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Parashat Mishpatim - Shabbos Shekalim – Mevarchim Chodesh Adar | 28 Shevat – 5 Adar 5777

EREV SHABBOS Feb 24rd 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:28 pm

SHABBOS SAT Feb 25th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Adar – 7:30 am
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:40 am
Mincha/ 5:15 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:34 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
This week's Gala kiddush is sponsored by the Tennenhaus/Levin, Goldschmid, and Yalovsky-Djoury families in honor of the engagement between Abbi Levin to Brachie Goldschmid. May they merit to build a bayis ne'eman b'Yisroel!
This week's kiddush is also contributed by the Dershowitz family in honor of the first yartzeit ofGary Friedman – Chaplain Chaim Tzi ben Yehuda Leib ZT”L of Jewish Prisoner Services International 
www.JPSI.org 
Seuda Slishit Lite

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 am /ROSH CHODESH ADAR
Mon- Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH ADAR
Tue-Fri  Shacharis 7 am 
Sun-Thu  Mincha / Maariv 5:30 pm /PLEASE HELP US MAKE MINYAN EVERY DAY/

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Mrs and Mrs Meir and Ariela Zwanzinger Macher on their marriage!
Mazal Tov to the GoldSchmid and Tennenhaus/Levin families on the engagement of Brachie Goldshmid and Abbi Levin!  May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel ! Only simchas!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MMSC Lamplighter Cocktail & Comedy Evening Sunday, Mar 26th 5:30 PM
At Hillel UW, 4745 17th Avenue N.E 
www.MMSCDaySchool.org

MMSC Purim Fundraiser
contact Kalanit at 
admissions@mmscdayschool.org

Community Kollel at CSTL – Tue Feb 28th 8 to  9 pm "אין שמחה אלא תורה"
Come learn with the community!  Learn any topic you want, with a chavrusa.  If you need a chavrusa, we will find you one.  Food and Refreshments will be served.

FINAL AVOS u’BONIM OF THE SEASON MOTZEI SHABBOS 7:30 – 8:30 pm
Sponsored by Rabbi Shuki and Chani Meyer. Info: Rabbi Herbstman
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

MEGILLAH AND PURIM PARTY AT CSTL – SAT NIGHT MAR 11th – 7 PM
“At the Zoo” – featuring Music and Dancing with Knock Your Socks off.  Petting Zoo with Animal Encounters. Arts and Crafts.  Raffle.  Full bar drinks for purchase.  Purim fun for all ages.  Sponsors by CSTL and Chabad of Seattle.  Info: Rabbi Avi Herbstman , 
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com 

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/ DON’T MISS OUT ON THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT!

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - MMSC Now Hiring Substitute Teachers
MMSC is looking for substitute teachers.  We are a private Jewish school in Seattle that is opened Monday -- Friday, 8:45am to 3:45pm.  As such, on-call substitutes for MMSC must have some or full availability between these hours of operation. Shifts may be 4-8 hours within that time frame. If interested please call Sue Chambers @ (206) 523-9766 for further information.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Hebrew Free Loan Association - Champagne Brunch & Raffle Sun  Mar 5th  10:30 am
At The Summit at First Hill. Guest Speaker, Rabbi Will Berkovitz,  CEO Jewish Family Service.  
www.HFLWA.org or  (206) 397-0005. Kosher under the Seattle Vaad.

The Journey That Saved Curious George Wed March 8th - May 24th 
The escape from the Nazi invasion of Paris of Curious George creators Margret and H.A. Rey. Henry & Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity, 2045 2nd Ave.,
https://www.holocaustcenterseattle.org/events/302-curious-george-exhibit

SeattleTorah Basics Revealed" Wed Feb. 22nd to  Mar 29th 7:30 pm
A six-class series hosted by Rabbi Bernie & Shirley Fox at their home, 7007 55th AVE S, Sea. More info: 
ThoughtsonParasha@gmail.com

Ezra Bessaroth Ladies Auxilliary Hamentashen Sale – March 5th at Noon
Pre-order by calling Selma Amon: (206) 721-0533

 

Jewish Federation Community Security Training Thur Mar 9th  10am - 3pm
Active shooter and IED awareness, identifying suspicious behavior. Space limited, RSVP required for admission. At  Temple De Hirsch Sinai - 1441 16th Avenue. Contact Andrew Chadick at AndrewC@SAFEWashington.com.

Women's Brunch with Mrs. Miriam Dvorin Sun Feb 27th 10 am
At the home of Emily Alhadeff, 5525 S Oakhurst Place. No charge. RSVP:
info@ashreichemyisrael.org

Ashreichem Yisrael's New Building Inauguration  - Sun Mar 5th 11 am
6721 51st AVE S, Seattle 
www.ashreichemyisrael.org 

A Beer Sheva Hadassah Women pre-Purim celebration, Feb 22nd at 7:30 p.m. 
Trumpets! Drums! Choruses! And the book of Esther, adapted for London audiences in 1732 by the wily showman and consummate musical artist George Frideric Handel. Come join Hadassah Life Member Gigi Yellen-Kohn, who hosts classical music on Northwest Public Radio, for this magical presentation at her home at 5721 S. Eddy.  Please RSVP to
BeershevaHadassah@gmail.com

QFC UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SEEKS KOSHER MEAT CUTTER
Kosher Meat Cutter/Meat Cutter Apprentice:  The University Village QFC  is accepting applications for a Kosher Meat Cutter or to become a Meat Cutter Apprentice.  Applicants for kosher positions must have and maintain the endorsement of the Seattle Va'ad and either already be a licensed meat cutter or willing to complete necessary meat cutter apprenticeship classes. This position is primarily responsible for the kosher meat program but will also assist in other kosher and general duties.  To apply fill out the application online, click here.  Also, please email a Rabbinic reference from the Seattle Va'ad (or who can be contacted by the Seattle Va'ad) to 
Jeremy.Allen@stores.qfci.com

NYHS Gala at the Westin Seattle Hotel. Sun Feb 26th 
We will celebrate the life and legacy of Jack DeLeon A"H and honor Beryl and Gary Cohen with the Jack DeLeon Community Leadership Award. Doors open at 5:00 pm. Visit www.nyhsgala.org to RSVP, place an ad or get more information.

THE SUMMIT BISTRO NIGHTS - Mar 28th May 23rd Jul 18th Aug 22nd and Dec 5th
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  Email 
Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Jewish Day School Annual Auction & Gala Sun Mar 19th 
Honoring Judy & Jeff Greenstein. Register at: 
www.jds.org

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR MISHPATIM
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2499780/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Mishpatim-Parshas-Shekalim-29th-Day-of-Shevat-5750-1990.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. This week brings together several events, each one of which provide important lessons in the service of G‑d:

a) The weekly portion, parshas Mishpatim, which continues the revelation of the giving of the Torah as our Sages declared, “Just as the first (commandments) were given at Sinai, these were given at Sinai.”

b) Parshas Shekalim, the first of the four portions read in preparation for Pesach. Parshas Shekalim describes the half-shekel which was original given by each member of the Jewish people to make the sockets for the Sanctuary. Subsequently, the half-shekel was given each year to purchase the communal offerings.

c) Today is also the Shabbos which blesses the month of Adar. Furthermore, it is the eve of Rosh Chodesh (which influences the Shabbos as evident from the fact that Tzidkasechoh Tzedek is not recited in the Minchah prayers).

The month of Adar is associated with the holiday of Purim when the Jewish people reaffirmed their commitment to the Torah as our Sages commented on the verse, “And the Jews carried out and accepted.” Our Sages explained that, at the time of the Purim narrative, the Jews “carried out” what they had “accepted” at Mount Sinai.

The fact that these three events fall on the same day implies that they share a connection. Although on the surface, they — particularly, the concepts of Mishpatim and Shekalim — may appear as diametrically opposite, there is an intrinsic bond between them.

This connection can be understood through the preface of this fundamental principle. The Mishnah defines a Jew’s purpose in life, stating, “I was only created to serve my Creator.” That service involves establishing a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds and is characterized by two basic thrusts:

a) Service with mundane matters, e.g., our service during the week when we are involved in the 39 labors which are necessary to provide ourselves with our needs.

b) Service in the realm of holiness, e.g., the service of Shabbos which does not involve effort in mundane activities. Rather, our energies are focused on holy matters, study and prayer. Even the physical activities which are carried out on Shabbos, eating, drinking, and the like, become expressions of holiness for they represent the fulfillment of a mitzvah, taking pleasure in the Shabbos.

The 39 labors which are forbidden on Shabbos are derived from the activities which were carried out in the Sanctuary. This implies that all of a Jew’s mundane activities are intended to make a sanctuary for G‑d in the world at large, i.e., to transform the world into a dwelling for Him.

Though these efforts involve the material substance of the world, it does not imply that the nature of that material substance changes. On the contrary, the intent is that the entire context of material things and mundane affairs be refined to the extent that they do not pose a contradiction to holiness, indeed, they become — to borrow a Talmudic expression — mundane food prepared in a manner of holiness. Nevertheless, even when this service is completed, these articles and activities remain material and mundane in nature.

We see this concept exemplified in the construction of the sanctuary where a certain portion of the Jews’ gold, silver, and the like, was donated and became part of the Sanctuary, the majority of the wealth they possessed, however, remained theirs.1 Similarly, though some of the material substance with which we are involved becomes transformed into articles of holiness, e.g., leather becomes fashioned into tefillin, the majority remain material in nature.

These two aspects of service are alluded to in the expression “Turn from evil and do good.” “Turning from evil” implies that the material substance of the world will not interfere with the service of holiness; “doing good” implies that the material entities themselves will express that holiness.

The above applies during the week when a person is involved with mundane activities. Shabbos, in contrast, is characterized by an all-encompassing atmosphere of holiness. Even one’s physical activities are mitzvos.

Based on the above, we can appreciate the lessons taught by Parshas Mishpatim and Parshas Shekalim which reflect these two approaches to service. Parshas Mishpatim deals primarily with the laws governing human relations, laws involving disputes between a person and a colleague. Thus, it is concerned with mundane matters and is intended, primarily, to negate the possibility of disputes and other undesirable occurrences. In this manner, it parallels the service of “turn from evil.” Though it ensures that the mundane activities will be carried out according to the Torah, they remain mundane and worldly.

[Because of the worldly nature of these laws, they can be comprehended by human intellect. Indeed, human intellect obligates that such laws be enacted2and, therefore, the Torah must emphasize that these commandments were also given at Mount Sinai, i.e., that they are G‑dly in nature.]

Parshas Shekalim represents the other approach. The half-shekel given was a material coin. Indeed, it was an inanimate object, the lowest form of existence in this world, one in which even the potential for growth was not revealed. Nevertheless, this half-shekel itself became a holy entity. The half-shekels mentioned in the Torah were smelted down and used as the sockets, the foundation of the Sanctuary. Similarly, in subsequent years, the half-shekels were used to purchase the communal offerings3 and, furthermore, the half-shekels themselves were considered as consecrated property.

This concept can be further developed in the light of a halachic principle. The half-shekel “may not be given in [by combining] many gifts, i.e., today, one gives some, tomorrow, some.... Rather, it must be given in its entirety as one at one time.” Thus, the half-shekel is considered a single entity that becomes consecrated in its entirety, without a portion remaining for mundane use. Furthermore, the manner in which it is given, “at one time,” implies a service which is above a human being’s usual potential. Generally, a person proceeds step by step, ascending level by level. In contrast, the giving of a half-shekel represents a radical change, an immediate and total transformation.

