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Parashat Tazria-Metzorah | 2-9 Iyar 5777

Fri- Apr 28th Erev Shabbos
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha/Candles 7:59 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:52 pm /COUNT #18/

Sat Apr 29th – Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:30 pm
Mincha  7:59 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2
Maariv/Havdalah 9:04 pm /COUNT OMER #19/

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9  am, Mincha 8:15 pm, Maariv 8:55 pm /COUNT OMER #20/
Mon Shacharis  7 am, Mincha 8:15 pm, Maariv 8:57 pm /COUNT OMER #21/
Tue Shacharis 7 am, Mincha 8:15 pm, Maariv 8:58 pm /COUNT OMER #22/
Wed Shacharis 7 am, Mincha 8:15 pm, Maariv 9:00 pm /COUNT OMER #23/
Thu Shacharis 7 am, Mincha 8:15 pm, Maariv 9:01 pm /COUNT OMER #24/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush is sponsored this week by our esteemed President, Yitzchok Rothman, in honor and in memory of the 43rd yahrzeit of his mother Bilhah bat Yitzchok Wolf haLevi Z”L(4 Iyar).  Kiddush is co-sponsored by Rabbi and Mrs SB Levitin, in honor of the birthday of the Rebbe Maharash, Beis Iyar. Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

DONATE TO CSTL VIA CREDIT CARD AT YOUR CONVENIENCE
Ivan now has a credit card reader for his smart phone, available at most week-day services.  We accept Visa-MasterCard-Amex-Discover, and of course Cash and Check!

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL's annual Lag B'Omer BBQ event Sun May 14th 
Please contact Yitzchok (hardcastle101@hotmail.com) if you can help with CSTL' s Lag B'Omer BBQ!

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime!Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/ DON’T MISS OUT ON THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT!

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,

miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

Yom haZikaron Commemoration and Yom haAtzmaut Tefila MON MAY 1st
At Minyan Ohr Chadash.  Mincha 7:30 pm /Program 7:45 pm. Cosponsored by Ohr Chadash, Sephardic Bikur Cholim, Ezra Besaroth, NYHS and SHA

BCMH Men's Club Holocaust Memorial Breakfast SUN APR 30th 9 am
Sponsored by the Wolf Family 
www.BCMHSeattle.org

StandWithUs Annual Community Reception Sun May 7 at 6:30 PM
At Town Hall, downtown Seattle. Tickets are still just $36. There will be a sumptuous buffet and Israeli wines. The keynote speaker is a world-recognized expert on international human rights at the UN, Anne Bayefsky. Register at 
www.StandWithUs.com/NWEvent2017Northwest@StandWithUs.com  or 206.801.0902.

Event for Jewish Singles and the entire community Sunday, May 7th, 7 pm-9 pm
with Shadchan Rochelle Frankel of LA. "Shidduchim: We're All In This Together". At the BCMH Yavneh Building.  Meet with Shadchan 7 pm, Lecture 8 pm

NYHS GOURMET FOOD & DESSERT AUCTION Wed May 24th 6:30 pm - 9 pm
At the Seward Park home of Dr. Menachem and Judy Maimon,.  Free and open to all!   Join NYHS is this unique tradition. Auctioneers Simon Amiel and Leah Gladstein will entertain as you sample, bid and buy delicious hand-crafted kosher goodies from our community chefs! RSVP and/or to Donate items, contact us at nyhs@nyhs.org or call 206-551-9322.

HAMSA SUMMER FOR TEENS IN ISRAEL
Trip sponsored by the Sephardic Educational Center. The deadline is May 1st! Scholarships are available, including a generous offer by Harley and Lela Franco. For more information, contact 323-272-4574 or email info@secjerusalem.org Also, please click here:
http://sephardiceducationalcenter.org/hamsa-israel-trip/

LEARN INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW MONDAYS STARTING MAY 1st 8 pm
Must know how to read Hebrew but do not need to be able to converse freely. In this course you will increase your vocabulary, conversational ability and reading fluency. $80 a person for the series. See 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/intermediate-hebrew.html  for more information or to register. Please register by April 24th. Class dates will be: May 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 28th and June 5th, 12th and 19th.

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILLIARY SEPHARDI FEST SUN JUNE 11th 
Sephardic Foods, childrens activities, craft booths.

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Seattle Kollel Wed Apr 26 - May 24, 7-8 pm, Hebrew Crash Course
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com 

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


THE REBBE MAHARASH
http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/626953/jewish/Rabbi-Shmuel-of-Lubavitch.htm © Chabad.org

The fourth Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch, Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch, known by the acronym "Maharash," was born in the town of Lubavitch (White Russia) on the 2nd of the Jewish month of Iyar in the year 5594 (1834).

Rabbi Shmuel was the youngest of seven sons born to Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Lubavitch, the third Chabad Rebbe, known as the "Tzemach Tzedek," and Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka. 

At an early age Rabbi Shmuel excelled in his studies; by the age of seven he was proficient in large sections of the Talmud along with the commentaries. Rabbi Menachem Mendel would regularly administer tests his son’s class, and grant monetary prizes to those who excelled. With that money Rabbi Shmuel would purchase books of Torah study.

When Rabbi Shmuel reached the age of twenty-one, his father requested of him to become involved in communal activism. His first task was to attend a conference called by the Russian government to discuss the publication of Jewish textbooks with German translation for use in the instruction of Jewish children. From that point on, Rabbi Shmuel continued his communal activism on behalf of a variety of Jewish causes. 

Leadership

A Scroll of Esther handwritten by Rabbi Shmuel (courtesy of Agudas Chassidei Chabad Lubavitch Library)

Rabbi Shmuel’s elder brothers were famed Torah scholars, well-known for their vast Torah knowledge. Rabbi Shmuel, on the other hand, chose to assume a low profile; his piety and scholarship went unnoticed by most.  Read more »

A year before his passing, Rabbi Menachem Mendel requested that Rabbi Shmuel publicly deliver discourses in Chabad philosophy – though he was only thirty-two years of age – a practice normally reserved for Chabad Rebbes. Rabbi Menachem Mendel instructed his followers to “listen to him [Rabbi Shmuel] as you listen to me.”

Although Rabbi Shmuel was the youngest son, he was chosen to succeed his father as "Rebbe" and leader of Chabad in the movement's capital, Lubavitch. (Four of his brothers established branches of the Chabad dynasty in other towns in White Russia and Ukraine).

In addition to mentoring and teaching his disciples and penning many discourses on Chassidic teachings and philosophy, Rabbi Shmuel – despite his frail health – traveled extensively throughout Europe, meeting with government and business leaders and lobbying them to exert pressure on the Czarist regime to halt its instigation of pogroms against its Jewish citizens.  Read more »

His fluency in languages such as Latin, French and Russian assisted him in these selfless ventures.

Teachings

Today, Rabbi Shmuel is perhaps most known for his saying (known in Yiddish as “lechatchilah ariber”): “The world says: If you can't go under [an obstacle], leap over; I say: In the first place, go over!”

Many of Rabbi Shmuel’s writings have been published by Kehot, the Lubavitch Publications House. Over twenty volumes of his works have thus far been published and additional volumes are being prepared for publication.

Some short teachings by Rabbi Shmuel were recorded by his grandson Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, the sixth Chabad Rebbe. 

Several melodies are also attributed to Rabbi Shmuel. 

Rabbi Shmuel, who throughout his life suffered from many ailments, passed away at the young age of 48, on the 13th of the Hebrew month of Tishrei in the year 5643 (1882). He is buried alongside his father in the city of Lubavitch.

Rabbi Shmuel was succeeded by his second son, Rabbi Shalom Dovber of Lubavitch.

Parashat Shemini – Mevarchim Iyar | 25 Nissan – 2 Iyar 5777

Fri- Apr 21st Erev Shabbos
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha/Candles 7:50 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:41 pm /COUNT #11/

Sat Apr 22nd   – Shabbos 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Iyar – 8 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:38 pm
Mincha  7:50 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT
Maariv/Havdalah 8:54 pm /COUNT OMER #12/

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9  am, Mincha 8:00 pm, Maariv 8:44 pm /COUNT OMER #13
Mon Shacharis  7 am, Mincha 8:00 pm, Maariv 8:46 pm /COUNT OMER #14
Tue Shacharis 7 am, Mincha 8:00 pm, Maariv 8:47 pm /COUNT OMER #15
Wed Shacharis 6:50 am, Mincha 8:00 pm, Maariv 8:49 pm ROSH CHODESH/COUNT OMER #16
Thu Shacharis 6:50 an, Mincha 8:00 pm, Maariv 8:51 pm ROSH CHODESH /COUNT OMER #17

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush Lite – No sponsor.  Seuda Slishit

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Yosef Grobman ZT”L. May the Lord comfort the family amongst the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/ DON’T MISS OUT ON THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT!

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

BCMH Men's Club Holocaust Memorial Breakfast SUN APR 30th 9 am
Sponsored by the Wolf Family 
www.BCMHSeattle.org

YOM haSHOA – HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY – SUN APR 23rd 6 pm – 9 pm
At Ezra Bessaroth. Mincha/Maariv Services, Remembrance Program, Divrei Torah

StandWithUs Annual Community Reception Sun May 7 at 6:30 PM
At Town Hall, downtown Seattle. Tickets are still just $36. There will be a sumptuous buffet and Israeli wines. The keynote speaker is a world-recognized expert on international human rights at the UN, Anne Bayefsky. Register at 
www.StandWithUs.com/NWEvent2017Northwest@StandWithUs.com  or 206.801.0902.

Event for Jewish Singles and the entire community Sunday, May 7th, 7 pm-9 pm
with Shadchan Rochelle Frankel of LA. "Shidduchim: We're All In This Together". At the BCMH Yavneh Building.  Meet with Shadchan 7 pm, Lecture 8 pm

HAMSA SUMMER FOR TEENS IN ISRAEL
Trip sponsored by the Sephardic Educational Center. The deadline is May 1st! Scholarships are available, including a generous offer by Harley and Lela Franco. For more information, contact 323-272-4574 or email info@secjerusalem.org Also, please click here:
http://sephardiceducationalcenter.org/hamsa-israel-trip/

Yom haZikaron Commemoration and Yom haAtzmaut Tefila MON MAY 1st
At Minyan Ohr Chadash.  Mincha 7:30 pm /Program 7:45 pm. Cosponsored by Ohr Chadash, Sephardic Bikur Cholim, Ezra Besaroth, NYHS and SHA

LEARN INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW MONDAYS STARTING MAY 1st 8 pm
Must know how to read Hebrew but do not need to be able to converse freely. In this course you will increase your vocabulary, conversational ability and reading fluency. $80 a person for the series. See
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/intermediate-hebrew.html  for more information or to register. Please register by April 24th. Class dates will be: May 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 28th and June 5th, 12th and 19th.

