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Shabbos Vayeira | 17 -24 MarCheshvan, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  OCT 26th  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:42 PM

SHABBOS - SAT OCT 27th  
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:19 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:42 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 6:41 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 5:40 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 4 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the Yahrzeit (17 Cheshvan) of Rav Menachem Mendel, the Ahavas Sholom, of Kosov       (1768-1825), founder of the Vizhnitz dynasty, of the Hagar family. He was a student of Reb Moshe Leib of Sassov and the son of Reb Koppel Chassid, the "chazzan" in the court of the Ba'al Shem Tov. He was known for his love of Jews and his great generosity.
https://www.breslev.co.il/tzadikim.aspx?language=english&category=145

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite.  Yasher Koach to Paul and Tamar Azous for sponsoring this week’s Chulent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

FARBRENGEN ALERT – CHOF MARCHSESHVAN – MON OCT 29th
The fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Sholom DovBer Schneersohn (known by the acronym "Rashab"), was born on the 20th of Cheshvan of the year 5621 from creation (1860). After the passing of his father, Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch, in 1882, Rabbi Sholom DovBer assumed the leadership of the movement. Over the next 38 years, he wrote and delivered some 2,000 maamarim (discourses of Chassidic teaching) including the famed hemshechim (serialized discourses) which contain his profound analytical treatment of Chabad Chassidism. In 1897, he established the Tomchei Temimim yeshivah in Lubavitch, the first institution of Jewish learning to integrate the "body" (Talmudic and legal studies) and "soul" (philosophic and mystical) of Torah into a cohesive, living whole; it was this unique form of education and Torah study that produced the "Temimim" -- the army of learned, inspired and devoted torchbearers who, in the decades to come, would literally give their lives to keep Judaism alive under Soviet rule. 
www.chabad.org/calendar . Venue TBD

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Mammar Mayim Rabbim "Abundant Waters" with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:50 PM 
Feeling anxiety and preoccupation with financial  stress ? The Rebbe explains how a person’s involvement in their business affairs should actually be a springboard for spiritual growth. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

16th Annual Worldwide Event for the Yahrzeit of Rachel Imeinu SUN OCT 28th 7:45 PM
BCMH Volotin Social Hall "Bringing the Geula: With the Power of Our Chessed" More info:
peninaharris@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU PM
5240 38th Ave NE 

"The Self Driven Child: Promoting Self-Discipline in Our Children” WED OCT 31st 8 PM
Rabbi Yehoshua Levy, Executive  Consultant for Torah U'Mesorah at BCMH. The community is invited to attend.

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

STAND WITH US NORTHWEST: Annual Community Reception OCT 28th  
www.StandWithUs.org Early bird registration deadline is Sept. 30.

AIPAC ANNUAL EVENT TUE OCT 30th 5:30 PM
Featuring Stephen Harper, former Prime Minister of Canada. At Seattle Sheraton Hotel. More info: (206) 624-5152 or seattle_office@Aipac.org

Mercaz Cider Pressing Party SUN NOV 4th 1:30 – 3:30 PM
Bring your apples and empty juice containers and instruments to play some music. We'll have apple crisp, snacks and tea. Dress for the outdoors but we will have a canopy up as well. 
www.mercazseattle.org

PREPARING FOR KINDERGARDEN – WED NOV 7th 5:15 PM
At Seattle Hebrew Academy 
www.seattlehebrewacademy.org

Bas Mitzvah Class for Girls Ages 10 & 11 Begins NOV 11th 10:15 AM
Given by Aliza Tanenbaum, BCMH Yavneh Youth Building. Contact Aliza Tanenbaum if you are interested.

Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State MON NOV 12th 7:15 PM
JGSWS presents Molly Bullard, Speaker & Owner o Seattle Photo Organizing at LDS Factoria Bldg. Topic: "Preserving Memories: How to Organize & Turn Your Family Memorabilia into a Personal Archival Project". More info: 
www.jgsws.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18th  
At Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: NOV 28th  , 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYEIRA
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507935/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayeira-20th-Day-of-MarCheshvan.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

On the previous Shabbasos, the importance of gathering together on every Shabbos to study Torah communally was mentioned. Similarly, it was suggested that one subject — the beginning or the conclusion of the weekly Torah portion — should be studied by all the communities. Accordingly, it is appropriate to focus on the first verse of the parshah and explain it in a manner which relates to the conclusion of the parshah.

Also, since this Shabbos falls on the 20th of MarCheshvan, it is associated with the birthday of the Rebbe Rashab which also falls on this date. A birthday is a day when “the spiritual source of one’s soul shines powerfully.” Hence, this day is important to us for the Rebbe Rashab was the predecessor of the Nasi of our generation, the Previous Rebbe, and he was the one who appointed him as the director of the Yeshivah Tomchei Temimim.

This connection is brought out by the following story which was related by the Previous Rebbe: When the Rebbe Rashab was a young boy, he went to his grandfather, the Tzemach Tzedek, for yechidus to receive a blessing in connection with his birthday. When he entered his grandfather’s room, he began to cry. His grandfather asked him why he was crying and he explained that in cheder, he had learned that G‑d had revealed Himself to Avraham and he was upset, why G‑d did not reveal Himself to him.

This story can be understood in terms of Rashi’s commentary on the opening verse of the parshah, “And G‑d revealed Himself to Avraham.” Rashi states: “[G‑d came] to visit the sick. Rabbi Chama bar Chaninah1 said: ‘It was the third day after his circumcision and the Holy One, blessed be He, came and enquired about his well-being.”