Thus, the service Shekalim appears to be the direct opposite of the service of Mishpatim which involves mundane matters. The contrast between the two is further emphasized by the fact that, unlike the laws of Mishpatim, the obligation to give a half-shekel was not self-understood. Indeed, even after he received G‑d’s command, Moshe, who represents the ultimate of intellectual achievement in the sphere of holiness, remained in wonderment over this command until G‑d showed him a coin of fire actually demonstrating how the mitzvah should be fulfilled.

The combination of the lessons of parshas Mishpatim and parshas Shekalim on a single Shabbos teaches us that these are two stages in the service of G‑d. In the initial stages of service, one is primarily involved in “turning from evil,” i.e., one’s activities are primarily involved in insuring that the mundane aspects of life should not be in contradiction to holiness. Afterwards, one proceeds to a higher level, “doing good,” service within the realm of holiness itself.

This, however, is not the totality of the lesson to be derived from the combination of these two parshiyos. Indeed, we see that even a person who finishes the first stage of service, e.g., a tzaddik, is not totally involved in holiness. Rather, he must devote a certain portion of his activity to material concerns.

This demonstrates that these two services are complementary, each one making a necessary contribution — which could not be achieved through the other service — in the task of making this world a dwelling for G‑d. One might assume that the transformation of the mundane into the holy is what is essential for a Jew’s service. Though such efforts are necessary, for a Jew’s service to be complete, it must also include involvement in the mundane aspects of worldly activity.

To explain: The service of shekalim has an advantage because it establishes unity between man (and the world as a whole) and the level of G‑dliness which transcends creation. In contrast, the service of mishpatim involves only the levels of G‑dliness which are enclothed within creation. There is, nevertheless, an advantage to the service of mishpatim. Through this service, unity is established with G‑dliness within the context of the mundane realities of the world. In contrast, the perspective of shekalim requires a person to rise above the context of worldliness, to nullify himself to the influence from above (since it is only through such nullification that the worldly could be transformed into holiness).

Thus, the service of shekalim establishes the dwelling for G‑d from G‑d’s perspective alone. In contrast, the service of mishpatim allows the world to become a dwelling for G‑d within the context of its own sphere of reference. Accordingly, the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d must combine both services. It must reflect G‑d’s desire for a dwelling, a desire which transcends the limits of intellect. Simultaneously, however, G‑d wills that this desire also permeate through and be enclothed in the level of intellect so that the G‑dliness which transcends creation can become one with the world itself, as it exists on its own level.

This is possible only through the influence of G‑d’s essence. G‑d’s essence has no limitations whatsoever. Accordingly, it is able to bring about the fusion of opposites necessary to establish “a dwelling,” i.e., a place where the essence of G‑d is revealed, “in the lower worlds,” within the context of their own level. Thus, the combination of the parshiyos Shekalim and Mishpatim reflect the fusion of these two essential services.

On another level, the combination of these two services is reflected within each of the parshiyos themselves. As mentioned above, our Sages emphasized that the laws of parshas Mishpatim are a continuation of the revelation of Mount Sinai, showing that even those concepts which can be grasped and comprehended by human intellect must be influenced by the self-transcendence and self-nullification which characterized the reception of the Torah at Sinai.

The same concept is alluded to in the conclusion of the parshah, which describes how the leaders of the people, “saw G‑d and ate and drank.” This can be interpreted in a positive context. Their vision of G‑d permeated through and influenced their physical activities, eating and drinking.4

Conversely, parshas Shekalim relates how G‑d showed Moshe “a coin of fire.” Through Moshe’s sight, the concept was able to be grasped and internalized by him, and then through his efforts, by the Jewish people as a whole. Similarly, the gift of the half-shekel brought about atonement for the sin of the golden calf, i.e., it refined the lowest aspects of our beings and brought them complete atonement.

2. The fusion of the concepts of shekalim and mishpatim is further emphasized this year when they are read on erev Rosh Chodesh. Rosh Chodesh is an intermediary between the weekdays and Shabbos. Though work is permitted on Rosh Chodesh, it is not referred to as “a day of action.”5

In Kabbalistic terminology, the concept can be explained as follows: During the week, the Sefirah of Malchus receives influence from Za’er Anpin (G‑d’s emotional attributes). On Rosh Chodesh, Malchus receives influence from the Sefirah of Chochmah (wisdom), a higher level. On Shabbos, Malchus ascends to its source which is higher than Chochmah.

To explain these concepts in Chassidic terminology: During the week, our service focuses on revealing the G‑dliness which is invested in the world and is expressed through the ten utterances of creation. This level of G‑dliness leaves place for the perspective of worldliness and, therefore, our service is focused on mundane matters.

On Shabbos, the level of G‑dliness associated with the natural order is elevated6 and the transcendent levels associated with the name Y‑H‑V‑H are revealed. Since the worldly aspects of existence are nullified, it is forbidden to do work, even work that is associated with the refinement of the world. On Shabbos, there is no place for the mundane, the environment is one of all-encompassing holiness.

Rosh Chodesh represents a fusion of these two aspects. The aspect of G‑dliness which transcends the world (which is revealed within the level of Chochmah) is drawn down within the world (through Malchus). Thus, it is unlike the weekdays when only the aspect of G‑dliness which relates to the world is revealed; nor is it like Shabbos, when the revelation of the transcendent aspects of G‑dliness causes the mundane aspects of reality to be negated. Instead, on Rosh Chodesh, the transcendent aspects of G‑dliness are revealed within the context of the world.

There is another dimension of Rosh Chodesh which relates to the fusion of the mundane and the transcendent. In the mussaf service of Rosh Chodesh, we recite twelve expressions of blessing, reflecting how each Rosh Chodesh is associated with the other eleven Rashei Chadashim of the year.7 Thus, there is a connection between Rosh Chodesh Adar and Rosh Chodesh Sivanwhen the Jews camped before Mount Sinai, prepared to receive the Torah.8

As explained on many occasions, the giving of the Torah represents the nullification of the decree separating the higher realms from the lower realms. This implies that not only will the lower realms become negated and transformed to a higher level of existence, but that even within the context of existence on the lower realms, unity will be established with the higher realms.

This union is reflected in Rosh Chodesh which, on one hand, is not “a day of action,” i.e., there is a revelation of the G‑dliness which transcends the world. There is, however, no prohibition against work, demonstrating how that revelation permeates through the creation as it exists within its own context.9

3. The above shares a unique connection with the coming month, the month of Adar. As explained above, the central feature of the month of Adar is the holiday of Purim which is associated with the giving of the Torah. When the Torah was given, there was a great revelation which “forced” the Jews to accept it. Thus, there was a question regarding their commitment to Torah. To state the concept in terms of the ideas discussed previously, the Jews’ connection to Torah came because of the revelation from Above and was not expressed within the context of their own existence. In the Purim narrative, the commitment shown by the Jews which brought about the Purim miracle came when there was no Divine revelation and thus reflects how their self-nullification came willingly, as an expression of their own beings.

Accordingly, the celebrations of Purim also permeate through the realm of worldly existence as evidenced by the fact that there is no prohibition against work. Also, the celebrations of Purim surpass the celebrations of other festivals, lifting a person beyond the limits of intellect as our Sages declared, “A person is obligated to become so intoxicated on Purim that he does not know the difference...” This reflects the revelation of the highest levels of G‑dliness in a manner in which they permeate through the limits of our world. Accordingly, in the Messianic age, when the celebration of all the other holidays will be nullified, Purim will continue to be celebrated.

This reflects the revelation of G‑d’s essence which is associated with the complete mesirus nefesh shown on Purim, a commitment emanating from the level of yechidah. This concept is also related to the name of the holiday, Purim, which means “lots.” In Chassidic thought, it is explained that a lottery reflects a revelation of the utter transcendence of G‑d’s essence.

This revelation begins on the Shabbos on which the month of Adar is blessed and is intensified throughout the month, as our Sages stated, “From the commencement of Adar, we increase our celebration.” This concept is particularly relevant this year when Shabbos falls erev Rosh Chodesh Adar and thus, there are three successive days (Shabbos and the two days of Rosh Chodesh) when the happiness of Adar is emphasized. This creates a chazakah, a presumption that can be accepted as established fact, regarding the happiness of the days that follow until the ultimate of happiness is reached on Purim.

This happiness should be reflected in an increase in the study of Torah which is connected with happiness, as, the verse states, “the statutes of G‑d gladden the heart.” In particular, increases should be made in the three services of Torah, prayer, and deeds of kindness.

In this context, it is worthy to mention the importance of working to provide every Jew (beginning with those in one’s immediate surroundings and including even those in the distant corners of the world) with everything that is necessary to celebrate Purim in a complete manner. This, in turn, will increase the blessings which G‑d will grant each individual.

May the joy we experience in these, the last days of exile, hasten the coming of the ultimate joy,10 the coming of Mashiach. May we “join one redemption to another,” and connect the redemption of Purim to the Messianic redemption. May it come in the immediate future.

Parashat Yitro | 13-20 Shevat 5777

EREV SHABBOS Feb 17th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:18 pm

SHABBOS SAT Feb 18th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:46 am
Mincha/ 5:05 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:23 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
A full Kiddush sponsored by Dr. Norman Share in honor and memory his brother Harvey Share (Zvi Le’ev ben Ya’acov HaCohen, z”l) whose 8th yahrzeit is on the 22nd of Shevat. Kiddush is also sponsored by Meir Zwanziger and Arielle Macher in celebration of their wedding this Sunday in Newton, MA. 
Seuda Slishit Lite

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 am
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am 
Sun-Thu  Maariv 9 pm. (Mincha to resume soon בעזרת השם)

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Meir Zwanzinger and Arielle Macher on their wedding on Yom Rishon in Newton, MA. May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MMSC Lamplighter Cocktail & Comedy Evening Sunday, Mar 26th 5:30 PM
At Hillel UW, 4745 17th Avenue N.E 
www.MMSCDaySchool.org

MMSC Purim Fundraiser
contact Kalanit at 
admissions@mmscdayschool.org

Community Kollel at CSTL – Tue Feb 21st  8 to  9 pm "אין שמחה אלא תורה"
Come learn with the community!  Learn any topic you want, with a chavrusa.  If you need a chavrusa, we will find you one.  Food and Refreshments will be served.

