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Shabbos Devarim - Chazon | 4-11 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- July 28th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

Sat July 29th Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:29 am
Mincha  8:30 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 3/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:34 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:15 pm

EREV TISHA b'AV: MON. JULY 31st  
Shacharis: 7 am 
Chatzot – Restrictions on Learning Torah begin 1:15 pm
Mincha 5:30 pm
Seudah Hamafsekes/pre-fast meal with bread & eggs after Mincha 
Sunset/Fast begins: 8:45 pm 
Maariv 9:22 pm /EICHA AND KINOT/

TISHA b'AV: TUES. AUG. 1st 
Shacharis: 7 am /KINOT/
Midday (Permissible to sit on regular chairs once again) 1:15 pm 
Tallis and Tefilin 8 pm 
Mincha: 8:15 PM - 
Fast Ends: 9:21 PM 
Maariv & Kiddish Levana 9:20 pm /9 Days restrictions continue to 1:15 pm Wednesday/

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush this Shabbat is being sponsored by CSTL members wishing our best to Michael and Ilana Levin as they leave Seattle in order to return to live in Israel!  Specifically, we wish to thank the following sponsors: Rabbi S.B. and Mrs. Levitin; Rabbi Alter and Debbie Levitin; Rabbi Elazar and Esther Bogomilsky; Rabbi Saifo and Frumi Marasow; Rabbi Shmueli and Rosie Tennenhaus; Mark and Tziviah Goldberg; Shimon and Dr. Susan Dershowitz; Dr.Yussi and Rachel Greenberg; Dr. Scott and Karin Pollack; David Voluck; Ben and Sarah Dershowitz; Yitzchok and Liz Rothman; Herschel and Meirav Cox; and Pat Leckenby. Please join us for this gala Kiddush!. Seuda Slishit

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Diana Rose Gould, Dina Raizel bas Sarah, on the 2nd of Av.  The levaya was on Thursday.  May her neshama have an aliya

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Shabbos Kallah for Brachie Goldshmid SHABBOS CHAZON JUL 29th AT 7 pm
Marave Herbstman is hosting.  Women & girls are invited to 4402 NE 65th St starting at 7:00pm. (Sorry, your sons cannot come--this is a FEMALES ONLY gathering.)

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm /NOT THIS WEEK/
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE NINE DAYS CONTINUE UNTIL 1:15 PM WED AUG 2nd 
During "The Nine Days" from Av 1st to the Ninth of Av, a heightened degree of mourning is observed, including abstention from meat and wine, music, bathing for pleasure, and other joyous and enjoyable activities. (The particular mourning customs vary from community to community, so consult a competent Halachic authority for details). Consumption of meat and wine is permitted on Shabbat, or at a Seudat Mitzvah (obligatory festive meal celebrating the fulfillment of a mitzvah) such as a Bris (circumcision), or a "Siyum" celebrating the completion of a course of Torah study (i.e., a complete Talmudic tractate). The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of conducting or participating in a Siyum on each of the Nine Days (even if one does not avail oneself of the dispensation to eat meat). Citing the verse (Isaiah 1:27) "Zion shall be redeemed with mishpat [Torah] and its returnees with Tzedakah," the Rebbe urged that we increase in Torah study (particularly the study of the laws of the Holy Temple) and charity during this period (www.chabad.org) Contact Rabbi Levitin with specific questions.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Continues to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

"The Isadore and Ruth Gibber Worldwide Tisha B'Av Event" Tue Aug 1st 
Emunah for Life, how to manage life's challenges. Info 
theseattlekollel@gmail.com
Program A: 2:45 pm at BCMH, 5145 S Morgan Street. 
Program B: 6:30 pm at SBH, 6500 52nd AVE S. 
Suggested donation: $15/Adults or $10/Students.

The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or emailrabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS CHAZON
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507848/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Devarim-Shabbos-Chazon-6th-Day-of-Menachem-Av-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Rav Levi Yitzchok of Berditchev interpreted the name, Shabbos Chazonto mean “the Shabbos of vision,” the time when each individual is given a chance to see the Third Beis HaMikdash. On the surface, this is the direct opposite of the simple interpretation of the name which connects it to the Haftorah, the vision of Yeshayahu which is a particularly harsh reproof of the Jewish people. [For this reason, it is included among the three Haftorosof retribution which are read before Tishah BeAv.] The consolation of the Jewish people begins only after Tishah BeAv and yet, according to the above interpretation, on the Shabbos before Tishah BeAv, each Jew receives the most complete consolation possible, the revelation of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

This difficulty can be resolved within the context of the explanation of the concept, “a descent which is intended for an ascent.” The concept of descent in and of itself has no place in creation. G‑d is the essence of good and “it is the nature of the good to do good.” Hence, there is no place for a descent in the world which He created unless it is intended to bring about an ascent that is so great that it makes the descent worthwhile. A descent for such a purpose can be considered a stage of the ascent which follows it.

This explains why each person is shown a vision of the Third Beis HaMikdash on the Shabbos before Tishah BeAv. The vision reveals that the ultimate purpose of the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash was the beginning of a process which will lead to the high peaks of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash.

This explanation, however, is insufficient: Descent and ascent are opposite thrusts. Although G‑d has ingrained within the nature of the world that a descent will lead to an ascent, descent is still the opposite of ascent. Furthermore, the concept itself is worthy of question. Why did G‑d ingrain such a nature in the world? Why is a descent necessary? In our present context: Why is it not possible to approach the heights of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash without first undergoing the descent connected with the Beis HaMikdash’s destruction?

These questions can be resolved by an analysis of the opening verse of this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Devarim: “These are the words which Moshespoke.” The word “these” implies an open revelation, an appreciation that the words of Torah1 are alive and new, as if one is hearing them from Moshe today.2 Each day, we receive the Torah anew. Therefore, the blessings which praise G‑d as “the Giver of the Torah,” use the present tense. Just as each day, man becomes “a new creation,” receiving his soul anew from G‑d, each day, the giving and the receiving of the Torah is renewed.