We must understand, why did the circumcision cause Avraham to fall sick? As explained in the previous Farbrengen, the great happiness and joy which Avraham should have felt at meriting to fulfill G‑d’s commandment should have prevented him from feeling any pain. We see a parallel to this in halachah: Though Shabbos is intended to be a day of pleasure, when a person has a disturbing dream, he is allowed to fast on the Shabbos because his fasting will give him more satisfaction than eating. Though the fast is connected with discomfort, the person’s emotional state is such that undergoing this discomfort is what will bring him pleasure.2 Similarly, in the present instance, the happiness Avraham felt at fulfilling G‑d’s mitzvah should have transformed his discomfort into pleasure.

It was explained that since G‑d desired that the covenant established through the mitzvahof circumcision permeate through the totality of our beings to the extent that it effects our actual flesh, it was necessary that Avraham let himself experience the feelings that the circumcision naturally brings.

Nevertheless, the question still arises: The fulfillment of mitzvos is intended to develop perfection in every aspect of a person’s soul. That spiritual perfection should, in turn, be reflected in every aspect of one’s body. In particular, in regard to the mitzvah of circumcision, G‑d told Avraham, “Proceed before Me and become perfect.” If so, why should a mitzvah which is intended to bring out perfection within a person cause him to become sick, so sick that on the third day, the sickness became stronger, and G‑d Himself had to “visit the sick?”3

To understand this concept, it is necessary to explain the concept of G‑d’s visiting the sick: In Or HaTorah, the Tzemach Tzedek explains that the source of sickness is the soul’s being lovesick out of a desire to cling to G‑d. [The Hebrew word for sick חולה is numerically equivalent to 49. There are “50 gates of understanding in the world.” Thus, when a person has acquired only 49, he becomes sick, yearning for the completion he lacks.] The remedy for this sickness is the revelation of G‑dliness. This is intimated in the Ramban’s commentary on our parshah which explains that G‑d’s revelation to Avraham healed him from the circumcision.

Based on the above, we can understand the connection between the revelation of G‑dliness and visiting the sick. Through the circumcision, Avraham reached a higher spiritual level, the 49th gate of understanding. This made him “sick,” “lovesick,” yearning for the fiftieth level.

To elaborate: The mitzvah of circumcision came after Avraham’s service of leaving “his land,” “his native country,” and “his father’s home,” i.e., after he completed the service of departing from his previous state (even when that state is itself a level of holiness), in order to proceed to “the land which I (G‑d) will show you,” i.e., to become one with G‑d’s will.4The mitzvah of circumcision demonstrates how this union with G‑d is reflected in “a covenant in your flesh.” This brought Avraham to the level of perfection.

This perfection, however, reflects only the perfection that can be accomplished by a creation, what a creation can achieve with its own efforts (which relates to the 49th gate of understanding).5 Thus, the possibility of sickness exists, i.e., one yearns for the fiftieth level which cannot be reached by man’s own efforts.6

On this basis, we can understand why the perfection Avraham achieved through the circumcision brought sickness. It was the reaching of the 49th level, the highest level that could be achieved through man’s own efforts, which led Avraham to the intense yearning for the fiftieth level. This yearning was so intense that he became “lovesick,” which, in turn, was reflected in sickness on a simple level. He was healed from this sickness by the revelation of G‑dliness, i.e., the revelation of the fiftieth level.

The words which the Torah uses to describe this revelation, וירא אליו ה' are each significant. The use of the word וירא rather than the Aramaic term for revelation implies that the revelation was direct and manifest.

אליו implies that the revelation permeated through Avraham’s being. His existence was not nullified by its power. Instead, he was able to accept the revelation and make it part of his being.

ה' is the most sublime of the names of G‑d. The revelation to Avraham came from the highest level of G‑dliness.

Combining all three concepts together implies that the highest levels of G‑dliness are revealed in the most complete manner in a way that permeates through the totality of Avraham’s being. Such a revelation is only possible because it emanates from the fiftieth level, the level which transcends all the Sefiros and is totally above the frame of reference of a created being.

The fiftieth level is a simple point totally above all dimensions and yet including within it all the length, breadth, and depth that is found within all the creations in the spiritual cosmos. This point represents, in the Rambam’s words, “the truth of His being,” from which “came into to being all the entities which exist.”

In the personal world associated with our service, this concept can be explained as follows: Although a person must prepare himself to receive the fiftieth level through bittul, the “lovesickness” described above, the revelation of the fiftieth level does not nullify a person’s individual existence. Rather, it permeates through the totality of his being. Since, “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are one,” G‑d’s essence is reflected within the Jew.

2. The Torah relates that this revelation took place “in the plains of Mamre,” i.e., it also had an effect on the surrounding environment in which Avraham lived. The relation of one’s spiritual level to the world in which one lives is reflected in the closing verses of the parshah as well. After the Torah relates the great mesirus nefesh of the Akeidah (the binding of Yitzchok),7 it lists the descendants of Nachor, concluding with the mention of Ma’achoh. Our Sages relate that the latter name is an acronym for the Hebrew phrase meaning, “Reign over the entire world in Your glory.”

This implies that the process in which the bittul and mesirus nefesh (symbolized by the circumcision) emanate from the essential point of the soul to become a fit vessel to receive the revelation of the fiftieth gate of understanding (G‑d’s revelation to Avraham) is not self-contained. Rather, since the fiftieth level is a point beyond all dimension, above the boundaries of above and below, it includes everything, from the highest point until the lowest levels and brings about a unity between those two opposites.

This concept is also reflected in the opening verse of Parshas Chayei Sarah which we begin to read in the minchah service. That verse states that Sarah’s life lasted “one hundred years, twenty years, and seven years.” Each of these three numbers is significant. 100 refers to the supraintellectual powers of will and pleasure, twenty to our mental faculties, wisdom and understanding, and seven, to our seven emotional potentials, thus including every aspect of our personalities. In Sarah’s case, the quality of Mesirus Nefeshwas such that it permeated through each of these potentials.8

Furthermore, Sarah’s service had an effect on her portion of the world as implied by her change of name. Previously, she was called Sarai which means “My ruler.” Changing her name to Sarah, “the ruler,” i.e., “the ruler of everyone,” emphasizes the influence she exerted on the world at large. This shows how the quality of mesirus nefesh can permeate, not only through the totality of one’s own personality, but can be extended further and influence one’s surrounding environment.

