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Shabbos Chukas | 6-13 Tamuz5777

Fri- June 30th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:52 pm

Sat July 1st Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:14 am
Mincha  8:53 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 5
Maariv/Havdalah 10:01 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

KIDDUSH 
Please join us this Shabbos for a Welcoming Kiddush! Camp Gan Israel Seattle is gearing up for a Fantastic and Fun Summer 2017.Our staff has been arriving this whole week, and we are thrilled to have this amazing staff taking care of our children. Please join us in welcoming them at the Kiddush at Shaarei Tefillah.Hoping to see you at shul.Good Shabbos,Rabbi Kavka.  Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD BEIS TAMUZ - THU JULY 6th 
On the 12th of Tammuz of 1927, the sixth Lubavitcher rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, was officially granted release from his sentence of exile to Kastroma in the interior of Russia. Twenty-seven days earlier, the Rebbe had been arrested by agents of the GPU and the Yevsektzia ("Jewish Section" of the Communist Party) for his activities to preserve Judaism throughout the Soviet empire and sentenced to death, G-d forbid. International pressure forced the Soviets to commute the sentence to exile and, subsequently, to release him completely. The actual release took place on Tammuz 13, and Tammuz 12-13 is celebrated as a "festival of liberation" by the Chabad-Lubavitch community. 
www.chabad.org/calendar Venue to be announced.

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

PARENTS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILDREN
The shul board would like to remind parents that they have sole responsibility for their children at CSTL

CHAIRS AND TABLES AT SHUL are for Shul Use Only.  
PLEASE do not remove them from the building.  PLEASE return any that are out of the building.    Thank you for your help.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

SEPHARDIC RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
The Sephardic Religious School (SRS) is a supplementary Jewish school serving Jewish children in Pre-School through Grade 8, meet on Sundays for 2 1/2 hours and Tuesdays for an additional 1 ½ hours. SRS is housed at the Mercer Island JCC and open to all Jewish children regardless of synagogue affiliation. For more information please call Rachely Hemmat 206 992-2235 or email
srs.hebrewschool@gmail.com


COMMUNITY NEWS

Hot Wings and Cool Music Sun July 9th 5pm-9pm. 
Eating together and playing music before the three weeks, bring your singing voices and an instrument! Wings, Salads, Vegetarian Option, Lemonade, BYOB.          Register here:
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/hot-wings-and-cool-music.html

Seattle Kollel
Wed through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus .
June 26 - Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at: 
www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed    
June 26 - July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seed 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR CHUKAS
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507841/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Chukas-7th-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. There is a unique dimension to Parshas Chukas which is not found in regard to any of the other parshiyos in the Book of Bamidbar. With the exception of the opening passage of the Book which was not conveyed until Rosh Chodesh Iyar of the second year after the exodus, the entire Book is written in sequential order.

Parshas Naso describes events that took place on the first of Nissan, the day when the Sanctuary was erected. Parshas Behaalos’cha also mentions commands that were given on that same day and then describes the decampment of the Jews which took place on the 20th of Iyar. The narrative of the sending of the spies described in Parshas Shelach began on the 29th of Sivan and the rebellion of Korach described in the parshah of that name took place after the 9th of Av of that year according to our tradition.

Consequently, the order of events described in Parshas Chukas surely raises questions: The portion begins with the passage of the Red Heifer which was related on the 2nd of Nissan in the second year after the exodus. Directly, afterwards it skips to the description of events which took place at the conclusion of the Jew’s forty years of wandering through the desert, the death of Miriam, the dispute at the springs of Merivah, Aharon’s death, the conquest of Sichon and Og, and ultimately, the camping of the Jews on the Jordan. From a passage which was related directly after the construction of the Sanctuary, the portion skips to the events which occurred at the conclusion of the Jews’ wandering through the desert.

Rashi explains that the narrative of Miriam’s death is joined to the passage concerning the Red Heifer to teach that “just as the sacrifices atone, the death of the righteous atone.” Thus, it can be explained that after mentioning the death of Miriam, the Torah continued with a description of the events which followed. However, since the Torah is precise in every detail, it is likely that there is a connection between all the events described in the parshah and the offering of the Red Heifer.

The above concepts can be understood in light of another problematic element in the conclusion of the parshah which discusses the conquest of the lands of Sichon and Og. The Torah mentions that Moshe sent spies to explore the land of Ya’azer. Not only did the spies carry out their mission, they actually conquered the land. Notwithstanding the positive aspect of their behavior, it raises a question: Why did they disobey the instructions that they were given?1

Furthermore, we find the first spies, whose sin caused the Jews to wander in the desert for forty years, transgressed because they made a similar mistake. Moshe instructed them to explore Eretz Yisrael in order to find out the easiest way of conquering it. The spies took an additional step, adding to the description of the land, their conclusion that the land couldn’t be conquered. Thus, the question arises: Why did these spies who apparently2 wanted to correct the behavior of the first spies emulate their example and add to the mission with which Moshe charged them?

There is another difficult point in regard to the Jews’ settling in the lands of Sichon and Og: Why did the tribes of Reuven, Gad, and half the tribe of Menasheh desire to remain in this land? On the surface, G‑d had promised the land of Canaan — the land between the Jordan and the Mediterranean — to the Jews. The territories of Sichon and Og on the eastern bank of the Jordan were not included in that land3 as clearly indicated by the fact that Moshe sent messengers toSichon asking him to allow the Jews to pass through his land on their way to Eretz Yisrael. If so, why did these two and a half tribes desire to settle in these lands. Indeed, their behavior appears reminiscent of that of the spies who refused to enter Eretz Yisrael.

[The Torah relates that they explained their desire as follows: They had a lot of cattle and TransJordan was fit for cattle grazing. Nevertheless, the question remains: How could they, members of Moshe’s generation, “a generation of knowledge,” care more about their property than about entering Eretz Yisrael?]

The problematic aspect of this narrative is further emphasized by the fact that ultimately Moshe agreed to their request and allowed them to settle in these lands. The agreement he made with them — that they would serve as the vanguard of the Jews’ armies — nullified the possibility that they would cause the entire people to lose heart and refuse to enter the land. It did not resolve the fact that these tribes themselves did not settle in Eretz Yisrael.

The above difficulties can all be resolved in light of the following explanation: Since the Jewish people were all prepared to enter Eretz Yisrael, it can be assumed that they desired to correct and atone for the sin of the spies. To correct this transgression in a complete manner, it was necessary to perform an act resembling the transgression, but of a positive nature. Hence, the spies mentioned in this portion — like the original spies — altered and added to the mission on which Moshe sent them. However, their addition was of a positive rather than a negative nature, reflecting Moshe’s true desire as Rashi comments, “they were confident in the power of Moshe’s prayer to be able to fight.”

A similar concept can be explained in regard to the desire of the two and a half tribes to stay in TransJordan. Their actions were motivated by a genuine love for Eretz Yisrael and a will to atone for the sins of the generation which did not wish to enter Eretz Yisrael.

To explain: When G‑d promised Avraham that his descendants would inherit Eretz Yisrael in theBris bein haBetarim, G‑d mentioned the conquest of ten nations, the seven who dwelled in Eretz Yisrael and also the Keni, Knizi and Kadmoni (identified with Moav, Ammon, and Edom) an area stretching from “the river of Egypt until the great river, the Euphrates.” Nevertheless, Moshe only mentioned the conquest of the seven nations who dwelled in Eretz Yisrael, the conquest of Moav, Ammon, and Edom, who dwelled (at least in part) in TransJordan was forbidden, left for the Messianic age.

There was a way, however, in which the Jews were able to dwell in a portion of these lands before the Mashiach’s coming. As our Torah portion relates, Sichon conquered some of the land belonging to these nations. After conquering his lands, the Jews were able to take possession of this territory as well. Indeed, our Sages use the expression that Sichon “purified”4 these lands. Thus, these tribes’ desire to settle in this territory was motivated by a commitment to dwell in all the portions of Eretz Yisrael possible.

When understood in this context, their acts also represent a correction of the behavior of the Jews who desired to remain in the desert. Just as those Jews did not want to enter Eretz Yisraelproper, these tribes did not desire to do so. However, their intent was not to reject the land, but rather to bring about its most complete settlement, extending it to the territory of the Keni, Kniziand Kadmoni to the fullest extent possible before Mashiach’s coming.5 For these reasons, Moshe was willing to accept their proposal and allowed them to settle in these lands.

The reason why these two and a half tribes in particular desired to settle in TransJordan can be explained as follows: The tribes of Reuven and Gad possessed many sheep and therefore, sought to settle in TransJordan because it was excellent pasture land. Chassidic thought explains that pasturing sheep is a profession which requires less involvement and effort in toil and labor than agriculture and thus, affords the shepherd time for meditation and contemplation.

This also relates to the sin of the spies and the desire to correct and atone for it. The spies did not desire to enter Eretz Yisrael because they desired to remain above worldly matters. This was a mistake because G‑d’s intent is that the Jews involve themselves in the refinement of the world. Thus, the efforts of the tribes of Reuven and Gad corrected this error. These tribes composed the vanguard of the Jewish armies which conquered Eretz Yisrael, thus demonstrating their appreciation of the importance and commitment to the refinement of the world. Nevertheless, after the land was settled and that task had been undertaken, they returned to TransJordan to involve themselves in service above the day to day mundane realities.

This concept also relates to the Mitteler Rebbe’s explanation of the difference between Eretz Yisrael and the land of the Keni, Knizi and Kadmoni. The Mitteler Rebbe associates the seven nations who lived in Eretz Yisrael with our seven emotional qualities and the Keni, Knizi andKadmoni with our three intellectual potentials. At present, our service consists of refining our emotional potentials. Accordingly, we were given the land of the seven nations. In the Messianic era, we will also be able to refine and develop our intellectual potentials and therefore, we will be granted the lands of these other three nations.6

The two points are interrelated because the service of the intellect reflects a step above the work of refining our day-to-day realities. The involvement of the tribes of Reuven and Gad7 with this uplifted intellectual service had an effect on the entire Jewish people — for these tribes maintained their connection with the people as a whole — and gave the people the power to accomplish the task of refining the world.

[In particular, the fusion of the two services can be seen in the tribe of Menasheh who were divided because of Moshe’s decision. He realized that the area in TransJordan was too large to be populated only by the tribes of Reuven and Gad and ordered half the tribe of Menasheh to join them. Thus, in this instance, the fusion of the service of intellect, above the realities of the world, and the service of refining the world was reflected in a single tribe.]

These concepts are related to the Mishnah’s statements concerning the lands of Ammon and Moav (which, as explained above, correspond to the lands of the Keni and the Knizi) in regard to the laws of Shevi’is (the Sabbatical year):

What is the law regarding the lands of Ammon and Moav in Shevi’is? Rabbi Tarfon decreed that they should separate “the tithe of the poor”... so that the poor people from Eretz Yisrael could derive support from them.

In the period of the Second Beis HaMikdash, these lands did not have the sanctity of Eretz Yisrael and were not required to observe its agricultural laws. Accordingly, they could sow their fields in the Sabbatical year. Although there was reason to assume that the Sages would have required the separation of the second tithe, instead, they ordered that the “tithe of the poor” be separated so that the poor, who this year would not receive their portion from the fields of Eretz Yisrael which lay fallow, could benefit from them.