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILLIARY SEPHARDI FEST SUN JUNE 11th 
Sephardic Foods, childrens activities, craft booths.

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Seattle Kollel Wed Apr 26 - May 24, 7-8 pm, Hebrew Crash Course
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com 

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR SHEMINI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518328/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shemini-26th-Day-of-Nissan-5743-1983.htm | A free translation from a talk of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson ZT”L © SichosInEnglish.org

1. We can draw lessons from three aspects of this Shabbos: It is Shabbos Mevarchim; more particularly, it is Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar; and because everything happens by Divine Providence, there is an additional lesson to be derived from the parshah read this Shabbos — Shemini.

In greater clarification: The Baal Shem Tov taught that nothing in this world is coincidence; everything happens by Divine Providence. This applies to even such things as minerals, plants and animals, and certainly to humans. Within the category of humans, Divine Providence is emphasized most strongly regarding Jews, and concerning Jews, it is most evident in matters of Torah and mitzvos. For although everything happens by Divine Providence, there are different degrees — to the extent that Torah tells us that G‑d says, “I will surely hide My face on that day.” That is, not only do we not see Divine Providence, but G‑d actively hides Himself. Thus, there are differing degrees in Divine Providence, commensurate to the importance of the subject — the more important it is, the greater and more revealed the Divine Providence. The highest level is, “the eye of the L‑rd is directed towards those who fear Him” — the highest level of Divine Providence (“G‑d’s eyes”) is directed towards the righteous (“those who fear Him”).

Although G‑d sees everything with a single glance, there can still be different degrees in Divine Providence. An example of this is man himself, who has various limbs. The essential life-force of a man is equal in all limbs. Nevertheless, there are differences in how that life-form is revealed in the limbs. The life-force in the brain, heart, and liver, for example, is stronger than in the nails, which if cut, do not hurt at all.

So, too, in the case of Divine Providence: On the one hand, it works through one glance (similar to the essential life-force in which there are no differences). Simultaneously, there are differences in the degree of Divine Providence (similar to the differences in how the life-force is revealed in the limbs), ranging from complete concealment (“I will surely hide My face”) to complete revelation (“the eye of the L‑rd is directed towards those who fear Him”).

In our case, Shabbos Mevarchim is a holy matter, pertaining to Torah and mitzvos: the mitzvah of sanctifying the month, and the custom of Shabbos Mevarchim — and “a Jewish custom is Torah.” Thus Divine Providence in the highest degree is associated with Shabbos Mevarchim, and we can therefore derive a lesson from the parshah read then.

The lesson from Shabbos Mevarchim (in general, relevant to all months): Shabbos Mevarchim is always in the preceding month, and thus the blessing given on Shabbos Mevarchim to the following Rosh Chodesh is said on the preceding month. The reason is simple: A blessing means we wish to effect something in a certain way — and this obviously applies only before the thing has materialized. Thus we bless Rosh Chodesh (and the entire month) before Rosh Chodesh — and therefore Shabbos Mevarchim must be in the preceding month.

A “month” in Hebrew is chodesh, which is cognate to the word chidush, meaning new. Although a month seems to be a repetition of the previous thirty day cycle, it is really something new — its service is carried out in an infinitely loftier manner, making it a new thing. If this higher service would not be infinitely loftier, it would not be completely new, but only an addition to the past. When it is infinitely higher, it is completely separated from previous service, and becomes a new thing.

An example of this is Torah study: One method of study is to repeat and relearn that which was studied previously. Although through each repetition one gains a loftier level and new insights, it is not new, for the loftier level is not infinitely greater: the new insights are in the same topic and same method of learning as before. A loftier method of learning is to increase in one’s study in an infinitely higher manner — in a new manner. Simultaneously, this new learning affects previous study, elevating it to the new level.

This is why R. Zeira, so that he could learn Talmud Yerushalmi, first fasted to forget Talmud Bavli. He did not fast to forget his actual knowledge (for it is forbidden to forget one’s learning), but to forget the method of study peculiar to the Talmud Bavli. The methods of study of the Bavli and Yerushalmi are complete opposites. Bavli’s is dialectic, whereas the Yerushalmi gets straight to the heart of the matter. Thus, to change from the Bavli’s method to the Yerushalmi’s, R. Zeira first had to fast to forget the method of study of the Talmud Bavli. Not only did he not forget the actual knowledge of the Bavli, but the study of the Bavli was now elevated — he could now learn it in a manner infinitely loftier than before, in a direct manner, not through dialectics.

To return to our point: a “month,” although seemingly but a repetition of the previous 30 days, is a completely new thing — for its service is performed in an infinitely loftier manner than the previous month’s service. The lesson from a month, then, is that service of Torah and mitzvos must always be in a new manner — infinitely loftier than before.

Because this requires much effort, Shabbos Mevarchim, which precedes the new month, serves as the proper preparation to such service. The lesson from Shabbos Mevarchim in general, then, is that a Jew must make the proper preparations for the infinitely higher service of the new month.

2. Although the common theme of all months is the element of newness — infinitely loftier service — that service must still be commensurate to the individual nature of each month. Thus there are differences in the preparation to each month — Shabbos Mevarchim. In our case, the service of Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar must be consonant to the particular service of the month of Iyar.

It is very hard to understand, however, how the service of Iyar can be infinitely loftier than that of the preceding month, Nissan. Nissan is the “month of redemption,” meaning a person is redeemed from the limits of nature. How then can we prepare on Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar for an infinitely loftier new service? Is not Nissan, “the month of redemption,” the ultimate?

Iyar, in Hebrew, is an acrostic for the words, “I am the L‑rd your healer.” The difference between G‑d healing and a human healer (doctor) is simple: A doctor heals the sickness that a person already has. G‑d, however, says, “All the sicknesses which I placed in Egypt I will not put on you, for I am the L‑rd your healer.” That is, G‑d’s healing is that He does not allow sickness to develop in the first place. In man’s spiritual service to G‑d, this corresponds to the idea of, “No sin shall befall the righteous.”

Now we can understand the different services of Nissan and Iyar. The service of Nissan is in the manner of redemption — Jews were in exile, and they were redeemed from it. Even when a person sins (exile), he can redeem himself from this undesirable state of affairs. The service of Iyar is in the manner of, “I am the L‑rd your healer” — it is not possible that a person in the first place does anything wrong (and that therefore he should need redemption).

Thus the service of Iyar is loftier than that of Nissan, and therefore even after Nissan, a person must go yet higher — the service of Iyar.

The lesson, then, from Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar is that we must prepare for the service of Iyar — to reach a level where sin is not even possible. Through this we reach an added distinction, special to Iyar — the only month in which every day we have the mitzvah of Sefiras HaOmer.

Sefiras HaOmer is also associated with our previous explanation that a “month” is the idea of newness — that although it seems to be but a repetition, it is really an infinitely higher level. Sefiras HaOmer has two aspects: 1) All the days of Sefirah are one, and therefore if one forgot to count one day, he cannot continue to count with a berachah. 2) Simultaneously, each day is separate, and therefore we make a blessing each day, not one blessing for the entire Sefirah.

Thus, although today, for example, is the tenth day of Sefirah, and we have already fulfilled the mitzvah of Sefirah for ten days, we still make a blessing for the eleventh time. For each day of the Sefirah sees an infinitely higher increase in sanctity, thereby making it a new thing — which deserves its own blessing.

Through our speaking of Sefiras HaOmer may we speedily merit the true and complete redemption through our righteous Mashiach, when we will fulfill the mitzvah of Sefiras HaOmer from the Torah, not just from our Sages as we do today. Then we will also have the Giving of the Torah in a new manner — “A new Torah will go forth from Me.”

* * *

3. As mentioned previously, there is also a lesson to be derived from the parshah read today — parshas Shemini. Although there are many lessons to be learned from parshas Shemini, we must first and foremost derive a lesson from the name “Shemini” itself, which means “eighth.” The Baal Shem Tov taught that the Hebrew name of a thing reflects its concept, and thus the idea represented by “Shemini” represents the entire parshah.

Everything in this world exists in a spiritual fashion, including man’s service to G‑d. Indeed, the reverse is true: Because they exist spiritually, in man’s service, they exist also physically. This is true of numbers also. The number seven, for example, symbolizes and is associated with the seven days of the week — “For six days G‑d made the heavens and the earth, and on the seventh day He ceased and rested.” After the seventh day, a new week begins — the first day, second day, etc. until Shabbos. The seventh day, Shabbos, is the end of a week. Thus, although hundreds of thousands of days have passed since creation, the day after Shabbos is still called the first day, and not the eighth day. For the purpose of the days of a week is that they are a preparation for Shabbos, and therefore the day after Shabbos is the first day of preparation for the coming Shabbos.

Parenthetically, even a simple Jew knows this. Previously, in Europe, a Jew knew unquestionably that the livelihood G‑d granted him throughout the week was so that he could celebrate Shabbos properly. In those days, it was unheard of that a Jew should work hard the entire week only to increase his bank account, to buy a car with a chauffeur, to buy a house with many rooms, or to purchase an extensive wardrobe — even when he can’t wear so many clothes!

A Jew doesn’t need all these things. He works hard to get them only because he envies another person. Our Sages said: “Envy, desire, and honor take a person out of the world” — they take a person out of Judaism and bring him into the world of America! These people call it wealth; it is really a sickness. A Jew should have no association with the “world of America,” for “You have chosen us from all the nations.” Certainly a Jew who has been in Tomchei Temimim — for even one moment — can have no real association with such a world. Once in Tomchei Temimim, a person is always associated with it, for “sanctity does not move from its place” — willingly or unwillingly. It gives him no peace. He, however, thinks he has but a headache, and therefore the doctor prescribes aspirin to soothe him. He suffers from an American malady, therefore he must be given an American cure. In truth, however, he has a “headache” because he is so involved in material pursuits!

To return to our point: Even a simple Jew knows that the number seven symbolizes the seven days of the week, associated with the world — “For six days G‑d created the heavens and the earth, and on the seventh day He ceased and rested.” The number eight, therefore, symbolizes that which transcends the seven days of a week, that which is above the world which was created in seven days.

The lesson from this in man’s service to G‑d: Service on Shabbos is different and loftier than on weekdays. On Shabbos a Jew does not have to rush to work, and therefore he says his prayers with greater concentration, etc. Although he fulfills all matters of Torah and mitzvos on weekdays too, it cannot be compared to Shabbos when he is not distracted by his business. On Shabbos every Jew is a “king” in his house, and therefore his mind is free to engage in Torah and mitzvos with greater concentration.

“Shemini — Eighth” teaches that even after the lofty service of Shabbos, service must be loftier yet — transcending the world which is associated with the seven days of the week. In plain terms: After the lofty level of his service on Shabbos, a Jew does not descend, G‑d forbid, from his level to begin the week anew, but instead ascends to a level loftier even than Shabbos — the level of Shemini.

