “Ya’akov went on his way” much be performed in the manner of “Lech Lecha.” Avraham was told to “Go from your land, your birthplace, and from your father’s house.” Chassidus explains that “your land” corresponds to a person’s will, “your birthplace” to one’s natural character traits, and “your father’s house” to one’s intellect. The command “Go from your land, your birth place and your father’s house” means a person should leave his will, his natural inclinations and traits, in order to fulfill G‑d’s will.

* * *

4. Chapter 17, verse 5 of parshas Lech Lecha states: “Your name shall no more be called Avram, but your name shall be Avraham, for I have made you for a father (“av”) of a multitude (“hamon”) of nations.” Rashi, on the words “a father of a multitude of nations,” comments: “This is an acrostic of his name [Av (father) & ham(on) (multitude) = Av(ra)ham]. And the letter ‘reish’ which was in it from the beginning [Avram], when he was a father only of Aram which was his place [Av (father) & Aram (name of Avraham’s residence) = Avram], even now, when he became father of the whole world [Av & ham], nevertheless, [the ‘reish’] did not move from its place [i.e. although apparently not belonging, for Av & ham = Avham, not Avraham]. For even the letter ‘yud’ of Sarai [the original name of Sarah, Avraham’s wife], complained against the Divine Presence [when it was removed from Sarah’s name upon the change from Sarai to Sarah (Bereishis 17:15)] until it [the letter ‘yud’] was added to Yehoshua, as stated ‘And Moshe called Hoshea bin Nun, Yehoshua.’“

There are some puzzling aspects to Rashi’s comment:

1) Why need Rashi bring a proof from the fact that the “yud” of Sarai had complaints against the Divine Presence, when it is self-evident that if a letter is removed from a tzaddik’s name, that letter will complain?

2) Rashi writes that “for even the letter “yud” of Sarai complained.” This seems to indicate that the letter “yud” really had no grounds for complaint — and therefore, since even it did complain, the letter “reish” of Avram certainly would have grounds to complain if removed from Avraham’s name. Why should there be a difference between the “yud” of Sarai and the “reish” of Avram, and to the extent that Rashi writes “even” in regards to the “yud?”

3) Rashi brings the “yud” from Sarai as proof why the “reish” from Avram remained in the name. Yet this seems to be a proof for the opposite view, for in fact, the “yud” of Sarai was removed. Instead, it was added to the name of another tzaddik, Yehoshua. But this itself was only after many years, and in two different eras: the “yud” was taken from Sarai before the exile in Egypt; and it was added to Yehoshua at the time the Jews entered Eretz Yisroel. Until then, the letter “yud” remained with complaints against the Divine Presence. How, then, can Rashi bring this as proof in regard to the “reish” of Avram?

4) Rashi states that the “letter ‘reish’ which was in it from the beginning, when he was a father only of Aram which was his place.” That is, Rashi explains why he was formerly called Avram. However, our verse talks only of the reason why he was now called “Avraham.” Why does Rashi explain the reason for previously being called “Avram?” And if there is reason to explain it, Rashi should have done so when we first came across the name “Avram,” and not wait until we learn of the change to “Avraham.”

The Explanation

There is no reason to explain why he was called Avram the first time we come across this name, for in the plain interpretation of Scripture, it is unnecessary to explain the reasons for all the names in Scripture! Thus we do not find Rashi doing so, even in the case of the names of tzaddikim, unless there is a special reason for it.

When, however, we come to the verse “Your name shall no more be called Avram, but your name shall be Avraham,” we see that Scripture itself continues to give a reason for the change — “for I have made you for a father of a multitude of nations.” Rashi is now forced to explain the connection of being “a father of a multitude of nations” to the name “Avraham” — that it is “an acrostic of his name:” “Av” (father) & “Hamon” (multitude) . “Avraham.” Although acrostics are not normally part of the plain interpretation, in this case Rashi must use it, for Scripture itself says that the fact Avraham is “a father of a multitude of nations” is the reason for his name — and Rashi therefore must explain the connection between the two.

Once we know that “Avraham” is one of the names which have a reason behind them — in the plain interpretation of Scripture — we must also find a reason for the name “Avram,” since this name (Avraham and Avram = same person) does have an explanation. Rashi therefore says “The letter reish which was in it from the beginning [Avram], when he was a father only of Aram which was his place [Av (father) & Aram (Avram’s residence) = Avram], even now, when he became father of the whole world, nevertheless, [the ‘reish’] did not move from its place.” In other words, “Avram” means “Av” (father) of “Aram.” He was father of Aram specifically, for since it was his place, his influence was naturally exerted there first. But “now, when he became father of the whole world” — his influence extended also to outside — there is no reason to differentiate between Aram and any other place.

But then a question arises: Since he was now “father of a multitude of nations,” he should have been called “Avham [Av (father) & hamon (multitude)] and not “Avraham.” The “reish” seems to be extra, for if he is “father of the whole world,” he is certainly also “father of Aram.”

In answer to this question, Rashi says that “the ‘reish,’ which was in it from the beginning ... nevertheless, did not move from its place.” Note that Rashi does not say that the “reish” was not deleted, but rather “did not move.” Rashi is thereby telling us that not only does the “reish” remain in the name — meaning, that even after becoming “father of a multitude of nations” he still remained “father of Aram” — but even more, that it “did not move from its place:” that it stayed in the name “Avraham” as before, and did not move, although the idea behind the “reish” (that he was “father of Aram”) is encompassed in the fact that he was now father of the whole world.

But all is still not clear: In the end analysis, the “reish” is nevertheless extra, for the idea behind it (“father of Aram”) is encompassed by the letter “hey” (Avraham) father of a multitude of nations. Why was it left in Avraham’s name? In answer, Rashi brings proof from the letter “yud” from the name “Sara!” — that “even the letter ‘yud’ of Sarai complained against the Divine Presence.”

What is the proof? Scripture states (Bereishis 17:15) that “You shall not call her name Sarai, but Sarah is her name.” Rashi comments on this that “‘Sarai’ denotes ‘my princess’ — for me, but not for others. Her name will (now) be Sarah — unqualified (without the suffix) — for she will be a princess over all.” Seemingly, after she became “princess over all,” she still remained “my princess” — just as with Avraham, he still remained “father of Aram” after becoming “father of the whole world.” However, this does not really hold true. Because Avraham was so great, it is possible that Sarah was princess over everyone except Avraham. This is particularly so since we will later learn that Avraham was greater then Sarah — both in age, and in qualities, as Rashi notes (17:17) that “Avraham believed [in the promise that he would have a son] and rejoiced, but Sarah did not believe and sneered.” Because Avraham was greater than Sarah, it is very possible that whereas Sarah was princess over the whole world, she was not over Avraham. And although previously she was called “Sara! — my princess,” “my” referring to Avraham — nevertheless, we learn in these verses that Avraham had risen greatly in quality — “the L‑rd appeared to Avram and said to him: I am G‑d Al-mighty; walk before Me, and be whole ... I will give My covenant between Me and you ... Your name shall be Avraham ... for I have made you for a father of a multitude of nations.” Thus, now, Sarah could not be a princess to Avraham, but only to the whole world.