In this context, we can see the connection between the three portions Lech Lecha, Vayeira, and Chayei Sarah: Lech Lecha represents the service of bittul and mesirus nefesh, leaving one’s previous state. This leads to Vayeira, the revelation of the essential point of G‑dliness. Chayei Sarah alludes to the reflection of that essential G‑dliness in every aspect of our personalities.

3. The above concepts also share a connection to the present date, the 20th of Cheshvan, the birthday of the Rebbe Rashab and the story of his crying related above. The Rebbe Rashab told the Tzemach Tzedek why he was crying, “In cheder, I learned that ‘G‑d revealed Himself to Avraham.’9 Why doesn’t G‑d reveal Himself to me?”

This story implies that the “lovesickness” that possessed Avraham after his circumcision also affected the Rebbe Rashab. Indeed, his desire was powerful enough to move him to tears. Since this story occurred in his early childhood, it is self-understood that as the Rebbe Rashab matured and experienced different revelations of G‑dliness, his thirst and desire grew to reach even higher levels until he reached the ultimate peak, the revelation of the fiftieth gate of understanding. This approach should serve as a lesson to all his followers, teaching them not to remain content with the spiritual level they have achieved, but rather to constantly strive to rise to higher peaks, going from strength to strength.

Although the Rebbe Rashab displayed this powerful thrust of yearning, nullifying himself entirely, his service also reflected the importance of drawing down influence into the totality of his personality and into the world at large. This is emphasized in his name, Sholom DovBer. Sholom (“Peace”) is one of G‑d’s names and reflects the essential point which includes the totality of existence as our Sages declared, “Sholom is equivalent to everything.” Thus, it is also drawn down and reflected in the lowest levels, even in the flesh of our physical bodies. This is connected with the Rebbe Rashab’s second name DovBer, which combines the Hebrew and Yiddish equivalents of “bear.” Our Sages explained that a bear is “overladen with meat,” i.e., it reflects the lowest levels.

The thrust on relating G‑dliness to the world can also be seen in the Rebbe Rashab’s activities. The Rebbe Rashab placed a heavy emphasis on explaining Chassidic subjects in a manner which could be understood and comprehended by human intellect. Similarly, he was the one who founded the yeshivah, Tomchei Temimim,10 which was dedicated to studying Chassidus in a systematic and organized manner, just as one studies a subject in Nigleh (the revealed, legal realm of Torah study).

He placed an emphasis on extending the essential connection beyond the intellect, effecting a person’s emotions and also his deeds and actions. This is also reflected in an effect on the world at large. Thus, the students of Yeshivas Tomchei Temimim became “soldiers of the House of David,” spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward. This was carried further by the Previous Rebbe, the successor to the Rebbe Rashab11 and the Nasiof our generation until Chassidus has been spread throughout the world, revealing how G‑d “reigns over the entire world in His glory,” as alluded to in the name Ma’achoh as explained above.

The above provides each of us with a practical directive. On Shabbos Vayeira — particularly, when it falls on the 20th of Cheshvan — each one of us should think over the story of the Rebbe Rashab’s crying and realize that regardless of the level he has already reached, he must strive to reach an even higher rung. This can be accomplished by increasing his Torah study, both Nigleh and Chassidus, in particular the Chassidus of the Rebbe Rashab, fulfilling mitzvos b’hiddur, and spreading the wellsprings of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus outward. This should be done by gathering together as a community with Ahavas Yisrael as the Rebbe Rashab stressed in Kuntreis Heichaltzu.12

Added potential for such service is granted this year, תש"נ, “a year of miracles.” The Hebrew for miracles “Nais” also means “lift up.” Thus, it relates to the efforts to rise above one’s previous level mentioned above.13 It also shares a connection to the revelation of the fiftieth level mentioned above for the נ in תש"נ, stands for 50. This also is connected with the concept of Ma’achoh, extending one’s spiritual service to include one’s environment, since the intent of “a year of miracles” is to infuse “the year,” one’s everyday routine, with miracles.

This will bring the most important miracle, the coming of Mashiach. His coming will be hastened by the service of Heichaltzu as performed by “the soldiers of the House of David” in their efforts to spread Chassidus. The shout of Ad massai (“Until when”) which they will inspire reflects the great yearning for G‑dliness which will be satisfied by the revelations of the Messianic era. May it be now, immediately.

Shabbos Lech Lecha | 10-18 MarCheshvan, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  OCT 19th  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:55 PM

SHABBOS - SAT OCT 20th  
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:15 AM/FULL KIDDUSH!
Shabbos Mincha 5:55 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite 
Maariv/Havdalah 6:54 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 5:50 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 4 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of the Yahrzeit (11 Cheshvan) of the Rebbe, Rabbi Nachum of Chernobyl, a disciple of the second leader of the Chassidic movement, Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch, and the founder of the Chernobyl dynasty of Chassidic Rebbes. 
www.chabad.org/calendar .

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Full Kiddush! Co-Sponsored by the Greene and Dershowitz families in remembrance of the yahrzeit’s of Laura (Leah bat Mordechai) Greene ZT”L, Efraim Alter ben Shmuel Dershowitz ZT”L, Chana (Tikva) bas Yechezkel Leib Dershowitz ZT”L, Ron Goldberg ZT”L and Chaim Don Tziprin ZT”L, may their memories be for a blessing.  A delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin, sponsored by Rabbi Mendy and Lehala Levitin and their son Shmueli  in honor of the birthday of their daughter  "Tali"רייזל ייטל, and in honor of the Yahrzeit of Rachal Imanu (11 MarCheshvan). Seuda Slishit Lite.