This lesson is specifically derived from Shemini — eighth, and not from eight. “Eight” means there are eight things present — seven and an extra one. “Eighth” means there is one thing, but it is the eighth: it comes after the preceding seven, and stands alone (unlike “eight” which means the other seven are present also). “Shemini,” then, represents a level that is unassociated with the preceding seven weekdays — it transcends the world.

This does not mean a Jew should wait until after Shabbos to perform the service represented by “Shemini,” to wait until a special day of the level of “Shemini.” The parshah is not called “Yom HaShemini,” “The eighth day,” but rather just “eighth,” teaching us that a special day is not needed to reach this level (transcending the world). The level of Shemini can be on Shabbos itself, and even on weekdays.

In greater clarification: “Shemini,” we have said, is the idea of transcending the world. This is puzzling. The purpose of a Jew is to make this world a dwelling place for G‑d. It seems, then, that “eight” (which includes the world — seven days of creation plus one more) represents this idea better than does “eighth” (which excludes the world, the seven previous days).

However, although “eighth” is an entity for itself (unlike eight), the very fact that the “eighth” follows the seven indicates there is some connection between them. The difference between “eight” and “eighth” is that in the former, the seven remain the same as before, and one more has been added, making eight. In the latter, the seven are elevated to the level of the eighth; they cease to be seven, and become part of the eighth. Thus there are two aspects to Shemini: The eighth as a separate entity; and as the other seven are encompassed by it.

When, therefore, we say Shemini transcends the world, we mean the world exists, but its existence is elevated to the level of Shemini — to the extent that the world assumes a new existence.

An example: In the future, our Sages tell us, people will not need to eat or drink, but their physical bodies will be nourished directly from the soul (unlike now, when the body receives nourishment from the soul through physical food). Although the body will then also be physical, it will be elevated to the level that its nourishment will be spiritual. This happened once before: When the Jews left Egypt, they ate Manna — “bread from the heaven.”

This, then, is the distinction given to Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar by parshas Shemini. One may think that because Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar occurs every year, there is nothing new to it this year. Parshas Shemini teaches that the service of Shabbos Mevarchim Iyar must be in the manner of “Shemini” — transcending the world, in a new manner.

May it be G‑d’s will that from parshas Shemini we merit very quickly the harp of Mashiach, which will be “a harp of eight strings,” in the third Bais HaMikdash, in the true and complete redemption.

* * *

4. Rashi, the commentator par excellence on Scripture, always explains anything difficult in the plain meaning of the verse (or else says, “I do not know”). Simultaneously, Rashi does not make any comment that is not associated with the plain meaning. In today’s parshah, Shemini, there is both a difficulty which Rashi does not explain, and something which Rashi does explain which does not seem to be necessary to understand the plain meaning.

The end of parshas Shemini (11:41-47) talks of the prohibition to eat “sherotzim” — small, creeping animals (e.g. snakes, insects, etc). Scripture repeats this prohibition a number of times in different ways: “Every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth is detestable and shall not be eaten (11:41)”; “Of all creeping things that creep upon the earth you shall not eat (11:42)”; “Do not make yourself detestable with any creeping thing that creeps, and do not defile yourselves with any creeping thing that moves upon the earth (11:44).” Rashi, on the words (11:44) “Do not defile yourselves,” comments: “By transgressing many prohibitive commandments regarding them; and for [the transgression of] every prohibitive command, stripes [is given].”

In the same parshah, we have previously learned that there are many types of animals which are prohibited to eat: unclean animals, unclean wild beasts, unclean fish and fowl. Rashi tells us that the prohibition to eat sherotzim is repeated many times, and that there are therefore many prohibitive commandments regarding the eating of a sheretz. A simple question arises: Why are sherotzim more severe than other forbidden animals, to the extent that the prohibition — and the accompanying punishment (stripes) — is repeated so many times (which is not the case in other forbidden animals)?

The question is even more puzzling in the light of Rashi’s comment at the beginning of this section. On the verse (11:2) “This is the living thing which you may eat,” Rashi comments: “‘This is the living thing’ — it denotes ‘life.’ Because Israel is attached to G‑d and are worthy of being alive, He therefore separated them from uncleanliness, and decreed upon them commandments....” Rashi further comments, “‘This is the living thing’ — This teaches that Moshe held the animal and showed it to Israel, [saying]: ‘This you may eat, and this you shall not eat; This you may eat, etc.’ Also of the creatures of the water he held each species and showed it to them. Similarly with fowl [it is stated]: ‘And these you shall detest among the fowls.’ And similarly with creeping animals [it is stated]: ‘And this shall be unclean to you.’”

We see that Rashi emphasizes the common theme among all living things that are forbidden to eat — that from all of them “He separated them [Israel] from uncleanliness.” If so, the above question is reinforced. Why are sherotzim more severe than other animals?

Another difficulty: At the conclusion of this section Scripture states (11:45): “For I am the L‑rd who brought you up from the land of Egypt.” Rashi explains that, “Everywhere it is written, ‘I have brought out,’ and here it is written ‘brought up.’ [In reference to this] it was taught at the school of R. Yishmael: [G‑d said:] ‘If I had brought up Israel from Egypt only for the reason that they do not defile themselves with sherotzim as do other nations, it would be sufficient for them, and it is an elevation for them;’ this is the meaning of, ‘I brought you up.’”

The same question arises: Why does G‑d say that, “if I had brought up Israel only for the reason that they do not defile themselves with sherotzim ... it would be sufficient ...”? Why is this said specifically concerning sherotzim and not other animals?

Further, why does Rashi emphasize that it would be sufficient that, “they do not defile themselves with sherotzim as other nations.” What difference does it make, in the plain meaning of Scripture, how other nations conduct themselves? The difference between Jews and other nations is not just in eating sherotzim, but in every facet of life. Why, then, does Rashi make this point regarding sherotzim specifically?

The source for Rashi’s interpretation is the Talmud. (Baba Metzia 61b) There, however, it does not mention anything about the conduct of other nations, and it also gives the reason why sherotzim is specifically severe. It states: “Why did the Torah write, ‘who brings you up?’ [The reason is] as the school of R. Yishmael taught, that G‑d said, ‘If I brought up Israel from Egypt only for the reason that they should not defile themselves with sherotzim, it would be sufficient.’ But, he objected, is their reward [for abstaining from sherotzim] greater than [the reward for obeying the commandments concerning] interest, tzitzis, and weight? He answered, although their reward is no greater, it is more loathsome to eat them.”

Thus we see the Talmud gives a reason for the severity of eating sherotzim — because it is more loathsome than other things. Why then does Rashi change his interpretation from the Talmud, in that 1) He adds the words, “as do other nations” — although it is seemingly unnecessary for the plain meaning; 2) He deletes the reason for the severity regarding sherotzim?

Another questions: Rashi only mentions the author of a particular interpretation if there is a difficulty in the plain meaning which is resolved through knowing the author. In our case, what difficulty is there that Rashi need tell us the author of this interpretation — the school of R. Yishmael?

The explanation:

Rashi need not explain the reason for the particular severity in the case of sherotzim, for it is self-understood from Scripture itself. “Sherotzim,” Rashi explains (11:41), “are things which are ‘low, short-legged, which seem, only to creep.’” That is, sherotzim are creeping things which are very low to the ground. When Scripture enumerates the different categories of sherotzim, it says (11:42): “Whatever goes upon the belly,” upon which Rashi notes, “This is a snake, and the term ‘belly’ denotes ‘bending,’ for it goes bent and prostrated on its belly.”

Scripture could have simply said “snake” and not “whatever goes upon the belly.” But it does not do so because it wants to emphasize that sherotzim are things which are low, moving on their belly.

In parshas Bereishis, we learn that because the snake caused Adam and Chavah to sin, it was punished — “You are cursed of all the animals and from all the beasts of the field.” Its punishment was, “On your belly you shall go, and dust you shall eat; and Rashi explains that, “it had legs and they were cut off.”

The severity of this punishment is that going on the belly indicates how lowly and unworthy the snake is of all animals. All of it is in the dust, whereas other animals, which go on feet, are above the ground. Moreover, all other animals eat grass or meat, whereas the snake eats only dust, the lowest thing. The fact that it is connected with the ground shows how despicable it is.

Since we thus already know how degraded sherotzim are — creeping things which are low on the ground similar to a snake — Rashi need not explain why the prohibition to eat sherotzim is more severe than other unclean animals.

But all is not clear: Since sherotzim are so disgusting, how are other nations allowed to eat them? Moreover, earth itself has many good qualities — all plants grow from the earth, and it is used for building purposes, etc. Why then are sherotzim so severely forbidden to Jews?

Rashi alludes to the answer by adding the words that Jews do not defile themselves with sherotzim “as do other nations,” and by telling us the author of this interpretation — the school of R. Yishmael. The Mishnah (Nega’im 2:1) states: “R. Yishmael says: The children of Israel (may I be an atonement for them), are like boxwood: neither black nor white but of an intermediate shade.” R. Yishmael is stressing the greatness of Jews that they are not black.

Earth, dust, is black. Since Jews are not black, they are far removed from “dust.” Therefore, sherotzim, which are close to the dust, are especially repugnant to Jews — which is not the case with “other nations.”

In greater clarification: R. Yishmael was speaking in regard to the laws of leprosy — what color of leprosy is unclean on what color skin (i.e. a color on a white skinned person has a different law than on a dark-skinned person). Leprosy is a punishment for wrong behavior, thus indicating a low spiritual state. The Rambam (Laws of Leprosy, 16:10) writes that first “the walls of the person’s house are affected ... if he remains wicked ... the vessels of his house change ... if he remains wicked ... his clothes change ... if he remains wicked ... his skin changes and becomes leprous.” Thus leprosy on the skin indicates a very low spiritual state.

R. Yishmael tells us the distinction of Jews: Although a Jew is on such a low spiritual plane that his skin is leprous, nevertheless, “May I be on an atonement for them” (an expression of love), and they are not black.

So too in our case: After the Torah talks of the prohibition of eating unclean foods, it emphasizes Jews’ greatness that “they do not defile themselves with sherotzim as do other nations.” Even a Jew who is so low that he eats forbidden foods, does not defile himself with sherotzim — because they are so repugnant, close to the dust.

Rashi’s interpretation is based on the words of the “school of R. Yishmael.” Thus, in addition to the above connection with R. Yishmael himself, there must also be a connection to the school of R. Yishmael.

The Talmud (Berachos 32a) states: “‘G‑d said, I have forgiven (the Jews for the sin of the golden calf) according to your (Moshe’s) word’: The school of R. Yishmael taught: ‘according to your words’ — the nations of the world will in the future say ‘happy is the disciple whose master agrees with him.’” The Maharshaexplains that G‑d forgave Israel for worshiping the golden calf and did not destroy them, so that the gentile nations would not say He destroyed them because He was unable to bring them into the Holy Land. This argument had been advanced by Moshe, and G‑d agreed with him and refrained from destroying the Jews. This is what the school of R. Yishmael said, that in the future the gentile nations will say, “Happy is the disciple (Moshe) whose Master (G‑d) agrees with him.” We see from this that it is important to G‑d (so to speak) that the gentile nations should also recognize the greatness of Jews.