This law contains a homiletic dimension which relates to the concepts described above. Our Sages stated: “One is only poor in regard to knowledge.” The poor from Eretz Yisrael, i.e., the people who lacked knowledge living in the holy land could derive sustenance from the service of knowledge carried out in the lands of the Keni and Knizi. Based on the above, we can also understand the connection between the events mentioned at the conclusion of Parshas Chukaswith the portion of the Red Heifer mentioned at the outset. The portion of the Red Heifer was related after the construction of the Sanctuary when the Jews were on a high spiritual level (having atoned for the sin of Golden Calf as Rashi mentions). It was not until the end of the forty year period after the conquest and settlement of the land of Sichon8 which atoned for the sins of the spies, that the Jews were able to reach a similar spiritual rung.

An added dimension to the above is contributed by the name ChukasChok can also mean “engraved” as the letters of the Ten Commandments were engraved into the stone. Thus, the letters are part of the stone itself which cannot be separated from it. Similarly, after the forty years of the desert, the Jews became totally united with Eretz Yisrael until the most appropriate metaphor to describe their connection was Chukas, “engraved letters.”

This was reflected in the desire of the tribes to settle in all the lands promised Avraham in theBris bein haBetarim.9 Though the conquest of those lands could not be completed — because of the Divine command, “Do not disturb Moav,” — that command also had a positive dimension. Through it, the potential was granted for the birth of Ruth, “the mother of royalty,” the ancestor of King David and thus, the Mashiach, who will complete the conquest of Eretz Yisrael. May it be in the immediate future.

2. The above concepts are given greater emphasis by the fact that Parshas Chukas is read in the month of Tammuz, the month associated with the Previous Rebbe’s redemption on Yud-Beis-Yud-Gimmel Tammuz. All redemptions are related to the ultimate Messianic redemption. In particular, this applies to the Previous Rebbe’s redemption for he is a Nasi and, as Rashiexplains, “the Nasi includes the entire people.” This point was emphasized by the Previous Rebbe himself who wrote:10

It was not myself alone that the Holy One, blessed be He, redeemed on Yud-Beis Tammuz, but also those who love the Torah and observe its commands, and so to all those who merely bear the name “Jew.”

Thus, the redemption of the Nasi of the last generation of exile and the first generation of redemption prepares for and hastens the coming of the ultimate Messianic redemption. Indeed, it is many years since the Previous Rebbe declared, “Immediately to Teshuvah; immediately to redemption.” We have surely completed the task of “polishing the buttons” and are ready to “stand prepared to greet Mashiach.” This is connected to Parshas Chukas which relates how the Jews were prepared to enter Eretz Yisrael and indeed, as explained above, anxious for the full and ultimate conquest of the land.11

This will be intensified by the Jews’ commitment to maintaining possession of Eretz Yisrael, declaring that this is a land which G‑d has given to us. Indeed, the gentiles emphasize this themselves referring to the land as Israel, identifying the land with the true nature of a Jew, the dimension which “strove with man and god and was victorious.”

In light of the above, efforts should be made to spread the celebration of Yud-Beis-Yud-GimmelTammuz in every place throughout the world. These efforts will augment the campaign to establish public sessions of Torah study12 mentioned previously. May the resolutions for activities in connection with Yud-Beis Tammuz hasten the coming of the Messianic redemption with which it is related.13

* * *

3. It is customary to also mention a concept from the chapter of Pirkei Avos learned this Shabbos (Ch. 5). This chapter includes several listings in groupings of ten, groupings of seven, and groupings of four. There are many other numbers that have a unique Torah significance. For example, the Torah describes the Jews as being “11 days from Choreb.” There are 12 tribes and 13 Attributes of Mercy. Similarly, there are many numbers from 1 to 600,000 which have significance. Nevertheless, as explained on another occasion (See Biurim to Pirkei Avos, p. 121), the three numbers repeated in this chapter share a common quality.

On the surface, the question might be raised: Of what purpose is the mention of the number in these teachings? It can, however, be explained that the mention of the number insures that all the particulars mentioned in the teaching will be remembered.

This teaches us an important concept. Not only is a general principle important, every particular, even those which appear minute are of significance. To allow for all the particulars to be recalled, the Mishnah mentions a number at the outset.

There is a connection to the latter concept to the teaching studied as an introduction to each chapter in Pirkei Avos:

All Israel have a portion in the World to Come as it is written: “And your nation are all righteous...”

In regard to the righteous, the Talmud teaches, “The righteous hold their money dearer than their bodies” and are precise even concerning matters worth less than a penny, i.e., they endeavor to use each particular element of existence, even if it is of seemingly minimal worth, for a holy purpose. This is reflected in a halachic concept which explains that, at times, an article which is not large enough to be considered significant is given halachic importance because it is used for a mitzvah.

There is a reflection of this concept in each of our lives. We must try to relate the mission of transforming the world into a dwelling for G‑d to every aspect of our existence. If a person has a chance to perform a task associated with a mitzvah, be it great or small, he should be happy to fulfill it. We are speaking about carrying out G‑d’s will which transcends all definitions of great or small, high or low. If anything, since “G‑d desire that He have a dwelling in the lower worlds,” involvement in services that are low, including also those low in importance, are necessary to fulfill that desire.

Our Sages declared: “This world is like a marriage feast. One should grab and eat, grab and drink;” i.e., this is a world in which G‑d’s marriage to the Jews is being celebrated. There is no time to sit and take stock. Rather, one should grab every opportunity to perform a mitzvah available.

Here, we see a connection to Parshas Chukas which reflects a commitment above reason and understanding. Though rationally, one might have reasons to think that there are other things which are more important, one must act above his intellect and devote himself to G‑d’s service, involving himself in activities, which his intellect might judge as too petty. Indeed, the feeling that one needs to judge the relative importance of different services stems from one’s yetzer horawhich dresses up in a silk kapote and tries to sway a person away from doing what he has to.

A person should tell his yetzer hora: Take off your silk kapote! I know where you come from. You come from Sodom. For in Sodom, they were known to steal less than a penny’s worth.

We see a reflection of this concept in Jewish law as well. When a person who is thirsty drinks water, even if he drinks less than a penny’s worth, he recites the blessing, shehakol niheyoh bid’voro, proclaiming how the entire world was brought into existence through G‑d’s speech.

The above should not be taken as a charge to become involved merely with things of no consequence. The intent is that one should be involved in whatever service Divine Providence presents one. If it turns out to be very important, to quote next week’s chapter of Pirkei Avos, a matter which is worth “a million golden dinars, precious stones, and pearls,”14 one should definitely remain involved. Nevertheless, one should show a similar commitment even the service is “less than a penny’s worth.”

A commitment to service of this nature should not lead to pride or inflated self-esteem. On the contrary, these emotions are the very opposite of the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in this world. In regard to a proud person, G‑d states, “He and I cannot dwell in the world.” ToChassidim, however, this point need not be stressed, because it is self-understood.

May we each fulfill the mission which G‑d grants us in the midst of affluence and may this lead to ultimate Messianic redemption. May it be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Korach | Rosh Chodesh Tamuz 29 Sivan – 6 Tamuz5777

Fri- June 23th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:53 pm

Sat June 24th Shabbos /ROSH CHODESH TAMUZ
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:11 am
Mincha  8:53 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 4
Maariv/Havdalah 10:03 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am /ROSH CHODESH TAMUZ/
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

GALA GIMEL TAMUZ KIDDUSH 
Kiddush this week is sponsored by Rabbi SB Levitin and Chabad of Seattle in honor and in memory of the 23rd yahrzeit of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbi OBM.  Seuda Slishit

SHABBOS FARBRENGEN FOR WOMEN –June 24th at 5 PM
T
he women of the community are invited to Ladies' Farbrengen 5 pm Shabbos afternoon Parshas Korach, at home of Tziviah Goldberg 4038 NE 58th St, guest speaker Chana Ginsburg of Crown Heights: teacher of Chassidus, coach, and personal growth counselor.
www.Kabbalahoflife.com  .

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Yechezkel and Ora Rappoport on the occasion of the wedding of Shimona Leah and  Sadya Davidoff.  May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel

Mazel Tov to Sarah Cohen and Chaim Siev on their engagement. Celebrate them with a L'Chaim Seudah Shlishit this Shabbat at Rabbi Avi and Rachel Rosenfeld’s home; 5240 38th Ave. NE. From 5pm to 7pm.  May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel

Mazel Tov to Yocheved, Avi and Chaya Leeker on the birth of their son and little brother!

GIMEL TAMUZ FARBRENGEN FOR WOMEN –TUE JUNE 27th at 7:30 PM
T
he women of the community are invited to Ladies' Farbrengen  in honor of Gimel Tamuz, the23rd yahrzeit of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbi OBM.   At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, 
chanielevitin@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

PARENTS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILDREN
The shul board would like to remind parents that they have sole responsibility for their children at CSTL

CHAIRS AND TABLES AT SHUL are for Shul Use Only.  
PLEASE do not remove them from the building.  PLEASE return any that are out of the building.    Thank you for your help.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/


COMMUNITY NEWS

Hot Wings and Cool Music Sun July 9th 5pm-9pm. 
Eating together and playing music before the three weeks, bring your singing voices and an instrument! Wings, Salads, Vegetarian Option, Lemonade, BYOB.          Register here:
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/hot-wings-and-cool-music.html

Full Day SEED Camp June 26 - Aug. 11
For boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seedJewish 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


 SICHO FOR KORACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507774/jehttp://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518605/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Korach-23rd-Day-of-Sivan-5744-1984.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

The Shabbos on which a month is blessed (Shabbos Mevorchim) is always situated in the preceding month. Accordingly, the Shabbos which blesses the fourth month (Tammuz) is in the third month (Sivan). That the fourth month is blessed by [a Shabbos in] the third month indicates a connection between the two months.

But is there necessarily a connection? Shabbos Mevorchim, because it blesses the coming month, must be before Rosh Chodesh of the coming month — i.e., it must be in the preceding month. In the order of the months, the third month naturally precedes the fourth. Hence the Shabbos which blesses the fourth month must be in the third month. Why, then, must we conclude that there is a connection between them?

However, the Rogatchover writes that “Everything, although seemingly having to be, was all directed and commanded by G‑d.” Thus, when two things in Torah are joined, there is a connection between them although they seemingly had to be joined. For Torah is master of the universe, and Torah cannot be limited in any way. Although we cannot grasp how it can exist in any other way, we believe with simple faith that it is so. Since these two things are joined — although they didn’t have to be — there is a connection between them.

In our case, although it seems the blessing for the fourth month must stem from the third month, it did not necessarily have to be from Torah’s perspective. The fact that it is indicates a connection between the two months.

To understand the lesson for service to G‑d we can derive from this, let us first analyze the meaning of the third month. That Sivan is the third month is not an incidental aspect, but a primary element. The Talmud (Shabbos 88a) states concerning Mattan Torah: “The threefold Torah (Chumash, Prophets, Writings) [was given] to the threefold people (Priests, Levites, Israelites) through the third born (Moshe — born after Aharon and Miriam) on the third day (of preparation) in the third month.” R. Nissim Gaon enumerates several other factors present at Mattan Torah connected with the number three.

