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Newsletter

Yom Kippur – Sukkot | 5778 Tishrei 9-17, 5778

Erev Yom Kippur – Fri Sept 29th 
Shacharit: 7:00 AM /with Kapparot Chickens!/
Mincha 3:00 pm /followed by Seuda ha’Mafsekes at home/
Candle Lighting 6:33/Fast Starts  6:51 pm /Light Yartzeit Candle/
Kol Nidre  6:45 pm
Maariv 7:20 pm

Yom Kippur – Sat Sept 30th 
Shacharit: 9:00 AM /YIZKOR/
Mincha 5:00 PM followed by Neilah
Maariv/Havdala  7:29 PM /Havdalah on candle, wine, and spices (Shabbos)/

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon- Wed 7 am /with L’Dovid /
Sun -Tue Mincha 6:30 pm, followed by Maariv  /Repeat Shema after 7:04 pm/

Erev Succos, Wed Oct 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv: 6:23 pm /Eruv Tavshilin: before lighting candles/

Succos- First Day, Thu Oct 5th 
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema: 9:57 am/
Mincha: 6:23 pm
Ma'ariv/Candles after: 7:19 pm /light from existing flame/

Succos- Second Day, Fri Oct 6th 
Shacharis: 9 am
Mincha/Maariv/Shabbos Candle Lighting (before): 6:19 pm light from existing flame/

Shabbos Succos- Sat Oct 7th 
Shacharis: 9 am /SPECIAL KIDDUSH LUNCH
Mincha 6:19 pm
Maariv/Havdalah 7:15 pm

WOMEN’S MIKVAH TIMES FOR EREV YOM KIPPUR FRI SEP 29th  10:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Contact Chana Plotke 206-898-5879 for more info. Please bring towels.

KAPPOROS AT CSTL FRI SEPT 29th 6:20 to 7 am and 8 am – 9 am 
Thank you to Rabbi Yosef Truxton from Chabad of Bellingham for facilitating the mitzvah of Kapparot at CSTL.  –Cost is: $18/person , $26/couple , $36/family CASH ONLY- make plans to bring the cash you need; please bring exact change.  Wishing you a Gmar Chatima Tova and a year of only revealed and abundant good!

MEN’S MIKVAH TIMES FOR EREV YOM KIPPUR FRI SEP 29th 6am – 9:30 am and 2pm – 6 pm
You must pay Men’s Mikvah membership or arrange a payment plan before use. Please bring towels

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazal tov to Kalanit and Mychael Lagbas on the birth of their baby boy on September 24! May they merit to raise their son to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Sari Weiss and the Weiss family on the Bar Mitzvah of Matan Shalom ben Avraham (Max Weiss) .  May he merit to grow to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim!

TOT GROUPS UPSTAIRS ON YOM KIPPUR 10:30 AM - 1 PM.
In Rabbi Levitin’s Study (upstairs). 3-5 years old: Drop Off .2 years old and under: accompanied by a parent. Limit of 10 children, light snacks provided. If you're interested in volunteering with tot groups, please email Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CHILDRENS PROGRAM UPSTAIRS ON YOM KIPPUR
Tova would like everyone to register again for the Yom Kippur downstairs kids' program this Shabbos. It will be from 10:30 to 2, ages 4 and up, light snacks but no lunch will be served.  Please reach out to Tova with any questions or if you'd like to make a donation to the CSTL Kids' Program! Please sign up at this link: 
https://goo.gl/forms/wG1SgEuIjfOYkO523 For Succos, there will only be a regular program on Shabbos, not on the days of Chag.

KIDDUSH CHOL haMOED SUKKOS Sat Oct 7th
Shabbos Chol Hamoed Sukkus  there will be a full sit-down Kiddish meal in the Shul Sukkah sponsored by Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L.  The whole community is invited.

LULAV /ESROG AND S’CHACH PICKUP AT CSTL Sun Oct 1st 3 PM – 8 PM
Questions? Call Rabbi Kavka 206-730-2775, rabbikavka@gmail.com

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE SUKKOT
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  For the Eruv Tavshilin we set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. We then say the following blessing on Erev Yom Tov.
www.ezrabessaroth.net

FARBRENGEN ALERT - SIMCHAS BEIS HA’SHOEVA SUN OCT 8th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi & Mrs. Sholom Ber & Chanie Levitin, 6519 49th Ave NE - In honor of the Yahrzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Binyomin Ben haRav Shumel Halavi Levitin ZT”L. 

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

PARKING ALERT – PLEASE DON’T BLOCK OUR NEIGHBORS
As a courtesy, please do not park within 6 feet from any of our neighbors driveways.

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.


COMMUNITY NEWS

SUKKOS MELAVA MALKA- Rebbe Nachman's Yartzeit Sat Oct. 7th 8:30 - 10:30pm
Music and Learning in Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld’s Sukka- 5240 38th Ave. NE

JUDAICA FOR SALE
Looking to purchase a new talet, tefillin or mezuzah?  Jeff Amon has been given the opportunity to continue selling a large variety of items from Israel which Hazzan Yogev Nuna was previously offering. There is a large selection of products.  Jeff is also able to order items he doesn't  currently have but which you may like. Please contact him to inquire about items you want and he'll will try his best to get it for you.  Jeff Amon, 206-271-6662

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com yonilevitin@gmail.com

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


REBBE’S SICHO FOR YOM KIPPUR 
http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/chassidic-dimension-festivals-1/11.htm © SichosInEnglish.org 

The Rambam states[70] that "Yom Kippur is the time of teshuvah for all.... Therefore all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur."

What does the Rambam mean with his statement that "Yom Kippur is the time of teshuvah for all," when the Rambam states in a previous paragraph that the entire ten-day period between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur is a propitious time for repentance, not only the day of Yom Kippur?

Additionally, teshuvah is not a time-bound commandment; as soon as an individual sins, he is obliged to repent.[71] The fact that the ten-day period between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur is an auspicious time for teshuvah in no way implies that the obligation to repent is greater then than during the rest of the year. Rather, these ten days are more favorable for repentance, and moreover, the teshuvah accomplished then is "immediately accepted."[72]

The special aspect of Yom Kippur lies in the fact that "Yom Kippur is a time for teshuvah ... therefore all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur." In other words, the very time frame, and not a specific sin, per se, obligates teshuvah. Thus Yom Kippur not only makes teshuvah easier, loftier, and so on, but the very day obligates one to repent.

Truly, this must be understood. If a person has sinned, he is obligated to repent during the entire year, not only on Yom Kippur. If, on the other hand, the individual is free of sin, then it would seem that he need not repent, even on Yom Kippur. Moreover, as he is sinless, what is he going to repent for?

During the rest of the year, it is a person's personal status as a sinner that obligates him to repent. On Yom Kippur, however, the time frame itself brings an obligation to do teshuvah, regardless of his status. Thus, the obligation extends to all, for it is not the person's actions but the day itself that necessitates teshuvah.

But the original question seems to remain: How can it be said that the obligation to repent on Yom Kippur extends to all, when - in its simple sense - teshuvah involves repenting for sins, and certain individuals may be free from sin?

The Rambam addresses this point when he states:[73] "Those sins for which a person has confessed during a previous Yom Kippur are to be confessed again during the following Yom Kippur. This is so even though his state of teshuvah remains steadfast. For the verse states:[74] 'For I know my iniquities, and my sins are constantly before me.'"

Since "there exists no righteous person in the land who [only] does good and never sinned,"[75] the possibility of teshuvah exists for all inasmuch as one's sins "are constantly before me."

There is only one difference. During the rest of the year, when the reason for teshuvah is the sin itself, then if a person did not sin in the first place, or has since repented, there is no obligation to again repent for the same sin.