That is why Rashi explains that the Jews “do not defile themselves with sherotzim as do other nations.” This distinction of Jews is recognized by all, even the gentile nations — who see that they eat sherotzim, while Jews do not defile themselves by eating them.

Shabbos Chol haMoed Pesach | 18- 25 Nissan 5777

Fri- Apr 14th   Erev Shabbos Chol haMoed Pesach
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha/Candles 7:39 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:31 pm /COUNT #4/

Sat Apr 15th  – Shabbos Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:44 pm
Mincha  7:40 pm 
Maariv/Havdalah 8:42 pm /COUNT OMER #5/

Sun Apr 16th – Erev Shevi’i Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9  am
Mincha/Candles  7:42 pm 
Maariv 8:34 pm /COUNT OMER #6/
It is customary to remain awake on the eve of the Seventh of Passover (i.e., tonight) and spend the entire night in Torah study and joyous celebration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea. (
www.chabad.org)

Mon Apr 17th – Shevi’i Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m.
Mincha 7 PM /Special Time - FOLLOWED BY KINUS TORAH/
Candles & Yartzeit Candles after 8:44 pm from existing flame
Maariv 8:35 /COUNT OMER #7/

Tue Apr 18th  – Acharon Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m /YIZKOR/
Mincha  6:45 pm followed by MOSHIACH SEUDA
Maariv/Havdalah 8:46 pm /COUNT OMER #8/
Chametz repurchased 9:15 pm

MOSHIACH SEUDA Tue Apr 18th  6:45 pm
Featuring words of Torah, 4 cups of wine, and shmura matzo (BYOB & Matza!) Shul will provide only some sweet wine, matzo, and Mellons.  Please keep all food in the social hall and supervise children. 
http://www.moshiachcampaign.com/media/pdf/529/xWCv5297556.pdf

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin NOT THIS Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
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KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
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sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
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COMMUNITY NEWS

BCMH Men's Club Holocaust Memorial Breakfast SUN APR 30th 9 am
Sponsored by the Wolf Family 
www.BCMHSeattle.org

HAMSA SUMMER FOR TEENS IN ISRAEL
Trip sponsored by the Sephardic Educational Center. The deadline is May 1st! Scholarships are available, including a generous offer by Harley and Lela Franco. For more information, contact 323-272-4574 or email info@secjerusalem.org Also, please click here:
http://sephardiceducationalcenter.org/hamsa-israel-trip/

YOM haSHOA – HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY – SUN APR 23rd 6 pm – 9 pm
At Ezra Bessaroth. Mincha/Maariv Services, Remembrance Program, Divrei Torah

Yom haZikaron Commemoration and Yom haAtzmaut Tefila MON MAY 1st
At Minyan Ohr Chadash.  Mincha 7:30 pm /Program 7:45 pm. Cosponsored by Ohr Chadash, Sephardic Bikur Cholim, Ezra Besaroth, NYHS and SHA

LEARN INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW MONDAYS STARTING MAY 1st 8 pm
Must know how to read Hebrew but do not need to be able to converse freely. In this course you will increase your vocabulary, conversational ability and reading fluency. $80 a person for the series. See 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/intermediate-hebrew.html  for more information or to register. Please register by April 24th. Class dates will be: May 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 28th and June 5th, 12th and 19th.

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILLIARY SEPHARDI FEST SUN JUNE 11th 
Sephardic Foods, childrens activities, craft booths.

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Seattle Kollel Wed Apr 26 - May 24, 7-8 pm, Hebrew Crash Course
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com 

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR SHABBOS CHOL haMOED PESACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/3195352/jewish/Shabbos-Chol-HaMoed-Pesach-5700-1940-Lakewood-2.htm | From the talks of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak of Lubavitch; translated by Uri Kaploun © SichosInEnglish.org

15. Without Kid Gloves. People often say, “Don’t ask the doctor: ask the patient.” In terms of Chassidus and chassidim, the doctor and the patient correspond to Rebbe and chassid. A patient’s illness can be serious, mild, or slight, but even a slight illness cannot be ignored. The Rebbe is the doctor. And the popular advice to ask the patient and not the doctor has been relevant – and is still relevant – in the spiritual lifestyle of chassidim.

At farbrengens, even exceptionally outstanding chassidim, both maskilim1 and baalei avodah, used to reprimand each other outspokenly, without kid gloves, to the point that the listener squirmed in pain.2 This was often the case with several celebrated chassidim – R. Aizik Homiler,3 R. Pesach Malastovker,4 R. Betzalel Ozoritcher,5 and R. Hillel Paritcher6 – and their respective Rebbeim did not tolerate that practice.

Nevertheless, though the attitude of the Rebbeim to such pungent talk was known among chassidim, they used to comment, “Don’t ask the doctor: ask the patient….”

It is no doubt superfluous to point out that the sharp words exchanged by those elder chassidim sprang from brotherly love and profound mutual respect.

16. Fruit of a Farbrengen. In days gone by, a chassidisher farbrengen was a Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen. The discussion centered seriously on the spiritual ambiance that surrounds [the formal texts of] Chassidus.7 For example, those present would analyze a chassidisher teaching260 in search of its inner meaning, and would discuss what can be learned from a chassidisher anecdote. Such farbrengens positioned chassidim in a cleaner atmosphere and on a higher spiritual level. When people went home from a farbrengen in those days, perhaps they were not more pious, but they were wiser, more refined, and more elevated. The atmosphere itself was cleansing.

Nowadays, however, because of the state of Torah observance and education and Yiddishkeit in the last twenty-five years, chassidishe farbrengens have turned into farbrengens whose function is to fortify the simple observance of Yiddishkeit. The topics are family purity, the observance of Shabbos, the need to establish fixed study sessions, and other basic requirements of Torah and mitzvos.

This kind of talk – and action – is obviously not only permissible but essential. However, on no account must it be allowed to replace a spiritually-oriented Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen.

Chassidim must distinguish between two different kinds of farbrengens: (a) the kind of farbrengen that furthers the practical observance of Yiddishkeit in general and the cause of education in particular; (b) a Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen that gives full and explicit expression to the authentic chassidisher spirit.

Every endeavor in avodah – whether in the area of seichel (intellectual activity), or middos,263 or thought or speech or action – must have a bechein, a concluding resolve that will produce a tangible outcome.8 The bechein is the very essence of that endeavor, and by making a firm resolve one must give it practical expression that corresponds to the nature of the endeavor that produced it. True, becheins vary considerably. The bechein that grows out of avodah in the area of seichel is different from the bechein that grows out of avodah in the area of middos; likewise, the bechein that grows out of avodah in the area of thought is different from the bechein that grows out of avodah in the area of speech or action. That said, all becheins share one characteristic – they must result in a bepo’al, a practical reality.9

At first glance one might well ask, What is the difference between a bechein and a bepo’al?

After all, it would seem that they are one and the same: the bechein of seichel is the bepo’al of seichel, and the bepo’al of seichel is the bechein. The same would seem to apply in the areas of middos or thought or speech or action. What, then, is the difference between a bechein and a bepo’al?

Chassidus teaches that there is a substantial difference between them. A bechein is natural, for in every thing G‑d implanted a bechein, which is its offspring. A bepo’al is artificial, for G‑d endowed every created being with a potential for a po’al, a potential for practical expression, which enables that created being to transform a bechein into a po’al.

As stated above, a bechein is the offspring of that created entity. Thus, the bechein of seichel is the middah which is the offspring that is born of that seichel. The ability of seichel to produce a middah that resembles it is one of the natural attributes with which G‑d endowed it. The resultant po’al vitalizes and sustains the offspring.

The same principle applies to the bechein and the po’al in relation to the middos, and in relation to the soul’s three “garments,” that is, its three means of expression – thought, speech and action. Thus, the bechein of middos is thought, the bechein of thought is speech, and the bechein of speech is action. Thus all becheins, including action, must have a po’al.

The po’al of the middos-bechein is that one’s thought processes should be orderly, and not too wide-ranging. The po’al of the thought-bechein is that it should find expression in sensitive and animated speech; the po’al of the speech-bechein is that the resultant action should be done with vibrant devotion.

bechein without a po’al is like sowing seed in vain, like bearing aborted children. It is one of the most harmful dangers that Chassidus is wary of, and warns chassidim to steer clear of.

There exist wrong-headed ovdim who imagine that if a middah is born as the result of their meditation on a G‑dly concept, this in itself a positive achievement. Such a person imagines that the fact that his meditation gave rise to offspring proves that his meditation was alive and that its offspring is viable. Not so, my dear brother! If there isn’t a tangible po’al in all of the above-listed stages of po’al, up to and including the exuberant enjoyment of an actual action, the seed was sown in vain and the offspring is stillborn.

True, the bechein is the very essence of the entity, but the bepoa’l is the soul of the bechein. It is the light of truth within all the becheins. To a certain extent, moreover, the exuberant delight that one experiences when finally carrying out the tangible activity confirms that the meditation that led to it rested on solid foundations.

It was stated above that the difference between bechein and bepo’al is that the bechein is natural, being the handiwork of G‑d, while thebepo’al is artificial, the work of mortals. The potential to carry out the po’al is natural, the handiwork of G‑d, but the po’al itself is the work of mortals. That has to be done by the man himself.

In both kinds of farbrengen, both the outward-oriented kind of chassidisherfarbrengen and the Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen, have abechein. Quite often, whether it has a broad spectrum or a narrow focus, it is a warm bechein. However, the exuberant delight in the resultant po’al is often missing – and that means that the birth was stillborn. And that in turn means that the seed sown at the farbrengen was sown in vain.

Chassidus therefore warns chassidim of the danger of a bechein without a po’al.

17. Antidote to Dilution. A Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen ought to be overflowing with [the values of] the authentic, age-old, unchanging, maskil-avodah chassid – the chassid whom the Alter Rebbe created, and whom our Rebbeim, each in his generation, nourished with Torah teachings and with directives in the paths of avodah.

Chassidus hasn’t changed and chassidim haven’t changed. It’s only that over the generations, the teachings and principles of Chassidus have been enriched and clarified by explanations that have enabled even those of lesser intellectual ability to grasp them. Chassidus and chassidim haven’t changed – but in the course of time, especially in the last thirty years, for various reasons Chassidus and chassidim have become diluted. Their essence is present, but too much diluted. Nevertheless, Chassidus and chassidim haven’t changed. We still have the age-old essential chassid, albeit diluted.

In the physical realm, we know that if one wants to rid a liquid or food of its superfluous water, one can’t simply pour it out, because then part of the liquid or food will be wasted. There are two opposite techniques: either to heat it to boiling point or to freeze it.