We could perhaps posit that the element of “three” which is present in all these factors is but an incidental aspect, not to be compared with the essential quality of each factor. For example, the fact that Torah is “threefold” — Chumash, Prophets and Writings — does not seem to be the primary quality of Torah, which is that Torah is G‑d’s “nursling” and “delight.” How can the fact that it is “threefold” compare to such qualities which totally transcend the realm of numbers? Similarly, that the Jewish people are comprised of Priests, Levites and Israelites seems incidental to the essential qualities of Jews which is that their souls are “part of G‑d Above,” that they are “a kingdom of priests and a holy nation” and that they are G‑d’s only son (“My son, My firstborn, Israel”).

Nevertheless, since the Talmud attaches so much importance to the number “three’ in connection to the giving of the Torah, we must conclude it is a vital concept.

“Three” represents peace: When two parties are in a controversy, the third party makes peace between them, uniting them into one entity. This is the idea of the “threefold” Torah, for “the Torah was given to make peace in the world.” Thus, although there are levels in the Torah which transcend the world (“plaything”, “delight”), the ultimate purpose of Torah is to work its effect in this corporeal world — “to make peace in the world.” And through the Torah descending into the world, it is elevated to a level higher than before, when it was G‑d’s “delight” — for it is specifically through its descent that the Divine will of making this world a dwelling place for G‑d is fulfilled.

Similarly, when a Jew engages in Torah for the purpose of making “peace in the world” — he does not closet himself with the Torah apart from the world — he thereby fulfills the Divine will of making the world a fit abode for G‑dliness.

Let us draw a parable. A person’s possession of an object entails two aspects: his ownership, and his use of it. Normally his ownership is the principal element, and the use is but an external aspect which expresses his ownership. If, for some reason, a person is prevented from using the object, his ownership still remains.

If a person owns a field, for example, his use of it is limited: When sowing, he cannot reap; when reaping, he cannot sow the field. But this does not detract an iota from his ownership, for use is but an external aspect compared to the actual ownership.

The above applies to one’s ownership vis-à-vis the potential uses in the object. In regards to the actual result of that use, however, one’s ownership and therefore potential use in the future cannot effect the actual result. When one needs to reap, for example, his ownership of the field which permits him to reap in the future, has no effect on whether he can actually reap now.

Torah, too, possesses the two aspects of ownership and use. Every Jew, even a newborn, receives the whole Torah as a heritage, and therefore owns the whole Torah. Use of the Torah occurs by stages: A child first learns to recite the verse, “The Torah which Moshe commanded us is the heritage of the congregation of Ya’akov”; when the child turns five years old, he learns Scripture; when ten, Mishneh; and so on, every year increasing in understanding of Torah.

These stages apply only to his use of the Torah. His ownership of it is total as soon as he is born. Seemingly, his ownership is the principal element, and the different stages of use are but external which express his ownership.

However, concerning the need to use the Torah in a certain way, one’s ownership is irrelevant; the actual use is what counts. In our case, since the purpose of Torah is to “make peace in the world,” it is not enough that one has ownership of the Torah and has the potential to use it in all ways; the main thing is to actually carry out the purpose of making peace. Thus, if for this purpose and need Torah had to descend below, and man has to lower himself to engage in worldly matters — it is not really a “descent,” for the main thing is the fulfillment of this purpose.

Thus the idea of “three” is a principal element in Mattan Torah, for the purpose of Torah is to “make peace in the world.” And that is why the number “three” present in all aspects of Mattan Torah (threefold Torah, threefold people, etc.) is not just a common element, but the principal theme which unites all of them — for the purpose of all of them is to make a dwelling place for G‑d in this world (“to make peace in the world” — the idea of “three”).

Shabbos Shelach – Mevarchim Tamuz | 22-29 Sivan 5777

Fri- June 16th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:51 pm

Sat June 17th Shabbos 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Tamuz 8 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:10 am
Mincha  8:51 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 3
Maariv/Havdalah 10:01 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9  am
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush this week is sponsored by Yitzchok Rothman, in honor and in memory of the 5th yahrzeit of Norman Manaster z"l  (Naftali Michael ben Baruch, 18th Sivan).   Seuda Slishit

SHABBOS FARBRENGEN FOR WOMEN – 17th June at 5:30 PM
Goldie Perry
 would like to invite the women of the community to a farbrengen in honor of her Birthday this Shabbat, Parshat Sh'lach at the home of Tziviah Goldberg.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Yechezkel and Ora Rappoport on the occasion of Shimona Leah’s marriage to  Sadya Davidoff.  May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel

Mazel Tov to Michoel and Ilana Levin on the birth of their granddaughter Natanella Rose to Avishag and Chaim Cowan.  May they merit to raise her to a life of Torah, chuppah, and ma'asim tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

PARENTS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILDREN
The shul board would like to remind parents that they have sole responsibility for their children at CSTL

CHAIRS AND TABLES AT SHUL are for Shul Use Only.  
PLEASE do not remove them from the building.  PLEASE return any that are out of the building.    Thank you for your help.

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/


COMMUNITY NEWS

CHANUKAT HABAYIT BUILDING DEDICATION: Sun June 18 at 10:30 am – noon,
Minyan Ohr Chadash community celebration of newly remodeled space! 
http://www.minyanohrchadash.org/

Hot Wings and Cool Music Sun July 9th 5pm-9pm. 
Eating together and playing music before the three weeks, bring your singing voices and an instrument! Wings, Salads, Vegetarian Option, Lemonade, BYOB.          Register here:
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/hot-wings-and-cool-music.html

Full Day SEED Camp June 26 - Aug. 11
For boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seedJewish 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHELACH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507774/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shelach-26th-Day-of-Sivan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. On Shabbos, the entire Torah reading of the week is read, thus fusing each of the separate elements of the Torah reading into a single whole. The Shabbos day includes within it all the days of the previous week, and thus, the Shabbos reading is also all-inclusive in nature. Although each of the different readings contains an individual message, their being read together as a single parshah endows them with a point of general significance. Furthermore, in a larger sense, they share a point of connection, not only to the entire Torah reading, but to the Torah as a whole, for the entire Torah is a single indivisible entity.

In particular, this concept is relevant to Parshas Shelach, where it is obvious how all the different elements of the Torah reading are interrelated. The majority of the Torah reading is concerned with the mission of the spies and the reaction of the Jewish people on their return. Even the subsequent passages, for example, the passage concerning the wine libations and the passage concerning the separation of Challah were mentioned, directly after G‑d told Moshe that the Jews would remain in the desert for forty years, so that the people would be reassured that ultimately, they would enter Eretz Yisrael.

Similarly, the concluding passage1 mentions the mitzvah of tzitzis, a mitzvah of all-encompassing significance which reminds one of the totality of the 613 mitzvos. This further indicates the connection shared between one passage from the Torah and the Torah as a whole.

It is necessary to understand, however, why this concept — how each passage of the Torah is connected to the Torah as a whole — is expressed by Parshas Shelach. What is the connection between this concept and Parshas Shelach? Similarly, it is necessary to understand why the connection between Parshas Shelach and the time of the year when this parshah is read, the conclusion of the month of Sivan.

These concepts can be understand through an analysis of the story of the spies and, more particularly, through contrasting the narrative of the spies sent by Moshe and the narrative of the spies sent by Yehoshua which is mentioned in the Haftorah. Among the differences between these two narratives are: a) There was no direct command for Moshe to send spies. Rather, G‑d left the matter up to Moshe’s discretion as Rashi comments on the word לדעתך in the opening verse of the Torah portion. In contrast, Yehoshua was explicitly commanded to send spies. This is obvious; after the disastrous results of the mission of the spies sent by Moshe, he surely would not have sent spies unless commanded to do so by G‑d. b) In regard to the spies sent by Moshe, the Torah uses the expressions “men” and “explore.” In contrast, in regard to the spies sent by Yehoshua, “spies” and “search out,” expressions which reflect more clandestine activities, are used. c) Moshe sent twelve spies and Yehoshua sent only two. d) In regard to the spies sent by Moshe, the Torah mentions the names of the spies and specifically states that they were the leaders of the people. In contrast, the identity of the spies sent by Yehoshua is not mentioned in the narrative. e) The spies sent by Moshe were sent openly; the entire Jewish people knew of their mission. Furthermore, there was no attempt to hide their mission from the gentiles. On the contrary, rather than dividing Eretz Yisrael among all of them, each one exploring a portion, they traveled as a group, in a manner which their presence could be noticed by anyone.2 In contrast, Yehoshua “secretly sent spies,” hiding the matter from the Jewish people and surely, from the Canaanites. f) The spies sent by Moshe traversed Eretz Yisrael in its entirety. In contrast, the spies sent by Yehoshua were instructed to “see the land and Jericho,” (i.e., at the outset, their mission had a more limited scope). Furthermore, in actuality, they merely went to Rachav’s house, fled to the hills for three days, and then returned to Yehoshua. Thus, they did not explore the land as a whole, and did not even explore Jericho in its totality.

The differences between the nature of the missions of the spies sent by Moshe and those sent by Yehoshua revolve around the differences in the purpose of these missions. To explain: In general, two reasons are offered for the sending spies by the Jews: a) to prepare for conquest of Eretz Yisrael, to discover its roads and fortifications so that it would be easier to plan an attack. b) To investigate the nature of the land, to inform the people of its positive qualities so that they will be eager to settle within it.

Moshe sent the spies primarily for the second purpose. He was confident that the conquest of Eretz Yisrael would be accomplished in a miraculous manner. He did, however, desire that they explore the land in order to tell the people of its positive qualities. In contrast, in the time of Yehoshua, this was no longer necessary — for the spies sent by Moshe had already accomplished this objective. It was, however, necessary to prepare for the conquest of the land, since in Yehoshua’s time, the conquest would require actual war, and for this purpose, he sent spies to Jericho.

To explain this idea: The Jewish people asked Moshe to send spies in order to “search out the land,” i.e., to investigate how the land should be conquered. Moshe, however, did not consider that purpose significant, as he told the people, “G‑d, your L‑rd, proceeds before you. He will fight for you.” Nor was there a need to explore the roads, because the pillar of cloud led the Jewish people during the day, and the pillar of fire led them at night.

Why did he send the spies? “To explore the land.... so that they shall see what kind of land it is... Whether it is good... whether it is rich...” And therefore, he told them to bring back some of the fruit of the land, so the Jewish people would all be able to behold actual proof of the land’s positive qualities.3

In contrast, Yehoshua did not send spies for this purpose, for this intent had already been achieved by the spies sent by Moshe. In this instance, the spies were sent for the purpose of preparing for the conquest of the land. Yehoshua realized that the conquest which he would lead would not be accompanied by the miracles that would have characterized Moshe’s conquest of the land. Therefore, he felt the need for spies to investigate the nature of the defenses of the land he was setting out to conquer.

Based on these general principles, we can explain the other particular differences between the mission of the spies sent by Moshe and those sent by Yehoshua. As mentioned, there was no Divine command to send spies, for from G‑d’s perspective, there was no need for such a mission. The land would be conquered in a miraculous manner and He had already assured the people that it was a good and prosperous land.