This provokes a question: Why did G‑d create man in a manner in which he is required to sleep? Man is created to serve his Creator through the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. Why was he created in a manner which requires him3 to interrupt this service and devote several hours each day to sleeping.4

This question can be resolved as follows: The purpose for man’s creation is to elevate the entire creation and bring it to a higher level of completion. Even though after G‑d created the world, “G‑d saw that it was good,” the creation is not self-contained. On the contrary, G‑d created the world in a manner which leaves room for man to become “a partner in creation,” and bring out a new dimension in existence.5

This new dimension is revealed through the service of Torah and mitzvoswhich elevate the nature of the world. Our Sages explain that the giving of the Torah allowed the potential for “the lower realms to ascend to the higher realms.” Although G‑d created these dimensions of existence as “lower,” through our service of Torah and mitzvos, they are elevated and lifted up onto the “higher” plane, reflecting the manner in which a miracle is uplifted above the natural order.

Similarly, within each person’s individual service, once a person has accustomed himself to a specific pattern of behavior, he should strive to reach a new and higher peak. Thus, Tanya explains our Sages’ definition of “one who serves G‑d” as “one who reviews his subject matter 101 times.” In that era, it was normal for each person to review his subject matter 100 times. Thus, by studying the subject matter for the 101st time, the person went beyond his nature and therefore, merited the title “one who serves G‑d.”

This new dimension of service is reflected in the fact that each day, a person becomes “a new creation” after his activity is interrupted through sleeping. Were a person to continue his study of Torah and fulfillment of mitzvos without interruption, the aspect of newness would not be revealed. Since his service would continue constantly, even when there is an increase, it would follow as a natural progression and not as a radical change.

In contrast, by creating man in a manner in which he is required to sleep and thus interrupt his service, G‑d emphasizes the importance of newness and how man has the potential to introduce this element into his service of G‑d. Furthermore, since this dimension of newness requires an interruption, this interruption can be seen as part of the service of G‑d infused by the quality of newness.

These concepts can be applied to the concept of a descent for the sake of an ascent.6 Were a person to continue his service in a constant pattern of growth and ascent, the new dimension of the ascent would not be perceived. In contrast, when there is an interruption in the pattern of growth, one is able to perceive the new quality in the ascent. Furthermore, the new dimension in the ascent which follows a descent allows for an ascent of a greater degree.

This process is reflected in the study of Torah, in the development of new Torah concepts. For this reason, to a great extent, the development of new Torah concepts has taken place in the time of exile.7 The composition of the Babylonian Talmud began a different pattern of revelation of new Torah concepts. The Mishnah was written in clear, concise terminology. In contrast, the Babylonian Talmud, composed in exile8 revealed a greater quantity and a new dimension of Torah ideas. This pattern has been continued in subsequent generations and the descent into the awesome darkness of exile — in particular, in this the generation directly preceding Mashiach’s coming — has granted the Jews the potential to develop a new dimension of service and to express this dimension through the development of new Torah concepts.9

The core of the idea is that in a state of revelation, when one is in a process of constant growth and ascent, man’s own initiative and power to contribute is not emphasized. It is possible that the reason he is constantly advancing is because of the revelation from above and it is impossible to know whether those advances would continue were those revelations to cease. In contrast, when a person is found in a state of descent — in particular, a descent to the lowest depths — and, nevertheless, he is not affected at all and continues his service with all his strength, this reveals the power of service on one’s own initiative and reflects a constant and eternal dimension.

In this context, we can understand why each person is shown a vision of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash on Shabbos Chazon. The intent of the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash was to bring about an ascent to a higher Beis HaMikdash in the Messianic age, a Beis HaMikdash which expresses the quality of newness (and thus, is brought into existence by a new dimension of service carried out by the Jews).

Since the revelation of this new Beis HaMikdash requires the destruction of the previous one, this destruction can be considered as the beginning of the construction of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash. Though on an obvious level, one perceives destruction, the inner intent10 is a phase of new building.11The new dimension of service of the Jewish people will produce a new and greater Beis HaMikdash

Our Sages interpreted the verse, “The honor of this later house will exceed that of the former one,” as a reference to the Second Beis HaMikdash which exceeded the First Beis HaMikdash in size (it was 100 rather than 30 cubits high) and remained for a longer period (420 years rather than 410). It a larger sense, however, the verse can be interpreted as a reference to the Third Beis HaMikdash whose “honor” will exceed that of the previous two for it will be “the Sanctuary of G‑d, established by Your hands,” a timeless, eternal structure.

The advantage of the Third Beis HaMikdash over the previous two is alluded to in the phrase,כתית למאור, “crushed for the light.” The First Beis HaMikdash lasted ת"י (410) years and the Second Beis HaMikdash lasted ת"כ (420) years. Ultimately, they were both “crushed,” destroyed. Yet, this serves as a preparation for “the light,” the revelation of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

The word למאור also alludes to the unique dimension of service which will lead to the building of the Third Beis HaMikdashלמאור refers to a source of light and rut to revealed light. The First and Second Batei Mikdashosreflected the aspect of revealed light. Through their being “crushed,” destroyed, the world was plunged into darkness. Nevertheless, by continuing to serve G‑d in the midst of this darkness, the Jews reveal a new dimension, service on their own initiative. This establishes a connection to the למאור, to the Essence of G‑d which transcends revealed light and which will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d, established by Your hands.”12

Accordingly, in these Three Weeks of Retribution, a Jew should not despair. Despite our appreciation of the depths of the descent, we must consider it as the beginning of the construction of the Messianic Beis HaMikdash.13 On the contrary, the vacuum created by the destruction of the Beis HaMikdashwill awaken a new and deeper level of service including the development of new concepts of Torah law. This, in turn, will lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy, “A new Torah will emerge from Me.”

In this context, it is appropriate, to mention the importance of making siyumim of Talmudic tractates, not only on tractates of Mishnayos, but also on tractates of Gemara, at least tractates like Tamid, which has several chapters of Gemara.

There is another advantage to the study of Tamid. It contains the description of the service of the Beis HaMikdash. Thus, it complements the study of Middos which relates the Beis HaMikdash’s structure. The study of these subjects is considered equivalent to the building of the Beis HaMikdash.

May the above lead to the actual construction of the Beis HaMikdash. For thousands of years, the Jews have prayed three times, “May our eyes behold Your return to Zion in mercy.” Surely, it is fitting that all these prayers be answered. Furthermore, in addition to our prayers, Rabbis have issued halachic decisions ruling that G‑d is obligated to bring the redemption. May this lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy at the conclusion of the Haftorah, “Zion will be redeemed through judgment (i.e., through an increase in Torah study, in particular, Torah law) and those who return to her through tzedakah,” when G‑d will lead each Jew out of exile. We will proceed, “with our youth and our elders,... with our sons and our daughters,” to our holy land, to Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash.