Comes Yom Kippur, however, when the time itself obligates teshuvah, if there was ever during the person's lifetime something for which he had to repent, the individual is obligated to repent once again on Yom Kippur, since "my sins are constantly before me." Thus, "all are obligated to repent and confess on Yom Kippur," as "there exists no righteous person in the land who [only] does good and never sinned."

This will be even better understood in light of that which the Alter Rebbe explains in Tanya[76] with regard to the verse "my sins are constantly before me." The Alter Rebbe explains that although a person may have done "a proper teshuvah" for a particular sin, nevertheless, when he is elevated to a higher level of Divine service, a loftier level of repentance is required.

Since the sanctity of Yom Kippur is such that all Jews are elevated on this day, then even those sins for which one has repented previously are to be repented for again, with a loftier manner of teshuvah - a Yom Kippur manner of teshuvah.

Rosh haShana – Shabbos Shuva/Haazinu | 29 Elul – 9 Tishrei 5777

EREV ROSH HASHANA, WED SEPT 20th //EREV TAVSHILIN & HATARAS NEDARIM/
Selichos/Shacharis/Hataras Nedarim 6:15 am
Mincha/Maariv/Candles – 6:52 pm

ROSH HASHANA DAY 1, THU SEPT 21st  
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Tashlich 5:40 pm
Maariv/Candles after 7:47 pm /from existing flame/

ROSH HASHANA DAY 2, FRI SEPT 22nd 
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Farbrengen 5:40 pm
Candles BEFORE 6:48 pm /from existing flame/
Maariv 7:37 pm

Sat Sept 23rd Shabbos Shuva/Ha’azinu
Shacharis: 9 am /Latest Shema 9:59 am
Mincha  6:30 pm /SHABBOS SHUVA DRASHA/ 
Maariv/Havdalah 7:43 pm

FAST OF GEDALIA, SUN SEPT 24th
Fast Begins 5:21 am
Shacharit 9 am
Mincha  6:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 7:33 pm

Weekdays /3 KEPITLACH/L’DOVID HASHEM ORI/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 6:45 pm

KIDDUSH SHABBOS SHUVA/HAAZINU
Kiddush Lite with Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent. No Seuda Slishit at Shul

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Shain Rose-Heisler and Rabbi Yitzi Heisler on the birth of their new daughter!  Mazel Tov to proud grandparents Valerie and Rabbi Simcha Brandeis!  May they merit to raise her to Torah Chupa and Maasim Tovim!

Mazel Tov to Rabbi Mordechai and Rochie Farkash and to the Levitin, New, and Farkash families on the engagement of Mina New and Levi Farkash!!! May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel!

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA –
Order online or print a form:  
http://seattleesrogim.com  Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

TZOM GEDALIAH – SUN SEPT 24th  
Tzom Gedaliah (Fast of Gedalia) is an annual fast day instituted by the Jewish Sages to commemorate the assassination of Gedalia Ben Achikam, the Governor of Israel during the days of Nebuchadnetzar King of Babylonia (580's BCE). As a result of Gedalia's death the final vestiges of Jewish national autonomy after the Babylonian conquest were destroyed, many thousands of Jews were slain, and the remaining Jews were driven into exile. (
www.ezrabessaroth.net)

PREPARE ERUV TAVSHILIN BEFORE THE HOLIDAY
The Eruv Tavshilin is a procedure that allows us to prepare food on Yom Tov for Shabbat within specific halachic parameters.  Before Yom Tov, set aside a hard boiled egg and a piece of bread to be eaten on Shabbat. Say “Eruv Tavshilin” blessing found in the Chabad Siddur.

RABBI LEVITIN’S ANNUAL SHABBOS SHUVA DRASHA – SHABBOS AT 6:30 PM
Please join us for Rabbi Levitin’s annual Shabbos Shuva Drasha.   Men, women, and children are encouraged to attend. The first Shabbos in the new year is traditionally known as Shabbos Shuva. As this Shabbos occurs during the Ten Days of Repentance, the Haftora read, which begins “Shuva Yisroel,” “Return Israel,” concerns repentance. Additionally, there is a custom that the Rabbi of each synagogue gives a special congregational lecture on this Shabbos on the topic of repentance and preparation for Yom Kippur. The Sfas Emes writes that one should strengthen their observance of mitzvos and performance of good deeds specifically on this Shabbos.   © Torah.org
http://torah.org/learning/yomtov-yomkippur-vol3no17/

DONATE TO CSTL – PLEASE
http://www.cstlseattle.org/3182565

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ROSH HASHANA KIDS PROGRAM – PRE REGISTRATION REQUIRED
This Rosh Hashana, there will be a downstairs kids' program on both days, from 10:30 am until 2:30 pm, for children 4 and up. There will be a light snack, but no lunch, so please plan accordingly. Due to the limited space we have, this program will be capped at 20 children and will require a reservation.  Please fill out the following form, one for each child attending: 
http://tinyurl.com/yd23qgul Please note: in order to ensure the safety of each child in this program, if your child leaves the room without permission, they will not be allowed back in and will need to be with their parents. L'shana Tova U'metuka Happy, healthy, sweet new year!

CSTL ROSH haSHANA TOTS PROGRAM
Children ages 3-5 can be dropped off. Children 2 and under should be accompanied by a parent. First Day of Rosh Hashana (Thurs): 10:30 AM-12:30 PM 
Second Day of Rosh Hashana (Fri): 10:30 AM - 2 PM
Groups will include free play, singing, and snack. There will be no groups on Shabbat, 9/23, and the upstairs room will be closed. 
If you are interested in volunteering with Tot Groups, please contact Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.

CSTL YAHOO GROUP and eNEWS REMINDER
This is a reminder that the CSTL Yahoo Group and eNews is an independent listserve, moderated by Dr. Joseph Greenberg for the benefit of the listserve’s members.  The CSTL Yahoo Group is not directly affiliated with CSTL or Chabad, and the opinions expressed in the CSTL eNews, and in posts by listserve members are not necessarily similar to those of the CSTL Board or Chabad Shluchim. To post a message, email 
cstl@yahoogroups.com .  The message will be distributed to the group iff approved by the moderator.  If there is an unusual delay in posting, phone Yossi directly. To subscribe to this listserve, email cstl-subscribe@yahoogroups.com To unsubscribe from this listserve, send an email to: cstl-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com  To visit the CSTL listserve on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cstl/ To change settings online go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cstl/join (Yahoo! ID required). To change to a single weekly message via email:  cstl-digest@yahoogroups.com  Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to: https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Rabbi Frand Annual Derasha Video Wednesday, September 27, 7:45 pm at the Kollel,. 
More info: https://www.seattlekolle.com/rabbi-frand-teshua-video

Sukkah Building Services
Contact Matthew Perry  
matthewperry@hotmail.com

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR ROSH haSHANA
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507862/jewish/The-Blessing-Delivered-by-the-Rebbe-upon-Receiving-the-Pan-Klali-Erev-Rosh-HaShanah-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

Because of the constraints of time upon the community, this is not the appropriate time to read the Pan. Before G‑d, all the particular requests mentioned here are revealed. He who hears the blessings of His nation Israel will surely fulfill the prayers of His people from His full, open, holy, and generous hand. In this manner, all the particular requests of the Jewish people will be fulfilled in regard to material and spiritual matters, fusing the material and the spiritual together.

May it be a year of light , a year of blessing, a year of redemption, a year of joy, a year of glory and splendor, a year of good company, a year of great merits, a year of good and long life, a year of great and revealed good, a year of good promises, a year of sustenance, a year of learning with outstanding success, a year when the desires of each one’s heart will be fulfilled together with those of the entire Jewish people thus endowing them with the power of the community, a year of great miracles of both an individual and communal nature, a year of help from above in all matters both material and spiritual, a year of strength for each Jew, that his Judaism can be expressed with more strength and power, a year of redemption, a year of tzedakah, a year of holiness, a year of walking upright, a year of exaltation, a year of happiness and rejoicing, a year of Torah, a year of tefillah (prayer), and a year of teshuvah.