The Jewish people, however, felt the need to send spies, and Moshe agreed since, as Rashi states in Parshas Devarim, he hoped that once he agreed wholeheartedly to their request, they would feel that he was not hiding anything from them, and would therefore, withdraw the request.

When this did not happen, Moshe presented the request to G‑d, asking whether spies should be sent to explore the land — i.e., not to search out the easiest way of conquest, but to bring back a report which would encourage the people to desire to conquer it as explained above. G‑d replied that this was left l’datechoh, to Moshe’s own discretion. G‑d did not oppose such a mission, nor did He see a real need for it. Moshe, however, as the shepherd of the Jewish people, saw the need for the people to be encouraged and therefore, consented to send the spies.

For this reason, he sent twelve spies, one for each tribe, and chose a leader of that tribe. His intent was for the spies to explore the entire land of Eretz Yisrael and to see that there was a portion appropriate for each tribe. Therefore, he sent a leader of the tribe, an individual who knew the needs of his tribe, and could tell them upon his return that there was a portion of Eretz Yisrael appropriate for them.

And it was with this intent that the spies traveled together as a group throughout Eretz Yisrael. Since the land had not been divided into tribal portions as of yet, it was impossible to send each of the spies to explore the portion to be given to his tribe. Rather, it was necessary for them all to see the entire land, and to appreciate how the land as a whole was suitable for their tribe.

This also explains why their mission was not secret. Needless to say, it was made known to the Jews, for its entire purpose was to encourage them to desire to enter Eretz Yisrael. Furthermore, it was not hidden from the Canaanites. Since it was not directed at military objectives, the spies had no reason to obscure their identity and mingle among the local people to discover whether they were afraid of the Jews or not. Similarly, they were confident that just as the conquest of Eretz Yisrael would be carried out in a miraculous manner, so too, they would be able to carry out their mission in a miraculous manner without having to be concerned with the danger of apprehension.

Yehoshua’s sending of spies, in contrast, had a clear military objective, to discover the most practical way to conquer Jericho. For this reason, he sent the spies secretly, sending two and not twelve (for thus they could hide easier). Needless to say, the mission was not publicized to the Canaanites, and even to the Jewish people, it was not made known (lest word of it leak outside).

Nor was it necessary to send the leaders of the people. Since the intent was not to convince the people at large of the land’s favorable qualities, there was no purpose in choosing leaders. (Indeed, doing so would make the mission public knowledge.) Rather, it was preferable to send individuals with military knowledge.

This also explains why the spies returned to Yehoshua without making a thorough investigation of Jericho. After Rachav told them that “the fear of you has fallen upon us. All the inhabitants of the land have melted with terror because of you... there is no courage remaining in any man,” they did not need to make any further explorations. They knew that the land could be conquered.

The above explanation also clarifies another problematic point regarding the mission of the spies sent by Moshe. Since the spies were the leaders of the Jewish people and unique individuals selected by Moshe himself. How is it possible that their mission led to such disastrous results?4

Based on the above, however, it can be explained that the spies’ mission did, in fact, accomplish its purpose. They came back and told the people that Eretz Yisrael was a land of milk and honey and brought samples of the fine fruit that it produced. Thus the Jews knew from actual experience the positive qualities possessed by the land, and afterwards — albeit unfortunately, very many years afterwards — this knowledge allowed them to enter Eretz Yisrael with happiness and joy.

Furthermore, even immediately, in a spiritual sense, there was a positive dimension to their journey for the fact that Jews on a high spiritual level traveled through Eretz Yisrael was the first stage of the ultimate conquest of Eretz Yisrael.5 Thus their mission was part of the service of elevating the lower aspects of our material world.6

The mission of the spies sent by Moshe also teaches us another lesson. A spy was sent from each tribe, because each tribe has a unique approach to the service of G‑d. For example, the service of the tribe of Yissachar centered on Torah study and that of Zevulun, on commercial activity the proceeds of which were used for tzedakah. Similarly, each other tribe had a path of service unique for it. In a correspondent manner, Eretz Yisrael is divided into twelve portions, one for each of the tribes, for the refinement of that portion of land is intrinsically related to the service of that particular tribe.7

Accordingly, it would seem more appropriate for each of the leaders to have investigated the portion of Eretz Yisrael8 appropriate for his particular tribe,9 and yet, we find that the opposite was true. All twelve spies traversed the entire land together. This emphasizes how the individual service of every Jew is interconnected with that of our people as a whole, for — as an expression of the mitzvah of ahavas Yisrael — one Jew helps another carry out his service. Furthermore, through the collective efforts of the entire Jewish people (as represented by their leaders), the refinement of the world is carried out in a more complete and more elevated manner.

* * *

2. Based on the above, we can understand the connection between Parshas Shelach and the month of Sivan, the month associated with the giving of the Torah. As mentioned, Parshas Shelach is always read towards the conclusion of the month of Sivan, and furthermore, the spies themselves began their journey on the 29th of Sivan.

The connection between the two revolves around the concept explained above, that the spies’ journey was a phase in the elevation and the refinement of the world. The refinement of the world is accomplished through the power of the Torah. Thus, the conclusion of the month of the giving of the Torah represents the extension of the Torah into the world at large and the refinement of the world that results from this activity.

The Torah is connected with the Jewish people as reflected in the fact that the name Yisrael is an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “There are 600,000 letters in the Torah.” Each Jewish soul has its letter in the Torah which serves as the source for its life-energy and vitality.

There are two laws concerning a Torah scroll that have significant parallels in our service of G‑d: a) Each letter in a Torah scroll must be surrounded by parchment and, b) a Torah scroll is incomplete unless it contains every single letter. From this, we can infer that each Jew has a service which is unique and specific to his particular soul, separate from that of other Jews. And, also, that the service of one Jew is incomplete until he joins together with the entire Jewish people. Similarly, there are two levels of refinement to be accomplished by the Jewish people: one that is the responsibility of each particular individual, and one to be accomplished by the people as a whole.

To explain: The concepts of oneness and division are intrinsic to the Torah and its mitzvos. The Torah is one, for it is G‑d’s wisdom and “He and His wisdom are one.” In contrast, there are 613 mitzvos. Since the mitzvos are G‑d’s directives for man’s conduct in the world at large, just as the world at large has 613 dimensions,10 so too, there are 613 different mitzvos.

More particularly, the contrast between oneness and division is reflected in the difference between Pnimiyus HaTorah (Torah’s mystic dimension) and Nigleh (the revealed teachings of Torah law). Nigleh is concerned with the refinement of the world, defining what is kosher and what is not, what is pure and what is impure. Accordingly, like the world, it is characterized by division, including the very basic division into sixty different tractates. In contrast, Pnimiyus HaTorah concerns itself with G‑d, “Know the G‑d of your father.” Hence, just as G‑d is one, this Torah discipline is characterized by oneness.

The above is also reflected within the Jewish people. From the perspective of the soul, all the Jews are united. What divides them? Their bodies, in which their souls are enclothed to carry out the service of refining the world at large. More particularly, the conscious powers of the soul (intellect and emotion) are characterized by division, and it is the essence of the soul (the revelation of which is through the service of bittul) which reflects oneness.

The journey of the spies teaches us that our efforts to refine the world do not relate only to those aspects of the Jews and the Torah which are characterized by division, but also relate to the transcendental levels that reflect G‑d’s fundamental oneness.

In particular, it can be explained that these two approaches to the service of refinement, an approach that focuses on particular divisions and an approach which is characterized by oneness, reflect the difference between the mission of the spies sent by Moshe and those sent by Yehoshua. Moshe sent twelve spies, one for each of the services which characterize the Jewish people, and he charged them with exploring the entire land, i.e., all of its different particulars.11

In contrast, the mission of the spies sent by Yehoshua was characterized by oneness. Therefore, he sent spies only to Jericho, “the padlock of Eretz Yisrael,” i.e., a city which in essence included the entire country and thus relates to the approach of oneness.

Similarly, these spies were sent in response to G‑d’s command, i.e., as an expression of the quality of bittul which brings into revelation the essence of the soul, the quality present in all Jews without distinction. The dimension of oneness associated with this mission is also reflected by each of the terms used by the verse, “two men [to] spy in secret.”

“Two,” in contrast to twelve, reflects the two fundamental thrusts — positive activity and the negation of undesirable influences — which include the totality of our service. “Men,” as opposed to leaders, indicate an emphasis, not on the greatness of the qualities possessed by the individual, but rather on the essential qualities common to all men.

“[To] spy in secret” reveals a modest approach to the service of G‑d characteristic of the quality of bittul. One does not seek personal aggrandizement or publicity.

3. The above concepts receive further emphasis in terms of our Sages’ explanation that the two spies sent by Yehoshua were Caleb and Pinchas. Why Yehoshua sent Caleb is understandable. He was the only one of the spies (other than Yehoshua himself) sent by Moshe who accomplished his mission successfully. Why, however, was Pinchas chosen? As mentioned above, Yehoshua sent these spies to prepare for the conquest of Eretz Yisrael and the Levites (Pinchas’ tribe) were to take no part in this war of conquest.

This question can be resolved within the context of our Sages’ statement that, in the Era of the Redemption, Eretz Yisrael will be divided into thirteen portions, a portion to be set aside for each of the tribes, including the tribe of Levi.

In the present era, the tribe of Levi did not receive a portion in Eretz Yisrael or a portion in the spoils of war, because — as the Rambam writes — the Levites:

Were set aside to serve G‑d, to worship Him, and to instruct others in His straight paths and righteous judgments.... Therefore, they were separated from the ways of the world and do not wage war as the other Jews do, nor do they receive an inheritance.... Rather, they are G‑d’s legion, and He, blessed be He, provides for them.

This applies in the present era, when the material nature of the world prevents a person from being both totally dedicated to G‑d and simultaneously involved with worldly affairs. In the Era of the Redemption, however, when the world will be refined and “the world will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the waters fill up the ocean bed,” there will be no need for the Levites to set themselves aside from worldly involvement. And hence, they too will receive a portion of Eretz Yisrael.

It can be explained that the division of Eretz Yisrael into thirteen portions is associated with the transcendent oneness which will permeate the world in the Era of the Redemption for אחד (“one”) is numerically equivalent to thirteen. This will also be reflected by the fact that G‑d Himself will be the One who divides the land in the Era of the Redemption.12

At present, the refinement of the world relates to those levels of G‑dliness which reflect the division within the world at large. In the Era of the Redemption, in contrast, we will merit the revelation of the levels of G‑dliness which transcend the divisions of the world and reflect His oneness.

This universal oneness also relates to the tribe of Levi, for that tribe possesses a general quality relating to the entire Jewish people as the Rambam writes:

Not only the tribe of Levi, but each and every man who is motivated by the generosity of his spirit to stand before G‑d and serve Him... is sanctified as holy of holies. G‑d will be his lot and inheritance forever... as for the Priests and Levites.

As a foretaste, and in preparation for, the conquest of Eretz Yisrael in the Era of the Redemption, and to emphasize the quality of oneness, Yehoshua sent Pinchas as one of his two spies.