Shabbos Matos-Masei | 27 Tamuz – 4 Menachem Av 5777

Fri- July 21st Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:38 pm

Sat July 22nd Shabbos 
Tehilim for Shabbos Mevarchim Menachem Av 8:00 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:20 am
Mincha  8:38 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2/
Maariv/Havdalah 9:44 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Tue –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Mon 6:50 am /Rosh Chodesh/
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

KIDDUSH 
The Kiddush sponsor for this week, Shabbos Matos Masay, is Frumeth Hirsh Polasky, in honor of Rabbi and Mrs. Levitin, for welcoming her to the community.  Also cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE NINE DAYS BEGIN SUNDAY EVENING JULY 23rd at 8:55 pm
"When Av begins, we diminish [our] rejoicing" (Talmud, Taanit 26b). On the 1st of Av, "The Three Weeks" mourning period over the destruction of the Holy Temple--which began 13 days ealier on Tammuz 17--enters an intensified stage. During "The Nine Days" from Av 1st to the Ninth of Av, a heightened degree of mourning is observed, including abstention from meat and wine, music, bathing for pleasure, and other joyous and enjoyable activities. (The particular mourning customs vary from community to community, so consult a competent Halachic authority for details). Consumption of meat and wine is permitted on Shabbat, or at a Seudat Mitzvah (obligatory festive meal celebrating the fulfillment of a mitzvah) such as a Bris (circumcision), or a "Siyum" celebrating the completion of a course of Torah study (i.e., a complete Talmudic tractate). The Lubavitcher Rebbe initiated the custom of conducting or participating in a Siyum on each of the Nine Days (even if one does not avail oneself of the dispensation to eat meat). Citing the verse (Isaiah 1:27) "Zion shall be redeemed with mishpat [Torah] and its returnees with Tzedakah," the Rebbe urged that we increase in Torah study (particularly the study of the laws of the Holy Temple) and charity during this period (www.chabad.org) Contact Rabbi Levitin with specific questions.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Continues to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

"The Isadore and Ruth Gibber Worldwide Tisha B'Av Event" Tue Aug 1st 
Emunah for Life, how to manage life's challenges. Info 
theseattlekollel@gmail.com
Program A: 2:45 pm at BCMH, 5145 S Morgan Street. 
Program B: 6:30 pm at SBH, 6500 52nd AVE S. 
Suggested donation: $15/Adults or $10/Students.

Seattle Kollel
Wednesdays through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus
Through Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at:www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed
Through July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seed
Tuesday, July 25, 7:15 pm, Pre Tisha B'Av Leil Iyun at the Kollel. Guest speakers will be Rabbi Ron-Ami Meyers, Rabbi Rafi Mollot and Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum. More info:
www.seattlekollel.com
The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or email
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR MATOS-MASEI
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507847/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Matos-Masei-28th-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. The three weeks between the 17th of Tammuz and Tishah BeAv are referred to as the Three Weeks of Retribution and Bein HaMetzorim, “between the straits,” names whose connotation is not openly positive.

This presents a conceptual difficulty. The number three is generally connected with positive themes, e.g., the three Patriarchs, the three pilgrimage festivals. Similarly, our Sages associated the giving of the Torah with the number three, praising G‑d for giving, “a threefold light to a threefold people... in the third month.” Furthermore, the number three has the implications of permanence as expressed in the verse, “the threefold cord will not be snapped speedily.” Similarly, in halachic terms, the number three is connected with a chazakah, a presumption that can be assumed to continue. Accordingly, it is difficult to understand: Why is the concept of retribution and destruction, the direct opposite of holiness and permanence,1 associated with the number three?

Generally, the concept is explained as follows: The awesome descent of the Three Weeks is intended to allow for an ascent. When a person wants to reach a level which is much higher than his present rung, it is necessary for him to undergo a descent first. Similarly, for the Jews to reach the peaks of the Messianic redemption, a redemption which will not be followed by a descent, it is necessary that they first undergo the descent of exile. In this context, the Three Weeks are associated, not with exile, but rather with the Third Beis HaMikdash that will be built after this exile.

This explanation, however, is insufficient for the Three Weeks connect the aspect of descent (and not the subsequent ascent) with three. When a descent is intended for the sake of an ascent, the descent itself is not desired. Indeed, it will ultimately be nullified and all that will remain is the ascent. If so, why is three which is, as above, usually connected with permanence, associated with a dimension that has no self-contained purpose and which ultimately will be nullified?2

The question can be reinforced: Generally, the number three expresses an ascent which follows a descent. For example, in the narrative of creation, the first day, is referred to in the Torah as yom echad, “one day,” i.e., a day of oneness, to quote the Midrash, “the day that G‑d was at one with His world.” It was followed by the second day, “the day on which strife was created,” as reflected in the separation of the higher waters from the lower waters. Accordingly, the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is not mentioned in connection with the second day since division, even when necessary for the world, cannot be called “good.”

This was followed by the third day, which compensated for the division of the second day, creating peace and unifying the two opposites. For this reason, the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is repeated twice, revealing a compound goodness which qualitatively exceeds the goodness of the other days.

This is reflected by the attribute of Tiferes (“beauty,” which was expressed on the third day of creation) which unifies Chessed (“kindness,” expressed on the first day of creation) withGevurah (“might,” expressed on the second day of creation). This reveals a unity which surpasses that of the first day. On the first day, the unity existed on a level above division. Thus, there is the possibility that division will ultimately arise. In contrast, the unity of the third day is established within the context of division, bringing about a true state of unity.

The same concept is reflected in Torah where we find the concept of “a controversy for the sake of heaven,” the controversy between Hillel and Shammai. This division has its source in the division which came into being on the second day of creation and, in turn, serves as the source for subsequent differences of opinion within Torah.