THANK YOU!
Thank you to Anonymous Donor and Rabbi Mendy Levitin for making full kiddush possible again with our new commercial refrigerator! Tizku L’Mitzvot!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Mammar Mayim Rabbim "Abundant Waters" with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 5:00 PM 
Feeling anxiety and preoccupation with financial  stress ? The Rebbe explains how a person’s involvement in their business affairs should actually be a springboard for spiritual growth. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah, Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
5240 38th Ave NE 

Karen Treiger Book Launch Event SAT OCT 20th 8:30 PM
Book Event at CSTL  with Karen Treiger, author of "My Soul is Filled With Joy". More info:
mendy@keilimetals.com www.karentreiger.com  info@karentreiger.com

Book Signing wand Author talk with Pnina Granirer MON OCT 22nd 7 PM
at Third Place Books. Pnina Granirer, is  one of the Romanian Jews sold by the Communist government in Hungary to the state of Israel after World War II. In Israel, Pnina studied art at the Bezalel Art Academy and became a renowned artist, helping to co-found an amazing institution called Artists in Our Midst in Vancouver, where she now lives.

Goldberg-Tobin Debate Wednesday, October 24th  7:00 PM
At Stroum Jewish Community Center on Mercer Island. Topic: "Left vs. Right, A Debate Modeling Civil Discourse on Israel". 
www.JewishInSeattle.org 
"The Self Driven Child: Promoting Self-Discipline in Our Children” WED OCT 31st 8 PM
Rabbi Yehoshua Levy, Executive  Consultant for Torah U'Mesorah at BCMH. The community is invited to attend.

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

DISCOUNT CODE FOR JAFFA ROAD CONCERT - SUN OCT 21st 
The highly acclaimed Toronto-based world music group Jaffa Road has established themselves as unique creators and interpreters of Jewish music in Ladino, Portuguese, Hebrew, Arabic, Russian, and English. Promo Code JAFFA10 saves $10 
www.sjcc.org

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN OCT 21st  11am-2pm. 
Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

STAND WITH US NORTHWEST: Annual Community Reception OCT 28th  
www.StandWithUs.org Early bird registration deadline is Sept. 30.

AIPAC ANNUAL EVENT TUE OCT 30th 5:30 PM
Featuring Stephen Harper, former Prime Minister of Canada. At Seattle Sheraton Hotel. More info: (206) 624-5152 or seattle_office@Aipac.org

Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State MON NOV 12th 7:15 PM
JGSWS presents Molly Bullard, Speaker & Owner o Seattle Photo Organizing at LDS Factoria Bldg. Topic: "Preserving Memories: How to Organize & Turn Your Family Memorabilia into a Personal Archival Project". More info: 
www.jgsws.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18th  
At  Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: NOV 28th  , 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR LECH LECHA
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507934/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Lech-Lecha-13th-Day-of-MarCheshvan.htm © SichosInEnglish.org 

The Torah relates that the first command which G‑d gave the first Jew, Avraham, was “Go out from your land, from your birthplace, and from your father’s house, to the land that I will show you.” This raises a question: On the surface, it would seem more appropriate that the first command given to a Jew would clarify the nature of service to be rendered to G‑d.

There are commentaries which explain tat Avraham’s journey is symbolic of the preparatory step necessary to serve G‑d. To serve Him properly, on must depart from all worldly perspectives. Only after turning away from evil,” one can then, “do good,” and serve G‑d in a desirable manner. Nevertheless, since every concept in Torah contains a self-contained purpose and does not merely function as a preparation for another service, it follows that this command must also be seen in such a light. Accordingly we must perceive Avraham’s journey as part — indeed, the beginning and the foundation — of every Jew’s service of G‑d

This concept can be clarified through the explanation of other problematic points in this verse. Among the difficulties raised by the verse are the following:

a) On the surface, since the intent of G‑d’s command was for Avraham to journey to a different land, it would seem more appropriate to say, “Go to the land that I will show you.” Why is it necessary to mention the place from which Avraham had to leave? Even if that was necessary, why is it necessary to elaborate, “from your land, from your birthplace, and from your father’s house”?

b) The order of the clauses, “from your land, from your birthplace, and from your father’s house” is also problematic. On the surface, first one leaves one’s “father’s house,” then one’s “birthplace” and then one’s “land,” the direct opposite of the order chosen by the verse.

c) On the surface, it would have been appropriate to give Avraham some insight into the nature of the land which would be his destination so that he could prepare himself and take with him any articles that he would require there.

d) This verse (in contrast to other verses in the same passage) does not mention that G‑d revealed Himself to Avraham. It relates G‑d’s command directly without any introductory remarks.

The above points can be explained as follows: G‑d’s command to Avraham to leave Charan began the preparatory service for the giving of the Torah, the event which forged the identity of the Jews as G‑d’s chosen nation. Thus, this command expresses the fundamental principles which characterize the service of the Jewish people.

A Jew lives in a physical world which is governed by the forces of nature which conceal G‑dly light. Furthermore, he is born with certain natural tendencies and is influenced by his environment. Nevertheless, he has the potential to rise above these limitations and, through the Torah and its mitzvos, serve G‑d who transcends all these limitations. He can reveal G‑dliness within the world and elevate the world above the level which it could otherwise attain.

Though “the world was created in a complete state”1 a Jew has the potential to lift it to a higher level of completion. The Midrash explains that before the giving of the Torah, there was a decree separating the higher realms from the lower realms. The giving of the Torah nullified that decree and afforded the potential for the Jews to ascend to the higher spiritual realms while living in this material word and to reveal G‑dliness in this lowly, material world.