Because once she became “Sarah” she was no longer “My princess,” it follows that it was now impossible to call her “Sarai” (i.e. to let the “yud” remain in the name — for it was simply not true that she was “my princess,” but only “princess for all.”) Therefore, the letter “yud” really had no valid claim to remain in the name.

The letter “reish,” on the other hand, did have valid justification for remaining in Avraham’s name, for the idea behind it still remained in force — that even after becoming “father of a multitude of nations” Avraham still remained “father of Aram.” (Unlike the idea behind the “yud,” which became abolished after the name “Sarai” was changed to “Sarah” — for she was no longer “my princess]. The only problem remaining is why the “reish” has to remain in its place (“Avraham”), when the idea behind it is encompassed in the letter “hey” (“Av Hamon — father of a multitude of nations”).

Rashi therefore explains that we find that “even the letter ‘yud’ of Sarai complained against the Divine Presence.” Although the ‘yud’ had no legitimate claim to remain in the name, G‑d nevertheless listened to its complaints and added it to the name Hoshea. Certainly, then, the complaint of the letter “reish” of Avram, which was a legitimate one — for its meaning remained in force (although encompassed in the letter “hey”) — should be reckoned with. Rashi by writing that “even the ‘yud’ of Sarai complained,” thereby answers the question raised previously that the proof from the letter “yud” seems to work to the opposite effect.

There is a lesson from Rashi’s interpretation for man’s service to G‑d. Everything pertaining to our forefathers is bestowed as a heritage on their descendants in every generation, to every Jew. In our case, the commandment of circumcision (which was the cause for the extra “hey” being added to Avraham’s name) applies to all Jews, including women, for “a woman is as one who is circumcised.” Moreover, a Jew is considered among those who are circumcised because of the very essence of his being — although he has not been physically circumcised. The Mishnah (Nedarim31b) states: “One who vows that ‘I will not benefit from the uncircumcised,’ he may benefit from uncircumcised Jews ... [If he vows that] ‘I will not benefit from the circumcised, he is forbidden to benefit from uncircumcised Jews ...” The reason for these laws is that all Jews (even those who are physically uncircumcised) are, in essence, circumcised.

It follows that just as Avraham achieved the status of “father of a multitude of nations” through circumcision, so all Jews possess this concept. Their task is to bring these hidden powers into a revealed state, from potential into actuality. It is not enough that a Jew is a “father” of his place (as Avraham was “father of Aram” before circumcision) — meaning, he influences those in his immediate surroundings — but he must be a “father to all the world,” meaning he influences the entire world.

Noach – Rosh Chodesh Marcheshvan 5778 | Tishrei 30 – Marcheshvan 6, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  FRI OCT 20th 
Shacharis 6:50 am/ROSH CHODESH MAR CHESHVAN
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:53 pm

SHABBOS SAT OCT 21st  /ROSH CHODESH MAR CHESHVAN
Shacharis: 9 am  
Mincha 5:53 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 6:49 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Bima Goldshmidt
 is helping to sponsor Kiddush this week in memory of her beloved sister, Leah Chana bas Pnina's 22nd Yahrzeit; and for a Refuah Shleimah, for her dear mother, Pnina bas Baila.  MEAT cholent, by Rabbi Mendy, returns to CSTL this week, sponsored by Kiddush Club.  Also, Yizchok Rothman is contributing to the Kiddush this week in honor of the 19thYahrzeit of Mark Dykan (Mordechai Ze'ev ben Ha Rav, Yaacov, 4th Cheshvan. Seuda Slishit Lite

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Fri 7 am
Sun -Tue Mincha 5:45 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:39 pm/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

4th Annual Great Big Challah Bake Thu Oct 26, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Stroum Jewish Community Center. More info: 
www.sjcc.org

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity. 
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR NOACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518316/jewish/Tzivos-Hashem-27th-Day-of-Tishrei-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Only a short while ago, on Sukkos, and before that, in the Ten Days of Repentance, gatherings were held. What, then, is the necessity for holding another gathering now? This question is reinforced by the fact that the other gatherings were held on special days — in the Ten Days of Repentance and on Sukkos, the “Season of our Rejoicing.” Today’s gathering, however, is on a regular weekday.

We must conclude that although everyone surely remembers that spoken in the previous gatherings, it is nevertheless important to repeat the 12 verses and sayings of our Sages, and to speak inspiring words which will strengthen us in carrying out G‑d’s mission. That mission is to “make a dwelling place for G‑d in this world” — to change the whole world, particularly the place where one resides, to a place where it is recognizable that G‑d is found there (His “dwelling place”) — by conducting oneself according to the Torah’s directives.

This mission includes the responsibility to influence other children (boys influencing boys, and girls influencing girls) that they too should follow the Torah, and with the same enthusiasm that you fulfill the Torah’s mitzvos. As our Sages have said: “You shall love your fellow as yourself — Rabbi Akiva says, this is a great principle in Torah.” One’s influence on his fellow must be “as yourself” — with the same enthusiasm as you fulfill Torah and mitzvos. This directive was uttered by Rabbi Akiva, one of the greatest of Israel’s Sages and educators, who thereby blazed the path for all Jews in all following generations.

What, then, is the reason for this extra gathering? Chassidusexplains that now, the period after Tishrei, begins the fulfillment of the above mentioned mission of making this world a dwelling place for G‑d. Before beginning a task, appropriate preparation is needed. Because the service in the coming months is especially difficult, a gathering to inspire people in their task is the appropriate preparation for such a service. This gathering will provide the necessary strength to overcome these difficulties, and the mission will be carried out with the requisite enthusiasm and seriousness — which assures success.

What is the difficulty in carrying out the mission in the coming months? When you assembled together last Nissan, there would be a seven week period until the next festival, Shavuos. Therefore you knew you had to gird yourself with strength until then in order to carry out the mission of the Commander-In-Chief (G‑d). When Shavuos would come, you would then receive the special strength that G‑d bestows on each festival. Likewise, when you assembled on Shavuos, and afterwards heard the reading of the Ten Commandments, you received strength to carry out G‑d’s mission for the coming three months until Tishrei, with its festivals.