A “controversy for the sake of Heaven,” is obviously not a simple matter of strife or conflict. Nevertheless, it — even the controversy between Hillel and Shammai — brought about a descent. Ultimately, however, it serves a positive function.3 The debate between a thinking process that favors leniency (since its source is the attribute of Chessed) and a thinking process which tends to severity (since its source is the attribute of Gevurah) leads to a clarification of Torah law.4 A third opinion emerges which reconciles and unifies both conflicting perspectives.5

Thus, both in the world at large and in Torah, the concept of descent and division is associated with the number two and three is associated with the ascent and unification that follows. Similarly, in regard to the Batei HaMikdashos: The first (associated with the Patriarch Avraham, and the attribute of Chessed) and the second (associated with the Patriarch, Yitzchok, and the attribute of GevurahBatei Mikdashos were destroyed, while the third Beis HaMikdash (associated with the Patriarch Yaakov and the attribute of Tiferes) will be an eternal structure. Thus the original question is reinforced: Why are these weeks which are connected with mourning, destruction, and exile associated with the number three?

This question can be resolved by developing a different understanding of the concept “a descent for the purpose of an ascent.” To explain: A Jew should be in a constant process of ascent, “always ascending higher in holiness,” “proceeding from strength to strength.” If so, what is the reason for a descent? To proceed to a higher and more elevated rung that could not otherwise be reached. To give an example from every day life, when faced with obstructions and difficulties, a person summons up inner strength that brings out greater achievements that would otherwise be impossible.

In this process of descent for the sake of ascent, there are two levels: a) a descent which is limited within the context of the natural order, b) a descent which cannot be fathomed by the rules of nature.

In the first case — which reflects the progression from two (descent) to three (ascent) — just as the descent is limited, so, too, the ascent has certain limits. In contrast, when the descent is unlimited, as in the Three Weeks, the ascent which follows is also unlimited in nature.

The first type of descent was implanted by G‑d in the natural order of the world. In contrast, the second descent is brought about by man, through his sins. Thus, in the first instance, there is a direct connection between the descent and the ascent which will follow. In contrast, when a person sins, on a revealed level, there is no apparent connection between the sin and the ascent through teshuvah which will ultimately follow. In particular, when the descent that is brought about by sin is connected with three — and thus, has the power of permanence — the ascent becomes even higher.

To rephrase the matter: The process of ascent that is brought about by descent is a natural phenomenon. Since the descent into the realm of division brings about a higher sense of oneness, the division is not genuine. On the contrary, even on the level of division, it is felt how it is temporary in nature, with no purpose in and of itself, and that it exists only to bring out the higher level of unity. When is there genuine division? When there is an approach that possesses the aspect of permanence associated with three and yet appears to be totally negative in thrust with no connection with the ascent that will follow. When unity is established in that context, then it is true and complete.

In this context, we can understand the Three Weeks. This period, brought about by our sins, reflects the lowest possible descent, a descent that would not be possible within the order of nature, and reflects the aspect of permanence associated with the number three. Thus, we see that this exile continues without end, to quote our Sages:

In the first generations, their sin was revealed and the end [of the period of retribution] was also revealed. In the later generations, their sin was not revealed and the end [of the period of retribution] was also not revealed.

Even after our Sages declared, “All the appointed times for Mashiach’s coming have passed,” the exile continues. Furthermore, on the surface, there is no way in which it is apparent how such an exile will lead to the redemption.

Nevertheless, this itself is an indication that it will lead to an ascent which is totally beyond our comprehension, that it will surpass even the peaks of holiness that were attained previously, establishing an entirely new framework of reference.

Furthermore, since this is the purpose of the descent of the Three Weeks — although it is not consciously felt — we must appreciate that the Three Weeks themselves have a positive dimension. The Three Weeks are associated with the revelation of the three powers of intellect.

In that context, the word פורעניות rendered as “retribution” can be reinterpreted in a positive context. The Zohar associates Pharaoh (whose name פרעה shares the same Hebrew root asפורעניות) “with the revelation of all the sublime lights.” Similarly, these Three Weeks can be the source for a revelation of light that transcends all limits, the light that will be revealed in the Third Beis HaMikdash.6

In this context, we can explain the connection between the Three Weeks and this particular Shabbos, the Shabbos on which the Book of Bamidbar is completed.7 The process of descent for the sake of ascent which is revealed in the Three Weeks goes beyond the limits of nature. Thus, it brings about a strengthening of the Jews in Torah, as evidenced by their calling out in powerful tones, Chazak, Chazak, Vinischazeik, (“Be strong, Be strong, May you be strengthened”).8

The concept of an immeasurable ascent which comes because of the descent into exile is also alluded to in each of the parshiyos of Matos and Masei.

The name Matos refers to a branch which has become strong and hard because it was cut off from the tree.9 There is a parallel to this in our service of G‑d. The Jewish soul as it descends into a body, particularly as it exists in exile, is, on an apparent level, cut off from its source. This brings about a hardening and strengthening process. On the surface, the hardening is negative in nature, intensifying the challenges which a Jew faces. Through confronting these challenges, however, a Jew attains added strength and power in his service of G‑d which enables him to endure the challenges of exile without being affected.

Similarly, the parshah of Masei shares a connection to the exile. Masei meaning “journeys,” in an extended sense can refer to all the journeys undergone by the Jews in their departure from Egypt (the place of boundaries and limitations) with the intent of reaching Eretz Yisraelin the Messianic era. These journeys add strength to the Jews as expressed in the exclamation,Chazak, Chazak, Vinischazeik.

Thus, the extended exile which is felt acutely in these Three Weeks should not bring a Jew to despair, but rather to an appreciation of the heights to which the exile will bring us. This realization should, in turn, bring about a strengthening of Torah and mitzvos which will lead to the Messianic redemption. This should be expressed in “spreading the wellsprings outward,” extending the influence of Torah to places which by nature have no connection to it.

In particular, this should be expressed in making siyumim, conclusions of the study of Talmudic tractates or Torah works. These siyumim should be made in every place possible. May this lead to a siyum of the exile.

Shema in the evening?” “Evening” refers to exile. Within the exile there can the recitation, i.e., the revelation, of Shema, the Oneness of G‑d and His unique connection to the Jews. This is brought about by מאימתי, which as the Maggid’s son Rav Avraham explained, can also be rendered as, “Out of awe,” i.e., the fear and awe of G‑d.