* * *

4. The above concepts also share a connection to the concluding passage of Parshas Shelach, the passage which deals with the mitzvah of tzitzis. Tzitzis is a mitzvah of general significance as reflected by our Sages’ statement that it is “equivalent to all the mitzvos” and the verse “and you shall see it and remember all the mitzvos of G‑d.” On the surface, this is problematic; as mentioned above, mitzvos are the medium G‑d has granted us to relate to the particular elements of this world, and therefore, they are characterized by difference. If so, how can there be a mitzvah which is all-inclusive in nature?

The answer is that this in fact is the nature of all the mitzvos. The inner dimension of all the mitzvos is that they are the Torah’s commands and thus, they all convey and communicate G‑d’s Oneness. Of all the mitzvos, this is openly revealed in the mitzvah of tzitzis for the numerical equivalent of the word, together with its physical form, eight strands and five knots, reflect a connection to all 613 mitzvos.

The mitzvah of tzitzis allows this oneness to be reflected in the observance of all the mitzvos, causing even those mitzvos which reflect the division and difference prevalent in the world at large to be characterized by a spirit of oneness. This is alluded to in the expression mentioned in the passage concerning tzitzis, “so that you remember and fulfill all of My mitzvos,” i.e., this mitzvah makes one conscious that all the mitzvos are G‑d’s mitzvos, united with Him. Thus tzitzis shares a connection to the mission of the spies whose journey was characterized by oneness as explained above.

The reading of this portion should inspire us to greater activities in the sphere of ahavas Yisrael, first and foremost, thinking about how to fulfill both the material and spiritual needs of our fellow Jews.13

This should also be expressed by activities which emphasize oneness among Jews in both of the two fundamental categories which characterize the service of the Jewish people, Yissachar — those individuals who devote themselves to Torah study — and Zevulun — those involved in worldly affairs. In regard to Yissachar, the Rambam writes that it is a mitzvah for a Torah sage to “teach all the students,” i.e., to extend his teachings to as many students as possible. Similarly, in regard to Zevulun, it is possible to give a donation to tzedakah on behalf of someone else and there are some rich people — may their number increase — who give donations on behalf of each member of the Jewish people.

Within the context of activities which emphasize the unity of the Jewish people, it is also worthy to mention the campaign to study the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah. This campaign unites many Jews throughout the world in the study of a single text. Similarly, in this vein, it is important to mention the spreading of the teachings of Chassidus outward. These teachings unite the inner dimensions of the Jews with the inner dimensions of the Torah, and thus, with the inner dimensions of G‑d. And it is the spreading of these teachings which will hasten the advent of the era in which “the earth will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the waters cover up the ocean bed.”

* * *

5. The Haftorah concludes with the verse, “G‑d gave the entire land into our hands and all the inhabitants of the land have melted [in fear] of us.” This verse should serve as a directive for us at present. We should not return to the gentiles one inch of those portions of Eretz Yisrael which G‑d has given us. And this resolve to maintain full possession of Eretz Yisrael will lead us to the era when the size of Eretz Yisrael will be increased and it will encompass the lands of 10 nations. Then it will be divided into thirteen portions, the tribe of Levi also receiving a share as mentioned above. And we will proceed to the Beis HaMikdash and offer the Thanksgiving sacrifice in thanks for our redemption from exile. May this be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Behaaloscha | 15-22 Sivan 5777

Fri- June 9th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:47 pm

Sat June 10th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:10 am
Mincha  8:47 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2
Maariv/Havdalah 9:59 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9  am
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Kiddush is sponsored this week by Adam and Ali Reiss, in honor of their son Austen's bar mitzvah!  Austen and his family are visiting us from the Miami area.  Kiddush is co-sponsored by Tova Cox, in honor and in memory of the upcoming yahrzeits of her parents Rivka bat Herschel z"l and Abraham ben Herschel z"l.  Tova also wants to say THANK YOU!! to Baila Goldschmid, Maya Kintzer , Dassi Plotke, and Rosi Marasow for their help and hard work in making CSTL's children's program a success. Seuda Slishit

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Adam and Ali Reiss on the occasion of their son Austen's bar mitzvah!  May he grow up into a life of Torah, chuppah, and ma'asim tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
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LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
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Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
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If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
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EZRA BESSAROTH LADIES AUXILLIARY SEPHARDI FEST SUN JUNE 11th 9 am – 3 pm
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Crypto-Jews in the American Southwest Tue June 13, 10:30 am
Jews who “converted” to Catholicism in Inquisition Spain and Portugal hid their Jewish faith and went to the Americas. Prof. Annette Fromm of Florida International University will speak on what drove them to leave Judaism, what led them to the Americas, and how they are seeking to return to their ancestral heritage. Temple De Hirsch Sinai, Seattle Campus. 
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Senior Safety and Security Awareness Thu June 8, 10:30 am
Jon Richeson, our local Homeland Security Department Protective Security Adviser, will speak about fraud alerts, scams targeting seniors, and best practices around cyber security and active shooter response. At Temple B'nai Torah. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

SEATTLE KOLLEL SUNDAY TORAH 9 am – 10:15 AM
Learning for adults and for children 5th through 8th grades.

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Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

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SICHO FOR Behaaloscha
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507773/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Behaaloscha-19th-Day-of-Sivan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Parshas Behaaloscha contains an aspect that does not exist in regard to all the other parshiyos of the Torah. The two verses beginning “And it came to pass when the ark would set out...” are set aside by upside down nunnim. Our Sages explain that these verses can be considered as a separate book of the Torah. According to this reckoning, there are seven books of the Torah, i.e., the Book of Bamidbar which is divided into three books, and the other four books. Thus, this week’s Torah portion includes portions of three of the Torah’s seven books.

Several difficulties are raised by this matter: a) According to this division, the sixth book of the Torah begins, “And it came to pass that the people complained.” This unfavorable occurrence is hardly an appropriate beginning for one of the books of the Torah.1 b) Similarly, we do not find a name for this sixth book in the works of our Sages. c) There are extensive explanations regarding the significance of the division of the Torah into five books. What is the significance of the seven books? d) What is the reason that this division is made in Parshas Behaaloscha?

A key to the resolution of these difficulties can be found in the opening passage of our Torah portion which describes the Menorah, which is a symbol of Torah for “the Torah is light.” Thus, just as the Menorah had seven branches, the Torah is divided into seven books.

To explain in greater detail: On the verse, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within,” the Rabbis commented “within them,” i.e., within each and every Jew. Therefore, every element of the Sanctuary teaches us fundamental lessons regarding our service of G‑d. Surely, this applies in regard to the kindling of the Menorah.

Although there are myriad meanings for every Torah concept, the simple meaning of the concept — and that simple meaning emerges from Rashi’s commentary — produces a lesson which is relevant to each and every Jew, man, woman, and child.

Rashi interprets the word Behaaloscha, the opening phrase of this Torah portion, to mean, “to kindle until the flame rises up on its own accord.” This is relevant within the context of our service of G‑d. The candles refer to our service of Torah and mitzvos, “a mitzvah is a candle and the Torah, light” and similarly to our souls, “the candle of G‑d is the soul of man.” The light of Torah must illuminate every aspect of our lives, even our involvement with mundane affairs, and even our surrounding environment. Through the mitzvos which establish a tzavsa (“bond”) between G‑d and our material world, the world is transformed into a dwelling for G‑d, a shining Menorah which spreads G‑dly light.

This G‑dly light must be kindled “until the flame rises up on its own accord.” Although the Menorah is lit by a Jew (Aharon the Priest), the ultimate purpose is that it shine on its own accord, without the assistance of the person lighting the Menorah. Similarly, in regard to our service of G‑d, although G‑d grants a Jew the potential to carry out the service of “the light of Torah and the candle of mitzvah,” and a Jew also receives influence from Aharon the Priest who lights the candles of the souls of the Jewish people,2 the ultimate purpose is that the candle of his soul shines on its own accord. I.e., a Jew’s soul should be permeated by “the light of Torah and the candle of mitzvah” to the extent that, without any external influence, “the flame rises up on its own accord.”

In particular, each of the terms in the above phrase is significant. The word “flame” refers to the part of the candle which produces light. This reflects the service of a Jew, to light up his surrounding environment, and not merely with a small light, but with a large flame.

This flame must “rise up,” i.e., a person should not stand in one place, but rather must constantly advance further in the service of G‑d.3 In particular, the phrase “rise up” implies a unique nature of advance. Frequently, a person will proceed in his service, expanding its breadth and scope, however, he will remain on the same level. In this instance, we are speaking about a person elevating the nature of his service, rising to a higher plane.

This flame must rise up “on its own accord,” i.e., this tendency for growth and development in the spreading of Divine light must become a person’s own natural tendency. Although, initially, a person is given the potential for this service by G‑d, this service must permeate his own being until it becomes his own natural tendency.

We see this in regard to the study of the Torah (“and Torah is light”). At the outset, a person is taught to study by others. Ultimately, however, the purpose is for a person to acquire the skills necessary to allow him to study the Torah himself, and furthermore, to study in a manner in which the Torah becomes engraved in his memory and thus becomes part and parcel of his own thinking processes.4

(This is reflected in the concept that the Torah concepts that a person develops are considered “as his own,” not only does he receive from the Torah, he adds to and increases the Torah itself.)

In a larger sense, the concept of a Jew developing himself in Torah study until his “flame rises on its own accord” relates to the concept of the giving of the Torah as a whole. At the outset, the Torah was given to the Jews by G‑d (i.e., the candle was lit by others). After the Torah was given, however, “the Torah is not in the heavens,” and Torah decisions must be decided by the Jewish people. G‑d and the Heavenly court come to hear the Torah decisions rendered by the Jewish people.

A similar concept applies in regard to the observance of the mitzvos. The ultimate dimension of this service is when it becomes internalized to the extent that it becomes a person’s natural reaction, to quote our Sages, “When one reaches Modim, one bows as a spontaneous reaction.” mitzvos behiddur, in a beautiful and conscientious manner).}

Similarly, our service in the world at large which is governed by the directives, “All your deeds shall be for the sake of Heaven,” and “Know Him in all your ways,” must also be carried out in a manner in which “the flame rises up on its own accord.” Even when a person eats, sleeps, and is involved with mundane activities, he “places G‑d before him at all times,” and does so in a manner which reflects how this appreciation became part and parcel of his very being.

A similar concept applies in regard to our efforts to influence others. Our intent should be to cause their “flame to arise on its own accord.” Even after the person who influenced them has departed, the influence will remain strong and they will continue to shine with “the light of Torah” and “the candle of mitzvah,” for this is their true being.

In a more particular sense, there are two possible explanations of “the flame rising up on its own accord”: a) At the outset, a Jew’s body does not shine with “the light of Torah and the candle of mitzvah,” nevertheless, through work and effort, the body is trained so that the Torah and its mitzvos become the body’s natural and spontaneous reaction.

In essence, however, this is against the nature of the body. Indeed, the body has to be trained to carry out this service, and without training, would not do so. b) From a deeper perspective, this is the body’s true nature for the true being of every entity in this physical world is essential G‑dliness. From this perspective, the service of the Torah and mitzvos reveals, instead of running contrary to, the body’s true nature.

These two explanations can be considered as two phases in a sequence. At the outset, the body conceals the light of Torah and mitzvos, and therefore, our service must involve training the body’s nature. Ultimately, however, through the refinement of the body, we can reveal the essential G‑dliness present in a Jewish body.