A year when G‑d will fulfill the desires of each Jew and the entire Jewish people in a generous and abundant manner including the most fundamental desire for which we are constantly waiting, the coming of the ultimate and complete Messianic redemption. Then, we will proceed, “with our youth and with our elders, with our sons and with our daughters,” all those who gave in a Pan and go together with their families and their students to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, to the Beis HaMikdash, and to the Holy of Holies.

Then, the entire Jewish people will celebrate Rosh HaShanah in Eretz Yisrael. Even there, Rosh HaShanah could be celebrated for two days depending on when the witnesses come. However, the two days are considered as one continuum. This will lead to continuous life, the era when, “those that lie in the dust will arise and sing,” and with the Previous Rebbe among us, we will proceed to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash, “the Sanctuary of G‑d established by Your hands.” May it be in the immediate future.

Shabbos Netzavim-Vayelech - Selichos | 24 Elul – 2 Tishrei 5777

Fri- Sept 15th   Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:02 pm

Sat Sept 16th   Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:55 am
Mincha  7:02 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapters 5&6/
Maariv/Havdalah 7:58 pm /SELICHOS 1:02 AM

Weekdays / SHOFAR FRI-SUN-MON-TUE/3 KEPITLACH/L’DOVID HASHEM ORI/
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Wed Selichos/Shacharis  6:30 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:00 pm

Selichot –Motzei Shabbos  at 1:02 am
The series of Selichot ("supplication") prayers recited in preparation for the "Days of Awe" of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur begin this Saturday night, after midnight (after the Ashkenazic custom; the Sephardic community begins on the 1st of Elul). On subsequent days, the custom is to recite the Selichot in the early morning hours, before the morning prayers, each morning up to and including Elul 29, the eve of Rosh Hashanah. 
www.chabad.org

EREV ROSH HASHANA, WED SEPT 20th //EREV TAVSHILIN/
Selichos/Shacharis/Hataras Nedarim 6:30 am
Mincha/Maariv/Candles – 6:52 pm

ROSH HASHANA DAY 1, THU SEPT 21st  
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Tashlich 5:30 pm
Maariv/Candles after 7:53 pm /from existing flame/

ROSH HASHANA DAY 2, FRI SEPT 22nd 
Shacharit/Musaf 9 am
Mincha/Farbrengen 5:40 pm
Candles BEFORE 6:48 pm /from existing flame/
Maariv 7:37 pm

FAST OF GEDALIA, SUN SEPT 24th  
Fast Begins 5:26 am
Shacharit 9 am
Mincha  6:30 pm
Maariv/Fast Ends 7:33 pm
 

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush is sponsored by Ronda Stark. We will also have Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent, sponsored by Shmulie/Rosie Tennenhaus. Seuda Slishit

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA – DEADLINE MON SEPT 18th 
Order online or print a form:  
http://seattleesrogim.com  Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

PRE-SELICHOS FARBRENGEN FRI SEPT 16th  11:00 pm to 1 am
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in preparation for Selichos. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 6:00 PM
Final 5777 opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with Rabbi Mendy!

DONATE TO CSTL – PLEASE
http://www.cstlseattle.org/3182565  .

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SOUP AND CINEMA IN THE SUKKAH – MON OCT 9th 7:30 PM
Chol ha’Moed Sukkos celebration at the home of Ben and Sarah Dershowitz, 7504 33rd Ave NE.   Featuring the Sundance Film Festival’s “Menashe”.  Also featuring Soup. More info and RSVP 
MHerbstman@gmail.com

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL ROSH HASHANA KIDS PROGRAM – PRE REGISTRATION REQUIRED
This Rosh Hashana, there will be a downstairs kids' program on both days, from 10:30 am until 2:30 pm, for children 4 and up. There will be a light snack, but no lunch, so please plan accordingly. Due to the limited space we have, this program will be capped at 20 children and will require a reservation.  Please fill out the following form, one for each child attending: 
http://tinyurl.com/yd23qgul Please note: in order to ensure the safety of each child in this program, if your child leaves the room without permission, they will not be allowed back in and will need to be with their parents. L'shana Tova U'metuka Happy, healthy, sweet new year!

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

The Shofar Factory at Eastside Torah Center Sun Sept 17th 
Come and see how a shofar is made! Participate in its construction.Learn many new details about the shofar and Rosh Hashanah. Enter a raffle to win a shofar of your very own! Enjoy delicious apple and honey tasting! Two Sessions - Divided by age 10:00 AM Ages babies to 7 years. 11:30 AM Ages 8-13 years. Cost: $5 per child pay at the door in the ETC Social Hall

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues were Due on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to 
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.  Men’s mikvah codes will be canceled unless dues is paid before Yom Kippur.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Starts Wed Sept 27th
Info: rabbiavrohomdavid@gmal.com or (206) 369-1215.

Rabbi Frand Annual Derasha Video Wednesday, September 27, 7:45 pm at the Kollel,. 
More info: https://www.seattlekolle.com/rabbi-frand-teshua-video

NCSY builds your Sukkah for you, Sunday, Oct. 1
Small Sukkah/$36 / Large Sukkah/$50. Time slots: 11-12, 12-1, 1-2 or 2-3. Must reserve a time slot by 9/30. Email mirkinc@ncsy.org to reserve.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS NETZAVIM/VAYELECH
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507861/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Nitzavim-Vayeilech-25th-Day-of-Elul-5750-1990.htm ©SichosInEnglish.org

1. Parshas Nitzavim is always read before Rosh HaShanah. This year, this reading is enhanced by the addition of Parshas Vayeilech and thus, the two are fused together into a single Torah portion.

The Previous Rebbe communicated a unique teaching which reflects the uniqueness of this Shabbos and explains why although this is the Shabbos before Rosh HaShanah, we do not bless the month of Tishrei in contrast to all the other months of the year which are blessed on the Shabbos preceding them:

The Alter Rebbe related: When I was in Mezritch,1 I heard from my teacher and master, the Maggid, who heard from his teacher and master, the Baal Shem Tov: The seventh month is the first of the months of the year. The Holy One, blessed be He, blesses it on the Shabbos of blessing (Shabbos Mevarchim) ... and with the power of this blessing, the Jews bless the other eleven months of the year.

There is a problematic element regarding this teaching. Why does it mention the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid, and the Alter Rebbe? We find that generally, although most of the Alter Rebbe’s teachings were based on the teachings of the Maggid and the Baal Shem,2 he did not mention them explicitly when relating those teachings. We find a similar incident in the Talmud. Rabbi Eliezar the Great explained that he did not mention the name of his teacher, Rabbi Yochanan, when relating a teaching because, “he never related anything which he did not hear from his teacher.” Thus, we must understand: Why did the Alter Rebbe mention the Maggid and the Baal Shem when relating this particular teaching?

It is possible to resolve this difficulty based on another Talmudic passage. Our Sages relate that, in the Beis HaMikdash, the priests would announce that the time for the morning sacrifices had arrived by proclaiming: “In the east, it is shining until Chebron.”3 Why did they mention Chebron each and every day? To allude to the Patriarchs who are buried there.

We find a similar concept in our prayer service (which was instituted in place of the sacrifices). Every day, during the week, on Shabbos, and even on Yom Kippur, we follow a similar pattern and begin the Shemoneh Esreh by praising G‑d, as “the G‑d of Avraham, the G‑d of Yitzchok, the G‑d of Yaakov.”4

Similarly, in regard to the teaching mentioned by the Alter Rebbe — which also contains an aspect of prayer, that G‑d grants abundant blessings in the new year which comes — the “patriarchs” of the Chassidic movement are mentioned. Mentioning their names brings about a more powerful revelation than merely having them in mind on the level of thought.