The superfluous water in Chassidus and chassidim needs to be heated to boiling point either by means of an evocative niggun that expresses the yearning of the soul and through a dance that expresses the soul’s cleaving to its source, or by means of a coldly cerebral exposition of one of the profound concepts in the teachings of Chassidus.

This should be the solid basis of a Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen – to serve as a fiery furnace that will boil out the dilution of Chassidus and chassidim, or as an ice-box that will freeze the dilution out of existence.

18. A central theme at aChassidus-chassidisher farbrengen should be avodah shebalev, explaining not only that it is an obligation, but explaining also how one ought to engage in it. It is true that my father, the Rebbe, published a Kuntreis HaTefillah,10 but what is written there has to be integrated into one’s life: one has to learn – and teach oneself – how to go about davenen. Elder chassidim who received traditions from earlier elder chassidim should teach younger chassidim how to daven, and they for their part should be open to learn from them.

19. Goals for a Lifetime. A Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen is a boundless heritage. A good farbrengen brings a person sooner or later to the loftiest levels, both in his comprehension of Chassidus, and in his avodah and sensitivity to Elokus.

[To summarize: On this theme, of spiritual elevation, R. Yehoshua ben Leviteaches in Pirkei Avos:11 “Whoever engages in the study of the Torah becomes elevated, as it is written,12 ‘From Matanah they came to Nachaliel, and from Nachaliel they came to Bamos.’ “ At the level of pshat, this verse simply names three of the stations in the course of our forefathers’ wanderings in the wilderness. However, R. Yehoshua ben Levi arrives at his above teaching by understanding these names at the non-literal level of interpretation known as derush. Thus, the name Matanah (lit., “a gift”) suggests “the gift of Torah”; the name Nachaliel implies that “my heritage is G‑d”; and the name Bamos means “high places.”

[The Rebbe Rayatz now takes this teaching one step further and, at the mystical level of interpretation known as sod, perceives a further subtext in these names. In the paragraphs below that begin “Chassidus understands…,” that subtext tracks stages in a person’s avodah of beirurim, as he refines and elevates his material environment by releasing the Divine sparks hidden within it.

[The above-quoted verse is preceded by the words, “and from the midbar (‘the wilderness’) they went to Matanah.”13 In Chassidus, the term midbar is a code word for the raw energy of the unprocessed Divine “sparks” from the World of Tohu that are embedded in our material world. More broadly, the term midbar here includes various stages that are alluded to in these verses by the placenames – Bamos, Gai, and Yeshimon (lit., “the wasteland”).]

Chassidus understands the sequence, “and from the midbar (‘the wilderness’) they went to Matanah, and from Matanah they came to Nachaliel,” in its characteristic style. Chassidus teaches that even the ability to attain the highest spiritual levels (“Bamos”) is granted to a person only as a gift (“Matanah”). That gift, called “Nachaliel” (which implies that “my heritage is G‑d”), is the privilege of “beholding the pleasantness of G‑d”14 and “delighting in G‑d.”15

The phrase that follows “from Nachaliel they came to Bamos”277 is, “and from Bamos they came to the valley (Gai).”16 In the terms of Chassidus, this means that the avodah of the individual who has already reached the lofty level called “Nachaliel” comprises two sides, whose codenames are “Bamos” and “Gai.” “Bamos” stands for the Divine sparks (nitzotzos) of the World of Tohu that have fallen into material entities, and “Gai” stands for the Torah and mitzvos of the World of Tikkun that are vested in material entities. In terms of the above individual’s spiritual tasks, his combination of “Bamos” and “Gai” thus implies [the ideal balance in avodah]: oros deTohu bekeilim deTikkun – the lights of Tohu in the vessels of Tikkun.17

The phrase that follows “and from Bamos they came to the valley (Gai)” is, “which is in the field of Moav, at the peak of Pisgah.”281 [Moav is an alien region, outside the Holy Land. In the Kabbalah, “the field of Moav” is thus a codename for kelipas nogah which, being a kelipah, masks kedushah, but it is the kind of kelipah that is redeemable by virtue of the holy spark within it.] The last-quoted phrase is thus saying: Although all material entities are under the dominion of kelipas nogah, in fact they are at the peak of the summit. (As Rashiexplains, the placename Pisgah means “the summit.”) Material entities are at the loftiest of all lofty levels.

[At this point, using the code language of the Kabbalah, the Rebbe goes on to say that it was G‑d’s Will, and His delight18 (“if one may express oneself in such terms”), which is hidden in His very Essence, to bring into being a material world. It is only the Divine ayin that sustains the existence of that material yesh, making it outwardly appearas the Essence of G‑d, “Whose existence stems from His Essence.”19 And by means of the beirur of the material yesh, as mandated by the Torah and its mitzvos, the lights of Tohu are brought to the rectified state of Tikkun. That ultimate stage is alluded to in the final phrase of the above-quoted verse281 which says that the peak of Pisgah “overlooks the wasteland.”

[Taming and redeeming the intense lights of Tohu, which fulfill their role by descending into the material world,]20 is the positive starting point for the realization of G‑d’s essential Will, by means of the avodah of the souls of the Jewish people in their Torah study and in their fulfillment of the mitzvos. They thereby carry out G‑d’s ultimate desire – that “the peak of Pisgah” should “overlook the wasteland.”

* * *

What sparks that positive starting point? – A Chassidus-chassidisher farbrengen that is conducted within the same framework that regulated the authentic vintage chassidim of bygone years.

20. A Paradoxical Descent.Chabad Chassidus uses clear terms to explain every subject, and that includes its explanation of a soul’s descent into a body.

A soul waits five thousand and several hundred years until it is finally privileged to be sent down to the earthly world and to be vested in a physical body.

The Zohar21 teaches that “every single soul stood in its own form before the Holy King.” The latter term (Malka Kaddisha) signifies Z’eir Anpin of the World of Atzilus, where the souls are located. As is well known, Z’eir Anpin of the World of Atzilus is still [“high” enough to be] reckoned among the infinite worlds. So since a soul is located in that infinite world of Z’eir Anpin of Atzilus, it is obvious that its avodah, in loving G‑d and standing in awe of Him, is lofty indeed. Yet even though it is in that sublime state, it waits for years on end for the privilege of being sent down to This World below and being vested in a body. From this alone we can appreciate the value of a soul’s descent into a body. We can grasp what serious weight is attached to that descent, in anticipation of the mighty ascent that will result from its attainments in the body in particular and in the lowly world at large.

21. More Fool than Chassid. At one of the cheerful farbrengens during the seven-day celebration of our engagement22 in the summer of 5656 (1896), my father said LeChaim and asked: “What’s going to be with ‘delighting in G‑d’?280 Until when is it being postponed? If someone’s a foolish [i.e., a self-deluding] chassid, he’s pushing it off until after his 120 years in This World. He’s pinning his hopes on one of two possibilities: (a) ‘At midnight the Holy One, blessed be He, comes and delights in the company of the tzaddikim in Gan Eden’;23 or (b) “[In the World to Come,] the tzaddikim will sit, with crowns on their heads, and will bask in the radiance of the Divine Presence.’24

“But he’s a foolish chassid – and a chassid and a fool just don’t make a good match.25 A fool can’t be a chassid, and a chassid most certainly can’t be a fool.26

“However, whoever pushes off ‘delighting in G‑d’ until after his 120 years is for sure a foolish chassid. He’s nevertheless a chassid, because he would like to experience ‘delighting in G‑d,’ whereas a misnaged knows nothing about that concept. What a misnaged does know about is delighting in himself: he pictures how the Holy One, blessed be He, derives delight from his chiddushei Torah, from his original contributions to Torah scholarship. As to delighting in G‑d, only chassidim know about that. But if a chassid pushes off ‘delighting in G‑d’ until after his 120 years, he’s a fool. And in a foolish chassid, a chassid shoteh, the fool is bigger than the chassid….”

22. Neither Foolish nor Wild. At the table on Shabbos Parshas Terumah in the year 5651 (1891), my father related: In the year 5550 (1790), when the Mitteler Rebbe was 16 years old, or a year later, when he was 17 years old, the [Alter] Rebbe entrusted him with the study program and guidance of the young married fulltime scholars who studied27 in the Alter Rebbe’s precincts in Liozna. At that time he said that the first step in chassidic education is to ensure that chassidim will not be fools, because foolishness (shtus) is an iron obstruction to a life of Chassidus.

To this my father added that the word shoteh has two meanings: (a) a fool, plainly and simply; (b) wild, untamed. And neither of these can partner with Chassidus and chassidim.

23. R. Aizik recalls the Alter Rebbe. My father shared the following recollection at the table on Shabbos Parshas Vayigash in the year 5655 (1894): “My father28 once told me that among chassidim, chochmah (canny perception)29 is inborn. He went on to say that R. David Tzvi Chein (the Radatz),30 who together with R. Yehoshua Dubruskin31 was visiting Lubavitch at the time, related that he had once traveled to Homil after Sukkos. He intended to spend several months in the company of the tzaddik R. Yitzchak Aizik,268 together with the fifteen or so single and married scholars who were studying there full time.

“That year Yud-Tes Kislev fell on a Friday, and in R. Aizel’s shul32 before Kabbalas Shabbos a table had been set with mashke and refreshments. After davenen, R. Aizel recited Kiddush with the festive melody of Simchas Torahover a goblet of very strong mashke and urged all those present to recite Kiddush. He then said that he was about to present us with a gift: he would tell us what the Alter Rebbe had said at the first festive meal held in thanksgiving for Yud-Tes Kislev, in the year 5562 (1801).”33

[From this point to the end of sec. 23 on p. 106 below, the speaker is R. Aizik Homiler.]

As far back as Tishrei, the inner circle of chassidim sensed that on the forthcoming Yud-Tes Kislev there would be fresh news. What the news would be, no one knew, but they felt that there was news in the air.

On Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah the [Alter] Rebbe was outstandingly joyful. In the various brief talks that he addressed to his sons and to a select group of elder chassidim, he said34 that for various spiritual reasons he had not accepted the suggestion of his chassidim that Yud-Tes Kislev, the date of his liberation, be instituted as an occasion to be publicly celebrated by a joyful festive meal. He went on to say that he himself had not yet held a thanksgiving meal which, according to the laws of the Torah, ought to be held; moreover, it is classified as a seudas mitzvah, a festive meal held in honor of a mitzvah. The mitzvah of this seudah, he added, is ahavas Yisrael, the obligation to love a fellow Jew, and “my grandfather”35 taught that for this mitzvah one must be prepared to undergo even mesirus nefesh, self-sacrifice.

At the festive meal on Simchas Torah, the Alter Rebbe shared a lengthy halachic pilpul36 with his brother, Maharil,37 as to what obligation applies to a person who belongs to one of the four specified categories of people who are commanded to express their gratitude appropriately,38 yet did not do so when the obligation first fell due.