This leads to the conclusion of the Talmud: “The School of Eliyahu [i.e., the prophet Eliyahu who will announce Mashiach’s coming] taught: Whoever studies Torah laws every day is assured of life in the World to Come.”10 The study of Torah law gives a Jew control over the entire world and enables him to experience the World to Come within the context of his life in this world. This will lead to the era of the redemption.}

This must lead to the ultimate decision of Torah law, that the exile has endured for too long and the Messianic redemption must come now.11

Shabbos Pinchas | 20-27 Tamuz 5777

Fri- July 14th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:45 pm

Sat July 15th  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:20 am
Mincha  8:45 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 1/
Maariv/Havdalah 10:02 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon  –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Abraham and Shprintze Kavka on the birth of a baby girl to Naomi and Levi! May they merit to raise her to Torah, Chupa, and Maasim Tovim!

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush Lite – No sponsor.  Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

THE THREE WEEKS 
We are now during the three weeks, weddings are not held; we do not play musical instruments or listen to music; we do not eat fruit which we have not yet eaten this season or wear new clothing that would require us to recite the Shehecheyanu blessing ; We do not cut our hair or shave. Consult Rabbi Levitin for details.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to http://www.CSTLSeattle.org to make your payment online with your credit card. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ezzy Bezzy BBQ Sunday, July 16,  6:30-7:30 pm
Cost: $20/person, by reservation only. 
https://ebbbq.wordpress.com/about/

The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

Seattle Kollel
Wednesdays through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info:
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus Through Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at: www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed. Through July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at: www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seedTuesday, July 25, 7:15 pm, Pre Tisha B'Av Leil Iyun at the Kollel. Guest speakers will be Rabbi Ron-Ami Meyers, Rabbi Rafi Mollot and Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum. More info:www.seattlekollel.com


The First Annual Green Speech Campaign, A Shemiras HaLoshon Initiative. Go to www.GreenSpeechWordsMatter.com or email JewishUnity@GreenSpeechCampaign.com to join. For local info on "Green Speech" & for a local study partner or group call (206) 369-1215 or email 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR PINCHAS
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507845/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Pinchas-21st-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Our1 Sages relate that the world will exist in its present state for six millennia: Two thousand years of chaos, two thousand years of Torah, and two thousand years of [which include the preparation for] the Messianic era. Thus, at present, in the closing years of the sixth millennia, there is added significance to the period of Bein HaMetzorim when we commemorate the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash and look forward to the time when it will be rebuilt.

In particular, this year, there is a unique dimension to this period as emphasized by the fact that it begins and is concluded on a Tuesday [on the dates of the 17th of Tammuz and Tishah BeAv respectively].

Tuesday is singled out as the day on which the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” is repeated. This shares a particular connection to the 17th of Tammuz, since 17 is the numerical equivalent of the word טוב meaning “good” in Hebrew. Thus, the period of Bein HaMetzorim begins on a day whose nature is positive. This reinforces our hope that, as the Rambam writes:

All these fast days will ultimately be nullified in the Messianic age. Furthermore, they will be transformed into festivals and days of happiness and joy.

In this context, the repetition of the expression, “And G‑d saw that it was good,” can be interpreted as referring to two types of good: a) entities whose positive nature is openly apparent; b) a good which comes from “the transformation of darkness to light and bitterness to sweetness,” as will be seen in regard to the 17th of Tammuz.

The concept of repetition is also connected to the Messianic redemption. Our Sages declared:

There are five letters which are repeated [i.e., have two forms, one for when they appear in the midst of a word and one when they appear at a word’s conclusion]. All these letters allude to the redemption. For example, the Tzadi, with it G‑d will redeem Israel in the final years of the fourth kingdom as it is written, “A man [Mashiach], Tzemach is his name. Under him, will flourish....”

The unique dimension of the 17th of Tammuz is enhanced by the Shabbos which follows since the Shabbos elevates the days of the previous week. In general, the Shabbasos of Bein HaMetzorim are above the aspect of mourning. On Shabbos, it is forbidden to carry out any of the rites of mourning associated with these days. On the contrary, these Shabbasos have to be characterized by joy and happiness; indeed, greater happiness than on other Shabbasos to negate the possibility of someone thinking that they are at all associated with sadness.2

In particular, this Shabbos reflects the positive dimensions of the Three Weeks as reflected by its date, the 21st of Tammuz. 21 is the numerical equivalent of the word אך (“only”), and alludes to the verse meaning, “It shall be only good for Israel.”3

The positive aspects of this Shabbos are further emphasized by the weekly Torah portion, Parshas Pinchas. Firstly, the very inclusion of this Torah portion in the period of Bein HaMetzorim is positive. “There is no good other than Torah.” Thus, the addition of a fourth Torah portion (besides Matos, Masei and Devarimwhich are always read during Bein HaMetzorim) is a positive point.

Furthermore, Pinchas is identified with the prophet Eliyahu who will announce the coming of Mashiach. In addition, the portion begins with G‑d’s declaration, “Behold, I grant him My covenant of peace.” This is Eliyahu’s mission, to establish peace among the Jewish people as the prophet Malachi relates, “Behold, I will send you Eliyahu, the prophet, who will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers.” This emphasis on peace will nullify the cause of the exile, unwonted hatred.4 When the exile’s cause is nullified, the exile itself will cease.

Similarly, the conclusion of the portion which describes the sacrifices offered on the Sabbath and the festivals alludes to the potential to transform the fast days into holidays and festivals.

The uniqueness of these Three Weeks is related to the Haftoros recited in this time. This period is called “the Three Weeks of Retribution” because theHaftoros of these three weeks, at least on the surface, deal with retribution. Only afterwards, follow “the Seven Weeks of Consolation” whose Haftoros mention prophecies of consolation. There is, however, a positive aspect to these Three Weeks. The numbers three and seven allude to the seven emotional powers and the three powers of intellect. From this, it appears that these Three Weeks are on a higher plane and are also the source for the positive qualities to be expressed in the weeks that follow.

In that context, the word פורעניות rendered as “retribution” can be reinterpreted in a positive context. The Zohar associates Pharaoh (whose name shares the same Hebrew root as פורעניות) “with the revelation of all the sublime lights.” Similarly, these Three Weeks can be the source for a revelation of light that transcends all limits.