AVOS u’BONIM MOTZEI SHABBOS THIS WEEK Feb 11th  7:15 – 8:15 pm
Sponsored by Rabbi Elazar and Esther Bogomilsky. Info: Rabbi Herbstman 
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

MEGILLAH AND PURIM PARTY AT CSTL – SAT NIGHT MAR 11th – 7 PM
“At the Zoo” – featuring Music and Dancing with Knock Your Socks off.  Petting Zoo with Animal Encounters. Arts and Crafts.  Raffle.  Full bar drinks for purchase.  Purim fun for all ages.  Sponsors by CSTL and Chabad of Seattle.  Info: Rabbi Avi Herbstman , avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

FARBRENGEN ALERT CHOF BEIS SHEVAT – SHABBOS KOIDESH 18 Feb 
The Rebbetzin passed away on Wednesday, the 22nd of Shevat, 1988, after a brief illness. Her burial took place a few hours afterwards at the Chabad cemetery in Queens, New York. Shortly before her passing, Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka requested a glass of water. After reciting the blessing, "...by Whose word all things come into being," she returned her soul to her Maker. The Rebbe pointed out that Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak passed away in Shevat, as did his grandmother, Rebbetzin Rivka, his mother, Rebbetzin Shterna Sarah, and his daughter, Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka. 
www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/110756/jewish/Her-Passing.htm

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - MMSC Now Hiring Substitute Teachers
MMSC is looking for substitute teachers.  We are a private Jewish school in Seattle that is opened Monday -- Friday, 8:45am to 3:45pm.  As such, on-call substitutes for MMSC must have some or full availability between these hours of operation. Shifts may be 4-8 hours within that time frame. If interested please call Sue Chambers @ (206) 523-9766 for further information.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

"Torah Basics Revealed" Wed Feb. 22nd to  Mar 29th 7:30 pm
A six-class series hosted by Rabbi Bernie & Shirley Fox at their home, 7007 55th AVE S, Sea. More info: 
ThoughtsonParasha@gmail.com

Women's Brunch with Mrs. Miriam Dvorin Sun Feb 27th 10 am
At the home of Emily Alhadeff, 5525 S Oakhurst Place. No charge. RSVP: 
info@ashreichemyisrael.org

Ashreichem Yisrael's New Building Inauguration  - Sun Mar 5th 11 am
6721 51st AVE S, Seattle 
www.ashreichemyisrael.org 

A Beer Sheva Hadassah Women pre-Purim celebration, Feb 22nd at 7:30 p.m. 
Trumpets! Drums! Choruses! And the book of Esther, adapted for London audiences in 1732 by the wily showman and consummate musical artist George Frideric Handel. Come join Hadassah Life Member Gigi Yellen-Kohn, who hosts classical music on Northwest Public Radio, for this magical presentation at her home at 5721 S. Eddy.  Please RSVP to 
BeershevaHadassah@gmail.com

QFC UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SEEKS KOSHER MEAT CUTTER
Kosher Meat Cutter/Meat Cutter Apprentice:  The University Village QFC  is accepting applications for a Kosher Meat Cutter or to become a Meat Cutter Apprentice.  Applicants for kosher positions must have and maintain the endorsement of the Seattle Va'ad and either already be a licensed meat cutter or willing to complete necessary meat cutter apprenticeship classes. This position is primarily responsible for the kosher meat program but will also assist in other kosher and general duties.  To apply fill out the application online, click here.  Also, please email a Rabbinic reference from the Seattle Va'ad (or who can be contacted by the Seattle Va'ad) to 
Jeremy.Allen@stores.qfci.com

Jewish Baseball Registration
Jewish Baseball Registration is now open for Jewish students in Seattle. For 3rd grade and younger please register here: http://www.seattleponybaseball.org/ For 4th grade and up please contact Torah Day School. Students who are not enrolled in TDS are eligible to sign up. If you would like to help start other teams including soccer and girls teams please contact Ari Hoffman

NYHS Gala at the Westin Seattle Hotel. Sun Feb 26th 
We will celebrate the life and legacy of Jack DeLeon A"H and honor Beryl and Gary Cohen with the Jack DeLeon Community Leadership Award. Doors open at 5:00 pm. Visit www.nyhsgala.org to RSVP, place an ad or get more information.

THE SUMMIT BISTRO NIGHTS - Mar 28th May 23rd Jul 18th Aug 22nd and Dec 5th 
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  Email 
Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Jewish Day School Annual Auction & Gala Sun Mar 19th 
Honoring Judy & Jeff Greenstein. Register at: 
www.jds.org

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR YITRO
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2499751/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Yisro-Yahrzeit-of-the-Rebbetzin-Chaya-Mushka-22nd-of-Shevat-5750-1990.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The Ten Commandments begin, “I am the L‑rd, your G‑d, who took you out of the land of Egypt.” The commentaries question why the verse mentions the exodus from Egypt rather than the creation of the heavens and the earth. On the surface, creation is a greater miracle than the redemption from exile. This question is reinforced by the Rambam’s statements at the beginning of the Mishneh Torah:

The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of knowledge is to know that there is a Primary Being who brought into being all existence. The knowledge of this concept is a positive commandment as the verse states, “I am the L‑rd, your G‑d.”

The fact that the Rambam explains that the mitzvah involves believing in G‑d as Creator reinforces the question why the verse mentions the exodus from Egypt instead of the creation.

A resolution of this question can be found in Rashi’s commentary on the above verse. Rashi writes: “Because I took you out, it is worthy that you subjugate yourselves to Me;” i.e., the phrase explains why the Jews should accept G‑d’s majesty. Since that majesty is manifest upon the Jewish people in particular, as the verse states, “I am... your G‑d,” the verse refers to the exodus, an event that involved the Jewish people alone, rather than the creation which involves every entity in the world.

This resolution, however, is insufficient because the word “who” appears to be a description of who “the L‑rd, your G‑d” is, rather than an explanation of why we should serve Him. In this context, the question thus remains. After G‑d announces, “I am the L‑rd, your G‑d,”1 why is the exodus mentioned instead of the creation?

One of the explanations to this question is that the exodus from Egypt relates to a higher level of G‑dliness than creation. Creation has its source in the name E‑lohim and, therefore, that name is used for G‑d in the narrative of creation. E‑lohim is numerically equivalent to the word Hatevah (“nature”) and thus refers to the G‑dly energy which maintains and is enclothed within the natural order. The exodus from Egypt, however, involved a step above the natural order. “The King of kings, in His essence and glory, revealed Himself to them and redeemed them;” it was a revelation of the name Y‑H‑V‑H, the attribute of G‑dliness that transcends nature. This quality was revealed at the giving of Torah. Thus, to emphasize that it is the aspect of G‑d that transcends nature which is revealed, it is the exodus and not the creation which is mentioned.

This explanation, however, does not resolve the difficulty in the Mishneh Torah mentioned previously for there, the Rambam explicitly associates the command, “I am the L‑rd...” with the creation. To resolve this problem, we have to understand the nature of the revelation at Mount Sinai.

In regard to that revelation, the question has frequently been raised: Why was the revelation accompanied by thunder and lightning? Why is it considered so unique? On the surface, the concepts mentioned in the Ten Commandments are simple matters connected with the maintenance of a stable society. These guideline were fulfilled before the giving of the Torah (several as part of the seven Noachide Laws). Indeed, our Sages state that Adam was commanded to fulfill them.2 If so, what was so unique about the giving of the Torah?

The explanation of the concept is as follows: The intent of the giving of the Torah is,

for the light of G‑d’s infinity to be revealed... [G‑d’s essence] is enclothed in the Torah which is His wisdom and “He and His wisdom are one”... that this revelation should be on this lowly plane, in material things. This is the meaning of the verse, “And G‑d spoke all these words (in order that) I, Y‑H‑V‑H will be your E‑lohim, i.e., your strength and life energy.

Thus, the new development brought about by the giving of the Torah is that the decree separating the higher realms from the lower realms was nullified and the aspect of G‑dliness that transcends creation (the aspect connected with the redemption from Egypt) could be drawn down within the context of the physical reality of the world.

There are two levels in Torah (which reflect two dimensions of the Giver of the Torah):

a) One level which reflects how the Torah has descended and lowered itself to be enclothed within the context of this material world.3 This relates to the aspect of G‑d which brings into being and maintains our limited existence.

b) The level of Torah which is united with its source, G‑d’s wisdom and G‑d’s will. On this level, the Torah is “a hidden treasure for You,” above all the limits of the world, above even the limits of the spiritual realms.

At the giving of the Torah, these two levels were combined. The aspect of Torah which is one with G‑d became invested in the aspect of Torah that is enclothed within the world.4 Based on the above, we can understood why the commandment “I am the L‑rd...” is associated with the exodus, thus reflecting that the aspect of G‑dliness which transcends existence, can be related, as the Rambam indeed does, with the creation. This, indeed, is the aim of the Torah, to have that dimension of G‑dliness which transcends the limits of creation permeate through the creation itself. Thus, the giving of the Torah and the exodus from Egypt reveal how the dimension of G‑dliness which brings into being a limited creation is itself not limited.

The potential to unite these two opposites (limitation and transcendence) stems from G‑d’s essence which is above both limitation and transcendence. Since the Torah is one with G‑d’s essence, unity is established between the Torah which descends into this world and deals with worldly matters and the aspect of Torah which transcends worldly existence.

Based on the above, it can be explained that two new developments characterize the difference between the Torah as it was possessed by the Patriarchs and the Torah as it was given on Mount Sinai:

a) The patriarchs possessed only the aspect of Torah that is connected to this world;

b) Their fulfillment of Torah and mitzvos was primarily a spiritual service which did not effect the material nature of the world.

Conversely, when the Torah was given on Mount Sinai, the essence of Torah, the aspect of Torah which is one with G‑d’s essence was transmitted. Therefore, the potential was also granted to elevate and refine the material nature of the world, infusing holiness into the physical substance of the world, and uniting it with the transcendent aspects of G‑dliness.

These three dimensions of G‑dliness: a) the aspect of G‑dliness which brings into being heaven and earth; b) the aspect of G‑dliness which transcends the limits of creation; c) the essence of G‑d which is above both limitation and transcendence and has the potential to fuse the two together, are reflected in the verse which introduces the Ten Commandments. That verse states: “And G‑d spoke all these words, saying, ‘I am Y‑H‑V‑H, your E‑lohim.’ “

In this context, “G‑d” refers to the essence of G‑dliness, the level which is above all definition. From this level emanates speech, i.e., a revelation which expresses that essence, saying “I.” This allows for “Y‑H‑V‑H,” the aspect of G‑dliness which transcends nature, to be “your E‑lohim,” your strength and life-energy.

The awareness of these three levels of G‑dliness can clarify the Rambam’s statements about the knowledge of G‑d in the beginning of the Mishneh Torah. As mentioned previously, in the first halachah, the Rambam mentions our obligation “to know that there is a Primary Being who brought into being all existence.” In the halachah which follows, the Rambam adds a second point:

If one would presume that He does not exist, no other being could possibly exist.

The latter statement raises several questions:

a) How is it possible for a Jew to arrive at such a thought? Furthermore, why are we (as part of the mitzvah of Torah study) obligated to learn about such a presumption?

b) The Hebrew term translated as “presume” יעלה על הדעת is somewhat cumbersome. Why did the Rambam chose it over other expressions with the same meaning?

c) On the surface, this halachah is merely restating — in a negative form — the same content communicated by the first halachah, that G‑d is the source for the existence of all creation. What new idea does it teach?

The concepts can be explained as follows: The first halachah describes the aspect of G‑dliness which has limited and contained itself and become manifest on the level where He is a “Being” which can serve as the source for existence. This is the level of G‑dliness in which He manifests Himself as Creator.

In the second halachah, the Rambam describes a higher level of G‑dliness. Therefore, he uses the expression יעלה על הדעת which literally means, “raises up one’s knowledge.” A person becomes conscious of a level of G‑dliness which is above the level of “existence.” From the standpoint of this level, the entire creation could not exist. The awareness of this level of non-being represents a process of growth and development over and above the awareness of G‑d achieved through the comprehension of the first halachah.

As a preface to these concepts, the Rambam begins, “The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of knowledge” (v‑u‑v‑h). The first letters of these Hebrew words spell out the name Y‑H‑V‑H. In this context, that name refers to G‑d’s essence, the level which is above both limitation and transcendence. Since this level is above both the levels of “existence” and “non-existence,” it has the potential to fuse together the two, causing that the level of G‑dliness in which He limits Himself to become a “Being,” is infused with the transcendence of the level of “non-being.”