The first stage of such service is a Jew’s willingness to leave “your land, from your birthplace, and from your father’s house.” These three terms reflect three influences of a general nature which affect a person’s character and behavior. “Your land” refers to the basic physical and material tendencies with which we are all born. “Your birthplace” to the traits and dispositions acquired from one’s environment, and “your father’s house” to those attitudes and character thrusts ingrained by one’s home.2

On another level, these three terms reflect three levels within a person’s own character: “Your land” refers to man’s basic nature, his instinctive drives. “Your birthplace” to the emotions that are aroused by his thoughts,3 and “your father’s house” to our intellectual potential.4

A Jew must be prepared to rise above these influences and these tendencies and proceed to “the land which I (G‑d) will show you;” i.e. to give himself over to G‑d’s will which is above his perception and understanding. This expresses the service of Mesirus Nefesh,transcending one’s intellect and giving over one’s will — and the totality of one’s personality to G‑d. One becomes unified with G‑d’s will to the extent that “G‑d’s will becomes one’s own will.”5 Even when a person dedicates every aspect of his character to G‑d’s service, he still remains an individual entity. For him to unite with G‑d, it is necessary that he “go out from his land,” his tendencies and desires, and “go to the land which I will show you.”

The service was epitomized by Avraham. He “recognized his Creator” at the age of three6and from that time onward rose higher in the service of good, dispensing kindness to others and proclaiming G‑dliness throughout the world. Nevertheless, at the age of 75,7G‑d told him that this service was not sufficient and that it was necessary for him to “Go out from your land, from your birthplace, and from you father’s house, to the land that I will show you.”

Based on the above, we can resolve the difficulties mentioned originally. Since a person must depart from his original state, it is necessary to describe that state in detail, mentioning the three influences (in ascending order of difficulty) which shape his character. Since his goal is Mesirus Nefesh, giving himself over to G‑d to the extent where he no longer feels his individual will, nor is governed by his on intellect, his destination is only described as “the land which I (G‑d) will show you.” He knows nothing about his destination, nor is it necessary for him to do so.

The above also allows us to understand why this command preceded G‑d’s revelation to Avraham. Only after a person departs from his original state and journeys to “the land which I will show you,” i.e., he units with G‑d’s will, is he a fit vessel to receive the revelation of G‑dliness.

2. The service of leaving one’s “land, birthplace, and father’s house” is not only personal in nature. Rather, it also involves the elevation of one’s family and surrounding environment Thus, we find that Avraham took Sarah, his wife, Lot, his nephew, his property, and “the souls which he made in Charan” together with him on his journey.

Such actions indicate that one has truly departed from his previous state, for nothing with which one shares a connection is left behind. Rather, everything is also elevated and taken to one’s new state. Similarly, the oneness which one establishes with “the land which I will show you,” is greater for, in this manner, it can permeate through the totality of one’s being. This allows one to spread the awareness of G‑dliness throughout the world, unifying them to the extent that G‑d is not only “the G‑d of the heavens” as He was before Avraham journeyed to Eretz Yisrael but “the G‑d of the heavens and the earth,” for through Avraham’s activities, all the travelers who passed through his home became aware of G‑d’s presence.8

Based on the above we can understand the connection of the be­ginning of the parshahwith its latter portions which describe in detail the story of Lot, how his shepherds and Avraham’s quarreled, his set­tling in Sodom, the war of the kings, and the miraculous manner in which Avraham saved him from captivity. On the surface, Lot’s story represents the direct opposite of the Mesirus Nefesh displayed by Avraham as Rashi quotes Lot as saying after departing from Avraham: “It is impossible for me to tolerate Avraham or his G‑d.” Similarly, his choice of Sodom as a place to live despite the wicked behavior of its inhabitants reveals the nature of his own character.

Nevertheless, Avraham’s efforts to elevate and refine his surroundings, to take them with him on his journey from his “land,” “birthplace,” and “father’s house,” “to the land that I (G‑d) will show you” also had an effect on Lot. Though Lot remained a wicked person, he still maintained a connection with Avraham.

This connection was not only one-sided. It also had an effect on Lot, refining him to the point that he continued showing hospitality to guests in Sodom despite the danger involved in such an activity. As the parshah relates, the inhabitants of Sodom would punish any act of hospitality harshly. Though he was conscious of this danger Lot was influenced by the training he received in Avraham’s household and eagerly sought to bring guests into his home. This self-sacrifice9 reflects how Lot was affected by Avraham’s service.

Thus, the journey “to the land that I (G‑d) will show you” lifts a person beyond his limits as a human being, a creation, and establishes his identity as a servant of G‑d, willing to do His will — whatever that implies — with a commitment of Mesirus Nefesh.

“The deeds of the fathers are a sign for their descendants.” [The Rabbis explain that this implies that our ancestors’ deeds endow us with the potential to follow in their footsteps.] Thus, Avraham’s settling in Eretz Yisrael made that land an eternal inheritance for his descendants. Because of his acts, every Jew in any era possesses a portion in Eretz Yisrael.

Similarly, Avraham’s spiritual service served as a preparation for the service of his descendants. Thus, his journey from his “land,” “birthplace,” and “father’s house,” is a source for every Jew to serve G‑d with Mesirus Nefesh. Although a Jew lives within the limits of worldly existence, he can depart from his individual existence — even if that existence involves holy matters — and give himself over entirely to G‑d’s will, devoting himself to transforming the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

3. The above also clarifies the connection between the command for Avraham’s journey given at the beginning of the parshah and the conclusion of the parshah which describes his circumcision. The circumcision is a “covenant” reflecting the unity between Avraham (and through him, his descendants) and G‑d. This unity is so complete that it is reflected in a sign on our actual flesh. It is the only mitzvah before the giving of the Torah that effected the physical nature of the world. It was through the fulfillment of this mitzvah that Avraham became “perfect.”