Tishrei, however, is different. We came girded with strength from Sukkos, and the two preceding gatherings in Sukkos and the Ten Days of Repentance. And this strength must suffice until the next festival, Pesach, in six months time! Thus the Yetzer (Evil Inclination) can come and make a Jewish child depressed by telling him: You have to summon up enough strength to carry out your task for six months! And this year, it is even more difficult, for since it is a leap-year, there are seven months until Pesach!

This gathering thus serves as the means to become stronger and stronger, in preparation to fulfilling one’s task in the coming seven months.

In practical terms: At this time, at the conclusion of Tishrei, a Jew must remember that he has been given the necessary powers to carry out his mission. Likewise, a member of Tzivos Hashem has also been given the necessary strength and training to go forth to the “battlefield” where the Yetzer is, and to carry out his mission joyfully and with a good heart.

Then the saying of our Sages, that “if you search, you will find” will certainly be fulfilled, and in the manner that “the thing is very near to you in your mouth and in your heart to do it.” It will be done with great success, and the Commander-In-Chief will be very pleased with you, and will bestow upon you further blessings and success to rise yet higher in the ranks of Tzivos Hashem.

*

2. As in every gathering, it is fitting to derive a lesson and directive from portions of Torah learned on the day of the gathering. The Torah is our “instruction manual,” from which we derive all things associated with Tzivos Hashem, and it also contains the “daily directive” appropriate for each day — the lesson derived from the daily portion of the weekly parshah.

Today is Tuesday of parshas Noach, and therefore the daily portion of Torah is the third section of parshas Noach. We learn in it of how Noach and his family were saved from the flood by being in the ark built according to G‑d’s command.

The Yetzer comes and says: The Torah itself says that these occurrences happened thousands of years ago. What, then, can you learn from it — especially in regard to the battle against the Yetzer in the United States (or any other country) in 5744?

The Baal Shem Tov provides the ammunition against this “attack” by the Yetzer. The Torah is eternal, with eternal lessons, illuminating the life of every Jew in all generations. The Yetzer is a fool, and doesn’t know what he is talking about! The Baal ShemTov taught that the story of Noach parallels that of every Jew. “Ark” in Hebrew is “teivah” which also means “word.” Noach was saved because G‑d commanded him to enter the ark. Similarly, G‑d gives every Jew a “teivah” — the “words” of prayer and Torah. Through prayer and Torah study with enthusiasm and life — to the extent that a Jew totally enters the words of Torah, and in prayer turns to G‑d with all his heart — he is safe and protected despite everything around him — just as Noach left the ark safely despite the fact that the world around him was devastated. Even if it is winter time, and rain or snow or a strong wind rages outside, it does not affect a Jew, for he continues in his prayers and Torah study — and also continues to influence his friends in the same direction, consonant to the great principle of “You shall love your fellow as yourself.”

Through such service — entering the words of Torah and prayer — that which happened to Noach happens to a Jew: He goes through the flood safely and peacefully, to the extent that “the earth dried out” — the flood ends, and the earth returns to normal. Then one goes forth freely and rules over the whole world (as Noach did) in G‑d’s mission to make the world a dwelling place for G‑d.

You will surely carry out this mission in the best way, succeeding with flying colors; and will receive all G‑d’s blessings. These blessings will be for you; and for all those who helped you and educated you and brought you into Tzivos Hashem — parents, teachers and counselors — that they may derive true “nachas” (satisfaction and pleasure) from you.

Then all of us will prepare for the redemption, and we will tell G‑d that since our sins — which was the cause of the exile — have been eradicated, He must, and surely will, eradicate the exile, and bring the redemption. We will then return to our Holy Land, to Yerushalayim the Holy City, to the Bais Hamikdosh, speedily in our times.

Shemini Atzereth – Simchat Torah | Tishrei 20-29, 5778

HOSHANA RABA WED OCT 11th  /PREPARE EREV TAVSHILIN/
Shacharis 7 am /WITH GRAND HOSHANOS/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 6:09 pm/Meal in CSTL Sukkah & Hakafos/Remember Yartzeit Candle

SHEMINI AZERETZ THU OCT 12th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /YIZKOR
Mincha 6:20 pm 
Maariv/Candles after 7:05 pm /from existing flame/ IN SHUL SEUDA & GRAND HAKAFOS

SIMCHAT TORAH FRI OCT 13th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /KIDDUSH LUNCH 10 AM
Hakafot and Dancing, Torah, Musaf, Mincha 11 am 
Candles /light Shabbos candles from existing flame before 6:06 pm/
Maariv 6:55 pm

SHABBOS BERESHIT- SAT OCT 14th /MEVARCHIM MAR CHESHVAN
Tehilim for Mevarchim Mar Cheshvan 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 am  
Mincha 6:06 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:02 pm

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Thu 7 am
Fri 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH MAR CHESHVAN 
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:00 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 6:51 pm/

Tot Groups on Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah from 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Tot Groups (upstairs room) will have supervised play on Shemini Atzeret, Simchat Torah and Shabbat. 3-5 years old: Drop Off. 2 years old and under: accompanied by a parent. Limit of 10 children, light snacks provided. Tots (ages 0-5) are also welcome to join the children's Hakkafot program downstairs at 12:00 PM on Simchat Torah. 
We are currently recruiting parent volunteers to help run this program! If you're interested in participating, please email Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

KIDDUSHES AND MEALS AT CSTL – SHEMINI ATZERET AND SIMCHAT TORAH
The following meals will be provided by CSTL for Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah:   1) Dinner Shemini Atzeret (Wed Oct 11) in the Sukka 2) Dinner Simchat Torah (Thu Oct 12) in the Social Hall, and 3) Lunch Simchat Torah (Fri Oct 13) in the Social Hall.  We are looking for Sponsors for this exciting time at CSTL!! Please contact Ivan or Rabbi Kavka.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SHMENI ATZERTH
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. The blessing can be found in the siddur.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

4th Annual Great Big Challah Bake Thu Oct 26, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Stroum Jewish Community Center. More info: 
www.sjcc.org

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity. 
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEMINI ATZERETH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518311/jewish/Hoshaana-Rabbah-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. There are aspects of Hosha’ana Rabbah, such as the recital of “tikkun,” that have nothing to do with joy. Nevertheless, Simchas Bais Hashoeva — Celebration of the Water Drawing — is present on every night of Sukkos, as explicitly stated in Mishnah (Sukkah8:1): “The flute playing (at the water drawing) took place sometimes on five days and sometimes on six.” That is, it took place on every day of Chol HaMoed. (The flute was not played on Shabbos or Yom Tov. Thus, when Yom Tov falls on Shabbos, there are six days of flute playing; when it falls on weekday, there are only five days). And thus Simchas Bais Hashoeva is present also on Hosha’ana Rabbah, the last day of Chol HaMoed.