Thus, these halachos allude to three levels of knowledge, G‑d as He is manifest in creation, G‑d as He transcends creation, and the essence of G‑d which is above both these levels and fuses the two together. These three levels parallel the three levels described above in the explanation of the first of the Ten Commandments.

The above concepts give us a deeper insight into the verse which introduces the Ten Commandments, “And G‑d spoke all these words, saying...” G‑d reveals Himself in “all these words,” which refer not only to the Ten Commandments, but to the entire Torah, the Written Law and the Oral Law, and “every new concept to be developed by an experienced sage.”5

This allows the possibility for each Jew to have this revelation reflected in his own Torah study. This is implied by the word “saying.” Throughout the Torah, the word “saying,” implies a statement or command given with the intention that it be communicated to others. In this instance, however, the entire Jewish people (even those of future generations) were present at the giving of the Torah and, therefore, that implication is not appropriate.

The Alter Rebbe explains that, in this instance, the word “saying,” implies that whenever a Jew recites a Torah concept the revelation of Mount Sinai is repeated. The words of Torah spoken by a Jew are “the words of G‑d.” Similarly, Psalms states, “My tongue will relate Your words,” i.e., the words of Torah recited by a Jew are “Your words,” and the person is merely relating them.

After this preparation, the Ten Commandments were given. The first two commandments are of a general nature. They represent, “the totality of the Torah, the commandment, ‘I am the L‑rd,’ includes all the positive commandments and the commandment, ‘You shall have no other gods,’ includes all the negative commandments.” As will be explained, these two commandments reflect the two dimensions of G‑d, being and non-being, mentioned above.

Afterwards, the Ten Commandments continue with “simple concepts,” laws which are associated with maintaining the existence of our material world,6relating the elements of our material existence to the transcendent revelation of G‑dliness. We see this union in the first commandment, “I am the L‑rd,” which, as explained above, involves the knowledge of — not merely the belief in — G‑d. Man comprehends within the concept of his limited human intellect, the existence of G‑d, relating also to the transcendent levels described above.

When a Jew realizes that through studying Torah, he is reciting “G‑d’s words,” that the words of Torah which he is studying are the same as the words of Torah given on Mount Sinai, he will approach Torah study with awe. Each day, he will consider the Torah he is studying as new and approach it with “awe and fear, trembling and sweat,” reexperiencing the emotions expressed by the Jews at Mount Sinai.

Though these concepts are true throughout the year, they receive special emphasis on Shabbos parshas Yisro when we read the Ten Commandments in the communal Torah reading. “A Jew must live with the times,” i.e., center his life around the weekly Torah portion. Thus, on Shabbos Yisro, we live with the giving of the Torah and the revelation of the transcendent dimensions of G‑dliness within the world.

The giving of the Torah is reflected in the revelation of light in our G‑dly souls and offers the potential to refine and elevate the lowly elements of our material world, in particular, our individual animal souls.7 To explain this in the context of the passage from the Mishneh Torah quoted above: The revelation of G‑d as “the Primary Being” — the level of G‑dliness associated with creation — leaves room for the existence of a world in need of refinement. In contrast, the “elevation of one’s knowledge” to the rung which appreciates G‑d above existence — the level of G‑dliness associated with the giving of the Torah — gives us the potential to carry out this service of refinement. The revelation that G‑d is the true existence and that our world is essentially nothingness, brings about the nullification of selfishness within our world.

* * *

2. The above also relates to the portion of the Mishneh Torah studied today, the conclusion of Hilchos Sotah which is the conclusion of Sefer Nashim. The Rambam concludes those laws with the directive for a husband to:

Speak gently to his wife... to direct her in a straight path... for him to be careful with his wife, his children, and the members of his household and warn them. He should supervise their ways at all times to know that they are proper... as it is said: “And you shall see to it that your tent is at peace and supervise your dwelling, that you do not sin.”

This concept relates to the giving of the Torah because the giving of the Torah represents the marriage between G‑d and the Jewish people and this world, His dwelling. Within this material world, there is the potential for undesirable influences, therefore, G‑d “sees to it,” that His “tent” (i.e., His wife, the Jews) is at peace and supervises His dwelling, establishing “a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds.”

The conclusion of the text, “that you do not sin,” raises a question: Generally, an effort is made to conclude Torah texts in a positive manner and indeed, at the end of several of his halachos, the Rambam obviously adds concepts for that intent. Although in this instance, he is quoting a Biblical verse, he could have followed the pattern of the final Mishnah in the tractate of Berachos which reverses the order of a verse so that the tractate would end in a positive manner. If so, why did the Rambam choose to end the chapter in a manner that the final word is “sin?”

It can be explained that, in this instance, though the final word “sin,” is not positive, the connotation of the verse in its totality, that a person will not sin, is positive. Indeed, it can be explained that this represents the ultimate of good, that even in a situation where the potential for sin exists, a person does not sin.8 [Or if, ח"ו, he does sin, he transforms the sin into good through the service of teshuvah, transforming darkness into light and thus revealing, the higher quality of light.]

In this context, we can see an advantage of the service of a Beinoni over that of a Tzaddik. The Beinoni’s service involves the confrontation of bad — evil thoughts occur to him — and yet through his service, he overcomes them and does not sin.

This concept can also be connected to the allusion to the Rambam found in the Torah. The first letters of the Hebrew words, רבות מופתי בארץ מצרים, “multiply My wonders in the land of Egypt,” are an acronym for the name Rambam. Though the phrase concludes with the words, “the land of Egypt,” which represents the lowest in levels, the service in such a situation brings out, “a multitude of wonders.”

This approach brings out the fullest possible good in a marriage relationship, including the ultimate marriage relation-ship, the bond between G‑d and the Jewish people, and, in a more personal sense, in the marriage bond between couples in this world. One must be concerned with one’s wife’s behavior,9this, in turn, will ensure “that your tent is at peace.”

3. The above can be related to the uniqueness of the present day, the yahrzeitof a tzadkanis. Such a day also involves the fusion of two opposite movements, the ascent of the soul to higher levels in the spiritual realms, and influence descending to the lower planes, “bringing about salvation in the midst of the earth.”

In particular, a lesson can be derived from the name, Chaya Mushka. Chaya (חי-ה) is related to the word Chaim, “life.” The ultimate source of life is G‑d’s essence which gives influence to the soul, “an actual part of G‑d from above.” The final letter, hay, alludes to the five organs of speech, which in a spiritual sense, refer to the potential for creation (for the world was created through G‑d’s speech).

The name Mushka is a Yiddish term. The use of a language other than Lashon HaKodesh alludes to the elevation of the lowest aspects of our existence. Thus, we see many leaders of Israel had two names, one in Lashon HaKodesh, and one in a secular tongue, e.g., the Alter Rebbe, Schneur Zalman, the Tzemach Tzedek, Menachem Mendel, the Rebbe Rashab, Sholom DovBer. The second name alludes to the service of refinement of the lowest aspects of the world which brings about the highest revelations.

In particular, Mushka (מושקא), is connected with the concept of “perfume.” Our Sages explain that smell is a sense which “brings pleasure to the soul,” pleasure being the highest of our spiritual potentials. Also, Chaya Mushka is numerically equivalent to 470, which is also the equivalent of the Hebrew word, eit (עת),” meaning “time.” Koheles mentions 28 different “times,” some, whose positive nature is open and revealed, and others, which through our service can be transformed into good. This relates to the name of the Rebbetzin’s father, Yosef Yitzchok which alludes to the service of the transformation of the estranged and also to the service of happiness.10

The yahrzeit should, as is Jewish custom, be connected with deeds undertaken in memory of the departed.11 In this context, it is worthy to mention the gathering of women organized in connection with the yahrzeit. Surely, this gathering will involve resolutions for increased efforts in spreading Yiddishkeit, in particular, spreading the three mitzvos, lighting Shabbos candles, kashrus, and Taharas Hamishpachah, which are associated with Jewish women. [We can assume that such resolutions will be made as evident from the kinus held in the previous year of which an album mentioning those resolutions was recently printed.]

Similarly, institutions should be established in memory of the Rebbetzin, in particular, institutions for the education of Jewish girls. Until the previous generation, Jewish girls received their education from their mothers and grandmothers. In the previous generation, however, the leaders of the Jewish people began establishing institutes of Jewish education for girls, for example, the Previous Rebbe, the Rebbetzin’s father, established Bais Rivkah.

Also, it is proper that gifts be given to charity in multiples of 470, the numerical equivalent of the Rebbetzin’s name. May these efforts bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy, “May those that lie in the dust arise and sing,” with the coming of the complete and ultimate redemption. May it be in the immediate future.

Parashat Beshalach – Tu b’Shevat | 13-20 Shevat 5777

EREV SHABBOS Feb 10th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 5:07 pm

SHABBOS SAT Feb 11th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:52 am
Mincha/ 4:50 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:11 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
This week's kiddish is cosponsored by Dr Norman Share in memory of his mother, Ethel Bat Yoseph (z'l) whose 25th yahrzeit is on the 10th of Shevat and the family of Meir Zwanzinger in honor of his ufruf this week. Yaakov Kimelfeld is also contributing to kiddush this week in memory of his father, Moshe ben Yaakov, whose yahrzeit is on Shevat 19th. Seuda Slishit Lite

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 am
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am 
Sun-Thu  Maariv 9 pm. (Mincha to resume soon בעזרת השם)

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Susan Sherriff (sister of Elisheva Loudon). Shiva at 5245 South Morgan St., Friday noon to 4 pm. May Hashem comfort Elisheva among the mourners for Zion and Jerusalem.  המקום ינחם אותה בתוך שאר אבלי ציון וירושלים

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Meir Zwanzinger in honor of his ufruf this week.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CSTL ANNUAL DINNER SUN FEB 12th honoring Dr Vernon and Lis Neppe
At Hillel, with Catering by Leah.  
www.CSTLSeattle.org . Please volunteer to help - event chair Velvilrosler@gmail.com . Please register ASAP at https://cstl2017.eventbrite.com

MMSC Lamplighter Cocktail & Comedy Evening Sunday, Mar 26th 5:30 PM
At Hillel UW, 4745 17th Avenue N.E www.MMSCDaySchool.org

MMSC Purim Fundraiser
contact Kalanit at 
admissions@mmscdayschool.org

Community Kollel at CSTL – Tue Feb 14th 6:30 – 9 pm "אין שמחה אלא תורה"
Come learn with the community!  Learn any topic you want, with a chavrusa.  If you need a chavrusa, we will find you one.  Food and Refreshments will be served.