This unbounded revelation is reflected in the three Torah portions which are always read during Bein HaMetzorim, the parshiyos: Matos, Masei, andDevarim. Each of these three parshiyos deal with a different dimension of the conquest, division, and inheritance of Eretz Yisrael. Furthermore, this includes not only the land of the seven nations which lived on the west side of the Jordan, but also the three nations (the Keni, Knizi, and Kadmoni5 ) whose territory began on the eastern bank of the Jordan. As explained previously,6 the tribes of Reuven and Gad desired to settle in these lands to fulfill G‑d’s promise to grant Avraham the lands of ten nations. Here, we see a fusion of the intellect and the emotions, a conquest of all ten nations alluding to control of all our ten potentials. In particular, the conquest of the lands of the Keni, Knizi, andKadmoni allude to the positive nature of these Three Weeks which reflect our three intellectual potentials.

The above is enhanced this year by the inclusion of Parshas Pinchas among the Shabbasos of Bein HaMetzorim. In particular, a positive dimension is revealed when the 17th of Tammuz falls on Tuesday. This creates an association between that day and the third aliyah of Parshas Pinchas which describes the division ofEretz Yisrael, stating:

Among these, the land will be divided....7 To a larger [tribe], you shall give a greater inheritance. To a smaller [tribe], you shall give a lesser inheritance.... Nevertheless, you must divide the land by lot.

Thus, three different approaches to the division of the land are mentioned: a) inheritance, b) a division based on the criteria of reason (“To a greater [tribe]...”), c) division by lots. It can be explained that these three different approaches are reflected in the phrase from the liturgy: “Fortunate are we! How good is our portion, how pleasant our lot, and how beautiful our heritage.” Through these three services, we hasten the division of Eretz Yisrael using these three approaches in the Messianic age. Indeed, the division of the land mentioned inParshas Pinchas can be interpreted as an allusion to that ultimate division of the land.8

The above concepts are also alluded to in the parshiyos, Matos and Masei which are read in today’s Minchah service. Parshas Masei begins, “These are the journeys of the children of Israel when they left the land of Egypt.” In Likkutei Torah, the Alter Rebbe asks: After the first journey, the Jews had already left Egypt. Why are all the journeys linked to this departure? He explains that the ultimate goal of all the 42 journeys was to leave Egypt, i.e., to transcend one’s boundaries and limitations.

Conversely, all the subsequent journeys were included within the first journey which took the Jews out of Egypt. Had the Jews merited, they would have continued directly into Eretz Yisrael, bringing about the Messianic redemption.

Nevertheless, due to the people’s sins, the redemption was delayed and they were forced to wander forty years in the desert. Similarly, this descent brought about the potential for later exiles. The ability to transform these negative elements is also alluded to in this week’s Torah reading. Parshas Matos deals with the subject of vows, including an allusion to the nullification of vows by a Sage.9 This relates to the nullification of all undesirable entities including the exile.

2. Parshas Pinchas also contains a description of the daughters of Tzelophchad’s request to inherit their father’s portion of Eretz Yisrael. The commentaries mention that their love for Eretz Yisrael came to them as a heritage from their ancestor Yosef who also displayed a great love for the Holy Land.

There is also a connection between Yosef and the 17th of Tammuz because Yosef was seventeen years when he was sold into slavery. Our Sages also connect this with the concept that seventeen is numerically equal to good. To explain:

Our Sages relate that after Yaakov’s confrontations with Lavan and Esav, he “desired to live in prosperity.” That desire was not granted immediately. Nevertheless, G‑d set into motion a series of events which led to the ultimate fulfillment of that desire. Yosef’s descent into Egypt eventually led to Yaakov living the 17 best years of his life in prosperity in Egypt. This, in turn, gave the Jews the potential to sustain the hardships of exile, and, ultimately, to transform the exile into a positive quality.

This is connected to the concept that Yaakov10 represents the entire Jewish people. Indeed, his second name, Yisrael, is the name of the people as a whole and, as explained in Tanya, his soul included the soul of each member of our people.

Each of the three Patriarchs represented a different quality in the service of G‑d: Avraham — deeds of kindness, as exemplified in his welcoming of guests; Yitzchok — prayer, as exemplified in his being chosen as a sacrifice; Yaakov — Torah study, as exemplified by his devoted attention to the study halls of Shemand Ever.

Although all these three services are of primary importance and must be fulfilled every day,11 there is a prominence granted to Torah study. Every moment of the day and night, a Jew has the obligation — and the opportunity — to study Torah; this applies even on Tishah BeAv. [Until the present year, for Mashiach will surely come beforehand.] There have been limitations against studying Torah on that day because Torah study brings happiness which is inappropriate on such an occasion. Despite these restrictions, there is an obligation to study those aspects of Torah which are permitted during the entire day.12

The fundamental connection a Jew shares with Torah is further emphasized by our Sages’ interpretation of the name Yisrael as an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “There are 600,000 letters in the Torah.”13

Our Sages relate that Yaakov taught all the Torah which he had studied to Yosef. Yosef, in turn, transmitted Yaakov’s influence to the entire Jewish people, granting them the potential to reach a complete level of Torah study. Indeed, Yosef related these qualities to the entire Jewish people, those who identified with them and those who, were it not for his influence, would be estranged from their Jewish roots. This is alluded to in Rachel’s association of the naming of Yosef with the prayer, “May G‑d add on to me another son.” This implies that Yosef has the potential to transform someone who is “another,” estranged from his Jewish roots, into a “son.” This quality of transformation will also be expressed in the transformation of the exile into a positive quality.

In particular, there is a greater emphasis on the above in the present generation whose Nasi is named Yosef since “the Nasi includes the entire people.” This is expressed in regard to his redemption which he interpreted as general in nature:

The Holy One, Blessed be He, did not redeem me alone... but rather, all who love our holy Torah, fulfill its mitzvos, and all those who bear the name “Jew.”

This year, the 110th anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s birth, his connection to Yosef receives greater emphasis for that number represents the number of years of Yosef’s life. The Previous Rebbe set the example of spreading Yosef’s service, extending Torah study to all Jews, even those estranged from their Jewish roots. Indeed, he emphasized this dimension in the letter and the maamarhe released to mark the first commemoration of Yud-Beis Tammuz, stressing the importance of spreading Torah study to all Jews and highlighting the importance of public sessions of Torah study. Implicit in his words is the promise that the Messianic redemption will be brought about through these activities.