The concept of kindling the lights “until the flame rises up on its own accord” is also relevant in regard to the effects of our service in the world at large. When a Jew performs a mitzvah with a material entity — and the performance of most mitzvos involve material entities — that entity becomes refined and elevated. Furthermore, in certain instances it becomes transformed into a holy article.

In these instances, although the holiness was conveyed upon the article through the Jews’ performance of the mitzvah, that holiness is imparted to the material entity itself, and remains even after the mitzvah has been completed. For this reason, such an object can be used for an oath and indeed, it is because the person taking the oath holds a sacred article in his hand, that the oath derives its power.5

We see this in regard to the sacrifices. Although it is necessary for a human being to consecrate a sacrifice, once the sacrifice is consecrated, it changes the nature of the material entity itself, causing it to become holy. Furthermore, this holiness can add to the person who consecrated it and bring him atonement.6

Although the material nature of the world is not [apparently] associated with holiness, G‑d gives a Jew the potential7 to transform a material entity into a holy object through his service of Torah and mitzvos and for that holiness to become an integral part of that entity itself, for “the flame to rise up on its own accord.”

This involves a fusion of opposites, bringing together the material and the spiritual. And this is accomplished by man’s actions. A parallel can be seen in the kindling of the lights in the Sanctuary. Here too, it is man’s activity which is necessary to bring the fire to the wicks. Once the wicks have been kindled, “the flame rises up on its own accord.”

The above applies, not only in regard to those matters which are obviously associated with a mitzvah, but also in regard to service in the world at large, in carrying out “all one’s deeds for the sake of Heaven” and “Knowing Him in all your ways.” Furthermore, it can — and must — be carried out, not only by adults, but also by children. This is accomplished by a child placing a chumashsiddur, and tzedakah pushka in a fixed place in his room. In this way, even when he does not use them, their very presence will remind him of their importance.

The ultimate intent is that this service of elevating the world at large involve even the lowest elements of existence, causing them to shine “on their own accord” with G‑dly light. Indeed, it is through the service with the lowest elements of existence that the transformation of the world into a dwelling for G‑d is completed. In Chassidus, this concept is explained through an analogy. When one wants to lift up an object, one places the lever below the bottom of the object and when it is lifted up, the higher portions of the object will also be raised.

In this context, we can understand a deeper dimension of the kindling of the Menorah by Aharon, the Priest. Aharon’s service involved “loving the creations and drawing them close to the Torah,” i.e., he involved himself with even those people who have no redeeming quality other than being G‑d’s creations. This represents an involvement with the lowest level of the Jewish people. Similarly, the light from the Menorah spread throughout the world, allowing even its lowest aspects to be elevated.

On the basis of the above concepts, we can resolve the questions concerning the seven books of the Torah and the fact that the sixth book begins with the passage describing the Jews’ complaints: The two numbers seven and five are of general significance. Thus, the Menorah, the symbol of the Jewish people as a whole, contain seven branches, one for each of the seven emotional qualities. Similarly, the number five is associated with the five books of the Torah which represent five categories within the Jewish people.

(The existence of these five categories is alluded to in this week’s chapter of Pirkei Avos which describes Rabban Yochanan ben Zakkai as having five students. Surely, Rabban Yochanan ben Zakkai who was the Nasi of the Sanhedrin and who renewed the study of Torah for the Jewish people in Yavneh, possessed more than five students. However, the intent is that these five represented general categories which included all the Jewish people.8 )

Although both five and seven are of general significance, there is a difference between them. Five refers to the service with oneself and the service in the realm of holiness, while seven refers to service with others and service within the world at large. For this reason, there are five books of the Torah and Rabban Yochanan ben Zakkai is described as having five students, for when describing the Jews as they study the Torah, it is necessary to speak of only five categories. Nevertheless, when considering the ultimate purpose of our service, that even the lowest elements of our existence become permeated with G‑dly light — and that is the purpose of the Torah as our Sages said, “The Torah was given solely to bring about peace in the world” — it is necessary to speak within the context of seven books.

And the sixth book — i.e., the book which follows the five levels of holiness — begins with a description of the lowest level of the Jews’ behavior, to show that through the process of teshuvah, even this level of conduct can be elevated to the point that “the flame rises up on its own accord.”9

The potential to carry out this service is derived from the fifth book and the message its two verses communicate. The first verse “And it came to pass when the ark set out, Moshe would say, ‘Arise O L‑rd and Your enemies will be dispersed,...’ ” reflects the service of refining the world at large. The second verse, “And when it came to rest, he would say, ‘Return O L‑rd, [to] the myriads and thousands of Israel,’ ” alludes to the indwelling of the Divine Presence among the Jewish people.

2. A similar concept can be derived from Parshas Shelach which we begin reading during the Minchah service. Parshas Shelach describes Moshe’s sending of spies to Eretz Yisrael. Among the questions raised by that narrative are: a) The Torah refrains from speaking negatively about all things, even a non-kosher animal. If so, why does it relate a narrative which is unfavorable in nature? b) The Haftoros chosen for the Parshiyos share the theme of the parshah. If so, why was the passage which describes the mission of the spies sent by Yehoshua chosen as the Haftorah for this Parshah? Although both passages describe stories of spies, the narrative of the Torah reading is negative in nature, while the narrative of the Haftorah is positive.

These questions can be resolved as follows: Yehoshua and Caleb declared: “The land is very, very good,” bringing out a positive dimension to the entire narrative of the spies. This was Moshe’s intent in sending them. And for this reason, Yehoshua sought to emulate Moshe’s conduct and sent spies before setting out to conquer Eretz Yisrael.10

Thus we can see the lasting dimension of the positive nature of Moshe’s activity in sending spies, how “the flame rises up on its own accord.” Even in a subsequent generation, his activity was copied.

* * *

3. Now is a time when we must light up the candles of the Jewish people in this era of exile. The cumulative legacy of all the positive activity of the previous generations is granted us, and now, all that is necessary is to kindle the flame, and make sure that it “rises up on its own accord.” Although our generation is on a lower level than the previous ones, being compared to the heel in relation to the entire body, it is our generation that has the potential to elevate the service of all the previous generations. We will be the last generation of exile, and the first generation of the Redemption, and in this way, bring redemption to all the Jews of the previous generations.

This is particularly relevant after the Previous Rebbe’s example of emulating the conduct of Aharon the Priest, “loving the creations and drawing them close to the Torah.” Through his activities, the wellsprings of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus were spread to those on the furthest peripheries of Jewish involvement.

These activities were specifically directed to hastening the coming of the ultimate redemption as the Previous Rebbe proclaimed, “Im­mediately let us turn to G‑d in teshuvah, and immediately we will be redeemed.” He also stated that all that is left is to “polish the buttons” before Mashiach’s coming. That service has already been completed. And now all we must do is “stand prepared to” greet Mashiach and to proceed “with our youth and our elders, our sons and our daughters” to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash.

4. This evening, the annual Melaveh Malkah on behalf of Colel Chabad is being held. Accordingly, we can assume that there is a point of connection between the portion of the Torah read this Shabbos and Colel Chabad.

This Torah reading describes the Menorah kindled in the Sanctuary. As mentioned in the Haftorah, that Menorah serves as a symbol for the entire Jewish people, because each Jew is candle which has the potential to illuminate the world with “the light of Torah and the candle of mitzvah.”

The Menorah contained seven branches, and yet it was made of a single block of gold. These are also symbolic factors. There are seven fundamental categories of service among the Jewish people, reflecting the seven emotional qualities (middos) attributed to G‑d. Each category of Jews reflects and reveals a different G‑dly quality. The division into these seven qualities does not, however, create separation among our people. On the contrary, there is a unique oneness which pervades and permeates our people as a whole, for we all share a single essence.

The oneness of the Menorah is also reflected in the fact that the six outer lights were pointed to the central shaft of the Menorah. In the allegory, this implies that the service of these seven different categories will be permeated by a single fundamental commitment to carry out G‑d’s inner will.

In an individual way, these concepts are also reflected in the spiritual service of each person, for each of us possess these seven qualities. They must be illuminated by the light of the essence of the soul, and in this manner, fused into a single and all-inclusive commitment to His service.

These concepts are reflected in Colel Chabad. Chabad is an acronym representing the intellectual qualities of Chochmah, Binah, and Daas which are the source for the seven emotional categories mentioned above. The name Colel which means “general quality,” refers to the unification of these seven qualities and their fusion into a single whole.

In a very real way, this describes the activities of Colel Chabad, for it is an organization which offers assistance to all Jews without distinction: material assistance, providing thou­sands with food, clothing, and other necessities, and spiritual assistance, spreading the awareness of Judaism among our people. These activities are dedicated to establishing unity and oneness among our people. In a very simple sense, when Jews see the care and attention their brethren show to them, their feelings of oneness will be aroused.

This emphasis on unity has been generated by the Rebbeim who all, beginning from the Alter Rebbe, have devoted great energies to activity on behalf of Colel Chabad. To express the concept within the context of the allegory of the Menorah mentioned above, the involvement of the Rebbeim has pointed all the seven lights, i.e., all the different forms of activity, to the central shaft of the Menorah, to a single unified commitment to G‑d’s will.

May all those who support the work of the Colel, both financially and with their efforts, realize that they are also a Colel, i.e., they do not live for themselves and they share a connection with others. And may this expression of unity — particularly as associated with tzedakah for tzedakah brings close the redemption — lead to the ultimate expression of unity which will be experienced in the Era of Redemption. May it be in the immediate future.

5. The following remarks were made by the Lubavitcher Rebbe Shlita during the farbrengen of Shabbos Parshas Behaaloscha. The Rebbe made these statements within the discussion of a subject of greater scope. Because of their relevance, we have published them under an independent heading. Nevertheless, they do not represent a complete treatment of the issues discussed and must be considered within the context of the Rebbe Shlita’s previous statements on these issues.

The day following the present Shabbos is the 20th of Sivan, a day which was established as a day of fasting because of the pogroms which took place in Poland.11

Polin as that country is called in Yiddish can be broken up into two Hebrew words Po lin, meaning “Here, we will spend the night;” i.e., it served as a haven for the Jews in the night of exile.12 This expression contains two implications:

a) that one’s stay will only be temporary. Ultimately, the Jews will leave exile, and in the era of the Redemption, come to their true place in Eretz Yisrael.

b) that during the interim while the Jews are in exile, they will be able to “spend the night” in peace and tranquility.

For many generations, this was realized in Poland. The Polish noblemen raised the Jews to prominent positions, entrusting their finances to them. The Jews, in turn, used this prosperity to bring about an increase in the service of Torah and mitzvos.

(These noblemen would call their Jewish overseers Moishkeh, a derivative of the name Moshe. This reflected a deep spiritual concept, that every Jew possesses a spark of Moshe our teacher in his soul.)

This teaches us lessons in regard to the exile as a whole:

a) that exile is associated with night - darkness and concealment. It is only a temporary state leading to the era of the Redemption.

b) that the Jews should use the prosperity offered by the exile to advance in the service of G‑d.13

Also, there is a particular lesson in regard to Poland. There is a need to provide Rabbis and community leaders who will motivate the Jews living there to turn to G‑d in Teshuvah.