AVOS u’BONIM MOTZEI SHABBOS THIS WEEK Feb 11th  7 pm – 8 pm
Sponsored by Mr. James Packman. Info: Rabbi Herbstman 
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - MMSC Now Hiring Substitute Teachers
MMSC is looking for substitute teachers.  We are a private Jewish school in Seattle that is opened Monday -- Friday, 8:45am to 3:45pm.  As such, on-call substitutes for MMSC must have some or full availability between these hours of operation. Shifts may be 4-8 hours within that time frame. If interested please call Sue Chambers @ (206) 523-9766 for further information.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

MOVIE NIGHT AT MINYAH OHR CHADASH Sat Feb 11th  at 7:30 pm
Come see an award-winning Israeli TV series “SHTISEL

DR. MORDECHAI KEDAR TO LECTURE TUES. FEB 14th at 7:30 PM
At Ezra Bessaroth. Dr. Kedar's topic: "What is the issue of Building in Jerusalem all about?" is an especially timely one.  Dr. Kedar, Director of the Center for the Study of the Middle East and Islam and research associate at the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, is one of the foremost recognized authorities in the field of Arab and Middle East Studies, with a special research focus on Islam, Islamic Movements, and Popular Arab culture. He has written many publications on the Islamic world, including works focusing on the clash of values between Islam, Middle Eastern societies and the West.Please RSVP to 
rabbimeyers@gmail.com

MELAVA MALKA SINGLES EVENT WITH LAURIE YOUNG SAT FEB 11th 8:15 pm 
Mixer plus a talk by Laurie Young, the Seattle Shadchan. The topic will be: HAPPILY EVER AFTER, CHOOSING LOVE. Singles of all ages are welcome. Reservations are required to attend.  For more information, contact Shira Balint at JSeattleSingles@gmail.com or check for the invitation on Mercaz Seattle's Facebook page.  Sponsored by Mercaz Seattle 
www.MercazSeattle.org

A Beer Sheva Hadassah Women pre-Purim celebration, Feb 22nd at 7:30 p.m. 
 Trumpets! Drums! Choruses! And the book of Esther, adapted for London audiences in 1732 by the wily showman and consummate musical artist George Frideric Handel. Never before had something called "an oratorio" been seen or heard; after "Esther," the "oratorio" took off like a rocket, and so did Mr. Handel's legacy. Hear some exciting music, and marvel at how much of the whole megilla does, or doesn't, survive the journey.  Come join Hadassah Life Member Gigi Yellen-Kohn, who hosts classical music on Northwest Public Radio, for this magical presentation at her home at 5721 S. Eddy.  Please RSVP to 
BeershevaHadassah@gmail.com

QFC UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SEEKS KOSHER MEAT CUTTER
Kosher Meat Cutter/Meat Cutter Apprentice:  The University Village QFC  is accepting applications for a Kosher Meat Cutter or to become a Meat Cutter Apprentice.  Applicants for kosher positions must have and maintain the endorsement of the Seattle Va'ad and either already be a licensed meat cutter or willing to complete necessary meat cutter apprenticeship classes. This position is primarily responsible for the kosher meat program but will also assist in other kosher and general duties.  To apply fill out the application online, click here.  Also, please email a Rabbinic reference from the Seattle Va'ad (or who can be contacted by the Seattle Va'ad) to 
Jeremy.Allen@stores.qfci.com

Jewish Baseball Registration
Jewish Baseball Registration is now open for Jewish students in Seattle. For 3rd grade and younger please register here: http://www.seattleponybaseball.org/ For 4th grade and up please contact Torah Day School. Students who are not enrolled in TDS are eligible to sign up. If you would like to help start other teams including soccer and girls teams please contact Ari Hoffman

Tu B'Shevat EVENT: "Scouts in the wild", Feb 12th 2:30 - 4:30 pm, 
A naturalist guided walk through the Mercer slough. Cost: $10. RSVP to rlr62@comcast.net. Limited to first 15.

BASICS OF JEWISH LIFE Feb 12th 5 pm 
Learn about words and concepts, customs associated with life stages, the Jewish calendar, fundamental principles of faith and heritage, Kabbalah of food, Airusin and Nisuin, and more in this free three-part series. Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County.

NYHS Gala at the Westin Seattle Hotel. Sun Feb 26th 
We will celebrate the life and legacy of Jack DeLeon A"H and honor Beryl and Gary Cohen with the Jack DeLeon Community Leadership Award. Doors open at 5:00 pm. Visit www.nyhsgala.org to RSVP, place an ad or get more information.

THE SUMMIT BISTRO NIGHTS - Mar 28th May 23rd Jul 18th Aug 22nd and Dec 5th 
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  Email 
Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Kollel - Trip To Israel for Women ages 45 - 60 Feb 26 - March 7
“Jewish Women Inspired – Renew your Wows!”. This trip is geared for all women 45ish – 60ish and for JWRP alumni who want to return to reignite the spark. Join a group of vibrant Jewish women for a fun filled action-packed journey of self- rediscovery & exploration. ABSORB the Beauty of Tiberias  - CRUISE the Kinneret  - TOUR the Mystical City of Tsfat  - TRAVEL to Tel Aviv - Free time for sightseeing and shopping  - WANDER the Historical Alleys of Jerusalem’s Old City -  PARTICIPATE in the Western Wall Experience  - CONNECT to your Ancestry at Rachel’s Tomb -  LED BY Scholar in Residence, Mimi David, experienced Israel tour leader  - MEET and learn from Renowned Jewish Speakers/Fascinating Authors. Land costs - $2400. For more information and to register contact Rooksie David and visit goinspire.com/jewish-women-journey 206-790-1475 / 
rooksiedavid@aol.com

Jewish Day School Annual Auction & Gala Sun Mar 19th 
Honoring Judy & Jeff Greenstein. Register at: 
www.jds.org

Seattle Va'ad HaRabanim 2017 Membership 
http://seattlevaad.org/vaad-services/#tab-membership or mail a minimum $36 donation to Vaad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle, 5305 52nd AVE S, Sea., WA 98118 or call the Vaad Office (206) 760-0805 to pay via Credit Card

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Kollel Daf Yomi - Tractate Baba Metzia, 9:15 pm Sun - Thu 
At the Kollel

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 8pm - 10pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR TU b’SHEVAT
http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2499046/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Beshallach-Tu-BeShevat-5750-1990.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Tu BeShevat is “the Rosh HaShanah of the trees.” The connection between this holiday and our service is evident from the phrase: “for a man is like the trees of the field.” Our Sages explain that a fruit tree serves as a metaphor for Torah sages and by extension, to the totality of the Jewish people since “all your sons are students of the L‑rd.” Accordingly, it can be explained that from a certain dimension — the aspect of man which can be compared to a fruit-bearing tree — the Rosh HaShanah of the Trees adds a level of fulfillment above that associated with Rosh HaShanah, the day of man’s creation.

This concept is based on the following principle: It is written: “He (G‑d) placed the world within your hearts,” i.e., every entity that exists within the world at large also exists within a Jew’s heart.1 Indeed, it would be more appropriate to reverse the order of that statement and say that because an entity exists within a Jew’s heart, a parallel is brought into being within the world at large.

Thus, we find the Jewish people referred to with the metaphor of land as the verse states, “You shall be a desired land,”2 and therefore, it is understandable that all the characteristics associated with land including the potential to produce fruit are reflected within the Jewish people. In particular, they share a special connection to the chosen land, Eretz Yisrael,3 and the seven species of fruit for which Eretz Yisrael is praised in the Torah.

Thus, we find each of these seven species employed as a metaphor for the Jewish people.4 The Jews are called, “the first of His grain” (referring to wheat and barley). Psalms describes the Jews as “a vine brought forth from Egypt” (grapes). Similarly, we find the metaphors of figs, “the first fruit of the fig tree in its season;” pomegranates, “your shoots are an orchard of pomegranates;” olives, “The L‑rd called your name, ‘a green olive tree, fair, with goodly fruit;”‘ and a date palm, “Your stature is like a palm tree,” and “the righteous will flourish like a palm tree.”

Since Tu BeShevat is the “the Rosh HaShanah of the trees,” it generates new life energy for those dimensions of a Jew’s service which are compared to trees. This concept can be understood in the context of the comparison between grain and fruit. There are two fundamental differences between them:

a) Grain is the staple of our diet and is necessary for the maintenance of our health. Fruit, in contrast, is not required for these reasons and is eaten, primarily, because of the pleasure it brings.

b) The growth potential exhibited by trees far exceeds that of grain. Though there is an abundant increase in quantity, the grain which is harvested is of the same nature as the kernels which were originally planted. In contrast, the seed of a fruit tree is of an entirely different nature than the fruit that is later harvested.

Similarly, in regard to our service of G‑d, the metaphor of fruit trees alludes to a service which is not limited to the basic necessities, but rather generates pleasure. Similarly, it reveals the potential for growth, not only a quantitative increase, but also, a leap to a higher level, a new framework of reference. Tu BeShevat, Rosh HaShanah of the trees, generates a new thrust of energy to carry out this service. Furthermore, there is an interrelation between this service and the service described by the metaphor of grain. Therefore, the new energy generated by Tu BeShevat also adds to that service.

There is an added dimension to the above services this year when Tu BeShevat falls on Shabbos.5 Shabbos is also connected with the service of pleasure and thus, shares an intrinsic bond with the service alluded to by fruit.

The weekly Torah portion, parshas Beshallach, also contributes to this theme. Parshas Beshallach describes the Jews’ exodus from Egypt. Two of the verses quoted above which use the fruits of Eretz Yisrael as metaphors for the Jewish people, “a vine brought forth from Egypt” and “your shoots are an orchard of pomegranates” are associated with the exodus by our Sages.

The concept of planting and harvesting is connected with the concepts of exile and redemption as the Alter Rebbe relates in Torah Or:

We find the expression “sowing” used in regard to the Jews in the Egyptian exile as it is written, “I will sow it for Me in the land.” Our Sages declared: “A person sows a kor to reap a harvest of several korrim....”

It is written, “Israel is sanctified unto the L‑rd, the first of His grain.” The emphasis is on “His grain,” that the Jews are G‑d’s produce.... Thus, just as a person sows grain for the additional amount that will grow, so too, since G‑d wanted the revelation of G‑dliness in the world to be increased... He sowed Israel His produce so that His glory would be revealed in an increased manner. Thus, there will be a great revelation of G‑dliness on this lowly plane, just as in the higher spiritual wonders... as will be revealed in the Messianic age. The Jews are the ones who cause this great revelation...

The Alter Rebbe continues, employing both the metaphors of grain and a vine to describe the activities of the Jews. Similarly, the Midrash uses the metaphors of sowing grain and planting trees and vines to describe G‑d’s sending the Jews into exile in Egypt.

In a more particular sense, the metaphor of implanting or sowing the Jews into exile is relevant on a personal level and relates to the manner in which the soul descends into this world to elevate the body, the animal soul, and its portion in the world at large, making a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds. Through our fulfillment of mitzvos (which are also described by the metaphor of sowing),6 we draw down the revelation of G‑dliness into the world.

2. As mentioned this revelation of G‑dliness is brought about by the Jews’ service. Accordingly, the seven species for which Eretz Yisrael is praised, i.e., the produce which the Torah regards as praiseworthy, each serves as a metaphor for different aspects of the service of the Jewish people. The first two species, wheat and barley, are species of grain. Our Sages explain that wheat is used as food for human beings, while barley is primarily used for animal fodder. Thus, these two species refer to the service of the G‑dly soul and the service of the animal soul respectively.

The Hebrew word for man, Adam, relates to the word, Adamoh, “I resemble,” in this context, “I resemble the One above.” The aspect of our beings for which this description is most appropriate is the G‑dly soul. Barley, “food for the animal (soul),” is intended to elevate and refine the animal soul. Though this service represents a descent, ultimately, it elevates even the G‑dly soul itself and lifts it to a higher rung of service.

To explain: We find that the animals were created before man. Similarly, in our own lives, we are required to feed our animals before eating ourselves. This pattern is reflected in our spiritual makeup. The G‑dly soul is “the second soul in Israel.” Before it becomes fully manifest in the body,7 the animal soul has already established its hold.

Furthermore, for most Jews, their primary service is the refinement of the animal soul for, as the Alter Rebbe writes, “the attribute of the Beinoni is the attribute of all men” and a Beinoni’s service involves refining his animal soul which “originates in the forces of evil, enclothes itself in his flesh and blood, and has not been transformed into good.”