From these discussions the elder chassidim gathered that on the approaching Yud-Tes Kislev there would be news: the Rebbe was sure to give the order for a festive thanksgiving meal, and he would no doubt participate in it personally.

Early in Kislev, we young chassidim from Homil, Bobruisk and nearby townships put together enough money to hire a wagon and buy a dozen pairs of fur-lined boots.39 We then hit the road by foot, except for an occasional brief rest on Azriel’s sleigh. On the way, especially at Rogatchov, Bichov and Shklov, we were joined by more people, who hired another two wagons. By the time we reached Liadi, on Thursday of Parshas Vayishlach, there were eighty of us.40

That Shabbos, in the course of which the Rebbe delivered three maamarim, no less, was one of the happiest Shabbosos that the chassidim had ever enjoyed.

After Minchah on Friday, before Kabbalas Shabbos, in the beis midrash that stood in the little courtyard, the Rebbe delivered the first maamar. It began with the words Vayishlach Yaakov and it appears in Torah Or. The passage beginning Vayashuvu hamalachim and the passage beginning Vayomer Yaakov are both part of the same maamar.

The Rebbe delivered the second maamar in the same beis midrash very early on Shabbos morning, about two hours before daybreak. He began it with the possuk, Vayomer Yehoshua…, be’eiver hanahar, though in Torah Or it begins with the words, Vayakam balaylah. The third maamar, which began Vayikach min haba beyado minchah l’Eisav achiv, was delivered in the same place, after Minchah on Shabbos.

The local zitzers and we guests repeated all three maamarim over and over, until we memorized them with their precise wording.

On Sunday and Monday, streams of chassidim from near and far began to converge on Liadi – from Bayev, Tatarsk, Chotemsk, Chaslavitch, Amtchislav, Klimovitch, Pahar, Potchip, Dubrovna, Orsha, Krupke, Talatshin, Borisov, Babinovitch, Dobromisl, Lubavitch, Rudnia and Liozna, as well as from a whole group of towns and townships in the Vitebsk-Polotsk Province.

On Tuesday, Yud-Tes Kislev, all those people davened in the beis midrash that stood in the little courtyard, in the beis midrash that stood in the big courtyard, and in all the local batei midrash – and all those places were packed.

The local Jewish townsfolk of Liadi announced that they would provide all of those out-of-town visitors with meals, free of charge, throughout that week and until after Shabbos. And that is exactly what they did: they lovingly demonstrated the characteristically Jewish instinct for hospitality.

It is noteworthy that their non-Jewish townsmen also took a share in the hospitality. Scores of them opened their homes for the visitors who were left without a place to sleep in the Jewish homes.

An exceptional degree of hospitality was displayed by the estate manager of Archduke Lubomirsky – the Jew-loving Yan Tchemerinsky. He notified the Jewish community of Liadi that every day they would receive from his estate 75 pud41 of rye flour from which they could bake bread, three cows and a number of calves from which they could prepare kosher meat, and a number of sleighs loaded with hay and oats for the visitors’ horses.

It was announced that after an early Minchah, everyone should assemble in the big courtyard in front of the beis midrash, and there the Rebbe would deliver a maamar of Chassidus.

The courtyard and the summer pavilion were packed tight. In the middle of the beis midrash stood the big bimah, on which there was a long table. A chassid nicknamed “the hoarse R. Shmuel Elye” on account of his lion’s voice called for quiet: the Rebbe was about to appear. When R. Shmuel Elye roared his Shaa! your knees would quake.

Immediately a band of burly and broad-shouldered young men appeared, and spearheaded their way like two threads as they burst through the huge and tightly-packed beis midrash. Within two minutes they had cleared a wide path leading from the front door to the bimah, making room for the impending entry of the Rebbe and his sons and brothers.

When the Rebbe first appeared at the entrance, we were overwhelmed by a reverent and awesome dread. In that state we heard his voice as he sang the well-known melody that accompanies the words, Tze’enah u’re’enah.

The Rebbe was accompanied by his brother the Maharil at his right and by his brother R. Mordechai42 at his left. In the second row there was his brother R. Moshe,43 accompanied by the two well-known elder chassidim. The third row comprised his sons – the Rebbe44 and R. Chaim Avraham45 to the right, and R. Moshe46 to the left. After them walked the Rebbe.47

As the [Alter] Rebbe approached the steps leading up to the bimah, he sang the familiar melody that accompanies the words, Keili Atah veodeka, Elokai, aromemeka.

The Rebbe took his seat at the table on the bimah and all those who accompanied him did likewise. As he sang, an inner fire flared, and the surrounding stillness aroused awe within us. He then delivered a maamar that began with the possuk, Padah beshalom nafshi. (It appears in Torah Or with a different opening phrase, Vayeiavek ish imo.) As soon as it ended, a chassidisher lead singer48 called R. Naftali Senner started a jolly niggun, and the “hoarse” announcer invited everyone to join in, in an orderly manner.

A table had been set in the Rebbe’s yechidus-beis-midrash, ready for a festive thanksgiving meal. There the Rebbe was joined only by his brothers and sons, as well as a select few privileged elder chassidim. After long entreaties the Rebbe’s son, R. Moshe, later agreed to share with a few of us the talks that had been delivered at the table. What we then heard we kept in utter secrecy, for that was his condition. [R. Aizil Homil added:] I will relay to you only one teaching, because it is relevant to the avodah of all chassidim.

The Rebbe had said: “I have a tradition from my zeide [that is, the Baal Shem Tov] that foolishness (not just a spirit of folly but the kind of foolishness that people describe as not clever), and sadness, and a [misplaced] feeling of self-worth are considered by chassidim as aveiros deOraysa.49 Conversely, chochmah (the acute perception that people call canny), and simchah that comes from finding whatever is good and cheerful in everything, and zerizus bimesinus (doing one’s avodah with calm swiftness) are considered by chassidim to be mitzvos deOraysa.50

24. The Source of Simchah. On Pesach in the year 5674 (1814) my parents and I were in Wiesbaden.51

At the seudah of Shvi’i shel Pesach52 my father recalled that at the seudah of Shvi’i shel Pesach in 5635 (1875), my grandfather the Rebbe Maharash had said: “The Baal Shem Tov said that Shvi’i shel Pesach is the source of simchah. Shemini Atzeres is the time of simchah and Shvi’i shel Pesach isthe source of simchah.”

25. A Pnimi and an Atzmi. There is a well-known principle that not every atzmi is a pnimi and not every pnimi is an atzmi.53 Being a pnimi enables one to become an atzmi. It is true that with a pnimi, a concept that he has meditated upon becomes part of him,54 but that does not mean that he has already become an atzmi.

26. To Mirror the Reality Above. It is completely understandable that to be described as an atzmi one does not have to mirror – in This World below – that which is Above. However, it is absolutely certain that a person who – in This World below – does mirror that which is Above is in fact an atzmi.

27. The Alter Rebbe’s Right Hand. On Yud-Tes Kislev, 5663 (1902), my father said: “In every aspect of his life, the [Alter] Rebbe – in This World below – mirrored that which is Above. When he moved his holy hand from one place to another, it certainly mirrored a revelation that was taking place Above at that moment in the attribute of Chessed, which is embodied in G‑d’s Right Hand,55in the World of Atzilus.”

28. The Joyful Approach to Avodah. On Shvi’i shel Pesach, 5664 (1904), at 3:00 AM, my father entered my room.56 At that time I was studying the middle of chapter 50 of Shaar HaEmunah, where the Mitteler Rebbe explains that the beirur by which the G‑dly soul sifts and refines [and uncovers the good that is latent in] the animal soul is an instance of the beirur by which the Divine Name מ"ה, whose gematria is אדם(“man”), sifts and refines [and uncovers the good that is latent in] the Divine Name ב"ן, whose gematria is בהמה (“animal”). The Mitteler Rebbe describes this process by the analogy of cooking: by the heat of a fire, the good and the bad in the food are separated, and the good is revealed.

My father took a seat and asked me: “What is a chassidisher yungerman studying on Shvi’i shel Pesach?”

On my table there was also a copy of [the Mitteler Rebbe’s] Derech Chayim,57so my father asked if I had been studying it. I answered that as part of my daily study schedule, I regularly learned a brief extract from one of its chapters in preparation for saying the Kerias Shema Before Retiring at Night.

My father commented: “It is true that the chassidic understanding of the phrase, ‘How good is a thing in its fit season!’58 includes all the classic teachings on avodah, and especially Iggeres HaTeshuvah and Derech Chayim. Nevertheless, there are times when one ought to arouse kav hasimchah, the joyful approach to avodah – especially on Shvi’i shel Pesach, which is the very source of simchah.”

29. Shemini Atzeres. [This section records a teaching which the Rebbe Rashab heard from the Rebbe Maharash at a yechidus in the year 5636 (1876). Its starting point is the Midrash that speaks of G‑d’s culminating celebration with His people alone on Shemini Atzeres, after animal sacrifices corresponding to all the seventy nations have been offered in the course of the preceding days of Sukkos. The Midrash likens that contrast to the private celebration which a mortal king, after having hosted all of his citizens for seven days, shares only with his dearest friend.59 The Rebbe Maharash then proceeds to expound that passage and relate it to the above-mentioned task of elevating one’s animal soul. He also discusses the intimate link between the yechidah, the innermost nucleus of the soul, with Atzmus, the very Essence of Elokus. The entire mystical exposition is expressed in a series of esoteric allusions to Kabbalistic code words that defy translation.]

30. Wordless Communication. Throughout that visit my father was in an elated frame of mind, and his holy joy was evident in every motion.

As he spoke, he discussed the distinctions between various modes of revelation – revelation by means of ruach hakodesh, by a revelation of Eliyahu [HaNavi], by being impregnated with the neshamah of a [departed] tzaddik, by beholding a [departed] tzaddik in a nighttime vision, and by beholding a [departed] tzaddik when awake. From that discussion I came to understand matters that I cannot speak of, even by allusion.

Now, 36 years later, as I leaf through the notes that I made soon after, I have hundreds of proofs that what I then understood was indeed exactly right.

31. Rebbe to Rebbe. [Here the Rebbe Rashab related the teaching of the Rebbe Maharash (in sec. 29 above) to sec. 50 and 51 of the Mitteler Rebbe’s Derech Chayim, which the Rebbe Rayatz had been studying at the time.]