There is a further connection to the morning sacrifice. On one hand, the morning sacrifice was the same each day. Every day of the year, the same rites were observed. Conversely, however, each day the intention of the sacrifice was different, appropriate to the uniqueness of that day. (For this reason, it was necessary to offer a new sacrifice each day.)

A similar concept applies in regard to each new year. The root of the Hebrew word for year, שנה, is also related to the words meaning “change” and “repetition.” Thus, our Sages have explained that each year is a complete cycle which includes the entire series of changes and developments which transpire and the year that follows is merely a repetition.

Nevertheless, each year is also a new development. As the Alter Rebbe writes in Tanya, “each year a new light which has never shone before descends and shines.” A higher light than shone during the period of the Beis HaMikdash and even in Gan Eden is revealed this year.

The Alter Rebbe’s teaching continues:

The blessing is contained in the Torah reading: “You are standing all together today.” The word “today” refers to Rosh HaShanah, the day of judgment... You are standing, victorious in judgment. Therefore, on the Shabbos before Rosh HaShanah we read5 the parshah: Atem Nitzavim. This is G‑d’s blessing [conveyed] on the Shabbos which blesses the seventh month which is a month of abundance and the source of abundant blessings for all of Israel for the entire year to come.

“You” refers to each and every Jew. “Are standing” implies a powerful and firm stance. Indeed, we find the root of the Hebrew word for “standing,” nitzav used in relation to a king. This implies that a Jew stands with the power of a king. Our Sages declare: “When the king speaks, mountains are moved.” “Mountains” refer to our material concerns. They are not destroyed, but rather “moved,” transferred and transformed into holiness.

The portion continues, “today,” the day of Rosh HaShanah, “the day of great judgment.” Although from one perspective, judgment is associated with limitation, from a deeper view, it is through judgment that “overwhelming energy”6 is conveyed. This energy will be expressed in the service of the Jews in Torah and mitzvos and which will ultimately permeate through and effect the material nature of the world, unifying existence in this material world with its source in G‑d’s True Existence.

Afterwards, the portion continues, “all together,” that the Jews stand as a single communal entity. This brings them, “before the L‑rd, your G‑d,” and causes them to be “victorious in judgment.”

The above is enhanced by the influence of Parshas Vayeilech which indicates that, from the powerful stance of Nitzavim, a Jew must “proceed from strength to strength.” This is further enhanced by the mitzvah of Hakhel mentioned in this portion. In Hakhel, the Jews are fused together as a single entity and they are inspired by the king’s reading of the Torah.

This leads to the conclusion of the portion, “And Moshe spoke the words of this song so that all the community of Israel would hear until its end.” The Hebrew for “until its end” (on,), can also be interpreted “until they became perfect” (תמים).

This prepares them for Parshas Haazinu which, as our Sages explain, reflects a situation when one is “close to heaven and far removed from the earth.” Although this level was achieved by Moshe alone, each Jew has a spark of Moshe in his midst. Hence, this is relevant to him as well.

This prepares us to enter the year 5751, a year when “I will show you wonders,” including the greatest wonder, the Messianic redemption which will be considered wondrous even in comparison to the miracles of the exodus from Egypt.

* * *

2. This is the final Shabbos of the “Seven Shabbasos of Consolation” which begin with a two-fold measure of comfort, “Comfort you, Comfort you, My people.” Based on the principle, “Advance in holy matters,” we can assume that from Shabbos to Shabbos, particularly on this, the final and concluding Shabbos, this consolation increases and grows.

This leads us to the Ten Days of Repentance. These ten days can be seen as a summation of the Seven Shabbasos of Consolation and the Three Shabbasos which preceded them.

This Shabbos is also the last Shabbos of the month of Elul, the “month of mercy,” when “the King is in the field.”7 This is reflected in the fact that, although usually on the Shabbos when a new month is blessed, the passage Av HaRachamim8 (“All-Merciful Father”) is not recited, on this Shabbos, when G‑d blesses the coming month, it is customarily said. This reflects the all-encompassing influence of Divine mercy.

This leads to the prayer, “Happy are those who dwell in Your House” (א שרי), in the Beis HaMikdash and then to the conclusion of the prayers, “The upright will dwell in Your presence.” The word “Your presence” can also mean “Your inner dimension,” for G‑d’s inner dimension is related to the inner dimension of the Jews.

This, in turn, gives the Jews the power to declare, “Give ear heavens...listen earth,” i.e., a Jew reveals how he has control over the heavens and the earth.

* * *

3. It is customary to conclude with directives for action. As mentioned several times this year, efforts should be made to gather Jews together on Shabbos in synagogues to study Torah and discuss directives for action. When a Jew enters a synagogue, he feels he is “in the presence of the King.” If many Jews come together, then, “Among the multitude of people is the glory of the King.” Even a child who enters a synagogue sees the ark and the Torah scrolls and is impressed.

At present, it is important to concentrate on efforts to provide all the needy with their holiday needs and thus, “they can “eat succulent foods and drink sweet beverages” on Rosh HaShanah. This need is further emphasized by the fact that Shabbos follows directly after Rosh HaShanah and thus there are three consecutive days where holiday meals must be served. This applies in both Eretz Yisrael and in the Diaspora.9

There is another unique aspect to the present year. Since Shabbos follows Rosh HaShanah, the Fast of Gedaliah is pushed off another day. This is significant because, at the outset, the Fast of Gedaliah is not held on the day of Gedaliah’s murder. He was slain on the second day of Rosh HaShanah and because of the festive nature of the day, the fast was postponed. This year it is postponed still another day, giving the potential for it to be pushed off completely and, indeed, turned into a day of celebration with the coming of the Messianic age when the fast days will be transformed into festivals.

The fact that the Shabbos after Rosh HaShanah is being held on a date which normally would be a fast is a further indication of the need to provide people with the potential to celebrate it in a full matter. This will lead to the holidays of Sukkos and Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah when (in the Diaspora), there will also be three consecutive festive days.

* * *

4. According to the Chabad custom of studying Pirkei Avos throughout the entire summer, on this Shabbos, we study the fifth and sixth chapters.

Both these chapters are connected with the present date, the 25th of Elul, the day on which the world was created. The fifth chapter begins, “The world was created with ten utterances,” and the sixth chapter concludes, “Everything which the Holy One, blessed be He, created in His world, He created only for His glory.” This reflects the state of the creation on the first day. Then, the entire host of the heavens and earth were brought into being, but they were still united with G‑d. This is implied by the Torah’s description of the first day of creation as יום אחד, “one day.” Structurally, the expression יום ראשון, “the first day,” would have been more appropriate. The Torah, however, calls it יום אחד, to imply that it was a day of oneness. “G‑d was one with His world.” It was openly evident how “Everything was created for His glory.”

May we be able to stand with the power and firmness of Atem Nitzavim, the power of a king, and, as implied by Parshas Vayeilech, “proceed from strength to strength,” until “we appear before G‑d in Zion.”

Shabbos Ki Savo | 17-24 Elul 5777

Fri- Sept 8th   Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:16 pm

Sat Sept 2nd  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:53 am
Mincha  7:16 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapters 3&4/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:13 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:10 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush Lite. Rabbi Mendy Levitin's special cholent is sponsored by Shmulie/Rosie Tennenhaus. Seuda Slishit

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Mushka Rosler-Naparstek and Velvil Rosler on the birth of their new daughter. May they merit to raise her to Torah, Chupa, and Maasim Tovim!