The reason why the G‑dly soul is forced to descend and enclothe itself in the animal soul which is material in nature is associated with the metaphor of sowing seeds described above. The animal soul is compared to the earth. Nevertheless, since its source is above that of the G‑dly soul, it has the potential to produce growth. Its refinement can bring one to greater heights than the service of the G‑dly soul alone.

This explanation raises a question: If the essential service is the refinement of the animal soul, why is wheat mentioned before barley in the verse praising Eretz Yisrael? On the surface, barley should be granted precedence.

The explanation is that it is impossible to begin with the animal soul alone. To refine the animal soul, it is necessary to first reveal the light of the G‑dly soul. When sowing seeds, the growth potential is latent in the earth, but unless a seed is sown, that potential will never be expressed. Similarly, because the animal soul is material in nature, the G‑dly soul must enclothe itself within it to bring out the power of its source.

This pattern is reflected in our service each day. According to the Jewish calendar, a day begins at night, thus the recitation of the Shema is the first mitzvah to be fulfilled each day.8 In that passage, we proclaim, “And you shall love the L‑rd, your G‑d,” the service of the G‑dly soul. Only afterwards, does the verse continue, “with all your heart,” interpreted by our Sages’ to mean, “with both your hearts,” i.e., with the animal soul as well. After the G‑dly soul’s expression of love, it is possible to refine the animal soul and transform it so that it too expresses love for G‑d.

Similarly, each morning, when a person arises as “a new creation,” he begins his day with the declaration, Modeh Ani, the acknowledgement of the G‑dly soul. Only afterwards, does he begin the service of working to refine the animal soul.

This pattern is alluded to in the verse, “Draw me out, we will run after You.” “Draw me out” is singular, referring to the service of arousing the G‑dly soul. “We will run after you” is plural, referring to the combined activity of the G‑dly soul and the animal soul. First, the G‑dly soul is aroused. Then, it enclothes itself in the animal soul and motivates it to the love of G‑d. This, in turn, brings out a greater love in the G‑dly soul, to the extent that it is motivated to “run.”

Based on the above, we can understand why wheat precedes barley in the verse cited above. The first efforts in harvesting the produce of the Jewish people must be directed to wheat, arousing love for G‑d within the G‑dly soul. Only afterwards, is it possible to proceed to barley, the refinement of the animal soul. It is through “the barley harvest,” however, that even the G‑dly soul can be lifted to a higher rung.9

3. As mentioned above, not only the grains, but also the five fruits for which Eretz Yisrael are praised, are metaphors for the services of the Jewish people. Furthermore, these services are also connected with the refinement of the animal soul.

a) Grapes — wine is described as “bringing joy to man and G‑d.” The name for G‑d used, E-lohim refers to those aspects of G‑dliness which limit and conceal revelation in order to allow for the creation of a limited world. Wine “brings joy to... E-lohim,” and thus, ensures that these forces of concealment will not prevent the revelation of G‑d’s inner qualities on this plane. Implied in this service is the refinement of the animal soul that it will no longer conceal G‑dliness.

b) Figs — according to certain opinions, the Tree of Knowledge was a fig tree and all opinions agree that after the sin, Adam and Chavah were able to correct a portion of the shame caused by their sin by wearing clothes made from fig leaves. Thus, eating figs is associated with the refinement of the spiritual descent caused by this sin.

c) Pomegranates — pomegranates refer to the fulfillment of mitzvos as our Sages commented, “Even the empty ones among you are as full of mitzvos as a pomegranate is seeds.”10 The performance of mitzvos involves carrying out deeds with material objects in this world and thus, emphasizes the elevation of this lowly plane of existence.

In particular, there are two dimensions through which the pomegranate seeds reflect the service of refining the material aspects of the world through performing mitzvos. Firstly, in contrast to grape seeds which can be seen through their skin, the pomegranate seeds are hidden. This reflects how the mitzvos are enclothed and hidden in the material aspects of our existence.

Also, each pomegranate seed is associated with a separate portion of the fruit. This relates to the concept that every Jew, even “the empty ones,” are “filled with mitzvos,” i.e., are entities of substance.

d) Olives11 — “an olive releases its oil only when it is pressed.” This alludes to the service of nullifying one’s existence which is on a higher rung than the service of subduing the animal soul in the process of refinement.

e) Dates — our Sages state that a date palm produces fruit after seventy years. Seventy refers to the completion of the task of refining our seven emotional attributes, the essential aspect of our service at present.

The period of seventy years also implies that much effort and energy is invested in this service. Nevertheless, just as the effort required surpasses that required for other fruit, so, too, the sweetness of the fruit is much greater.

The appreciation of the above concepts can be enhanced in light of the Baal Shem Tov’s interpretation of the verse, “You shall be a desired land.” The Baal Shem explained that the Jews are like a choice land in which are buried valuable treasures of jewels and pearls. This implies that in addition to the produce the land provides (both grain — what is necessary to maintain one’s existence — and fruit — which brings pleasure) the land brings forth treasures which give a person much greater pleasure than fruit.

Within the context of our service, this refers to the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah which, in his well-known parable, the Alter Rebbe described as the most precious jewel in the king’s crown.

In that parable, the Alter Rebbe explains how the jewel must be pulverized and mixed with water to form an elixir to be poured over the king’s son’s face in the hope that one drop will enter his mouth and save his life. From this explanation, we can appreciate that there are two dimensions to the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah: one which is necessary to save the life of the King’s son, i.e., to preserve the Jewish people in the darkness of exile, and a deeper dimension, the revelation of the quality of pleasure in Torah,12 which is a preparation for the revelation of Pnimiyus HaTorah in the Messianic age.

Shabbos contributes an aspect of completion and fulfillment to the days of the previous week. Thus, an added dimension to the above concepts is contributed this year when Tu BeShevat falls on the Shabbos that contributes fulfillment to the fortieth anniversary of Yud Shevat. As explained in the previous farbrengens, the service of the seven Nesi'im (who parallel the seven fruits for which Eretz Yisrael was blessed) in spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward has already been completed in an abundant manner, in a manner of pleasure.

Thus, from the above, we can derive several directives to be applied in our behavior. The “Rosh HaShanah of the Trees” should inspire each person to increase those aspects of his service which are related to pleasure and growth, the two concepts we can learn from trees as explained above.

Also, included in the concept of growth are the activities a person undertakes to influence others beginning with the members of his family and those living around him. Thus, he becomes like “a fruit tree, yielding fruit after its kind whose seed is within it.”

[Indeed, the latter concept sheds light on a problematic point. The Mishnahdescribes Tu BeShevat as “Rosh HaShanah for a Tree,” yet, in most texts, we find the holiday described as “Rosh HaShanah of the Trees,” using the plural form. This construction alludes to the fact that each tree serves as the source for others.]13

May these efforts lead to the period of ultimate growth, the Messianic age, when all our service carried out throughout the period of exile will blossom. The connection of the concept of growth to the Messianic era is emphasized by the fact that Tzemach, one of Mashiach’s names, means “growth.” Similarly, in the Messianic prophecy, “a sceptre shall arise in Israel,” the word for “sceptre,” shevet,14 also means “branch.” Similarly, the prophet declares, “A shoot shall come forth from the stem of Yishai, and a branch shall grow forth out of his roots.”

The above also relates to this week’s Torah portion, parshas Beshallach which describes the final stages of the exodus from Egypt. This is also related to the Messianic redemption as it is written, “As in the days of your departure from Egypt, I will show you wonders.” Our Sages also alluded to this connection, associating the song sang by Moshe at the Red Sea with the ultimate song of redemption to be sung at the coming of Mashiach. May we experience that redemption and all journey to Eretz Yisrael where we will “eat of its fruit and be satiated with its goodness.”15 May it be in the immediate future.

Parashat Bo | 6 -13 Shevat 5777

EREV SHABBOS Feb 3rd 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 4:55 pm

SHABBOS SAT Feb 4th 
Shacharis 9 am /Latest Shema 9:57 am
Mincha/ 4:40 pm /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:01 pm

KIDDUSH SPONSORS
The Stern family is cosponsoring kiddush this week in honor of Marion's 70th birthday!" Kiddush is co-sponsored by Yitzchok Rothman, in honor and in memory of the 18th yahrzeit of his father, Yehuda ben HaRav Yehoshua Falik (29th Shevat).  Seuda Slishit Lite

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 am
Mon- Fri  Shacharis 7 am 
Sun-Thu  Maariv 9 pm. (Mincha to resume soon בעזרת השם)

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Abraham and Shprintze Kavka on the birth of a new grandson to Rabbi Moishe and Esther Kavka, of Rockville Maryland. May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupah and Maasim Tovim! 

Mazel Tov to Golda-Rochel Rosencrantz and Mathew Perry on the Engagement and L’Chaim.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

CSTL ANNUAL DINNER SUN FEB 12th honoring Dr Vernon and Lis Neppe
At Hillel, with Catering by Leah.  
www.CSTLSeattle.org . Please volunteer to help - event chair Velvilrosler@gmail.com . Please register ASAP at https://cstl2017.eventbrite.com

FARBRENGEN ALERT - YUD SHEVAT Mon Feb 6th from 8:00 pm
At the home of Yechezkel and Ora Rapoport, 1114 NE Perkins Way, Shoreline, WA 98155 for a farbrengen in honor of Yud Shevat. Men, women and children are invited.

Community Kollel at CSTL – Tue Feb 7th 6:30 – 9 pm "אין שמחה אלא תורה"
"There is no joy but Torah" Come join in celebrating the L'Chaim of Goldie Rosencrantz and Matthew Perry in conjunction with this week's CSTL Community Kollel. We look forward to seeing you there. Come learn with the community!  Learn any topic you want, with a chavrusa.  If you need a chavrusa, we will find you one.  Food and Refreshments will be served.