3. Yeshayahu the prophet declares, “Tzion will be redeemed through justice and those who return to through tzedakah.” The Alter Rebbe explains that justice refers to Torah study and that these two activities, Torah study and tzedakah, will bring about the Messianic redemption. In particular, this applies to the study of the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah which includes the entire oral law. The above applies to a greater extent on Shabbos, a day which should be utilized to “gather groups together in Torah study.”14 In particular, these concepts are relevant during Bein HaMetzorim.

Also of unique relevance at the present time is the study of the structure of theBeis HaMikdash as revealed in Yechezkel’s prophecies, in the Mishnah in the tractate of Middos, and in the teachings of the Rambam in Hilchos Beis HaBechirah. (To enable people to study all these texts, they have been printed in a single volume.)

Similarly, it is important to hold siyumim (gatherings celebrating the conclusion of Torah texts) during these days including the day of Tishah BeAv itself.15These directives should be publicized in every place throughout the world.

May these activities hasten the coming of the time when Bein HaMetzorim will be transformed into a period of celebration with the coming of Mashiach.16

Shabbos Balak | 13-20 Tamuz 5777

 

Fri- July 7th Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:50 pm

Sat July 8th  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:16 am
Mincha  8:50 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 6
Maariv/Havdalah 10:03 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon, Wed –Fri Shacharis  7 am
Tue – Shacharis 6:50 am /Fast of 17 Tamuz/
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 8:30 pm

FAST OF 17th TAMUZ TUE JULY 11th 
Fast Begins 3:03 am
Shacharis 6:50 am
Mincha 8:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 9:45 pm

KIDDUSH 
Thank you to Rabbi Levitin and Chabad of Seattle for sponsoring Kiddush in honor of Yud Beis/Yud Gimel Tamuz.  Seuda Slishit

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES SHABBOS FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD BEIS TAMUZ - SAT JULY 8th 5 PM
Farbrengen for women and girls in honor of Yud-Beis / Yud-Gimel Tammuz at Tziviah Goldberg's, 5 pm Shabbos Parshas Balak. 4038 NE 58th St. Bring a story or D'var Torah if you like. 

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Camp Gan Israel Seattle Goes to Six Weeks! Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th 
Campers ages 2 -12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2017, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Camp Gan Israel Seattle: Mon Jul 3rd to Fri Aug 11th. Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/


COMMUNITY NEWS

Hot Wings and Cool Music with Mercaz - Sun July 9th 5pm-9pm. 
Eating together and playing music before the three weeks, bring your singing voices and an instrument! Wings, Salads, Vegetarian Option, Lemonade, BYOB.  Register at
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/hot-wings-and-cool-music.html

Ezzy Bezzy BBQ Sunday, July 16,  6:30-7:30 pm
Cost: $20/person, by reservation only. 
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The Rhodes Memorial Committee Sunday, July 23, 7:00 pm, 
A recital of "My Life In Auschwitz & Bergen Belsen", the testimony of Lucia Capelluto as told to Lina Galasso Delfini. Sephardic Dessert following program at Ezra Bessaroth, 5217 S Brandon St. More info: 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

"Beersheva Hadassah Salon:  How to Talk About Israel" July 23, 7:30 pm,
Presented by Dr. Mike Harris. Click here for Bio. At the home of Gail Eisenberg, 7316 Bowlyn PL S, Sea., WA 98118. How can you effectively challenge anti-Israel activists? Come and hear a veteran Israel activist who wrote the book on the subject.  Suggested Donation to Hadassah: $18. Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP by July 19th to 
Beersheva.Hadassah@gmail.com  

Seattle Kollel
Wed through July 26, 8:00 pm,  "A Taste of Lomdus" More info: 
www.seattlekollel.com/a-touch-of-lomdus .
June 26 - Aug. 11, Full Day SEED Camp for boys entering 3rd grade & up, Aug. 14-18, Half Day. At the Kollel. Register at: 
www.seattlekollel.com/camp-seed    
June 26 - July 21, full day SEED Camp for girls entering 3rd grade & up. Register at:
www.seattlekollel.com/girls-camp-seed 

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR BALAK
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507841/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Chukas-7th-Day-of-Tammuz-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. Yud-Beis Tammuz, in addition to being the Previous Rebbe’s day of redemption, is also his birthday. This year there is a unique dimension to this aspect because it is the 110th anniversary of his birth. The Torah associates the number 110 with Yosef who lived for 110 years, mentioning that fact in two separate verses.

Yosef’s lifespan has raised several questions. On one hand, the Talmud states that “the years of Yosef’s life was reduced,” and indeed, he did not live as long as his father or grandfather. On the other, the Midrash chooses Yosef as an example of long life, stating:

Since he worked hard to honor his father in Egypt, he merited the crown of old age... as it is written: “And Yosef saw Ephraim’s great-grandchildren.”

It can be explained that there is no contradiction between the two: Compared to his brothers and his ancestors, he did not live long. When compared to an average person, however, his life was prolonged. In addition, Yosef possessed the unique aspect of seeing the third generation of Ephraim’s descendants and Menasheh’s grandchildren(Bereishis 50:23; see The Living Torah). The Torah does not explicitly describe any other figure as being blessed with the fortune of living together with that many generations of his descendants.1

Despite this dimension, Yosef’s life was, in fact, shorter than that of his brothers and, indeed, less than 120 years. Furthermore, Yosef’s life was shorter than that of his father.2 This fact can be clarified by another concept.

It can be explained that the reason that Yosef merited to see a continuity of his descendants is a result of the fact that Yosef was the first Jew to serve as a king. With the exception of the fact that he did not sit on the throne, he fulfilled all the functions of the monarchy.3

Thus, Yosef serves as the source of monarchy for the Jewish people and we find the expressions, “the kingdom of the House of Yosef” and “the Mashiach of the House of Yosef.” Even though the ultimate dimension of monarchy is associated with the House of David, who will come from the tribe of Yehudah, that dimension will not be revealed until the Messianic age. Until then, Yosef is supreme and Yehudah receives from him.

[The ultimate expression of monarchy is seen in the crown. For this reason, the sign of whether a monarch of the House of David was fit for his position was whether the crown fit him or not. A crown, Kesser, in Hebrew, is identified with the Sefirah of that name.