Indeed, Simchas Bais Hashoeva on Hosha’ana Rabbah is loftier than on the other days of Sukkos for several reasons:

1) Torah commands to “increase in sanctity,” and thus each successive night of Sukkos must see an increase in joy. Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is the last night, its joy, which follows the successively increasing joy of the previous nights, is the greatest of all.

2) Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is the last night, it is the conclusion and “seal” of Simchas Bais Hashoeva — and “everything follows the conclusion.”

3) Simchas Bais Hashoeva is connected to the joy of Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah. Although separate concepts, there is an interrelation between them simply because they both share the same theme: joy. This is particularly emphasized on Hosha’ana Rabbah, for it is erev Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.

We see, then, that not only must one be joyous on Hosha’ana Rabbah, but the celebration of Simchas Bais Hashoeva then is of the loftiest degree. And although the concepts unique to Hosha’ana Rabbah (e.g. the recital of “tikkun”) take up much time, one can still engage in both types of activities (Simchas Bais Hashoeva and the recital of tikkun), for, says G‑d, “I do not ask of them according to My abilities, but according to their (Jews’) abilities.”

This idea is present on the other nights of Sukkos too, on each of which two different concepts are present: Simchas Bais Hashoeva, and the idea of the “guests” which visit every night. Although the latter is associated with the former, they are basically separate concepts, to the extent that they take place at different times: The “guests” visit during the meal, whereas Simchas Bais Hashoeva takes place when the water is drawn. Nevertheless, Jews devote time to both these concepts on each night of Sukkos. Indeed, not only are they not contradictory, but they complement one another.

So too with the night of Hosha’ana Rabbah. Although its other activities necessitate much time, a Jew can still devote attention to both them and to Simchas Bais Hashoeva. All its concepts can be done perfectly. Moreover, joy is even loftier than “perfection,” for joy breaks through all limits — even the limit of perfection. And, as noted in the case of the other nights of Sukkos, not only are the different concepts not contradictory, but they complement one another. The recital of “tikkun,” the “guests,” and the daily portion of Chumash all add to the joy of Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

2. Hosha’ana Rabbah’s “guests” are King David (of those enumerated in the Zohar: Avraham, Yitzchok, Ya’akov, Moshe, Aharon, Yosef and David) and the Rebbe Rashab (of the “Chassidic guests” enumerated by the previous Rebbe: Baal Shem Tov, Maggid, Alter Rebbe, Mitteler Rebbe, Tzemach Tzedek, Rebbe Maharash and Rebbe Rashab). The common theme of tonight’s “guests” is that both are associated with the idea of “kesser” — “crown.”

In regard to King David, a “crown” is one of the main objects in a monarchy, to the extent that the king’s splendor depends on it — as stated, “Your eyes shall see the king in his splendor.” This is particularly true of the Davidic kings, as our Sages have said: “It was a testimony to the house of David that whoever was eligible for the kingship, the crown fitted him, but it would not fit anyone who was not eligible.” Moreover, David is the “Sweet Singer of Israel” — i.e. author of Tehillim. Tehillim begins with the word “Ashrei,” which word appears twenty times in Tehillim — and the number twenty corresponds to “kesser” — crown.

In regard to the Rebbe Rashab, he was born in the year 5621, which in Hebrew is “Kesser-Aleph.” Further, his birthdate is the twentieth of MarCheshvan — and “twenty” in Hebrew is “chof” — again, the idea of “kesser.” The connection between this and Hosha’ana Rabbah is that Hosha’ana Rabbah is the end of Sukkos and Simchas Bais Hashoeva; and according to the rule that “the end is rooted in the beginning,” Hosha’ana Rabbah is rooted in the beginning of all the worlds — the level of “kesser.”

How does the idea of “kesser” add to joy? “Kesser” has the meaning “makif,” “surrounding” or “encompassing.” Joy associated with “kesser” therefore surrounds the whole person, encompassing his total existence. Simultaneously, this joy permeates a person in his inner aspects — just as a crown adds to a king’s splendor.

This teaches how Hosha’ana Rabbah should be celebrated. A person must serve G‑d with joy all year round; Yom Tov contributes additional joy; Sukkos, the “Season of our Rejoicing, yet more joy; Simchas Bais Hashoevah contributes an extra element of joy, a successively greater amount each night, culminating in Hosha’ana Rabbah. In addition to all of the above, the idea of “kesser,” “makif,” lends a unique aspect to the joy of Hosha’ana Rabbah. This “makif” encompasses the joy of Hosha’ana Rabbah and its other aspects: although individual concepts in their own right, they are encompassed together by the level of kesser.

In slightly different words: While all aspects of Hosha’ana Rabbah are permeated with the joy that stems from the level of kesser, these aspects still retain their individuality. Such a service — to retain all the concepts as individual entities, while simultaneously encompassed together by and within joy — is an extremely difficult one, for since joy “breaks through all barriers,” it is the antithesis of orderly service when each concept retains its proper place. It can be done however, for we find differing levels in joy (makif) itself — although joy in general is the idea of breaking all barriers.

Another theme common to tonight’s guests is that both emphasize the idea of smallness and descent — through which one eventually reaches the ultimate in ascents, the level of “kesser.” Of King David it is stated that “David is the small one,” analogous to the moon which is the “small luminary.” Likewise, the concept of “kesser” associated with the Rebbe Rashab is connected to the days of the month (the 20th of MarCheshvan) — again, the idea of the moon, the “small luminary.” It is specifically through descent and self-nullification (the waning of the moon) that one reaches the highest level, “kesser” — for “descent is for the purpose of ascent.”

In further clarification: The sun and moon were at first created equal, “the two great luminaries.” Afterwards, the moon was reduced; it experienced a descent. This descent is for the purpose of ascent — for in the future, the moon’s light will be like the sun’s: it will also be a “great luminary.” Indeed, it will be even greater than before the descent, greater than the sun — ”descent for the purpose of ascent.”

The above is particularly emphasized this year, a leap year. A leap year, by adding an extra month, makes up the number of days in a lunar year that are less than a solar year. And, not only is the deficiency made up, but the year then becomes longer than a solar year.

The idea that “descent is for the purpose of ascent” is emphasized not just by today’s “guests” (that both are “small”), but also by the fact that Hosha’ana Rabbah is “erev” Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.