AVOS u’BONIM MOTZEI SHABBOS THIS WEEK 6:45 – 7:45pm
Special Yud Shevat hachana. Sponsored by the David and Leah Kaimov.  Info: Rabbi Herbstman
avrahamshlomo@hotmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - MMSC Now Hiring Substitute Teachers
MMSC is looking for substitute teachers.  We are a private Jewish school in Seattle that is opened Monday -- Friday, 8:45am to 3:45pm.  As such, on-call substitutes for MMSC must have some or full availability between these hours of operation. Shifts may be 4-8 hours within that time frame. If interested please call Sue Chambers @ (206) 523-9766 for further information.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate 


COMMUNITY NEWS

WOMENS EVENING – SHLOSHIM OF REBISA ESTHER MAIMON – FEB 7th 7:30 pm
Tehilim, Prayers, and Personal Stories At Sephardic Bikur Cholim. Lysa Almo 
Lysa3456@gmail.com

MOVIE NIGHT AT MINYAH OHR CHADASH Sat Feb 11th  at 7:30 pm
Come see an award-winning Israeli TV series “SHTISEL

DR. MORDECHAI KEDAR TO LECTURE TUES. FEB. 14TH AT 7:30 PM
At Ezra Bessaroth. Dr. Kedar's topic: "What is the issue of Building in Jerusalem all about?" is an especially timely one.  Dr. Kedar, Director of the Center for the Study of the Middle East and Islam and research associate at the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, is one of the foremost recognized authorities in the field of Arab and Middle East Studies, with a special research focus on Islam, Islamic Movements, and Popular Arab culture. He has written many publications on the Islamic world, including works focusing on the clash of values between Islam, Middle Eastern societies and the West. Please RSVP to 
rabbimeyers@gmail.com

MELAVA MALKA SINGLES EVENT WITH LAURIE YOUNG SAT FEB 11th 8:15 pm 
Mixer plus a talk by Laurie Young, the Seattle Shadchan. The topic will be: HAPPILY EVER AFTER, CHOOSING LOVE. Singles of all ages are welcome. Reservations are required to attend.  For more information, contact Shira Balint at JSeattleSingles@gmail.com or check for the invitation on Mercaz Seattle's Facebook page.  Sponsored by Mercaz Seattle 
www.MercazSeattle.org

QFC UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SEEKS KOSHER MEAT CUTTER
Kosher Meat Cutter/Meat Cutter Apprentice:  The University Village QFC  is accepting applications for a Kosher Meat Cutter or to become a Meat Cutter Apprentice.  Applicants for kosher positions must have and maintain the endorsement of the Seattle Va'ad and either already be a licensed meat cutter or willing to complete necessary meat cutter apprenticeship classes. This position is primarily responsible for the kosher meat program but will also assist in other kosher and general duties.  To apply fill out the application online, click here.  Also, please email a Rabbinic reference from the Seattle Va'ad (or who can be contacted by the Seattle Va'ad) to 
Jeremy.Allen@stores.qfci.com

Jewish Baseball Registration
Jewish Baseball Registration is now open for Jewish students in Seattle. For 3rd grade and younger please register here: http://www.seattleponybaseball.org/ For 4th grade and up please contact Torah Day School. Students who are not enrolled in TDS are eligible to sign up. If you would like to help start other teams including soccer and girls teams please contact Ari Hoffman

EB FRUTICAS DINNER AND CELEBRATION FEB 10th 6:15 pm
www.EzraBessarot.net or you can call Susan in the office, 206 722-5500. Price goes up after Feb. 6

Tu B'Shevat EVENT: "Scouts in the wild", Feb 12th 2:30 - 4:30 pm, 
A naturalist guided walk through the Mercer slough. Cost: $10. RSVP to rlr62@comcast.net. Limited to first 15.

BASICS OF JEWISH LIFEFeb 5, Feb 12, 5 pm 
Learn about words and concepts, customs associated with life stages, the Jewish calendar, fundamental principles of faith and heritage, Kabbalah of food, Airusin and Nisuin, and more in this free three-part series. Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County.

NYHS Gala at the Westin Seattle Hotel. Sun Feb 26th 
We will celebrate the life and legacy of Jack DeLeon A"H and honor Beryl and Gary Cohen with the Jack DeLeon Community Leadership Award. Doors open at 5:00 pm. Visit www.nyhsgala.org to RSVP, place an ad or get more information.

THE SUMMIT BISTRO NIGHTSMar 28th May 23rd Jul 18th Aug 22nd and Dec 5th 
In 2017, there will be six different Bistro events, including a summer party on our 4th floor plaza, and five seated dinners.  Email 
Chrise@summitatfirsthill.org  to make a reservation.   Bistro Night at The Summit features kosher cuisine (supervised daily by Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle staff) in an elegant atmosphere.

Kollel - Trip To Israel for Women ages 45 - 60 Feb 26 - March 7
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 DVAR TORAH FOR BO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507871/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bo-Yud-Shevat-5750-1990.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org

1. “And it came to pass in the fortieth year on the eleventh day of the eleventh month...” This year, Yud Shevat marks the fortieth anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s passing, the day when:

All of his deeds, teachings, and service on which he labored throughout his lifetime... is revealed and shines from above to below and... “brings about salvation in the midst of the land.”

Our Sages associate the significance of forty years with Moshe telling the Jews that G‑d grants them at that time, “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear.” Similarly, our Sages state, “After forty years, a man attains [full grasp of] one’s teacher’s knowledge.” Thus, at present, we are given the potential to comprehend the inner intent and the essence of the Previous Rebbe’s service. This, in turn, should bring about a new era in the comprehension of his teachings and the fulfillment of his directives.

The statements of Moshe mentioned above were made in the fortieth year after the exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah. Then, the Jews were given the potential to comprehend, “all that the L‑rd did in the land of Egypt... the great wonders... and profound miracles.”

The exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah (and subsequently, the entry into Eretz Yisrael) are of fundamental importance to the Jewish faith. With the exodus from Egypt, the Jews became G‑d’s people. This distinction was reinforced at the giving of the Torah when G‑d gave His Torah to the Jews within the context of this material world. His intent was that they would study the Torah and fulfill the mitzvos and, in this manner, refine this world and transform it into a dwelling for G‑d.

The full potential for this service was granted in the fortieth year when G‑d granted the people, “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear,” thus, enabling them to comprehend in full, “the knowledge of the Teacher, G‑d, Himself.”

The Zohar explains that the fulfillment of the first commandment, the knowledge of G‑d, contains two dimensions: a) a general awareness of His existence and b) the knowledge of G‑dliness as He is manifest in all His particular dimensions.

The wonders of Egypt enabled the Jews to attain an initial awareness of G‑d as the verse states, “And I will take you to Me as a people... and you will know that I am the L‑rd, your G‑d.” This was intensified at the giving of the Torah when, “You have been shown to know that the L‑rd is G‑d.”

The completion of this service of knowledge, the comprehension of the particular dimensions of G‑dliness, came in the fortieth year, as the Zohar continues:

The Jews had applied themselves for forty years to the commandments of the Torah as Moshe had taught them.... This was the instruction in a particular manner as it is written, “And you shall know this day and take unto your heart.”

Thus, G‑d’s granting “a knowing heart...” to the Jews in the fortieth year represents the completion of the service associated with the exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah. This prepared them to enter Eretz Yisrael where the fulfillment of the mitzvos and the construction of the Bais HaMikdash, generates the potential to realize the intent of the giving of the Torah, to transform the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

This sequence of events is more than a historical chronicle, but rather, provides a lesson for us at all times. We recall the exodus from Egypt twice each day, emphasizing how each person must consider it as if he left Egypt himself. Similarly, when we bless G‑d as “the Giver of the Torah,” we use the present tense, implying that the giving of the Torah is always relevant. Similarly, G‑d’s granting a “knowing heart...” in preparation for the entry into Eretz Yisrael is of eternal significance.

Thus, when a period of forty years of service1 is completed, a Jew derives the potential to attain full grasp of his Teacher’s (G‑d’s) intention.2 Greater emphasis on the above comes at present time since, according to all signs, ours is the last generation of exile and, through “attaining [full grasp] of our teacher’s knowledge,” we are preparing to enter Eretz Yisrael in the Messianic redemption.

In particular, the above is relevant in regard to the passage of forty years since the passing of one of the Chabad Rebbeim. Chabad places a stress on comprehension of the teachings of Pnimiyus HaTorah using the faculties of wisdom, understanding, and knowledge. Thus, there is a greater connection to “a knowing heart,” and “one’s teacher’s knowledge.”

The above concepts can be understood in greater depth through a more particular examination of the two quotes mentioned above. There are a number of questions raised by G‑d’s granting of, “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear:”

a) Why must these potentials be granted by G‑d?

b) The verse states that these potentials are granted “to you.” What is the significance of that addition?

c) What do the three concepts “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear” allude to?

d) What is the significance to the order in which they are stated in the verse?

Similarly, our Sages’ statement, “After forty years, a man attains [full grasp of] one’s teacher’s knowledge,” provokes certain questions:

a) The expression “attains,” קאי is somewhat problematic. On the surface, an expression like “comprehends” or “perceives” would seem more appropriate.

b) The Hebrew word used for “man” is Inish. Chassidic thought explains that of the different terms used for man in Lashon HaKodesh, Enosh refers to the lowest of levels, a weak person who cannot master his nature. Therefore, it appears inappropriate when speaking about a person who “attains [full grasp] of his teacher’s knowledge” to use the word Inish.

These questions can be resolved within the context of the concepts mentioned above. The intent of the exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah is the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in this world. When a Jew unites with G‑d through studying Torah and fulfilling mitzvos, he can establish a dwelling for Him. There are two dimensions to these efforts:

a) the revelation of G‑dliness from above;

b) the manner in which it will be received and accepted within the world.

Thus, the general awareness of G‑dliness established through the exodus from Egypt and the giving of the Torah is a reflection of the revelation of G‑dliness from above, while the deeper, particular understanding achieved after forty years reflects the internalization within the context of the world.

This relates to the teachings of the Mitteler Rebbe who explains that in prayer, there are two levels of meditation: a general meditation, “Know before Whom you stand,” and a particular meditation, connected with the meaning of the individual prayers one is reciting.

The general meditation has an advantage in that one relates to the essence of the G‑dly light. In contrast, the particular meditation brings the matter closer to the individual person. The general meditation can cause a person to deceive himself into thinking that he is very close to G‑d even when, in truth, he is very distant. In contrast, a person who develops a particular conception of the matter will not deceive himself in this manner. Indeed, the comprehension of the particulars will lead him to a deeper and more inclusive understanding of the whole. The general understanding, however, is beneficial because it gives direction to the particular meditation that follows.

This concept can be related to the two levels of the knowledge of G‑d described previously. The general meditation parallels the knowledge of G‑d achieved through the exodus from Egypt, the revelation from above, while the particular meditation is associated with the internalized knowledge achieved after the forty years in the desert.3

The above concepts can be explained within the context of the two quotes, “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear,” and “After forty years, a man attains [full grasp of] one’s teacher’s knowledge,” mentioned above. Since the “knowing heart” that is granted after the forty years is associated with internalizing the revelation of the giving of the Torah, it follows that it, like that revelation itself, relates to the following two dimensions: a) the revelation of the name Y‑H‑V‑H which transcends the world. [The world was created through the medium of the name E‑lohim. At the giving of the Torah, a higher level of G‑dliness, the name, Y‑H‑V‑H, was revealed.] b) the Torah was given to the Jews in this world. From the giving of the Torah onward, “the Torah is not in the heavens.” Indeed, the Jews have a certain measure of dominion over the Torah.4

Similarly, these two dimensions are associated with the level of fulfillment achieved by the Jews in the fortieth year. Therefore, the verse which describes the Jews’ attainment of “a knowing heart...” relates that it is being “given by the L‑rd,” emphasizing the aspect of revelation from above and that the revelation is being granted “to you,” i.e., indicating that it will be internalized within the Jews.

In this manner, the Jews will be able to reach a complete level of comprehension, not only the general knowledge which comes about through the revelation from above,5 but also the appreciation of all the particulars that comes about through a person’s use of his own intellectual capacities. The full use of our intellectual potential is alluded to by the three expressions: “a knowing heart, eyes to see, and ears to hear,” which refer to our three intellectual powers. “Knowing” refers to the power of Daas (“knowledge”). “That see” refers to the power of Chochmah (“wisdom”), the “eye of the mind” and “that hear” refers to the power of Binah (“understanding”) the potential to internalize ideas.

These intellectual peaks affect “the heart,” and bring about an emotional response which, in turn, brings about change on the level of thought, speech, and action. This gives us the potential to “attain [full grasp of] our teacher’s knowledge.”

The latter expression implies that a person renews his entire being and bases his activity on a new foundation. He no longer acts within the context of his own limited existence, the base for his efforts is “his teacher’s knowledge.”