ORDER ESROGIM FROM RABBI KAVKA – WEB SITE AVAILABLE MON SEPT 11th 
Order online or print a form: 
http://seattleesrogim.com Pick up is at Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch. There is limited availability! rabbikavka@gmail.com

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

CHECK YOUR MAZUZOT IN LYNNWOOD SUN SEPT 10th
Reb Moshe Liberow from Colorado Springs will BeH be spending  Sunday Sept 10th in Lynnwood checking Mezuzos. The website to reserve a spot is JewishSnohomish.com/Scribe.  Ksiva Vachasima Toiva, Rabbi Berel Paltiel 425-286-7465 
Rabbi@JewishSnohomish.com 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

ELUL 18th  FARBRENGEN - THE BAAL SHEM TOV’S YAHRZEIT - FRI SEPT 8th  5:00 pm
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in front of the Men’s Mikvah
in honor of the Baal Shev Tov’s Yahrzeit. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 6:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE STARTS SUN SEPT 10th 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
$440/daily, $220/weekly, $100/holiday only. Paying for one visit is not an option if you live in this community. Visitors pay $2.50 for single use. You can go to
http://www.CSTLSeattle.org  to make your payment online with your credit card.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Mercaz Bee Garden Tour Sun Sept 10th 10:30am
http://www.westseattlebeegarden.com/ All ages! Afterward play at a park (weather depending) $5 per family, $2 per individual

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS KI SAVO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507858/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Savo-Chai-Elul-5750-1990.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org

1. There are two significant sayings with which the Previous Rebbe described Chai Elul: a) “Chai Elul introduces chayos (life-energy) into the service of the month of Elul,” or more particularly, “Chai Elul introduces chayos (life-energy) into the service of ‘I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.”‘ b) Each of the last twelve days of the year correspond to one of the twelve months. In these days, we are granted the potential to compensate for any deficiencies and elevate our conduct of those months. In this context, Chai Elul corresponds to the month of Tishrei.

From these statements, we see that Chai Elul is of general significance adding chayos to Elul and also, effecting the entire year. On the surface, however, it is difficult to understand: Elul as a whole is the month of stock-taking and teshuvah for the year at large. If so, what is the nature of the addition brought about by Chai Elul.

From the Previous Rebbe’s statement, it appears that the addition is one of chayos (“life-energy”). Chai Elul generates the potential for the service of Elul to be infused with energy and vitality. This, however, is also problematic. Since “we can assume that each Jew conducts himself in a proper manner,” surely the entire Jewish people have carried out the service of Elul with energy, vitality, and joy for these are fundamental principles in the service of G‑d.

Accordingly, it would appear that the Previous Rebbe’s statement indicates that from Chai Elul, a new phase of service is begun. Although Elul as a whole is a month of stock-taking, from Chai Elul onward begins the “Elul of Elul.” This, in turn, relates to the new life energy which Chai Elul introduces. This new energy, not only adds vitality to the previous service, it initiates a new phase of service.

To explain: The month of Elul is a month of general significance which includes the entire year1 and grants the potential to compensate for any deficiencies in our conduct of the previous year and elevate it to a higher rung. Similarly, it is the month of preparation for the new year.2 Accordingly, the service carried out in Elul is of a general nature.

This is emphasized by the fact that the name Elul serves as an acronym for the Hebrew words meaning, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine,” which emphasize the bond of love between G‑d and the Jewish people. This bond characterizes the totality of this relationship and thus, is relevant in all times and places. Similarly, the fact that the name of Elul serves as an acronym for verses reflecting “The three pillars on which the world stands: Torah, service (prayer), and deeds of kindness,” and similarly, services of a general nature, teshuvah and redemption,3 further emphasizes the all-encompassing nature of the month.

In truth, this concept applies to the totality of Torah and mitzvos.There is an interrelation between general principles and their particular application. Indeed, every particular element is a reflection of the most general concepts. Since, “the world was created for the Torah,” this concept is also reflected in the world at large. Each point of time or space includes within itself time and space in its totality.

This concept is reinforced by the Baal Shem Tov’s teaching that at each moment, the creation is renewed. When G‑d brought existence into being from total and absolute naught, the first moment of existence that He created included within it every moment that would follow.4 Similarly, at every moment, as G‑d brings into being the totality of existence anew, every moment includes all previous and all subsequent moments of existence just as the first moment of creation included all time.

This concept clarifies a fundamental concept in regard to teshuvah.It is explained that, in one moment, a person can compensate for inadequacies in his behavior over many years.5 How is that possible? Because each moment contains within it the totality of time and can thus alter the nature of the events which occurred previously. This concept, although true at all times, receives greater emphasis during the month of Elul which is, as explained above, a month of general consequence.

To the above, Chai Elul contributes the dimension of chayos — life-energy. Chayos is not a particular element of one’s existence which one can point to like one of the limbs of the body. On the contrary, it is, by nature, entirely above the body. Nevertheless, it enclothes itself within the body, changing the nature of the body to the extent that the body itself becomes alive.

The relationship between the body and its life-energy is different from that of a particular element and the general category in which it is included. In the latter instance, there is an interrelation between the two. Indeed, as explained above, the entire general category can be reflected in a particular element. This is, however, no more than a reflection and there remains a difference between the particular entity and the general category in its totality.

In contrast, the relationship between the body and its life-energy is very different. On one hand, abstractly, there is no relation between the two. The life-energy of the soul is of a totally different nature than the body. Nevertheless, the soul descends and enclothes itself within the body to the extent that the body’s nature changes and not only the soul, but also the body, lives.

The reason for this change is because the soul’s life-energy emanates from the essence. An essential quality permeates through everything and exists equally in all places and thus, every aspect of a person’s being is affected by his life-energy.6

On this basis, we can understand the uniqueness of Chai Elul. As explained above, Elul is a month of general significance which includes all the service of the Jewish people. Chai Elul emphasizes the chayos — “life-energy” — of that service, the bond between the Jews and G‑d.

For this reason, the twelve final days of the year beginning on Chai Elul represent a new phase of service. The aspect of stock-taking which began on Rosh Chodesh Elul focused on the particulars of one’s service in the three general services of Torah, prayer, and deeds of kindness, reviewing one’s thought, speech, and action. In contrast, the stock-taking which begins on Chai Elul focuses on the essence of a Jew’s connection to G‑dliness and its expression within his behavior. We are not as concerned with the particular elements of service, but rather with the connection in its totality, the life-energy of our service.

This amplifies the explanation of how one moment of teshuvah can effect one’s entire past. Since here, we are focusing on the essence of the connection, its life-energy, and as explained above, an essential quality exists equally in every place, each moment is connected with the essence and thus, has an effect on one’s existence in its totality.

The above enhances the significance of Chai Elul for it corresponds to the month of Tishrei. The Hebrew letters for Tishrei (תשרי) can be rearranged to form the word reishis (רשית), which means “the head of.” Chassidic thought explains that Rosh HaShanah is called “the head of the year,” to emphasize how, just as the head includes the life-energy for the entire body, Rosh HaShanah includes the life-energy for the entire year. Similarly, Tishrei as a whole is a month which includes the life-energy for the entire year. Chai Elul, which compensates for and elevates the service of Tishrei, is thus intrinsically connected with the life-energy for the year in its totality.

The chayos of Elul — the love relationship with G‑d as expressed by the verse, “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine” — is expressed in the service of prayer which represents a process of connection with G‑d. Indeed, this connection relates to G‑d’s essence as our Sages commented, “Pray to Him and not to His attributes.” In contrast, deeds of kindness relates to G‑d’s attribute of kindness,7 and Torah study relates to G‑d’s intellectual attributes. Thus, it is through an increase in prayer, which connects us to G‑d’s essence that — to quote the second version of the Previous Rebbe’s adage — Chai Elul adds life to the service of “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.” For this reason, it is customary even for Torah scholars8 to place greater emphasis on the service of prayer in this month.

All of the above is enhanced this year when Chai Elul falls on Shabbos for Shabbos also emphasizes the inner bond between the Jews and G‑d.9 This generates even greater potential to “infuse chayos in Elul,” and in the service of “I am my Beloved’s and my Beloved is mine.”