The three festivals of Pesach, Shavuos and Sukkos correspond to Avraham, Yitzchok and Ya’akov respectively. Shemini Atzeres corresponds to Yosef. Because Hosha’ana Rabbah is erev (and the preparation to) Shemini Atzeres, it follows that Yosef is also associated with Hosha’ana Rabbah. And the idea of “descent for the purpose of ascent” is highly emphasized in the case of Yosef.

Scripture (Bereishis 39:1) states that “Yosef was brought down to Egypt.” In Egypt itself, Yosef experienced a further descent — imprisonment. Yet it was precisely through this descent that Yosef was elevated to the highest position in Egypt. And his physical experiences were paralleled by his spiritual life. The lower the descent, the higher the following ascent — and therefore Yosef’s double descent (into Egypt and then into prison) resulted in a correspondingly high ascent.

We find the same phenomenon with the previous Rebbe, whose name is Yosef. After his descent into prison, the dissemination of Judaism and Chassidus was greatly expanded.

This theme (descent leading to ascent) is also found in today’s portion of Chumash, the fourth section of parshas Berachah. It states (Devorim 33:18): “To Zevulun he said: Rejoice Zevulun in your going out, and Yissachar in your tents.” Rashi comments that “Zevulun and Yissachar made a partnership: Zevulun went out to business ... made profit and gave thereof to Yissachar who sat and engaged in Torah. Therefore [Scripture] placed Zevulun before Yissachar, for Yissachar’s Torah came about through Zevulun.”

The difference between Zevulun and Yissachar parallels that between Torah and mitzvos. “Yissachar” refers to those whose principal service is Torah study (“Yissachar in your tents”). Zevulun’s service lies principally in good deeds, fulfillment of mitzvos. More generally, Zevulun’s service is to refine and elevate the world (“Zevulun in your going out”).

The same applies to Torah and mitzvos: The world is refined mainly through actual performance of mitzvos, which are enclothed in physical objects — and not as much through Torah study, which is intellectual comprehension.

That today’s portion of Chumash places Zevulun before Yissachar emphasizes the greatness of mitzvos and its accompanying refinement of the world vis-a-vis Torah study. Thus the idea of descent — into the world to engage in worldly matters — which results in an ascent, is emphasized by today’s portion of Chumash.

The same concept is further emphasized by the continuation of today’s portion of Chumash (33:20): “To Gad he said ... He dwells at peace like a dead lion, tearing the head at one stroke with the arm.” This verse is associated with the mitzvah of tefillin — for Jewish warriors are able to “tear the head at one stroke with the arm” through the merit of putting tefillin on the arm and head.

Tefillin emphasizes the idea of refining the world. Part of the mitzvah of tefillin is to subjugate one’s brain and heart to G‑d: the tefillin on the hand corresponds to the subjugation of one’s actions, including one’s “portion in the world;” tefillin on the head corresponds to subjugation of one’s brain to G‑d. Moreover, say our Sages (Kiddushin 35a), “The entire Torah is compared to tefillin.” This refers to all the mitzvos of the Torah, and, as noted above, the idea of mitzvos (compared to Torah) is to refine the world. Thus Gad emphasizes the distinction of performing mitzvos and refining the world.

3. In addition to all of the above, there is another concept peculiar to Hosha’ana Rabbah that is not found in any of the other days of Sukkos. Besides the mitzvah of taking the four kinds and reciting Hosha’anos, which exist on all the days of Sukkos, on Hosha’ana Rabbah we take five aravahs (willow branches) and strike them on the ground.

This, although only a custom of the prophets, possesses an element not found in the mitzvah of the four kinds. Although the latter is a mitzvah from the Torah, if the first day of Yom Tov falls on Shabbos, we do not perform this mitzvah then. In regard to striking the aravah, however, the calendar is so fixed that Hosha’ana Rabbah can never fall on Shabbos — allowing this custom to be performed every year without fail. This shows the greatness of a “custom.” The very fact that it is not a mitzvah in the Written Torah shows that it stems from a source so high that it cannot be explicitly revealed in the Torah. And this is why it was made sure that Hosha’ana Rabbah should never fall on Shabbos, allowing us to strike the aravah.

We can draw inferences from this for Simchas Bais Hashoevah. The Rambam makes no explicit mention of Simchas Bais Hashoeva, although he elaborates in great detail on the lofty joy of Sukkos. A Jew may therefore think that it is not a very important thing — that it is only a custom. The striking of the aravah teaches the lofty nature of a Jewish custom, to the extent that special measures were taken to ensure it could not be deferred because of Shabbos.

The custom to strike the aravah emphasizes the idea that through a descent, one reaches the highest levels. The aravah is the plainest of the four kinds, for it has no smell or taste. Yet only it is called “achvinah” — because it grows “in “achvah” — “in friendship” (i.e. willows grow closely together).

Although each of the four kinds express the idea of unity, nevertheless, the qualities of the other three kinds (taste, smell or both) overshadow the aspect of unity they possess. The aravah, in contrast, has no special qualities, and therefore its unity is revealed. That is why the element of unity possessed by the other three is explained in Chassidus (the esoteric of Torah) only, whereas that of the aravah is explicitly recorded in the exoteric aspect of Torah (“achvinah”).

In man’s service to G‑d, “aravah” corresponds to plain people without special qualities (no taste or smell). It is specifically in them that the idea of unity is emphasized, extending to unity with G‑d.

Furthermore, the aravah used on Hosha’ana Rabbah is not the one used in the mitzvah of the four kinds; a separate aravah must be used. For if the one used in the mitzvah of the four kinds was used, the very fact that it was used for a mitzvah gives it a special distinction — which somewhat obscures its totally plain nature. A new aravah, never used for a mitzvah, emphasizes its pure plain nature.

Now we can understand why the custom of striking the aravah emphasizes the idea of ascent following descent. Through the lowly aravah — a new one, without any redeeming qualities — we perform the unique service of Hosha’ana Rabbah, the “custom of the prophets,” which, we explained previously, is of the highest level.

The above is expressed in the result that follows the fulfillment of this custom. The text of the prayer that follows the beating of the aravah says that through the striking “there shall be five ‘sweetened’ severities.” Chassidus explains that sweetening of the severities (which leads to the strengthening of kindness) — is greater than just drawing down kindness. This is the idea noted above: that specifically through a descent do we reach the highest levels.

The first severity to be sweetened is the exile, the greatest of all descents. The greater the descent, the greater the following ascent. After the great descent of exile, we reach the ultimate heights, through which the severities are sweetened. In the future, Jews will say “I give thanks to You, G‑d, that You were angry with me” — meaning that Jews will thank G‑d for the exile, for then they will see the greatness that resulted from it.