To emphasize how this changes his entire being, our Sages use the expression קאי איניש rendered as “a man attains.” קאי literally means “stands.” Employing this term implies that the activity is not only intellectual, but lifts up the totality of one’s being. The term inish which, as explained above, refers to the lowest rung of humanity, indicates how even the most underdeveloped parts of our being will be raised to the level of “the teacher’s knowledge.”

Furthermore, “his teacher’s knowledge,” refers to the manner in which the teacher comprehends the concept for himself, not the way he communicates it to his students. To express this idea in terms of the Jews’ attaining “[full grasp] of their teacher’s (G‑d’s) knowledge” after forty years in the desert, this implies that they were able to perceive, not only the aspects of G‑dliness associated with the creation of the world, but rather the transcendent aspects of G‑dliness which are above creation. These aspects of G‑dliness were enclothed in the Torah which is “G‑d’s wisdom” and “He and His wisdom are one.” Though this level was given to the Jews when the Torah was given at Mount Sinai, it was not until forty years later that they “attained full grasp of their Teacher’s knowledge” and were able to internalize this potential and make it part of their beings.

In doing so, this fulfilled the intent of the giving of the Torah, the establishment of unity between the world and G‑d. This can be achieved through the knowledge of the Torah when “a perfect unity” is established between a Jew and G‑d which raises up the totality of the Jew’s being (even the lowest elements, Inish, as above) to “one’s teacher’s knowledge.”

These two levels of knowledge of G‑d: knowledge of Him as Creator and knowledge of Him as He transcends the creation and is manifest in Torah are reflected in the Rambam’s statements in the Mishneh Torah. He begins that text by stating:

The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of wisdom is to know that there is a Primary Being who brought into being all existence. (Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah 1:1)

He continues describing a number of principles relating to G‑d as Creator in order to give us the potential to “recognize He who spoke, and [thus,] brought the world into being” (Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah 2:2).

The Rambam, however, does not confine himself to a description of the knowledge of G‑d as He is manifest in creation. Rather, he also describes how:

The Holy One, blessed be He, recognizes His truth and knows it as it is. He does not know with a knowledge which is external to Him... Rather, the Creator, may He blessed, He, His knowledge, and His life, are all one... He is the Knower, He is the subject of knowledge, and He is the knowledge itself. (Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah 2:10)

This knowledge will ultimately be attained by the Jewish people as well as the Rambam states in the conclusion of this text:

The occupation of the entire world will be solely to know G‑d. Therefore, Israelwill be great sages and know hidden matters, attaining knowledge of their Creator to the [full] extent of human potential as it is stated, “And the earth will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the waters fill up the ocean bed.”

There is some difficulty, however, in ascribing man’s potential to comprehend these dimensions of G‑dliness to the Rambam’s statements. The Rambam writes:

The truth of this concept cannot be grasped or comprehended by human thought. This is implied by the verse, “Can you find the comprehension of G‑d? Can you find the ultimate of the Almighty?”...

It is not within the potential of a living man... to comprehend this matter in its entirety. (Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah 1:9-10)6

Based on these statements, it is difficult to understand how one can “attain [full grasp] of his Teacher’s (G‑d’s) knowledge.” Furthermore, the Rambam’s perspective, itself, is difficult to comprehend. Though, as quoted, he negates the possibility for us to comprehend G‑d as He exists for Himself, he, himself, gives a description of G‑d’s knowledge (as quoted previously). Furthermore, he includes that description in a text which is written “for the limited and for the great.”

This difficulty can be resolved within the context of the objections the Raavadhas raised to the Rambam’s statements about the knowledge of G‑d. In Hilchos Teshuvah 5:5, the Rambam concludes his attempt to resolve the apparent contradiction between Divine omniscience and free choice by stating, “We have no power to know how the Holy One, blessed be He, knows.” The Raavad objects to the Rambam’s statements, stating:

He began by asking questions, but ultimately left them unanswered and returned the matter to a question of faith. [If so,] it would have been better for him to have [initially] left the matter to be accepted with simple belief.

In resolution of these objections, we must conclude that the Rambam is not telling us that there is a certain dimension we can understand and afterwards, deeper truth that cannot be comprehended by human intellect. Rather, he is teaching how through faith, a person can lift his knowledge to a level which transcends the potential of human powers of understanding. Faith does not have to remain a potential which is in essence above the person. On the contrary, a complete service of faith permeates our powers of understanding and elevates them, taking them beyond their limits.7

When a Jew’s faith permeates through the totality of his being in this manner, he has the potential to “attain [full grasp] of his Teacher’s knowledge,” to comprehend the dimension of G‑d’s knowledge which transcends the limits of human potential. Our capacity for such comprehension thus, stems from two factors: a) G‑d’s willingness to enclothe Himself in the attribute of knowledge. From that knowledge, comes into being our potential of knowledge. b) The internalization of our power of faith. This gives us the potential to unite with G‑d’s knowledge.

Thus, at the giving of the Torah, the Jewish people were at the level where their understanding of G‑d related only to the dimension of G‑dliness manifest in the creation. During the forty years in the desert, they elevated themselves level after level until after the forty years were completed, G‑d granted them, “a knowing heart,8 eyes that see, and ears that hear,”9 powers that allow them “to attain [full grasp] of their Teacher’s knowledge,” i.e., to comprehend G‑d’s knowledge. Since this potential transcends the limits of human potential, it had to be granted from G‑d.

Based on the above, we can explain the relationship between the giving of the Torah and the “knowing heart...” received after the forty years in the desert on the basis of the Talmudic structure, “a general principle which is followed by a specification and then again, by a general principle.”

The giving of the Torah is an all-encompassing generality, for it was given by G‑d who is all-encompassing. Afterwards, during the Jews’ forty years of service, came “specifications,” particular steps upward through the Jews’ efforts. After forty years, when this service of “specifications” was completed, “a man attains [full grasp] of his teacher’s knowledge.” The specific knowledge becomes united with the all-encompassing revelation, elevating all the specific aspects of knowledge and service which transpired in these forty years.

[This line of thinking can be extended and related to other Talmudic structures. The principle of “from a general principle to specifications,” can be related to the process in which G‑d enclothes Himself (the “general principle”) into the intellectual framework of Torah (“specifications”)10 in order for man to proceed “from specifications (limited human knowledge) to a general principle (the knowledge of the Teacher).”11 ]

A parallel to this sequence can be seen in our daily service. We begin the day with prayer, a general statement of awareness that we stand before G‑d, King of kings. Afterwards, we proceed to the various particular elements of service which we carry out throughout the day.

More particularly, within the service of prayer itself, we begin with a general statement, Modeh Ani, an acknowledge­ment of G‑d’s granting us our souls. Afterwards, the different blessings and prayers we recite bring out particular dimensions of our connection with Him. At the conclusion of the prayer service, we again make a general statement, Ach Tzaddikim, which relates that “the upright will dwell in Your presence.” G‑d’s presence refers to His essence, the fundamental point of His being which includes all existence. Since this general statement follows all the particular elements of the prayer service, it represents a higher level than our original statement.

To explain the above concepts within the context of the forty years since the Previous Rebbe’s passing: A Nasi of the Jewish people does not abandon his flock. Rather, each Jew is given the potential to “attain [full grasp] of his teacher’s knowledge,” to lift his entire existence up to the level where it is controlled by “the knowledge of the teacher.”

This can be achieved by studying the Previous Rebbe’s teachings. In regard to the giving of the Torah, our Sages explain that the word Anochi, the opening word of the Ten Commandments, is an acronym for the Hebrew phrase meaning, “I wrote down and gave over Myself,” revealing how G‑d invested Himself in the Torah. “The righteous resemble their Creator,” and thus, they too, invest themselves in their teachings. Thus, the Rebbe Rashab remarked before his passing, “I am going to heaven, but I am leaving you my writings.”12

The above is particularly relevant since our generation is the final generations of exile and the Jewish people have already accomplished the refinement of all the particular sparks of G‑dliness invested within the world. In the previous generations, this service of refinement had not been completed.13 At present, however, we have elevated all the sparks of G‑dliness within the world and are ready to proceed to the ultimate and complete redemption.

* * *

2. Since “from the Shabbos are blessed all the days of the coming week,” it follows that the above concepts are associated with this week’s Torah portion, parshas Bo. This portion describes the Jews’ exodus from Egypt, “On this very day, all the armies of G‑d (Tzivos Hashem) left the land of Egypt.”

The key to the Jews’ departure from Egypt is their identification as “armies of G‑d.” A soldier stands in absolute self-nullification, giving himself over beyond the reaches of his intellect. Even when he sleeps, one can appreciate that he is a soldier.14

When this bittul which transcends intellect permeates through and encompasses one’s entire being — as explained above in regard to faith — a connection is established with G‑d’s essence. “The simple commitment of a common person is connected with G‑d’s transcendent simplicity.” Thus, in the maamar connected with the Previous Rebbe’s passing, Basi LeGani, the Previous Rebbe explains how the king squanders all the treasures of the kingdom on behalf of the common soldiers for they are the ones who are actively involved in carrying out the war.

Thus, when the Jews were identified as “the armies of G‑d,” “the King of kings, the Holy One, blessed be He, revealed Himself to them in His glory and redeemed them.” Afterwards, for forty years, they internalized this service of bittul until they “attained [full grasp] of the Teacher’s knowledge” as explained above.

The Messianic redemption will reflect the redemption from Egypt as the prophet declares, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.” Thus, after the conclusion of this forty year period, the potential is granted for us to “attain [full grasp] of the teacher’s knowledge” and enter Eretz Yisrael in the Messianic redemption.

3. On the basis of the above, an answer can be given to the many who have asked: What service is required at present in the fortieth year after the Previous Rebbe’s passing?

This service must involve making a new entity — within ourselves and within our surrounding environment — which stands on a new foundation, the “full grasp of our teacher’s knowledge.” All the activities which the Previous Rebbe demanded of us: the study of Torah with diligence, fulfilling mitzvos b’hiddur, and, in particular, spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward, must be carried out with renewed energy, based on a new perspective. We must begin looking at things, not from our limited perspective, but from the perspective of “the full grasp of our teacher’s knowledge,” i.e., viewing things as the Previous Rebbe would have viewed them.

This means that it is not sufficient to add merely an additional aspect of service — or even to add a new general body of service. What is required is to establish ourselves as an entirely new entity based on the Previous Rebbe’s approach. Though this is a declaration of a general nature, surely, after consideration of the matter, each individual will appreciate the particular activities that he should carry out as a new entity based on “the full grasp of our teacher’s knowledge.”

Our Sages stated, “A person must say, ‘The world was created for me.”‘ This implies that, in addition to the personal renewal experienced by each individual, there must be new activities in the world at large. Efforts must be made to establish new institutions for Torah study, prayer, and deeds of kindness which are permeated by the spirit of Chassidus. In places where an institution of this nature already exists, efforts must be made to open at least one more institution and, in places where, as of yet, no such institutions exist, to establish one — preferably more — institutions of this nature.

Since everything in the world begins with Torah, it is proper that effort be made to publish new collections of Torah in both Nigleh and in Chassidus, and in particular, in the teachings of the Previous Rebbe. Similarly, it is appropriate that on the day of Yud Shevat itself, increases be made in the areas of Torah study, prayer, and deeds of kindness. In the latter area, donations to charity should be made in multiples of forty.

May these activities bring about the fulfillment of the prophecy, “Those who lie in the dust will arise and sing,” with the coming of the Messianic redemption. May it be in the immediate future.

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