2. The above concepts are also connected to this week’s Torah portion which begins by mentioning the mitzvah of Bikkurim, the first fruits. Our Sages explain that the first fruits refer to the Jewish people, G‑d’s first fruits, as it were. G‑d’s conception of the Jewish people existed before the world, preceding even the Torah itself.10

Offering Bikkurim represents developing a connection with that level, the source of the souls of the Jewish people, which in turn, brings about a connection with G‑d. Thus, Bikkurim are related to the service of prayer.11 Thus, there is a connection to the concepts explained above in relation to Chai Elul.

The mitzvah of Bikkurim is to be fulfilled, “When you come into the land... take it as an inheritance, and settle within,” alluding to the service of the Jewish people in refining the world at large. The epitome of this service is the transformation12 of the land of the seven13 Canaanite nations into Eretz Yisrael. This service will be completed in the Messianic age when, in addition to the lands of these seven nations, we will be granted the lands of the Keni, Kniziand Kadmoni.14

The chayos introduced by Chai Elul is also reflected in the parshiyos read in the weeks that follow. Nitzavim (“You are standing”)15 describes how the entire Jewish people, from the most elevated until the most simple, are standing “all together,” “unified and at one,” because they are one with G‑d, establishing a covenant with Him.

This leads to Vayeilech [(“And he went”) which is read together with Nitzavim this year] which grants the Jews the potential to “proceed from strength to strength.” Since G‑d is totally unlimited, there is no limit to the bonds which a Jew can establish with Him and we can — and should — continue to ascend level after level.

This leads to Parshas Haazinu which according to our Sages describes a state in which one is “close to the heavens and removed from the earth.” Although even the prophet Yeshayahucould not reach that level,16 nevertheless, each Jew who realizes the essential connection he shares with G‑d, can be “close to the heavens.”

From this we proceed to Parshas Berachah, “This is the blessing which Moshe... blessed the children of Israel,” extending (for the word berachah can mean both “blessing” and “extension”) the influence of Moshe to all the Jewish people.

This generates the potential for Bereishis. A Jew “becomes a partner with G‑d in the work of creation,” drawing down G‑dliness into the world, revealing how the entire world depends on His creative potential. This refines the world and transforms it into a dwelling for G‑d.

* * *

3. This Shabbos, we study the third and fourth chapters of Pirkei Avos. Not only are the chapters numbered three and four, they begin with teachings that emphasize these two numbers: Chapter Three begins: “Reflect upon three things...”17 and Chapter Four begins by mentioning four categories that reflect the epitome of developed character traits.

The numbers three and four are of general significance for the Jewish people. We have three Patriarchs and four Matriarchs. Furthermore, three and four equal seven, the number of branches which existed in the Menorah, which are representative of the seven paths of service of G‑d. In particular, the numbers three and four are connected with the service of the intellect. We possess three intellectual potentials (Chochmah, Binah, and Daas) and at times, we speak of four potentials because Daas is counted as two, since it serves as the source for both the two general emotional categories, Chessed and Gevurah.18

As a preface to both these chapters,19 we study the teaching, “All Israel have a portion in the World to Come as it is written, ‘Your nation are all righteous...’ ” This teaching emphasizes the essential connection G‑d shares with every Jew. It is because of this essential bond that “All Israel have a portion in the World to Come.”20 Similarly, it is this essential connection which gives rise to the seven services alluded to in Chapters Three and Four.

The above concepts must influence our behavior on the level of deed. From Chai Elul onward, the new life-energy drawn down in Elul must bring about an increase in all aspects of the service of Elul, allowing for a deeper dimension of correction and completion to be contributed to the service of the previous year.

In particular, it calls for an increase in the service of prayer, for it is through this service that the essential connection mentioned above is expressed. Similarly, there should be an increase in Torah study. In particular, focus should be made on the laws pertaining to Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkos, and likewise, the inner dimensions of the service of these holidays.

Also, in preparation for the coming festive season, efforts must be undertaken to ensure that every Jew is given his holiday needs so that the holidays can be celebrated in a manner of “eat succulent foods and drink sweet beverages.” In particular, this is relevant this year when Shabbos comes directly after Rosh HaShanah (in the Diaspora as well as in Eretz Yisrael), and thus, there are three consecutive days when festive meals must be served. (Similarly, in the Diaspora, this phenomenon is repeated for the holidays of Sukkos and Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah.)

May the good resolutions made regarding the above lead to the fulfillment of the promise made at the beginning of the Torah reading, “When you will enter the land...”, with the coming of Mashiach who will lead the entire Jewish people back to Eretz Yisrael.21 This is particularly relevant at present, at the conclusion of “a year of miracles,” as we prepare for a year when, “I will show you wonders.”

Shabbos Ki Tseitsei | 10 - 17 Elul 5777

Fri- Sept 1st  Erev Shabbos 
Shacharis 7 am 
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 7:30 pm

Sat Sept 2nd  Shabbos 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Latest Shema 9:49 am
Mincha  7:30 pm /SEUDA SLISHIT/Pirkei Avot Chapter 2/
Maariv/Havdalah 8:27 pm

Weekdays
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis  7 am
Sun-Thu Mincha/Maariv 7:25 pm

KIDDUSH 
Kiddush will be sponsored by Shimon and Tova Cox, in honor of several Simchas in their family!!  We will also have our delicious cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit

SHOFAR FACTORY SUN SEPT 3rd 3-4 PM AT THE NE BRANCH LIBRARY
In the library community room.  6801 35th Ave NE.   With Rabbi Emlen.  Fun for the whole family.   RSVP to rabbiherbstman@gmail.com

CUSTOMS OF THE MONTH OF ELUL 
Shofar at Shacharis
. daily. L’Dovid haShem Ori daily at Shacharis and Mincha.  Three additional chapters of Psalms daily. Elul is also the time to have one's tefillin and mezuzahs checked by an accredited scribe to ensure that they are in good condition and fit for use. From the beginning of Elul and throughout the High Holiday season, we include the blessing "May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year" (Leshanah tovah tikateiv veteichateim) in letters and greetings to one another. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

ELUL 10th  FARBRENGEN IN HONOR OF RABBI YOSEF CARO - FRI SEPT 1st  5:00 pm
Please join us for a farbrengen with words of Torah in front of the Men’s Mikvah
In 1522, Rabbi Yosef Caro started writing the Beit Yosef, his famous commentary on the Arba Turim, Yaakov Ben Asher’s comprehensive Halachic code. He started writing this commentary in Adrianople, Turkey, and continued for the next twenty years, during which time he relocated to Safed, Israel. He completed the monumental work on the 11th of Elul. It took another ten years for the writings to be published. (
www.chabad.org/calendar).

SHABBOS AFTERNOON PIRKEI AVOS WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 7:30 PM
An amazing opportunity to learn Pirkei Avos with commentaries and insights.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE STARTS SUN SEPT 10th 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

CSTL Shabbos Kids Club
Looking for volunteers to give a shuir to the older kids either once per month or a one time occasion It is for the ages 5-12.  The shuir is generally about 10-15 minutes long on any topic, parsha, holidays,Jewish history, Mitzos.  Your choice.  Please contact me   Thank you.  Tova Morah@msn.com 206-383-2516

FROM THE PRESIDENT
Please keep all food in the Social Hall.  Please feel empowered to tell anyone you see leaving the Social Hall with food to please not do so.  Doing this will help us clean for the coming Holidays!

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

Men’s Mikvah annual Dues are Due Annually on Elul 1st 
For more information, please contact Yechezkel Rapoport.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Mishmar Chavura with Rabbi Avi Rosenfeld Thu 9pm
Parsha Learning and Discussion. Everyone welcome to join the conversation.  5240 38th Ave. NE.  Snacks served

Labor Day / Elul Bagel Brunch on at BCMH Mon Sept 4th 11 am. 
Must register & pay by Wed., Aug. 30 to 
www.bcmhseattle.org Cost: $10/Adult (ages 12 & up); $5/Child (ages 4-11); Kids 3 & under are free; $40/Family Rate. During Brunch: Program for kids "Making Your Own Shofar" with Rabbi Shimon Emlen. **Free for kids attending Brunch, $5 per child otherwise.