However, even with this explanation, the idea that Jews will thank G‑d for the exile will be a matter of faith. For G‑d, Who is omnipotent, can effect the loftiest levels (sweetening the severities) without first having the severities, the exile. This is particularly so when the severities in this case are not just spiritual ones, but physical ones, the persecutions and tragedies of the exile. Thus intellectually, the necessity of the exile is impossible to understand. Why need the Shechinah (Divine Presence) be in exile, Moshiachin exile, every Jew in exile — and getting worse every day?! We can only take it on faith that in the future we will thank G‑d for the exile.

G‑d concealed the reason for the exile so that a Jew should sincerely beseech G‑d that He should “speedily cause the scion of David Your servant to flourish.” If there would be even the tiniest amount of understanding that there is some good in exile — one would not ask for the end of exile in total sincerely.

There is thus a paradox: On the one hand, Jews must believe with perfect faith that in the future they will give thanks to G‑d for the exile. On the other hand, they must cry out with all their might that they want to leave exile!

The time for the true and complete redemption has certainly arrived, when the promise that “You shall on that day say ‘I thank you, G‑d, that You were angry with me” will be fulfilled. And, as noted above, this is emphasized in the striking of the aravah, which is the idea of sweetening the severities.

Because “deed is paramount,” all the above must be translated into actual deed. We must tonight utilize the time that is not dedicated to the recital of tikkun, to celebrate Simchas Bais Hashoeva. It must not be a fake joy, but a true one. For although there are things that prevent joy (the exile, etc.), we can put aside these considerations for the moment, and truly be joyous. Moreover, it is through joy that we abolish the exile — for joy breaks through all barriers.

4. A further point: One of the things which bring the redemption closer is tzedakah, as our Sages say (B. Basra 10a): “Great is tzedakah for it brings near the redemption.” It emphasizes the idea of refining the world, as the Alter Rebbe writes (Tanya, ch. 37): “You can find no mitzvah in which the vital soul is clothed to the same extent as in the mitzvah of tzedakah: for in all the other commandments only one faculty of the vital soul is clothed ... while in the case of tzedakah, which a man gives out of the toil of his hands, all the strength of his vital soul is embodied in his work ... thus when he gives it for charity, his whole vital soul ascends to G‑d.” And through this, his portion in the world, and the entire world, is elevated and refined. This is especially so when tzedakah is combined with joy, for then, because joy breaks through all barriers, the world is elevated in a loftier manner.

It is thus proper to now increase in tzedakah. We will therefore give dollars to be distributed to those here — so that these dollars can be given to tzedakah during the day.

May it be G‑d’s will that from the celebration of Simchas Bais Hashoeva we proceed to the principal joy — when all Jews will leave exile with joy and a good heart, “with our youth and our elders, with our sons and our daughters.”

Sukkot 5778 – Simchas Bais haShoeva | Tishrei 14-23, 5778

Erev Succos, Wed Oct 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv: 6:23 pm /Eruv Tavshilin: before lighting candles/

Succos- First Day, Thu Oct 5th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema: 10:05 am/
Mincha: 6:23 pm
Ma'ariv/Candles after: 7:19 pm /light from existing flame/

Succos- Second Day, Fri Oct 6th 
Shacharis: 9 am
Mincha/Maariv/Shabbos Candle Lighting (before): 6:19 pm light from existing flame/

Shabbos Succos- Sat Oct 7th 
Shacharis: 9 am /SPECIAL KIDDUSH LUNCH
Mincha 6:19 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:15 pm

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Wed 7 am /with L’Dovid /
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:15 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:05 pm/

HOSHANA RABA WED OCT 11th  /PREPARE EREV TAVSHILIN/
Shacharis 7 am /WITH GRAND HAKOFOS/
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 6:09 pm /Meal in Sukkah & Hakafos/Remember Yartzeit Candle

SHEMINI AZERETZ THU OCT 12th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /YIZKOR
Mincha 6:20 pm 
Maariv/Candles after 7:05 pm /from existing flame/ Meal in Sukkah & GRAND HAKAFOS

SIMCHAT TORAH FRI OCT 13th 
Shacharis 9:00 am /KIDDUSH LUNCH 10 AM
Hakafot and Dancing, Torah, Musaf, Mincha from 11 am 
Candles/Maariv 6:06 pm /light Shabbos candles from existing flame before/

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SUKKOT AND BEFORE SHMENI ATZERTH
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. The blessing can be found in siddur.

KIDDUSHES AND MEALS AT CSTL – SHEMINI ATZERET AND SIMCHAT TORAH
The following meals will be provided by CSTL for Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah:   1) Dinner Shemini Atzeret (Wed Oct 11) in the Sukka 2) Dinner Simchat Torah (Thu Oct 12) in the Social Hall, and 3) Lunch Simchat Torah (Fri Oct 13) in the Social Hall.  We are looking for Sponsors for this exciting time at CSTL!! Please contact Ivan or Rabbi Kavka.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YAHRZEIT OF THE REBBE MAHARASH - WED OCT 4th 5 PM
Please join us for a Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah.  In honor of the Yahrzeit (Tishrei 13th) of the fourth Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch, Rabbi Shmuel Schneersohn, known as "Maharash" (a Hebrew acronym for "our master Rabbi Shmuel") , the author of more than a thousand ma’amarim.  
www.Chabad.org/calendar

KIDDUSH SHABBOS CHOL haMOED SUKKOS Sat Oct 7th
S
habbos Chol Hamoed Sukkus  there will be a full sit-down Kiddish meal in the Shul Sukkah sponsored by Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shmuel haLavi Levitin ZT”L.  The whole community is invited.

FARBRENGEN ALERT - SIMCHAS BEIS HA’SHOEVA SUN OCT 8th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L. 

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Feature film showing ”Fill The Void”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP
MHerbstman@gmail.com

PARKING ALERT – PLEASE DON’T BLOCK OUR NEIGHBORS
As a courtesy, please do not park within 6 feet from any of our neighbors driveways.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

SUKKOS MELAVA MALKA- Rebbe Nachman's Yartzeit Sat Oc. 7th 8:30 - 10:30pm
Music and Learning in Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld’s Sukka- 5240 38th Ave. NE

THE SHABBAT PROJECT SEATTLE Unity Havdala Concert Oct. 28th 7:30PM
Sephardic Bikur Holim , 6500 52nd Ave South Seattle WA 98118. Soulful Havdallah Concert, Featuring Jewish Music Star Eli Beer and Live Band. An uplifting culmination to a powerful Shabbat of Unity! World renowned singer Eli Beer will lead us in song and dance as we unite in joyous music to celebrate our shared Jewish identity.
https://www.shabbatprojectseattle.com/

 SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SUKKOS 
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518304/jewish/1st-Night-of-Sukkos-5744-1983.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

 1. Man is by nature more interested in something new, as Torah commands: “Every day it (Torah) should be as new in your eyes,” (and even further, not just “as new,” but actually “new”). For, as Rashi notes (Devorim 6:6), “nobody notices an antiquated ordinance,” whereas a new one, “everyone hastens towards it.” Thus, in our case, preference should be given to speaking of those matters of Sukkos which are peculiar to this year, for they contain new elements compared to Sukkos of every year. However, it is still necessary to first review (at least briefly) the basic themes of Sukkos, which are present every year.