Furthermore, this covenant was established with the help of G‑d, Himself. Our Sages relate that Avraham was afraid to carry out the circumcision and G‑d helped him, “extending His hand and holding the knife together with him.” Thus, he and G‑d became partners in the fulfillment of the mitzvah.10 This partnership demonstrated the complete nature of the union with G‑d and His will, with that union being reflected in Avraham’s physical being. The connection between the mitzvah and Avraham’s physical being is further emphasized by the physical pain the circumcision caused.

[On the surface, it is difficult to understand: Why is the mitzvah of circumcision connected with pain? Also, in particular, in regard to Avraham, Avraham as a master of his senses and had control over his feelings. If so, why did he feel pain over the circumcision? On the contrary, since this was the first mitzvah which G‑d actually commanded him to fulfill, because this mitzvah effected his physical being itself and allowed him to reach “perfection,” he should have been so happy to perform the mitzvah that he felt no pain at all.11

The explanation of the concept is: Since circumcision establishes a covenant with G‑d in our actual flesh, the covenant must be forged in a manner that reflects the nature of our flesh. Since, by nature, we feel pain when our flesh is cut, that pain must be felt in connection with the fulfillment of this mitzvah.

Thus, Avraham would not have felt any pain over the circumcision. On the contrary, he would have been happy to fulfill G‑d’s will. He, however, had departed from his own personal nature and given himself over entirely to the fulfillment of G‑d’s will. Accordingly, since G‑d desired that this mitzvah be carried out in a manner that effects our actual flesh, Avraham let himself experience the feelings that the circumcision would naturally bring.]

The complete union with G‑d that Avraham established through the circumcision is transmitted to all his descendants, allowing them to establish a complete connection with Him, a connection that effects even their physical beings.

On this basis, we can explain the connection between the three Torah portions, Noach, Lech Lecha, and Vayeira. Parshas Noach describes the flood which came to purify the world. After its completion, Noach saw a “new world,” a world that had been refined and elevated to a higher level.12 This served as a preparatory step for G‑d’s command to Avraham to leave his home, i.e., to rise above the limits of worldliness and go to, “the land which I will show you,” i.e., to commit himself to G‑d’s service with Mesirus Nefesh (Parshas Lech Lecha). This, in turn, brings about “And G‑d revealed Himself to Avraham” (Parshas Vayeira), the ultimate oneness with G‑d, a unity which reflects the revelation of the giving of the Torah and the Messianic era.13

4. The above also relates to the month of MarCheshvan, the month which is characterized by a transition from Tishrei, a month that is “filled with festivals,” to the day to day routines of life, “And Yaakov went on his way.” This is also related to the service of Lech Lecha, leaving one’s previous level (even if it was involved with a service in the realm of holiness) and setting out on a new path of service with Mesirus Nefesh. In this manner, “his way,” the individual matters of a Jew, become unified with “G‑d’s way,” “the land which I will show you.”14

In particular, greater potential for such service is granted this year, תש"נ, “a year of miracles.” This year each Jew is given special powers to rise above the natural order. Furthermore, he has the potential to elevate his family and his surrounding environment15to a higher plane as well.

The above is connected with two practical directives which will lift our service to a higher level:

To gather together every Shabbos to study Torah communally: As mentioned previously, it is appropriate that in every community where Jews live, they should gather together on Shabbos to study Torah, both Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah, and make good resolutions concerning their service in Torah, prayer, and deeds of kindness. In particular, at this time, it is appropriate to take on resolutions regarding the needs of the community.

In order to unite all the different communities together, it is appropriate that, in addition to the established Torah classes, every community should join together in the study of a single subject. This study should center on the weekly Torah portion, studying at least several lines as they are interpreted by one commentary in the realm of Nigleh and one commentary in the realm of Pnimiyus HaTorah, Chassidus.16 In the realm of Chassidus, to save everyone the trouble of finding appropriate subject matter, it is suggested to study the discourses of the Tzemach Tzedek in the series Or HaTorah which includes explanations of many of the verses from the weekly Torah portions including the first and final verses which are often regarded with special appreciation by Torah students.

b) Gifts to tzedakah — Giving tzedakah is one of the most important mitzvos in the Torah, indeed, it is “equal to all the mitzvos.” In particular, it is important in this era directly before the Mashiach’s coming. To stress the importance of increasing one’s gifts to tzedakah this year, it is appropriate that every director of an educational institution should distribute money — even a penny is sufficient — to each of the students and each of the employees for them to give to tzedakah. This will serve as an example to motivate the students to give tzedakah, adding to the amount they were given with their own money. This should be done at least once a week, preferably on Fridays before the students depart for Shabbos.17

This practice should also be followed in all Jewish organizations and institutions. The director of the institution should distribute money to be given to tzedakah to all of the employees at least once a week. Similarly, this practice should be followed in organizations and institutions that involve gentiles since tzedakah is necessary for “the settled nature of the world.” (Accordingly, some authorities consider it one of the seven universal laws given to Noach and his descendants.) In particular, this applies in America, where tzedakah is one of the pillars of the country. The above points should be publicized wherever possible. Surely, the suggestions will be accepted and bring greater success than that which was originally conceived.

May our efforts in Lech Lecha — going out from our previous position with mesirus nefesh— bring about the era when G‑d will take us “to the land which I will show you,” Eretz Yisrael, with the coming of Mashiach.