Parashat Tzav - Pesach | 11- 21 Nissan 5777

EREV SHABBOS Apr 7th 
Shacharis 7 am 
Mincha/Candles/Maariv 7:30 pm

SHABBOS SAT Apr 8th 
Shacharis 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:52 am /NO Kiddush in Shul – Kitchen Closed
Mincha/ 7:15 pm /SHABBOS haGADOL SHIUR
Maariv/Havdalah 8:30 pm

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Neither Kiddush nor Seuda Slishit – Kitchen closed for Pesach Cleaning

Sunday, April 9th
Shacharit 9 am
Mincha/Maariv 7:40 pm 
Bedikat Chametz (search for chametz) after 8:23 pm

Erev Pesach, Monday, April 10th 
Fast of First Born Begins 4:50 am
Shacharit 7:00 am / Siyum Bechorot 
Last time to eat chametz 10:56 am
Last time to burn chametz (biur chametz) 12:03 pm
Candles/Mincha 7:34 pm
Start Seder after: 8:25 pm
Finish Eating: before hatzot 1:09 am

Tue Apr 11th    Pesach Day 1
Shacharis 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:36 pm/
Mincha 7:35 pm
Maariv/ Sefira  8:26 pm /COUNT 1/
Candles (from existing flame after)/Seder Prep should not start before 8:35 pm
Start Seder after: 8:35 pm
Finish Eating: before hatzot 1:10 am

Wed Apr 12th   Pesach Day 2
Shacharis 9:30 am
Mincha: 7:35 pm
Maariv/Havdala/Sefira 8:36 pm /COUNT 2/

Thu- Apr 13th   Chol haMoed Pesach
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha 7:40 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:29 pm /COUNT 3/

Fri- Apr 14th   Erev Shabbos Pesach
Shacharis 7 am
Mincha/Candles 7:39 pm
Maariv and Sefira 8:31 pm /COUNT 4/

Sat Apr 15th  – Shabbos Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:44 pm
Mincha  7:40 pm 
Maariv/Havdalah 8:42 pm /COUNT OMER #5/

Sun Apr 16th – Erev Shevi’i Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9  am
Mincha/Candles  7:42 pm 
Maariv 8:34 pm /COUNT OMER #6/
It is customary to remain awake on the eve of the Seventh of Passover (i.e., tonight) and spend the entire night in Torah study and joyous celebration of the great miracle of the splitting of the sea. (
www.chabad.org)

Mon Apr 17th – Shevi’i Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m.
Mincha 7 PM /Special Time - FOLLOWED BY KINUS TORAH/
Candles & Yartzeit Candles after 8:44 pm from existing flame
Maariv 8:35 /COUNT OMER #7/

Tue Apr 18th  – Acharon Shel Pesach
Shacharis: 9:30 a.m /YIZKOR/
Mincha  6:45 pm followed by MOSHIACH SEUDA
Maariv/Havdalah 8:46 pm /COUNT OMER #8/
Chametz repurchased 9:15 pm

PUBLIC SEDER AT CHABAD HOUSE MINYAN– MON AND TUE NIGHTS at 8 pm
4541 19th Ave NE.  Featuring an inspiring Hagadah, Matzah, Wine/Grape Juice, Chrain, Charoses, and a delicious seder meal!   
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SAFETY OF CHILDREN AT CSTL – IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM CSTL BOARD
As a reminder children are not allowed to play outside the Shul. Parents please keep your children in the Kids Program or with their parents in Shul. The Board of CSTL and CSTL will not be responsible for children that are left unattended. Thank you for your cooperation.

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SELL YOUR HAMETZ BEFORE 7 AM MONDAY MORNING 
www.chabad.org/sellchametz

MOSHIACH SEUDA Tue Apr 18th  6:45 pm
Featuring words of Torah, 4 cups of wine, and shmura matzo (BYOB & Matza!) Shul will provide only some sweet wine, matzo, and Meal Mart Seder Leftovers.  Please keep all food in the social hall and supervise children. 
http://www.moshiachcampaign.com/media/pdf/529/xWCv5297556.pdf 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

RABBI LEVITIN’S SHABBOS HAGADOL LECTURE – SAT APR 8th AFTER 7:15 pm MINCHA
Please join us for the annual mitzvah of hearing Rabbi Levtin’s Shabbos haGadol Lecture. Men, Women, and Young Adults are encouraged to attend!

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/ DON’T MISS OUT ON THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT!

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY – Hillel needs Mashgichim
Contact the info@seattlevaad.org

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY - MMSC Now Hiring Substitute Teachers
MMSC is looking for substitute teachers.  We are a private Jewish school in Seattle that is opened Monday -- Friday, 8:45am to 3:45pm.  As such, on-call substitutes for MMSC must have some or full availability between these hours of operation. Shifts may be 4-8 hours within that time frame. If interested please call Sue Chambers @ (206) 523-9766 for further information.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact SARAH DERSHOWITZ, Gabbai Kiddush, 
sgdersho@gmail.com . Please inform Sarah by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THANK YOU TO JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE
Funding for CSTL Outreach Program was made possible, in part, by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle.  Please donate to JFGS at 
https://www.jewishinseattle.org/donate


COMMUNITY NEWS

KASHERING POT AT BCMH SUN APR 9th 9am-Noon

Pre-Pesach Dinner at Mercaz Sunday, April 9th 5pm - 7pm
What do we eat the day before Pesach? Don't worry about it and come to Mercaz for dinner!!! Register at 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/prepesach After all your cleaning and prep, take a break and enjoy a delicious fleishig El Salvadoran dinner - great food for adults and for kids!  Traditional homemade El Salvadoran Papusas made with meat or refried beans. Accompanied by homemade Pico De Gallo and salad. Spaghetti with meat sauce available for kids ( and anyone else).  Vegan option available!  Reserve by April 6th. $20 for adults, $15 for kids 3-12, $72 Family, Under 3 free. More at the door.

PASSOVER GUIDES ONLINE
OU 
https://oukosher.org/passover/passover-guide/ 
Seattle Vaad: 
http://seattlevaad.org/passover 
Star K: 
http://www.star-k.org/passover

Rabbi Tanenbaum's Shiur on Kashering for Pesach  - ONLINE
First part covers kashering flatware, pots, and pans.  Second part covers kashering countertops, ovens, stovetops, sinks, etc. 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/mbcislg1kkh1hjh/Kashering%20for%20Pesach-%20Rabbi%20Yaakov%20Tanenbaum.mp3?dl=0 

Hillel UW Passover Lunches Thur. & Fri., April 13 & 14, 11:00 am-1:30 pm, 
Cost: $18/Community & Jconnect / $8/Students with pre-paid on-line reservations or $20 at the door. Passover meals are under the supervision of the Va'ad HaRabanim of Greater Seattle. RSVP for Seders and Lunches by April 5, 2017. More info: 
www.hilleluw.org/passover

BCMH Men's Club Holocaust Memorial Breakfast SUN APR 30th 9 am
Sponsored by the Wolf Family 
www.BCMHSeattle.org

HAMSA SUMMER FOR TEENS IN ISRAEL
Trip sponsored by the Sephardic Educational Center. The deadline is May 1st! Scholarships are available, including a generous offer by Harley and Lela Franco. For more information, contact 323-272-4574 or email info@secjerusalem.org Also, please click here:
http://sephardiceducationalcenter.org/hamsa-israel-trip/

Passover Food Truck 
At multiple locations throughout Seattle. More info: 
www.hilleluw.org

Passover Depot by Affordable Kosher
5980 1st AVE S, Sea., 98108, just 1.5 miles South of 4th AVE Costco. More info:
http://www.affordablekosher.com/passoverdepot

YOM haSHOA – HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY – SUN APR 23rd 6 pm – 9 pm
At Ezra Bessaroth. Mincha/Maariv Services, Remembrance Program, Divrei Torah

Yom haZikaron Commemoration and Yom haAtzmaut Tefila MON MAY 1st
At Minyan Ohr Chadash.  Mincha 7:30 pm /Program 7:45 pm. Cosponsored by Ohr Chadash, Sephardic Bikur Cholim, Ezra Besaroth, NYHS and SHA

LEARN INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW MONDAYS STARTING MAY 1st 8 pm
Must know how to read Hebrew but do not need to be able to converse freely. In this course you will increase your vocabulary, conversational ability and reading fluency. $80 a person for the series. See
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/intermediate-hebrew.html  for more information or to register. Please register by April 24th. Class dates will be: May 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 28th and June 5th, 12th and 19th.

QFC UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SEEKS KOSHER MEAT CUTTER
Kosher Meat Cutter/Meat Cutter Apprentice:  The University Village QFC  is accepting applications for a Kosher Meat Cutter or to become a Meat Cutter Apprentice.  Applicants for kosher positions must have and maintain the endorsement of the Seattle Va'ad and either already be a licensed meat cutter or willing to complete necessary meat cutter apprenticeship classes. This position is primarily responsible for the kosher meat program but will also assist in other kosher and general duties.  To apply fill out the application online, click here.  Also, please email a Rabbinic reference from the Seattle Va'ad (or who can be contacted by the Seattle Va'ad) to 
Jeremy.Allen@stores.qfci.com

EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILLIARY SEPHARDI FEST SUN JUNE 11th 
Sephardic Foods, childrens activities, craft booths.

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

Seattle Kollel Wed Apr 26 - May 24, 7-8 pm, Hebrew Crash Course
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com 

Derech Emunah –Every Sunday Evening  7:30 pm, 
"A Taste of Derech Emunah", a weekly Women's class by Rabbi Shaul Engelsberg in the BCMH Yavneh Youth Building.

Camp and Israel Scholarship Applications Available
Apply for Jewish overnight camp scholarships, first-time camper grants, teen Israel scholarships.
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


DVAR TORAH FOR TZAV
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507893/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tzav-Shabbos-HaGadol-12th-Day-of-Nissan-5750-1990.htm | Free translation of a talk by the Lubavitcher Rebbe OB”M © SichosInEnglish.org1.

1. Among the unique aspects of the month of Nissan is the recitation of the passages that describe the offerings brought by the Nesi’im (princes) of each tribe at the dedication of the Sanctuary in the desert. Each day, we read of the offering brought by the Nasi of a different tribe and on the thirteenth of Nissan, we read the portion connected with the kindling of the Menorah which relates to the tribe of Levi.1

This also relates to Nissan’s distinction as “the month of redemption” and our Sages’ association of Nissan with “miracles of a truly miraculous nature.”2 “In Nissan, we were redeemed and, in Nissan, we will be redeemed in the future,” the Messianic redemption, when “As in the days of our exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.” Thus, the narrative of the dedication of the Sanctuary is appropriate for the present month when we will witness, with G‑d’s help, the dedication of the Third Bais HaMikdash.

The dedication of the Sanctuary also relates to the individual service of each Jew. Our Sages note that in the command to build the Sanctuary, “And you shall build Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within,” the Torah uses the plural form of the word “within,” and interpret that to mean, “within each and every individual.” Within each Jew’s heart, and in an expanded sense within his house and surrounding, a “Sanctuary for G‑d” must be established.3

Thus, today, the twelfth of Nissan, the conclusion of the dedication of the Sanctuary, shares a unique connection to the present age, the last moments before the Messianic redemption when we are involved in the completion of the task of making this world a dwelling for G‑d.