The first basic concept is that it is Yomtov, which, as it name indicates, is a day which is totally good. All things in this world have elements of bad; Yomtov, however, is only good, as seen from the fact that even the eating and drinking done on Yomtov is a mitzvah — i.e., even its physical aspects are all good. Moreover, although it is also a mitzvah to eat on Shabbos, we see that it is a Jewish custom (which is Torah) to eat more on Yomtov than on Shabbos.

This difference between Shabbos and Yomtov is also expressed in the respective sacrifices offered on these days. On Yomtov, part of the sacrifices were eaten by its owners; on Shabbos, no part was eaten by the owners. And because everything of Yomtov is completely good, it produces great joy.

Among Yomim Tovim themselves, all of which are festivals of rejoicing, Sukkos has a special place, as indicated by its name, “the Season of our Rejoicing.” Moreover, there is an additional distinction accruing from Simchas Bais Hashoeva, which is celebrated at night. Although the joy of Yomtov in general is associated with the sacrifices which were offered during the day, the water used for the water-libation was drawn at night, and this was done with great joy — “You shall draw water with joy.” Moreover, of the Simchas Bais Hashoeva, our Sages said (Sukkos 51b): “Whoever did not see the Simchas Bais Hashoeva, has not seen joy in his life.”

Although in the times of the Bais Hamikdosh they celebrated the Simchas Bais Hashoeva on Motzoei Yomtov of Sukkos (and not on Yomtov itself), nevertheless, outside Eretz Yisroel, and particularly in exile, Simchas Bais Hashoevah is present also on the night of Yomtov.

“The Season of our Rejoicing,” including Simchas Bais Hashoevah, is for seven days, as stated: “You shall rejoice before the L‑rd your G‑d for seven days.” In these seven days themselves, the first day (and night) of Sukkos has a special place. It is a rule that “all beginnings are difficult,” whereas afterwards, once the initial breakthrough has been made, it is easier to continue. In our case, the idea of joy begins on the first day of Sukkos — to breakthrough and tread the path so that all Jews can celebrate the Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

Because the first day signals the start, it is the most difficult day on which to achieve great joy. As we see, it is particularly difficult to celebrate on the first night, because everyone is tired and weary from preparing for the festival. More weariness is induced on erev Sukkos then on erev Rosh Hashanah, erev Yom Kippur, erev Shabbos or erev Pesach, for although more toil is needed to prepare for Pesach, there is more time to prepare (30 days), and therefore most things are done before the actual eve of the festival. On Sukkos, however, it is the custom to make all the preparations — the sukkah and the four kinds — in the four days between Yom Kippur and Sukkos. Because there are only four days, some things get left for the last moment — and therefore Jews are busy to the last moment in preparing for Sukkos.

Yet, despite one’s weariness, a Jew must then begin to rejoice in Simchas Bais Hashoeva! How is this possible? A Jew has a G‑dly soul, and when G‑d commands him to do something, he immediately does it without thinking. Moreover, not only does the body follow the soul, but, because G‑d chose a Jew’s physical body, the body of itself also fulfills G‑d’s commands.

Thus, on the first night of Sukkos, the joy that is produced despite the difficulties involved, is lofty indeed.

2. All of the above applies to Sukkos of every year. In addition, there are special lessons to be derived from the calendar of this year, the new element compared to all other years. This lesson must be comprehensible to all Jews, even the simplest, for they too participate in Simchas Bais Hashoeva. On the other hand, there is a directive even for the loftiest category of Jews, a directive in which they are equal to the simple folk.

Sukkos this year begins on Thursday, whereas as last year, for example, Sukkos began on Shabbos. There are therefore two lessons to be learned from this: 1) the distinction that accrues from Sukkos beginning on a weekday and not on Shabbos; 2) the distinction accruing from Sukkos beginning specifically on Thursday, and not on other weekdays (Monday or Tuesday — for Sukkos can never begin on Sunday, Wednesday or Friday).

When Sukkos falls on Shabbos, one is prohibited to cook food, and the festival’s needs must be prepared beforehand. When Sukkos is in the middle of the week, one is allowed to cook food for Yomtov. Food prepared on the same day is tastier than that cooked beforehand — which adds to the joy of Yomtov. The importance of freshly cooked food is underscored by the fact that the Torah permitted cooking on Yomtov to allow greater enjoyment from the food. Moreover, as further proof that freshness is important, a special miracle happened with the “lechem haponim” (show-bread) in the Mishkan and Bais Hamikdosh, that it remained as fresh as the time it was baked.

The joy produced through tasty food is experienced also by simple Jews. The higher category of Jews also feel this — but in a different way. A Jew is hungry or thirsty for food and water because his soul is hungry for the G‑dly spark which is within the food. Fresh food means its G‑dly spark is a new one, and therefore a person doesn’t need the command that Torah “should be in your eyes as new” to elevate that spark — since it really is a new spark.

As noted above, within weekdays themselves, Sukkos can be on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday. The Baal Shem Tov taught that everything happens by Divine Providence, and thus the fact that Sukkos this year is on Thursday must have special importance.

When Sukkos is on Thursday, we make an “eiruv tavshilin,” which means that a person, already on erev Yomtov, prepares food for the Shabbos which follows the first two days of Yomtov. This emphasizes that G‑d provides a person’s needs — already on erev Yomtov — for the first day of Yomtov, the second day of Yomtov, and for the following Shabbos.

Although G‑d provides for everyone, it is not always in such a fashion that it is prepared ready on the table. An “eiruv tavshilin” shows that on erev Yomtov G‑d has provided — on the table — not just for the two days of Yomtov, but also for Shabbos. On Shabbos itself, the provision is until its conclusion, for the “eiruv tavshilin” is eaten at the third meal of Shabbos. Moreover, the “eiruv tavshilin” should be an “esteemed cooked food,” such as meat or fish, showing that G‑d provides not just an ordinary dish, but an esteemed one.