Community Trip to Israel. April 29-May 8, 2018, 
"Creative Israel: Exploring Israeli Innovation through Technology, Ecology, and the Arts". An optional 3-day pre-trip is available. More info: www.jewishinseattle.org/israel-trip, taryno@jewishinseattle.org or (206) 774-2217.

NEED A DRIVER – CALL GERSHON!
For all your transportation needs, call Gershon Grashin (206) 856-2754


SICHO FOR SHABBOS SHOFTIM
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507855/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Seitzei-11th-Day-of-Elul-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.org.

1. This week’s portion begins, “When you go out to war upon your enemies.” Although the Torah is intended to be eternally relevant, on the surface, it is difficult to understand the lesson which can be derived from this portion which describes the conduct of the Jews in war (and in particular, a war which is not directly commanded by G‑d, a milchemas reshus, which is not at all applicable in the present era).

The lesson we can learn from this portion involves the dimension of our service that is involved with material things and matters of this world, refining and elevating its physical substance, making it a vessel for holiness and thus, transforming the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

This service is of a different nature than the service in the realm of holiness itself, the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. The latter service is characterized by peace, drawing G‑dliness into the world. No “enemy” is involved. In contrast, when one is involved in refining the world at large, then one must “go out to war upon your enemy.” The nature of the material world opposes G‑dliness and stands in contradiction to the establishment of a dwelling for Him. To create a dwelling for G‑d, a place where His essence is revealed, within this world, it is necessary to “wage war” against this dimension of worldliness and conquer it.

The aspect of concealment within this world — and its tendency to oppose the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d — was created by G‑d, Himself. Thus, the power which opposes holiness does not stem from the world’s material substance alone, but rather, from the nature with which it was endowed by G‑d. Accordingly, it is understandable that a Jew must summon up very powerful energies to wage war against such power.

For this reason, the Torah uses the expression, “When you go out to war upon your enemy.” A Jew “goes out to war,” i.e., he must leave his own realm, the involvement with holy matters, and involve himself with material affairs.

When involved in this service, he must know that he has the potential to succeed. Therefore, he is told that he must wage war, “upon your enemies.” Grammatically, it would have been proper to state “against you enemies,” or “with your enemies.” Nevertheless, the Torah used a somewhat awkward construction to teach us that, before the war begins, a Jew has to know that he stands above his enemies.

In microcosm, this conception of war is relevant within our own lives as well. A Jew possesses a G‑dly soul and, on a lower level, an animal soul and a body. He must fight a war, the conflict with the yetzer hora, to overcome the natural drives of the body and the animal soul with the intent of conquering them and thus, preventing them from disturbing his service of G‑d. Furthermore, ultimately, he should reach the point where he serves G‑d, בכל לבבך, interpreted by our Sages to mean, “with both your desires,” i.e., the yetzer hora will also become transformed. The potential for this service stems from the fact that, in essence, a Jew is “above your enemies.”

The Torah teaches us about two types of war: milchemas mitzvah — wars which G‑d commanded us to wage, e.g., the wars necessary to conquer Eretz Yisrael and annihilate the Canaanites who lived there previously, the war against Amalek, and a war to defend the Jewish people against attackers; and milchemas reshus — those wars waged by a king “with other nations to extend the boundary of [Eretz] Yisrael] and magnify its greatness and reputation.”

The war with the seven Canaanite nations — and similarly, in the Messianic age, the war to conquer the lands of the ten nations — has as its purpose, the conquest of their land and its transformation into Eretz Yisrael, the holy land. In contrast, a milchemas reshus is not a mitzvah and is intended merely to “extend the boundaries of Israel” in a place which, by nature, belongs to gentiles.

In the personal sphere, a milchemas mitzvah involves waging a war against the material dimensions of the world according to the Torah’s commands with the intent of conquering them for Torah, making them like Eretz Yisrael.It involves, however, only those aspects of the world which are necessities for life. In contrast, a milchemas reshus involves “extending the boundaries” of holiness beyond our minimum necessities. A person goes beyond the limits of the minimum which Torah allows him and elevates other aspects of the world, transforming them into holiness.

To express this concept in regard to eating: Rather than eat bread and water, one eats succulent meats and drinks aged wines, but does so for the sake of holiness. Similarly, in regard to the world at large, a person goes beyond the limits of his own environment and seeks new areas to refine by establishing a synagogue, a house of study, or a place where mitzvos are performed.

milchemas reshus does more than involve a wider sphere of activity than a milchemas mitzvah, it requires a different type and quality of service. To understand this concept, we must probe into the very nature of a milchemas reshus: On the surface, the concept of a milchemas reshus is problematic. In regard to a milchemas mitzvah, the reason the Jews go to war is because G‑d commanded them to. He told them to conquer Eretz Yisraeland make it their land. Thus, what the Jews are taking rightfully belongs to them. Although — as Rashi quotes in the beginning of his commentary on the Torah — the gentiles may claim: “You are thieves,” the Jews can answer, “The land belongs to G‑d... and He gave it to us.”

In contrast, when it comes to conquering other lands, this rationale does not apply. On the contrary, these lands were given to the gentiles, not to the Jews. If so, how can the Jews go out and conquer these lands. Seemingly, it would be appropriate to call them thieves for doing so.

A similar, and perhaps even deeper question applies regarding the parallels to this concept in our service of G‑d. A Jew has the power to transform the material substance of this world into holiness, because of the potential granted to him by the Torah. Indeed, in an ultimate sense, these entities were brought into being with the intent that they be transformed into holiness.

Although a war is necessary to bring about that process of transformation, that is because G‑d desired a dwelling in the lower worlds. Hence, even these entities were created in a manner in which they “belong” to the lower worlds and appear as an “enemy” to the service of holiness. Despite this tendency, however, they were also intended to be transformed into holiness.

We see this concept in regard to Eretz Yisrael. Although G‑d had promised Avraham that He would give Eretz Yisrael to his descendants,1 when the Jews re-entered Eretz Yisrael, they had to assert their control over the land through war. Indeed, before the Jews conquest, the Torah referred to Eretz Yisrael as “the inheritance of the nations.” Nevertheless, at the very beginning of creation, the potential that the Jews would conquer Eretz Yisrael and transform it into a land of holiness was already granted.

This concept is easily understandable. Since G‑d created Eretz Yisrael, He is entitled to give it to whomever He pleases. He granted it to the Jews, however, in a manner that will enable them to appreciate it, not as a gift given from above, but rather as something which they acquired through their own efforts. This requires that they wage a war to transform the land from being the heritage of gentiles into Eretz Yisrael, the holy land.

The above applies, however, in regard to wars which are mitzvos. In this instance, there is an explicit Divine command to conquer this portion of the world for holiness and reveal its essential connection to the Jews. When, however, speaking of a milchemas reshus, there is no Divine command involved, nor does the land belong to the Jews. Thus, taking it away from the gentiles — or in the personal sphere, taking it away from worldliness — is seemingly improper.

This, however, is the purpose of this portion of the Torah — Parshas Ki Seitzei, which describes a milchemas reshus — to teach us that we possess the potential for a new and different service; a war fought according to the directives of the Torah, but which was not obligated by its command. This endows the Jews with the potential to conquer additional portions of the world and make them and ultimately, the entire world — not only the limited area of Eretz Yisrael — a dwelling for G‑d.

This is the purpose of the creation of all existence. Although the Torah states that only Eretz Yisrael was given to us from above — and not the world at large, this is because G‑d desired that this aspect of the task to make the world a dwelling for Him be dependent totally on the service of the Jews. Torah does not give any commands regarding these matters, leaving them solely in the hands of the Jewish people.