There is a connection between this year’s commemoration of Yud-Beis Tammuz and the attribute of Kesser. This is the 63rd anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s release from prison. 63 can be divided into 50 (a number identified with Kesser) and 13 which stands for the 13 Attributes of Mercy and the drawing down of their influence to the Jews who are divided into twelve tribes and the tribe of Levi.]4

The concept of prolonged years and continuity from generation to generation is integrally connected with the concept of monarchy as it is written, “Prolong the king’s life, extend his years from generation to generation.” Therefore, the Torah explicitly associates these qualities with Yosef. Nevertheless, since the ultimate aspect of monarchy will be revealed in the House of David, Yosef’s life was actually not as long as that of his brothers. Furthermore, the Zohar explains that Yosef did not live to be 147, the age to which his father Yaakov lived, because he gave 37 years of his life to King David, implying that ultimately, the Kingdom of Yosef will lead to the Kingdom of David.5

On the basis of the above, we can appreciate the unique dimension of Yud-Beis Tammuzin the present year, the 110th anniversary of the birth of the Previous Rebbe — the Yosef of our generation. Here, it is possible to see the continuity of the generations whose service he inspired, a service that will bring about a spreading of the wellsprings of Chassidus outward and thus, lead to the coming of Mashiach.

This concept can be associated with the redemption of Yud-Beis Tammuz which was of a collective nature, strengthening and encouraging Torah and Yiddishkeit, not only in the Previous Rebbe’s generation, but in the generations that follow until the present day. Indeed, we see that as a result of his redemption, the Previous Rebbe was able to reach America, “the lower half of the world.” There, he continued to spread Torah andmitzvos and transferred this mission to the coming generations who have expanded this service. This will lead to the ultimate expression of monarchy, the coming of Mashiach whose sovereignty will spread throughout the entire world.

The above concepts receive greater emphasis due to the fact that the Previous Rebbe is the sixth generation6 of the Chabad Nesi’im who spread the wellsprings of Chassidus outward, reaching the furthest reaches of the world.

Our Sages relate that there will be six millennia to the existence of the world in its present state: two thousand years of chaos, two thousand years of Torah, and two thousand years of [preparation for] the Messianic age. Thus, the sixth millennia is intended to prepare us for the seventh millennia, the age which is “all Sabbath and rest for eternity.”

* * *

3. Each year, on one’s birthday, it is customary to study the chapter of Psalms associated with the number of years of one’s life together with its commentaries. Similarly, this Psalm is recited each day throughout the year. Because of the attachment of Chassidimto the Previous Rebbe, it is proper that they study and recite the Psalm associated with his birthday.

Psalm 111 contains the verse, “He has made a remembrance of His wondrous works.” The Tzemach Tzedek comments on this verse:

Whatever G‑d does for the righteous in this world is only a “remembrance” of what He will do for them in the world to come.... Even the miracles of the exodus from Egypt are only a “remembrance” when compared to the miracles which will be in the Messianic era as implied by the verse, “As in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”

The above receives even greater emphasis this year, תש"נ, “a year of miracles,” which will lead to תשנ"א, whose letters form an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “May this be the year of ‘I will show wonders.’ ” This is further intensified by the connection to this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Balak, which contains several allusions to the Messianic redemption. For example, the Rambam writes that the verse, “A star will shoot forth from Yaakov and a staff will arise in Israel,” is a reference to Mashiach’s coming.

The above concepts can be applied in each of our lives since each Jew has a connection to royalty as our Sages declare, “the Jews are like the sons of kings.” Similarly, the Jewish people as a whole are called Yosef and thus, particularly, our generation whoseNasi is named Yosef — and “the Nasi includes the entire generation” — share a connection to the Previous Rebbe, the Yosef of our generation.

Each Jew, within the context of his life in the physical world, receives a crown7 of kingship from G‑d. This gives him the potential to live in a manner of redemption, without being hindered by any of the obstacles of the exile. On the contrary, he rules over his environment and reveals G‑d’s sovereignty in the world.

To allow a Jew to carry on this service, G‑d grants him manifold blessings so that he can live a life of peace and prosperity — in Eretz Yisrael or in the Diaspora — and thus, further his service of Torah and mitzvos. The celebration of Yud-Beis Tammuz this year grants further potential for such service, endowing each Jew with the potential to spread this service to others, “raising up many students,” and thus establishing continuity with the generations to come.

When each Jew lives in “a manner of redemption,”8 the world will be prepared for the ultimate redemption. Then, this, the last generation of exile will become the first generation of redemption.

On a practical level, resolutions should be taken regarding the following: a) Gifts should be given to tzedakah in multiples of 110 and in multiples of 63; b) The farbrengens ofYud-Beis Tammuz should be continued and, in every place, farbrengens should be held on the 14th and 15th of Tammuz, in the hope that this will transform the 17th of Tammuz into a day of celebration, c) The campaign of public sessions of Torah study should be reinforced, d) The maamar, Asarah SheYoshim released by the Previous Rebbe in connection with Yud-Beis Tammuz should be studied, e) Psalm 111 should be studied together with its commentaries.

These activities will lead to the fulfillment of the promise, “And you shall spread westward, eastward, northward, and southward,” spreading G‑dliness throughout the world. This will lead to the coming of Mashiach. May it be in the immediate future.

* * *

4. At present, the affluence enjoyed by the Jewish community allows the possibility for Rabbis to study Torah without disruption and thus, penetrate to the depth of Torah, deriving practical halachic decisions. It must, however, be emphasized that although, from an abstract perspective, the most challenging aspect of Torah study is to deal with the application of halachah, before actually putting into practice — or advising others to put into practice — one’s decisions, it is proper to consult with a Rabbi who has experience in rendering decisions in applied halachah. Indeed, we find that in previous generations, before a Rabbi was allowed to render halachic decisions, in addition to having Semichah, “ordination,” he had to have shimush, “internship,” during which he assisted a practicing Rabbinical authority.

The influence of the practical application of halachah is evident form the following story concerning an important Rabbi (whose name will not be mentioned lest some of the particulars in the story are not accurate) who was being tested to see if he was fit for a Rabbinical position. He was asked many questions which he answered correctly with the exception of one, to which he gave an answer that contradicted the views of most other authorities. When questioned about this point, he explained, that G‑d has helped him to, as of yet, never err in regard to an actual halachic question. Apparently, the question was being asked merely from a theoretical perspective with no intent of being applied to actual behavior and therefore, his answer was lacking.

May today’s Rabbis render the halachic decision of immediate relevance: that the exile has lasted too long and may G‑d carry out their decision and bring Mashiach.

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