Thus, when a Jew realizes that G‑d, Who fills the whole earth, has devoted His attention to give him the Torah and its mitzvos and customs, including the “eiruv tavshilin” — a great joy results.

From all the above, we see the great joy of Sukkos this year deriving from many aspects. First of all, the joy of a regular day, in which one’s service must be performed with joy. Then, the joy of the Yomtov, particularly the extra happiness of the “Season of our Rejoicing” — Sukkos. In addition, Simchas Bais Hashoeva adds to the joy. Further, because Yomtov is on a weekday, when one eats freshly cooked food, extra joy accrues. And finally, there is the joy deriving from Yomtov being on Thursday, when an “eiruv tavshilin” is made.

3. In addition, there are lessons to be derived from the daily portion of Chumash, and from today’s “guests.” The guest of today, the first day of Sukkos, is Avraham, and the Chassidic guest is the Baal Shem Tov.

Of Avraham it is said that “Avraham was one” — the first Jew, the progenitor of the Jewish people. Because both the “guests” of a particular day share a common theme, we find the same idea in regard to the Baal Shem Tov. Before he became revealed, he used to travel around arousing the Jewish identity that is within each Jew, by inspiring them to say “Blessed be G‑d,” “with G‑d’s help,” etc. The difference between them is that Avraham’s service, although directed primarily to Jews, also encompassed the whole world, for it took place before Mattan Torah. The entire service of the Baal Shem Tov, however, was directed towards Jews.

There is a further common theme between Avraham’s service and that of the Baal Shem Tov. Avraham revealed G‑dliness in the world, as Rashi writes (Chayeh Sarah 24:7): “Now He is the G‑d of heaven and the G‑d of the creations. But when I was taken from my father’s house. He was only G‑d of the heavens and not G‑d of the earth, for the world’s inhabitants did not recognize Him, and His name was not usual on the earth.” In other words, Avraham revealed to the world that the whole world is nothing but G‑dliness.

So too with the Baal Shem Tov: He urged that people say “Blessed be G‑d,” etc. even in regard to physical, mundane things. This is the same idea as Avraham’s work of making G‑d, “G‑d of the earth” — that G‑dliness should permeate even “earth” things — physical, mundane things. For when a Jew would answer “Blessed be G‑d” to the Baal Shem Tov’s question of how his livelihood was, it meant that he blessed G‑d while engaged in “earth” things.

This is associated with today’s portion of Chumash, the fifth section of parshas V’Zos HaBerachah. It speaks of Moshe’s blessing to the tribe of Don, who was the “gatherer of all the camps.” Rashi interprets this to mean that “whoever would lose something, it (the camp of Don) would restore it to him.” Thus, although Don travelled last, it was specifically Don who was the “gatherer” of all the camps,” able to restore a article lost even of those who travelled first.

Our generation, too, is the “gatherer of all the camps.” It concludes and seals the service of all Jews of all the generations, and through it the true and complete redemption comes. We are as a dwarf atop a giant. Although a dwarf in comparison to previous generations, we, through standing on the giant’s shoulders, can reach the highest places.

What does the “gatherer of all the camps” mean in man’s spiritual service? A loss of a physical object is the result of the loss of a spiritual object. Because a Jewish soul is a “part of G‑d Above,” G‑d does not allow a spiritual loss to remain forever. This is achieved through the level of Don in every Jewish soul, whose task is to restore a lost article to its owner.

Don’s service, then, is to ensure that nothing of a Jew remains lost. In general, it means that everything of a Jew should be whole and perfect — that all his physical matters are connected to G‑dliness. And this is the idea of today’s guests, which, we explained previously, was that both Avraham and the Baal Shem Tov endeavored to introduce G‑dliness even into physical, mundane things.

The above can be viewed in a different aspect, one which is associated with Moshe’s blessings to the Jews. If a Jew, of any tribe, should “lose” one of Moshe’s blessings, Don’s task is to retrieve it and restore it to its owner. And this is done in the manner of “This is the blessing which Moshe blessed,” the word “this” being used for something substantial and revealed, something to which the finger can be pointed and say “This is the blessing.”

Because Don returned the lost articles to all the tribes, it follows that Moshe’s blessings to Don, written in today’s portion of Chumash, encompass all Moshe’s blessings to all the Jews.

This is also alluded to in the continuation of today’s portion (33:25): “Iron and brass are your locks, and as your (younger) days, (so shall be) your old age.” Rashi explains on this verse that “now he speaks in reference to all of Israel” — the continuation of Don’s blessings which also encompass all the blessings of all the tribes.

The verse continues “There is none like G‑d, Yeshurun, Who rides upon the heavens in your help and has His excellency in the skies.” These verses, too, are related to Simchas Bais Hashoeva: If a Jew should think that he cannot have the proper joy in exile, he is told “Iron and brass are your locks.” G‑d encloses a Jew with bars and locks of iron and brass, not allowing anyone or anything to disrupt a Jew’s bond with G‑d — and therefore Simchas Bais Hashoeva can be celebrated properly, with full joy.

The verse then continues “There is none like G‑d ... and has His excellency in the skies,” upon which Rashi comments: “Know for yourself, Yeshurun, that there is none like G‑d among all the gods of the nations, and that not as your Rock is their rock. Who rides upon the heavens — He is that G‑d Who is “your help,” and in His excellency, He rides upon the skies.” In other words, G‑d, in the same fashion as He “rides upon the heavens,” and “has His excellency in the skies,” is likewise below — to be the help of every Jew in every place and in every time.

It therefore follows that, when a Jew occupies himself in Torah, all creation listens to him; not only is no opposition exhibited, but help is extended. As emphasized in today’s portion of Chu-mash — “as your (younger) days, (so shall be) your old age (“do’vecho”)” — on which Rashi says: “All the lands will cause to flow (“do’ovos”) silver and gold to the land of Israel,” similar to the idea of “kings shall be your foster-fathers and their princes your foster-mothers.”

This applies even in exile, as the Talmud relates (Zevachim 19a), that an important non-Jewish monarch arose from his place, and, unasked, assisted a Jew to fix his belt!

From thinking of the matters learned from the daily portion of Chumash — that even in exile, we are protected by “iron and brass, to the extent that non-Jews help us in all matters — we see that great distinction accrues to Simchas Bais Hashoeva.

The previous Rebbe said that everything is given to a Jew; he need only need do something to receive it — “Stand prepared all of you.” That “something” is to be joyous and dance! Then, very soon, we will be joyous and dance with our righteous Moshiach in the true and complete redemption.

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