Thus, a milchemas reshus brings out a new dimension of service, serving G‑d voluntarily, on one’s own initiative, and thus, reaches a more complete level in the efforts to make this world a dwelling for G‑d. Through this service, even those elements of existence which belong to the realm of worldliness — as opposed to those which were, at the outset, designated for holiness — become part of G‑d’s dwelling.

There is, however, a question involved: Since there is no obligation from the Torah to carry out a milchemas reshus and there is a danger involved,2 why should such a risk be taken? Similarly, in the personal sphere, since the “war” to transform the material substance of the world requires that one become involved in material things, there is a possibility that the person’s spiritual level will sink.

Though danger also exists in a milchemas mitzvah: a) We have no choice. We are commanded to wage such a war. b) The Torah’s command itself protects us from danger.

In a milchemas reshus, however, there is no such command. Hence, the question arises: Why should a Jew expose himself to danger? The Torah explicitly commands us to protect ourselves from physical harm. Although this service can bring a person to a higher level, since there is a risk involved, it would appear proper that one should devote one’s time and energy to the service of holiness where one will surely succeed.

Furthermore, if one fails in a milchemas reshus, there is a possibility that one will no longer be able to continue any service at all. Under such circumstances, it would seem preferable to devote oneself to the service of holiness, where one’s future will not be jeopardized.

[Needless to say, we are not speaking about individuals who have nothing else to do, and because, “A person was born to toil,” feels it necessary to wage a milchemas reshus. Every Jew has what to do in the study of Torah and the fulfillment of mitzvos. Why should this be jeopardized?]

This, however, is the lesson taught to us by this Torah portion: Despite the danger involved, a Jew must commit himself to this service. Furthermore, he is granted a Divine promise for success, “the L‑rd, your G‑d, will give the enemy into your hand.”3

Thus, we see a fusion of two opposites: On one hand, the Torah teaches us that the Jew must choose to go out to war himself despite the danger involved. Simultaneously, he must fulfill the command to preserve his life. This is possible because a Jew is connected with the essence of G‑d which is the source for the fusion of opposites.

This leads to a deeper understanding: The world and worldliness (“your enemy”) has a power which it was granted by G‑d. Indeed, it exists as an entity separate from the realm of holiness.4 For this reason, it is necessary to wage war to conquer such an entity and this war possesses a certain amount of danger.

Nevertheless, because a Jew is connected with G‑d’s essence, he has the potential to bring about a new development in creation, conquer these elements of existence, and thus, have them included in the dwelling for G‑d established in the lower worlds. G‑d promises him success in these activities: “The L‑rd, your G‑d, will give the enemy into your hand.” Furthermore, “you will take captives.” This phrase can be interpreted to mean that even those aspects of existence which were “captured” by the “enemy” can be redeemed and transformed into holiness.

Potential for this service is derived from the fact that a Jew is essentially “upon (i.e., above) his enemies.” He is one with G‑d, transcending entirely the limits of the material world. This reflects a higher dimension of soul than the service to conquer Eretz Yisrael. Although the latter conquest also involves a war, as mentioned above, from the outset, Eretz Yisrael was the part of the world destined to become included in the realm of holiness. Therefore, it involves a dimension of service which is also limited in nature and which relates to worldly matters. In contrast, the service of milchemas mitzvah relates to that aspect of the Jewish people which is “above your enemy,” transcending all aspects of material existence and one with G‑d.

These concepts are also reflected in the personal realm, in a Jew’s war with his yetzer hora, his struggle to refine his body and animal soul. On the verse, “And you shall... see the difference between one who serves G‑d and one who does not serve Him,” our Sages comment, “ ’One who serves G‑d’ is one who reviews his subject matter one hundred and one times. ‘One who does not serve Him’ is one who reviews his subject matter only hundred times.”

In Tanya, the Alter Rebbe differentiates between these individuals and a tzaddik. A tzaddik is called “a servant of G‑d,” using the past tense. He has already completed his battle with the yetzer hora and hence is referred to with a title that attests to the acceptance of his service as an established fact. In contrast, the expression, “one who serves G‑d,” indicates that the person to which it is referring is presently in the midst of his struggle with his yetzer hora, i.e., a benoni.

The Alter Rebbe continues, explaining the difference between “one who serves G‑d” and “one who does not serve Him.” In that era, it was customary for a student to review his subject matter one hundred times. Therefore, it was the one hundred and first time, the time when the person went beyond his habit and normal practice, which caused him to be distinguished as “one who serves G‑d.” His striving (“war”) to rise above his nature and personal habits merited that he be awarded such a title.

These ideas can be related to the concepts of milchemas mitzvah and milchemas reshus explained above. Although a person has already waged the milchemas mitzvah which is required of him and thus refined his nature and habits to the extent that he is worthy of the title tzaddik, one might assume that he need not be involved in “wars” any more. On the contrary, he should proceed from strength to strength in the realm of holiness.

Nevertheless, in order to merit the title “one who serves G‑d,” one cannot remain satisfied with one’s previous achievements. Rather, one must “go out to war,” strive to change and elevate one’s habits and nature, and reach an even higher level of holiness. This applies even to one who has engaged in such milchemos reshus previously. Although after refining his behavior to be included in the realm of holiness, he strove to seek greater heights, having attained those heights, he cannot remain passive, but must “serve G‑d,” by seeking an even higher peak.

The above is particularly relevant in the month of Elul. The yetzer hora may try to tempt a Jew, telling him, “Surely, you have already carried out all the dimensions of the service of Elul, observing Torah and mitzvos b’hiddur.Therefore, it is time to rest. If you want, continue your service, but do it in a regular manner, in a pattern that fits your accepted norms. Don’t risk anything. Devote your energies to holiness.”

In the present generation in particular, the yetzer hora will add, “This is the last generation of exile and the first generation of the redemption. Seemingly, our energies should be directed towards preparing the world for the coming of Mashiach by devoting our energies to progress in holiness, to rising higher spiritually.”

For this reason, the Torah teaches us, “When you go out to war...” emphasizing how a Jew must constantly wage wars both against his own personal nature and in the world at large to make the world a dwelling for G‑d. Indeed, even Mashiach will “fight the wars of G‑d,” to bring the world to its ultimate state of refinement.5

Thus, in this time, each person must apply himself to the service of Elul in a manner which challenges his nature. This includes the establishment of a bond of love and happiness with G‑d as emphasized by the verse, “I am my Beloved’s...”6

This relationship is expressed through Torah study in which a complete bond is established between a Jew and G‑d. Thus, it is appropriate that each individual increase his own Torah study and also influence others (particularly, children7 ) to attend public sessions of Torah study.

Similarly, there should be an increase in tzedakah which reflects the unity of the Jews. Such unity brings about the love of G‑d and motivates the expression of His love for the Jews. * * *

2. Our Sages state that thirty days before a holiday, we should learn the laws pertaining to it. It is already less than thirty days before the holidays of Tishrei begin and in this context, it is necessary to mention that importance of providing Jews with their holiday needs so that they will be able to celebrate Rosh HaShanah and (the holidays which follow) in the manner stated in the Bible, “Eat sumptuous foods and drink sweet beverages and send portions to those who do not have prepared.” This is particularly relevant this year, when Shabbos comes directly after Rosh HaShanah,8Sukkos, and Simchas Torah, and thus, festive meals will have to be prepared for three consecutive days.

May these activities bring each person a kesivah vachasimah tovah for a good and sweet year and may it conclude the greatest blessing, the coming of Mashiach, who will “fight the wars of G‑d and be victorious,” and then, rebuild the Beis HaMikdash where we will fulfill the mitzvos mentioned in this week’s Torah portion, bringing our first fruits as an offering to G‑d

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