Shabbos Noach | 3 -10 MarCheshvan, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  OCT 12th  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 6:08 PM

SHABBOS - SAT OCT 13th  
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:10 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 6:09 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 7:09 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 6:00 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–YAHRZEITS (9 MARCHESHVAN) OF EFRAIM ALTER AND CHANA (TIKVA) DERSHOWITZ ZT”L - FRIDAY 5 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite.  A delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin, sponsored by Yitzchok and Liz Rothman in honor and in memory of the 20th yahrzeit of Mark Dykan (Mordechai Ze'ev ben Yaacov ZT”L), 4th of Cheshvan. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Mammar Mayim Rabbim "Abundant Waters" with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 5:15 PM 
Feeling anxiety and preoccupation with financial  stress ? The Rebbe explains how a person’s involvement in their business affairs should actually be a springboard for spiritual growth. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

AIPAC ANNUAL EVENT TUE OCT 30th 5:30 PM
Featuring Stephen Harper, former Prime Minister of Canada. At Seattle Sheraton Hotel. More info: (206) 624-5152 or seattle_office@Aipac.org

BETWEEN THE LINES-VOICES OF ISRAEL - MON OCT 15th  7 PM AT OHR CHADASH
Come hear the true life experiences and perspectives Israeli soldiers, Aviv and Chen.

DISCOUNT CODE FOR JAFFA ROAD CONCERT - SUN OCT 21st 
The highly acclaimed Toronto-based world music group Jaffa Road has established themselves as unique creators and interpreters of Jewish music in Ladino, Portuguese, Hebrew, Arabic, Russian, and English. Promo Code JAFFA10 saves $10 
www.sjcc.org

STAND WITH US NORTHWEST: Annual Community Reception OCT 28th  
www.StandWithUs.org Early bird registration deadline is Sept. 30.

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN. OCT 21 11am-2pm. 
Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN NOV 18
At  Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 

Mental Health First Aid: Nov 28, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN OCT 21 11am-2pm
Celebrate our Sephardic heritage at the SJCC. Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

Karen Treiger Book Launch Event SUN OCT 14th 5-7 PM
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. More info: www.karentreiger.com / RSVP: 
info@karentreiger.com



REBBE’S SICHO FOR NOACH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518378/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Noach-6th-Day-of-MarCheshvan-5743-1982.htm ©SichosInEnglish.org

This Shabbos comprises several elements: It is Shabbos parshas Noach; it falls out on the 6th of Cheshvan; it follows Shabbos Bereishis; and it precedes the 7th of Cheshvan. Consonant with the Baal Shem Tov’s teaching that everything provides lessons for man’s service to G‑d, each of the above elements in Shabbos parshas Noach provide a directive.

First of all, it follows Shabbos Bereishis, on which starts the principal service of the entire year — “Ya’akov went on his way.” “Ya’akov” is singular tense (not “the children of Ya’akov): went (in Hebrew “holach”), is singular tense: and “his way” is also singular tense. Thus, although this Scriptural phrase is applies to all Jews’ service to G‑d, each is his own particular way, emphasis is laid on their unity “Ya’akov went on his way , “ singular tense, all Jews as one entity.

Unity in the service of “Ya’akov went on his way,” which begins after Shabbos Bereishis, has greater emphasis on the Shabbos following Shabbos Bereishis (Shabbos parshas Noach), for Shabbos itself emphasizes unity among Jews. Our Sages say that although on weekdays an am ha’aretz (ignoramus, boor) cannot be trusted if he says he has separated terumah and ma’aser from his food, on Shabbos however he does not lie — and a Talmid Chacham can then eat from his food. Thus on Shabbos a Talmid Chacham and an am ha’aretz are united.

Furthermore, on Shabbos the world is elevated from the level of speech to the level of thought. Speech is a “garment” separate from the soul, it being directed to someone else;and without another person present, speech is unnecessary. Thought on the other hand is a “garment” united with the soul. This is the reason why a person’s thought is continuouslyworking, whereas speech does not. Since thought is united with the soul, then, just as the soul and its vitality are continuous, so too is thought. In our case, since on Shabbos the world is elevated to the level of thought, the idea of unity is stressed.

Since unity is emphasized on Shabbos, it is the appropriate time to hold a farbrengen — for it too expresses the unity of Jews. The Alter Rebbe said that a Chassidic farbrengen can achieve greater results than can the angel Michoel, the “great prince” of Yisroel: for at a farbrengen the unity of Jews is actually seen. And this produces greater satisfaction for G‑d than the angel Michoel’s efforts.

2. In addition to the above lesson from this Shabbos following Shabbos Bereishis (unity in the service of “Ya’akov went on his way”), there is also a lesson to be derived from Shabbos parshas Noach itself. “Noach” derives from the word “neichah,” meaning “pleasing;” and the repetition of the word “Noach” in the first verse of the parshahcorresponds to two types of “pleasing:” pleasing to Above and pleasing to below. This is the idea of teshuvah: Before hand one was in an undesirable state; now, through teshuvah, he has rectified this in the manner of “neichah.”

Parshas Noach also stresses the idea of the redemption. Chassidus explains the connection between Noach’s ark and a sukkah. Sukkah is the idea of peace, as stated: “Spread over us the sukkah of Your peace.” In Noach’s ark, the idea of peace was also present, for although all animals were there together, no animal disturbed or attacked another. This is similar to the peace of the future redemption, when will be fulfilled the promise “A wolf will dwell with a sheep ...” and they will not harm or attack ...”

This is the difference between Sukkos and Noach’s ark: The revelation of the festival Sukkos also affects the world, as we see that on Sukkos seventy bullocks were offered corresponding to the 70 nations of the world. Nevertheless, this was only in regard to the nations, but not to a literal “wolf and sheep.” Moreover, the effect of Sukkos differed between the 1st and 2nd Bais Hamikdosh. In the first, the effect was open — the nations paid tribute to King Solomon; in the second, it was not revealed, and indeed, the Jews were under the rule of the gentile nations.

The revelations in Noach’s ark, on the other hand, affected even animals, all living together for a year in harmony — “the sheep together with the wolf.” This was similar to the future promise of “a wolf will dwell with a sheep” — and this is the connection between parshas Noach and the future redemption.