Shabbos Naso 8-15 Sivan 5777

Fri- June 2nd Erev Shabbos
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:42 pm 

Sat June 3rd – Shabbos
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:10 am
Mincha 8:42 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 1
Maariv/Havdalah 9:53 pm 

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THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status. 

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Come say Tehilim 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis 

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE. For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com 

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SICHO FOR NASO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2508101/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Naso-9th-Day-of-Sivan-5747-1987.htm © SichosInEnglish.org 

1. One of the main themes of Shabbos is that it effects completion and elevation in the preceding six days. This is what the Torah means when it tells us ‘Vayechulu —the heavens and the earth...were completed.’ It also infers the aspect of pleasurable satisfaction that comes along with this attainment. 

At the same time, in order to eat on Shabbos one must prepare before Shabbos. In this aspect, too, the eating on Shabbos constitutes a completion and elevation of the preparatory stages which took place during the preceding week. 

Thus, the Shabbos which follows Shavuos, has the lofty quality of serving as the day which carries the aspect of ‘The Season of the Giving of our Torah’ to its loftiest completion. The Shabbos after Matan Torah brings an incalculable uplifting, to the degree of delight. 

Although this symbiosis takes place even on the Shabbos which follows other holidays, the Gemara states that everyone agrees that the Torah was given on Shabbos, and therefore there is a special connection in this respect between Matan Torah and Shabbos. 

On the subject of ‘festivals of joy,’ Shavuos has a unique aspect of rejoicing, as manifest in the rule that one may not fast on Shavuos. The Alter Rebbe rules in Shulchan Aruch: 

It is forbidden to fast a ‘dream fast’ on the holiday of Shavuos, because it is the day on which the Torah was given and we must eat and rejoice on it to show how pleasant and acceptable this day is for the Jewish people. It differs from the other holidays and Shabbos when ‘dream fasts’ are permitted. (Shulchan Aruch HaRav, Laws of Pesach 494:18) 

This means that with the giving of the Torah more holiness had to be brought into the physical world through the very simple acts of eating and drinking which may not be suspended or substituted by fasting, and it is in effect even now in the time of the galus. This is in common with the theme of Shabbos which must be enjoyed through festive meals. 

Now, on this Shabbos which follows, completes and uplifts the preceding days of Shavuos there is, and should be, an increase in all of these matters. Since G-d only makes demands according to our ability, when a special day comes and there are greater expectations, we can be sure that G-d gives us the added powers to carry out His request and mission. 

We must therefore utilize all our powers to their fullest potential, so as not to miss any opportunity. 

In mitzvos there are practices which one is obligated to seek out to do —and those which only if the opportunity presents itself must one comply with the mitzvah. An example of this would be building a parapet on the roof of a house which must be done, only if you build a house, or, placing a mezuzah on the doorpost —only when you live in a proper house with proper doors (not a tent). 

Here, however, we speak of practices connected to Matan Torah and certainly they are vitally and centrally important in every person’s Divine service. So you must seek out every opportunity to show how good and pleasant the Torah is. 

This would be similar to the mitzvah of Tzitzis which we spoke about on Shavuos, concerning which the Rambam rules that although the law is that Tzitzis must be put on four cornered garments only when, and if, you have such garments, nevertheless: 

Every pious person...should strive to wrap himself in a garment that needs fringes in order to fulfill this mitzvah. (Laws of Tzitzis 3:11) 

Since the fringed garment encompasses the person it is analogous to the general body of Torah and mitzvos which collectively encompass the pious person. So too, just as one must strive to fulfill the mitzvah of Tzitzis, we must also strive to carry out all the aspects of the Season of the Giving of our Torah and draw them into the entire year. 

On this Shabbos after Shavuos we must make every effort to reach these lofty levels and bring out the intense pleasure of Shabbos and Matan Torah. And also to reveal G-d’s pleasure: ‘I commanded and My will was done.’ Bring it into action! 

Then we will merit the true action —through our righteous Mashiach and through the Holy One, Blessed be He — G-d will take us out of the galus ‘one by one.’ 

Then G-d’s unity will be revealed and all the world will strive to know G-d. As it says: 

For the world will be filled with the knowledge of G-d as the waters cover the sea. (Yeshayahu 11:9) 

Speedily and truly with no delays, truly, now

2. Why is it that on each holiday we explain and expound the special qualities which raise that holiday above all the others, while during the previous holiday and during the following holiday we exalt them above all the others, including the one that we just established to be the greatest? 

Similarly, when the same festival comes around each year we pronounce the special loftier qualities of the holiday when it occurs in just such a setting, as compared to other years. 

This dilemma may be dispelled if we keep in mind the Talmudic adage: ‘Of what is your father most observant?’ (Shabbos 118b) Generally speaking, each individual has a particular mitzvah (or mitzvos) which serves as his ‘gateway’ to the other mitzvos. In a like manner the particular setting of the day and date of a festival comprise the ‘gateway’ for all the rest of Torah and mitzvos. At that moment it is the loftiest of all. 

Does this sound too esoteric, too spiritual? Well, in Halachah we know the rule that sometimes in the city of Rav the Halachah was ruled according to the opinion of Rav, while in the city of Shmuel the Halachah followed Shmuel’s opinion, notwithstanding any seeming contradictions. 

We may draw an analogy from space (place) to time. At certain times certain conditions prevail which put one thing or another in a position of ascension. 

With this in mind let us approach the special quality of this Shabbos which follows Shavuos this year, in relation to its date and Torah portion. 

This year Shavuos occurred on Wednesday which put it in the second half of the week, which is called ‘before the Shabbos.’ This indicates a stronger connection between Shavuos and Shabbos than if the holiday occurred during the first half of the week which is called ‘after the Shabbos.’ 

In the diaspora, where the second day of Shavuos occurred on Thursday, there is a second connection to Shabbos because three days are seen as one (Thurs., Fri., Shabbos). This connection enhances the perfection and uplifting that Shabbos effects in Shavuos. 

What about the portion of Naso? 
The portion of Naso is always read either on the Shabbos before Shavuos or on the Shabbos following Shavuos — as is the case this year. 

What is the special relationship between Shavuos and Naso and what unique significance may be gleaned when Naso follows Shavuos? 

Naso signifies ‘raising up,’ Naso es rosh—the head must also be raised up (consequently the whole body will rise). 

When we read Naso on the Shabbos following Shavuos then the completion and perfection effected by Shabbos on Shavuos will be even more ‘uplifting.’ 

Naso’s connection to Shavuos, the Season of the Giving of Our Torah, may be understood from the Midrash which teaches that before Matan Torah there was a decree which forbade that which is above from descending and that which is below from ascending. Matan Torah changed all that, the lofty ones (elyonim) came down on the earth and the corporeal existence may now raise itself to become an object of holiness — sanctified. 

Before Matan Torah when one performed a mitzvah with some physical object the object did not become sanctified. After Matan Torah, the observance of mitzvos with physical objects — Tefillin, Mezuzah etc., — makes the objects holy. 

So, when Naso is read after Shavuos it builds on the accomplishments of Shavuos and it attains even greater heights — ultimate loftiness and perfection. 

There are other aspects of the portion of Naso which may be associated with Shavuos. 

In a previous farbrengen we compared the common factors of the Season of the Giving of Our Torah and the practice of the nezirus. Since the vows of the Nazerite bring a certain holiness to the individual, as expressed in the Torah, ‘he is holy to the L-rd,’ and as explained in Chassidus, it has a similarity to Matan Torah which initiated the principle that physical matters may be sanctified. 

In the laws of vows we learn that one may make a promise (neder) to do some good act —however, we are not able to make a vow (sh’vuah) concerning a mitzvah. For a vow is a restriction and one cannot place any restrictions on mitzvos. The Nazerite vows, however, are considered to be a neder and, consequently, there may also be a comparison to Shabbos which adds perfection and loftiness even to the Season of the Giving of Our Torah. 

Another subject covered in this week’s Torah portion is the collective sacrifices brought by the tribal princes and the inauguration of the altar which was effected through their offerings. These sacrifices signified an important aspect of communal unity and thereby have a strong connection to Matan Torah which was preceded by the united encampment of the Jewish people —‘as one man with one heart.’ 

As in all cases of unity, here, too, we have unity out of diversity, for at Matan Torah Moshe stood alone, Aharon alone, the Kohanim alone etc., and yet they all combined as one man.... Similarly, in the case of the tribal princes, each Nasibrought his offering on a different day, yet the Torah tells us that it was considered as if they all brought their sacrifices on the first and last days, together. 

Interestingly, the reacceptance of Torah that took place at the time of the Purimmiracle also came as a result of the unity of the one people, ‘young and old, children and women’ on one day. Here again we see an aspect of ascent after Matan Torah just as Shabbos perfects the Season of the Giving of Our Torah. 

Finally, at the close of today’s portion the Torah tells how Moshe would enter the Tabernacle to speak with the Holy One, Blessed be He, the classic form of Torah study between the Holy One, Blessed be He, and Moshe. Here again is a connection to the Season of the Giving of Our Torah. Just as the Torah was originally given after the unity of the Jewish people was established, so too was the daily transmission of Torah initiated following the communal sacrifices. This again reiterates the idea of Torah and unity. 

After the conclusion of the Torah reading, in the afternoon we study Pirkei Avosand here again we read in the first chapter ‘Moshe received the Torah at Sinai and transmitted it...’ to all the Jews in all the generations. Having received the Torah this week, on Shabbos we speak of carrying out, and studying the Torah and rising steadily higher. 

In practice: 
The responsibility rests on everyone to increase qualitatively and quantitatively the study of Torah to the point of increasing Torah by finding innovation and revealing new meaning. This is the individual’s personal share in Torah as we say, ‘give us our share in Torah.’ 

What about those who are unlearned and ignorant? How can they innovate in Torah. The answer is that in Torah the action is as important as the study, in fact, the study is greater only because it leads to action, and it is expressed through the action. 

Sometimes the sincere and devout practices of a simple person, when they are pursued with diligence and wholeheartedness, can serve as an example and lesson to those who are wiser and more learned. When we see small children pray fervently and piously, surely their prayers can have a tremendous, positive impact on much older and wiser adults, as we often see. The simple Jew is thus a Torah innovator! And he truly has his own share in Torah! 

Utilize the quality and perfection of the Shabbos day after Shavuos to increase the Divine service of the Season of the Giving of Our Torah, in study and revelation, to your highest ability. Take your power from Moshe who transmitted Torah to all, and as a trusted shepherd, he gave everyone according to his ability. This was the way of Moshe, of Dovid HaMelech and of the Baal Shem Tov, all associated to Shavuos and all true shepherds of Israel. 

And may G-d grant us the fulfillment of the prophecy: ‘Awake and sing, ye that dwell in the dust’ (Yeshayahu 26:19)— Moshe and Aharon among them. Together with Dovid king Mashiach and the Baal Shem Tov with all the Tzaddikim and Nesi’im of Israel up to and including the Previous Rebbe the Nasi of our generation — together with all the Jewish people —in the true and complete redemption through our righteous Mashiach. When the Holy One, Blessed be He, as it were, will also return from exile, and then a new Torah will emerge...very soon and truly, now. 