Today’s service, the conclusion of the dedication of the Sanctuary, is connected with the expression, “Last in deed, first in thought.” This implies that when a deed is actually completed, one’s original thoughts are revealed. This refers, not only to the thoughts necessary to plan the performance of the deed, but rather, to the person’s fundamental intent, a thought that stands above any plans, an idea that the person himself may not be consciously aware of.

We see this concept reflected in our behavior. Deed comes after thought; i.e., first, a person desires a particular thing and then his will influences his intellect and emotions, until it reaches the aspect of conscious thought, speech, and then, deed. When, however, the deed is carried out, a level of pleasure that was not expressed previously in thought is revealed.

Similarly, in regard to G‑d: The “last in deed,” the actual service of the Jews in the fulfillment of Torah and mitzvos, reveals a level of thought that transcends all the levels revealed in the order of spiritual worlds, relating to G‑d’s essence itself.

Our service on this earthly plane in refining the lowest aspects of this material world, transforming it into holiness, has an advantage over the revelation in the spiritual realms. The transformation of the lowest aspects of the world, “last in deed,” comes about from G‑d’s essence which is above all levels that are revealed, even on the first and highest levels of thought. This concept is emphasized on the final day of the dedication of the Sanctuary, “last in deed,” when the ultimate intention, “first in thought,” was revealed.

This concept is related to the tribe whose Nasi offered his sacrifices on this day, the tribe of NaftaliRashi explains that the name Naftali is associated with the concept of connection, which is related to the service of prayer. Prayer reflects the service of ascent from the lower realms upward. A person prays to G‑d in concern over his material needs. This, in turn, brings about a new revelation from above. This service of elevation from below reflects the concept of “last in deed” described above.

This concept is also related to the service of the tribe whose Nasi offered sacrifices on the previous day, the eleventh of Nissan, the tribe of Asher. The service of Asher relates to the attribute of pleasure as implied by the blessing given to him, “he will provide the delicacies of the king.” The attribute of pleasure relates to the dimension of yechidah, the essence of the soul.

The Midrash explains that Asher relates to the “happiness of Israel,” which comes because, “they chose the Holy One, blessed be He, as their G‑d.” This attribute is reflected in the date on which the sacrifices were brought, the eleventh of Nissan. Eleven is associated with a quality which transcends the ten sefiros, the level of “You are one, but not in a numerical sense,” which is reflected in the level of yechidah.

This service leads to the twelfth of Nissan, the day on which the essential connection between G‑d and the Jews is revealed through the service of “last in deed” described above. This service reveals the level of “first in thought,” the source of the Jewish souls, the quality of Asher, expressing it in a manifest manner on the worldly plane.4

This leads to the service of the thirteenth of Nissan. 13 is numerically equivalent to the Hebrew word אחד meaning one. As mentioned, on the thirteenth of Nissan, we read the passage describing the Menorah whose light revealed G‑d’s oneness throughout the world.

The concept of “Last in deed, first in thought” is intrinsically related to the Messianic redemption. The time of the revelation, the end of times, is hidden and sealed and will not be revealed until the redemption actually comes. Since the nature of the redemption itself transcends the concept of revelation as the Rambam writes, “In that age, the Jews will... know hidden matters,” therefore, the time for the revelation is also hidden.

The nature of the redemption is concealed not only from humans, but from G‑d, Himself, as it were. The Midrash describes the nature of the redemption as follows, “to My heart, I have revealed it, but to My limbs, I have not revealed it;” i.e., the concept of redemption is above revelation even for G‑d, Himself. Thus, the coming of Mashiach represents the level of “first in thought,” an essential level which is above revelation. This level will be revealed in a manifest manner by the service of “last in deed,” our service of refining the world in the period of the exile.

The fact that, in the Messianic era, the matters which are, by nature hidden, will be revealed, indicates that the dimension of G‑dliness which is expressed transcends, not only the revealed levels, but those which are hidden. A level which is hidden, by nature, will never come into revelation. Thus, the revelation of hiddenness in the Messianic age reflects the influence of G‑d’s essence which stands above all concept of concealment and revelation.

This concept is also relevant to the time of the Messianic redemption. On one hand, there is a time, hidden and concealed, for the redemption. Nevertheless, the Torah commands us to wait for Mashiach at every moment. At any time, Mashiach can be expected to come.

The resolution to this apparent contradiction is related to the concepts described above. Just as G‑d’s essence transcends both concealment and revelation and fuses them both together, similarly, it transcends the entire concept of time and can fuse past, present, and future together.

To explain the above in simple terms that can be applied in our behavior: There is a difference in the way a person relates to an event which he knows will take place at a certain specific time in the future and the way he relates to a future event whose time is unknown. When the event has a specific time, the person does not begin to prepare for it until its time approaches. In contrast, if there is no specific time set for the future event, there is a possibility that it will occur any moment. Therefore, a person lives in constant awareness of it and thus, the future has a powerful effect on his present behavior.

This concept can be applied in regard to the time for the Messianic redemption. If the time for the Messianic redemption was revealed, then, the concept would not be relevant at present. In contrast, since the time for Mashiach’s coming is not revealed and yet, it is known that at any moment he may come, every moment of our lives is lived in anticipation of his coming.

The anticipation of Mashiach’s coming fuses together the exile and the redemption. Considering Mashiach’s coming as an imminent reality, grants one an awareness of the redemption in the midst of exile.5

This concept is particularly relevant in the present age, the last generation of exile. Now is the time of “last in deed” in regard to our service in exile. We have completed the service of spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward. To refer to the Previous Rebbe’s expression, “we have already polished the buttons and are standing prepared to greet Mashiach.”

The above is enhanced by the influence of the present year, the fortieth year after the Previous Rebbe’s passing. This grants each of us the potential to “attain [full grasp] of our teacher’s knowledge.”6 Added potential is granted by the fact that this is “a year of miracles,” and that Nissan, the present month, is asso­ciated by our Sages with, “miracles of a truly miraculous nature.”

Each one of us has been charged with the mission of hastening Mashiach’s coming by anxiously awaiting him and by preparing the world for his coming. Having reached the “last in deed,” the completion of the service of the Nesi’im, we are awaiting the “first in thought,” i.e., the revelation of G‑d’s true and ultimate intent for the world, the Messianic redemption.

* * *

2. The above can also be connected with the chapter in Psalms, Psalm 89, whose recitation — based on the custom revealed by the Baal Shem Tov of reciting the Psalm associated with the number of years of one’s life — was begun on Yud-Alef Nissan.

The final verses of the chapter refer to “those who scorn the footsteps of Your Mashiach.” This reflects the service of “last in deed,” the refinement of the lowest of all possible of levels. Nev­ertheless, it is through this service of refinement that we proceed to the Psalm’s concluding verse, “May G‑d be blessed forever. Amen and Amen.” On this verse, the Ibn Ezra comments, “Through Divine inspiration, the Psalmist saw the coming of the Mashiach and, therefore, expressed thanks to G‑d.”

This verse also indicates the service necessary to bring the redemption. The Hebrew word l’olam translated as “forever,” can also be rendered “to the world.”7 The word boruch translated as “blessed” also has the meaning “extended.” Thus, the verse implies that the revelation of G‑dliness will be extended until it is revealed within the context of our world, within even the deepest darkness of exile.

The potential to carry out this service is generated from the fact that this Psalm is “A composition of Eitan HaEzrachi.” Chassidic thought explains that Eitan refers to the essence of the soul as it clings to G‑d’s essence, the dimension of the soul which is a “part of G‑d from Above.”

This dimension of soul is described as HaEzrachi, “the native born,” i.e., the innate G‑dly potential present in every individual which reflects the level of “first in thought” described above. In our service, the level of Eitan refers to the power of the soul as expressed in mesirus nefesh, self-sacrifice.8

Maskil, the Hebrew word translated as “composition,” also refers to our essential potential for intellect which influences all our potentials.

Thus, we can understand the relation between the conclusion and the beginning of this Psalm. The potential to carry out the service of refinement in the darkness of exile, confronting “those who scorn the footsteps of Your Mashiach,” comes from the essential connection alluded to in the words, Eitan HaEzrachi. This quality generates the potential for mesirus nefesh which is necessary to carry out the service of “last in deed” in these final days of exile. Ultimately, this service will lead to the coming of the Mashiach.9

3. The above is also reflected in this week’s Torah portion, parshas Tzav. Our Sages associate Tzav with the concept of eager­ness and zealousness. Based on the principle that G‑d also fulfills Torah and mitzvos — indeed, “He tells His words to Yaakov,” i.e., what He does, He commands us to do — He will surely be eager and zealous in bringing the Messianic redemption. Then, we will be able to carry out the sacrificial services described in this Torah portion in the third Bais HaMikdash.

[Throughout all the years of exile, our people have carried out the sacrificial services within “the altar in their hearts.” Surely, after so many years, G‑d will grant them the potential to actually carry out these services in the Bais HaMikdash.]

The connection between this portion and the Messianic age is brought out by the Or HaChayim who explains the verse in the opening passage of the portion, “the entire night until the morning” as follows:

Until when will Israel be in [exile]?... “The entire night” is a reference to the time of exile.... “Until morning” refers to the time when He will reveal His glory to us and then dawn will come.... This will be after 500 years of the sixth millennium have passed, the shining of the light of the sixth day, Mashiach will come. G‑d’s day is 1000 years long. The first five hundred years represent the night and the next five hundred years, the day.

The Or HaChayim’s statements surely apply at present when 250 years have passed since that time, i.e., it is already passed midday.10 Surely, Mashiach’s coming is very imminent.

From Parshas Tzav, we proceed to parshas Shemini11 which describes the revelation of the Divine Presence in the Sanctuary. May we merit the complete and all-encompassing revelation of the Divine Presence which will be in the Third Bais HaMikdash.

“Deed is most essential.” Since, as explained above, Mashiach’s coming is imminent, we must increase our efforts in the activities which demonstrate how our anticipation of Mashiach’s coming effects our behavior and shows how we are prepared for the redemption.

In particular, this involves: a) an increase in the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah, spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward, for this will bring Mashiach. Added emphasis on this comes through the influence of the Tzemach Tzedek’s yahrzeit tomorrow. The Tzemach Tzedek’s teachings reveal the fusion of nigleh(the teachings of Torah law) and Pnimiyus HaTorah (Chassidus) which will bring about Mashiach’s coming. Surely, this day will be used for the study of the Tzemach Tzedek’s12 teachings, preferably at least three times throughout the day. b) An increase in tzedakah, particularly the tzedakah necessary to provide people with their Pesach needs.

May these efforts bring about that, on the Seder night, we are “all reclining,” together with all four sons, the entire Jewish people, in Eretz Yisrael, in Jerusalem, and in the Bais HaMikdash, where “we will partake of the sacrifices and the Paschal offerings, and acknowledge You with a new song for our redemption and for the liberation of our souls.” 

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