3. In the sacrifices brought by the tribal princes we find that Rashi explains the reasons for certain items: 

One silver dish— The numerical value of its letters (of the letters of these two words) is 930, corresponding to the years of Adam Harishon.... The weight thereof was 130 Shekels — in allusion to the fact that when he (Adam) first raised children to maintain the world in existence he was 130 years old.... (Rashi, Bamidbar 7:19) 

Several question have been raised on this Rashi: 

A —What relationship does the age of Adam bear to the sacrifices of the tribal princes? 

B —What is unclear in the simple translation of this verse that motivates Rashi to seek meanings and allusions for the details in the verse? 

The plain meaning of these verses accounts for the listing of details so as to emphasize the great value and importance of the princely sacrifices. Because the offerings were precious they were naturally done with much care and attention. 

It is also self-evident that we cannot question the reason for any specific amount mentioned in the plain meaning of the verse. For since there had to be some number and measure given, you cannot question why one particular number was chosen. 

In Moreh Nevuchim the Rambam states this principle: 

..Why were seven rams lambs sacrificed and not eight: the same question might have been asked if there were eight, ten or twenty lambs. So long as some definite number of lambs were sacrificed. It is almost similar to the nature of a thing which can receive different forms, but actually receives one of them. We must not ask why it has this form and not another which is likewise possible, because one should have had to ask the same question if instead of its actual form the thing had any of the other possible forms. Note this and understand it. (Moreh Nevuchim 3:26) 

For this reason Rashi need not give any explanation for the sizes and measurements of the Tabernacle and its vessels. And so here we ask what forces Rashi to seek reasons and allusions for these particular details of the tribal offerings. 

Another question has been raised: Why does Rashi fail to explain why the tribe of Levi did not participate in bringing sacrifices for the inauguration of the altar? 

Assuredly the tribe of Levi was a special tribe, as the Torah itself directs us not to count them among the rest of the people, and Rashi explains: ‘The legion of the King is worthy to be numbered by itself.’ (Rashi, Bamidbar 1:49) If so, how can it be that all 12 tribes participated in the dedication of the altar and Aharon, the prince of Levi, was left out of the inauguration process. 

Rashi does not ignore this question completely, because in the beginning of Behaaloscha Rashi says: 

When Aharon saw the dedication offerings of the princes he then became uneasy in mind because neither he nor his tribe was with them in the dedication.... (Ibid. 8:2) 

So: 
1) Why does Rashi wait for the next portion, Behaaloscha, to tell us of Aharon’s emotions —he should mention it where it belongs, in the portion of Naso, 

and; 

2) Why does Rashi hush it up. He should clamor for some explanation, why indeed was Aharon excluded? 

We cannot say that Aharon was excluded because of his own fear that G-d was in some way displeased with him — because this misapprehension had been cleared up by Moshe on the first day of Nissan when he addressed the people and proclaimed that in fact the Shechinah would come to rest by virtue of Aharon’s service in the Tabernacle. Thus, we have no reason to think that Aharon should be excluded. 

The answer to this dilemma may be found in the simplicity of the verses themselves. 

The fact that the tribe of Levi was the ‘legion of the King’ does not cause us to question that they should have participated in the dedication offerings —quite to the contrary, it lends proof to the principle that they should not have joined the others. 

The theme of the dedication offerings was that the people brought gifts to the Tabernacle. Would it be appropriate that the King’s own legion give itself a gift — does the King bestow a gift on Himself? 

The gifts were brought for the use of the Mishkan, in fact, they were set aside for the use of the Levi’im and Kohanim. It would therefore be absurd for the Levi’im to bring gifts to themselves. For this reason, too, the tribe of Levi did not participate in the donations made for the Tabernacle or in the collection of the half-Shekels, which was used for the foundations of the Mishkan and for the communal sacrifices. 

An analogy may be drawn from a wedding where the groom and bride do not get involved in the preparations for the wedding. Everyone is busy preparing and doing whatever is necessary for the wedding, yet the celebrants themselves only make the marriage, give the ring, say the blessings, drink the wine, et. al. 

This was the case at my own wedding: During the wedding feast the Previous Rebbe arose from his place to circulate among the guests and distribute cups of LeChaim. When I saw this I felt that I could not remain seated while he was standing and giving out the drinks. So I rose from my seat with the intention of joining him and extending a hand to help, to hold the bottle or give out the cups, etc. The Previous Rebbe saw me and motioned to me to remain in my place. Stubbornly I tried again to rise and join him (a Jew is always stubborn) and he again motioned very clearly that I should not leave my seat. I was consequently forced to remain seated —on ‘pins and needles’ —until the Previous Rebbe returned and sat down again in his seat to resume the festive wedding meal. 

(The Rebbe smiled!) Today’s five-year-old Chumash student was certainly not at my wedding, nevertheless he saw a similar conduct at his upsherinish (first haircut) when he was three years old. 

His father, uncles and friends surrounded him, the Rav may also have been there. They all stood around him but he sat at his place. Why? Simple, he was the celebrant. 

So Rashi does not have to tell us why the tribe of Levi was not included — it is self-evident that the King’s legion are the celebrants and have no obligation to bring gifts to the dedication of the altar. 

Now, however, Aharon’s uneasy mind is surprising. After all, his tribe was excluded because of their superior standing. Why was he upset? The answer may be found when we read the final verse in Naso: 

When Moshe came into the Communion Tent to speak with [G-d] he would hear the voice.... (Bamidbar 7:89) 

Moshe’s entry into the Communion Tent evoked Aharon’s dismay. This is why Rashi does not mention it until the portion of Behaaloscha, and why Rashi does not make a big deal of the exclusion of Levi from the offerings, since it was Moshe’s Torah study with G-d that engendered a new point that caused Aharon’s chagrin to reemerge. 

The Tent of Communion served two purposes — it was the religious center of the Jewish people specifically designated for all sacrifices and associated Divine service and worship. It also served as the place where Moshe learned Torah from G-d. Aharon himself could only learn Torah from Moshe as Rashi had explained: 

Moshe used to learn the Torah from the mouth of the Almighty: Aharon entered and Moshe taught him his lesson. (Rashi, Shmos 34:32) 

This was really the cause of Aharon’s uneasy feeling. 

Aharon was not jealous of Moshe’s greatness or unique standing with regard to the Torah, for the Torah had already revealed Aharon’s standing in relation to Moshe: 

He (Aharon) will be your spokesman...he will be your superior and chief.... (Shmos 4:16 and Rashi, loc. cit.) 

Aharon was concerned that he and his tribe did not have a share in preparing the Mishkan to be a place where Torah would be taught to Moshe —by the Holy One, Blessed be He. This bothered him — for all the other princes did have a share in just this function. 

So he did not clamor for inclusion — since his exclusion was based on exclusivity, but he did feel bad. 

To assuage his feelings Rashi informs us that the Holy One, Blessed be He, told him: 

By your life! Your part is of greater importance than theirs for you will kindle and set in order the lamps. 

* * * 

The questions of the silver plate and Adam’s age may be understood when we look back to a previous Rashi: 

That day received ten crowns (was distinguished in ten different ways): it was the same day as was the first day of creation, the first day on which the princes offered etc., as it is set forth in Seder Olam. (Ibid. 7:12) 

The five-year-old Chumash student peruses the chapter of the offerings of the princes and finds nothing said of the first day of creation; he is puzzled. What is the connection? So Rashi tells us that the numerical equivalent of the two words ‘silver plate’ is equal to Adam’s years. Adam, being the goal of creation encompasses all aspects of creation. Rashi then goes on to speak of when Adam brought offspring into the world, when he was 130 years old. For the goal of creation is to guarantee the continuation of the world by bringing a new generation into the world. 

Rashi then concludes: 

Seventy Shekels — corresponding to the seventy nations that descended from Noach’s sons. (Ibid. 7:19) 

For the world would not be complete and whole without the seventy nations. 

There is however another question regarding that verse itself. What motivated Rashi to seek an explanation for the verse which simply states that on the first day the offering was brought by...? 

It would seem simple and plain to translate the verse as it is stated. 

The answer for this question is that in the previous verse we are told: 

Let them present their offerings for the altar’s dedication one prince each day. (Bamidbar 6:11) 

Now Rashi feels that it would be sufficient to simply begin the next verse by saying: ‘The one to bring his offering...was Nachshon son of Aminadav.’ It would have been self-evident that he was the one who brought his offering on the first day. The Torah did not have to state the words, ‘On the first day.’ 

So Rashi starts off without mentioning the problem by simply stating the special qualities of that first day. 

Having said that it was the first day of creation and the first day of the tribal sacrifices it becomes evident that there is a connection between the two —for that reason Rashi later brings the explanation that the numerical equivalent of the silver plate was equal to Adam’s age. 

He had mentioned that there were ten crowns given to the day, he then went on to list those two which are really relative to the details of what happened that day and he adds, ‘as is described in Seder Olam.’ 

Rashi does not deem it appropriate to quote this exposition of Seder Olam in every place where one of the ten occurrences are related in Scripture —only here, because of the superfluous ‘First day.’ He realized that the Torah wanted us to know what was so special about that day and he tells us that they represented ‘ten crowns’ for all the occurrences were of great importance, similar to ‘crowns.’ 

* * * 

4. The Alter Rebbe writes in his Siddur that we do not say the penitential prayers, 

From Rosh Chodesh Sivan until (and including) the 12th of the month, that is five days after Shavuos, for the holiday has seven days of completion. 

From here we derive that these are auspicious days —we do not say the penitential prayers because whatever good they may effect is done automatically by virtue of the special day. Therefore, it is appropriate that during this time we should add to all the actions and Divine service of Shavuos so as to complete and perfect it in a rich manner. 

These efforts should be expended in the three pillars of Torah, prayer and acts of loving-kindness upon which the world stands, as we learned in today’s chapter of Avos. 

Clearly, Torah is appropriate, for Shavuos is the Season of the Giving of Our Torah. 

Prayer, too, is connected to Matan Torah for the declaration, ‘We will do and we will listen,’ represented a state of self-nullification which is attained in prayer. Furthermore, at the time of Matan Torah the souls of the Jewish people ‘flew away’ and had to be returned, which points to self-sacrifice, as the Baal Shem Tov teaches, this is reached in intense kavanah during prayer. 

And acts of loving kindness. About Shavuos the Torah says: 

You shall then celebrate the festival of Shavuos to your L-rd, presenting a hand-delivered offering according to the extent of the blessing that G-d your L-rd has granted you. (Devarim 16:10) 

The Torah uses the term ‘hand...offering’ and Chassidus explains that this is higher than the offerings of the heart which are dependent on the emotions of the heart —here the hand continues to distribute charity without restriction — straight from the soul. 

This must also be instilled in the youth — all three areas of Torah, prayer and good deeds — by placing a chumash, siddur and charity box in their rooms which will remind them of the mitzvah of tzedakah. 

When you place a pushkah in the room of a small child his curiosity will be awakened, especially if it has pictures on it. He will check out the pushkah and find that it has a slot; he will be more curious to know what can go into the slot. He is impatient, and you will give him a coin to put into the box and in that way you train him to give tzedakah. 

May we also have the true ‘time of completion’ during these days —of the sacrifices —and all aspects of Shavuos that we missed, because we still do not have the Bais HaMikdash, may they all appear with the coming of our righteous Mashiach and we will kindle the lights of the Menorah with the true and complete redemption, quickly and truly in our days.  

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