Since such a thing (the revelations of the future) once existed (in Noach’s ark), it follows that now it is much easier to effect the future revelation. Moreover, the revelation in Noach’s ark was in a time when the world was in such a low state that they received the punishment of the flood. Certainly then, after Mattan Torah and after the service of Jews throughout the generations, it is now much easier to bring the future redemption.

Just as the greatness of Noach’s ark was the result of one man’s service, Noach, so too the individual service of each Jew in Torah and mitzvos hastens the future redemption.

May it be G‑d’s will that through our deeds we speedily merit the true and complete redemption through our righteous Moshiach, when the promise “a wolf will dwell with a sheep” will be fulfilled -both literally, and in regard to the nations of the world.

*

3. In addition to the above, there is a special lesson to be learned from the day on which parshas Noach falls this year — the 6th of Cheshvan. The Shulchan Aruch states: “In Eretz Yisroel we begin to ask (for rain — the prayer “Bestow dew and rain for blessing,” said in the Shemoneh Esreh prayer) from the night of the 7th of MarCheshvan ... It would really have been fitting to ask for it immediately after the festival (of Sukkos), but they delayed asking for 15 days after the festival, so that the last person in Israel who went up (to the Bais Hamikdosh) for the festival should reach his home — to the Pros River, which was the furthest settlement from Yerushalayim — and not to be troubled by the rain.”

Since we ask for rain on the night of the seventh, it follows that the last Jew reached his home during the 6th of Cheshvan, before the night of the seventh. For if not, the rain that would come down on the night of the seventh would impede his journey. This is the importance of the 6th of Cheshvan: It is the very end of the pilgrimage to the Bais Hamikdosh for the festival — for the journey to and fro from Yerushalayim is also part of the mitzvah of making the pilgrimage. Since the 6th of Cheshvan is the end and conclusion of the pilgrimage — and “everything follows the conclusion” — it is the appropriate time for gatherings to be held to strengthen and increase in the good resolutions made in the month of Tishrei regarding service to G‑d in the rest of the year.

Moreover, since the 6th of Cheshvan is the conclusion of the festival, it follows that one can also make up the deficiencies in, and perfect the matters of Tishrei. Thus, when a Jew knows that there were times in Tishrei that were not utilized properly, he should not think it is irretrievable, but he has the opportunity to rectify it on the 6th of Cheshvan. Although this applies to the 6th of Cheshvan every year, when however it is on Shabbos (as this year), extra strength is given in this, for Shabbos is an “auspicious time.”

The strengthening of good resolutions and the rectification of deficiencies must first and foremost be in the mitzvah campaigns: Ahavas Yisroel, Torah, education, tefillin, mezuzah, tzedakah, house full of Jewish books, kashrus, Shabbos and Yom Tov lights, and family purity.

In addition to the above distinction of the 6th of Cheshvan (the conclusion of the matters of Tishrei) , it is also the eve of, and preparation to, the seventh of Cheshvan, when we begin to ask for rain. “Rain” symbolizes G‑d’s blessings, for all blessings depend on rain. Moreover, since rain comes from heaven, we see openly that it is something which comes from above (blessings from G‑d). Scripture, concerning the greatness of Eretz Yisroel compared to Egypt, states. “It is not like the land of Egypt ... where you planted seed and watered it with your foot ...:” Instead, “It drinks water of the rain of heaven.” That is, Egypt had to bring water for irrigation from the Nile, whereas G‑d gives rain to Eretz Yisroel. Thus the distinction of the seventh of Cheshvan is that then they started to ask for rain, which encompasses all the blessings of G‑d.

Although we begin to mention rain (by saying “He causes the wind to blow and the rain to fall”) on Shemini Atzeres, we do not then ask that rain should actually fall (as explained above, they delayed the asking for rain for 15 days after the festival). Instead, we begin to ask for It to fall on the 7th of Cheshvan. Since “deed is the principal thing,” the principal concept of rain is on the 7th of Cheshvan (and not Shemini Atzeres), for then we ask for the actual rain to come.

Moreover, the mentioning of rain on Shemini Atzeres needs a great deal of effort, whereas on the 7th of Cheshvan we ask for rain without any special endeavors. The start of saying “He causes the wind to blow and the rain to fall” is on an auspicious time — Shemini Atzeres; yet despite the greatness of this day, we still need special efforts: Announcement concerning it must be made in the congregation; a special prayer is said; this prayer has a special tune; said by a special chazan; and we answer “amen” three times at its conclusion.

On the other hand, asking for rain on the 7th of Cheshvan needs no special effort. It is weekday then, when we are engaged in weekday activities, and we cause rain to fall by simply adding a few words (“Bestow dew and rain for blessing”) in the regular Shemoneh Esreh of weekday!

Although the reason we can bring rain on the 7th of Cheshvan without special effort is because we have already effected the idea of rain on Shemini Atzeres, nevertheless, the conclusion of it on the 7th of Cheshvan, when we actually bring the rain, is a much loftier thing — for thereby the matter is brought to perfection. And as mentioned previously, since “deed is the principal thing,” the actual bringing of the rain on the 7th of Cheshvan is the most important part.

The greatness of the sixth of Cheshvan then is that it is the eve of and preparation to the 7th, when the rain begins to fall. Moreover, since all the days of the week are blessed from the preceding Shabbos — and this year the 6th of Cheshvan is Shabbos — it follows that not only is the sixth the “eve” of the 7th, but it also provides the strength and blessing for the rains on the 7th (for the 7th is blessed from the preceding Shabbos which this year is the 6th).

*

4. In parshas Noach we learn of the flood that G‑d brought upon the earth, leaving alive only Noach and those with him in the ark. Ch. 7, verse 12 of the parshah states: “The rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights.” Rashi, quoting the words “The rain was upon the earth,” comments: “But later on [verse 17] it says ‘And the flood’ [i.e. ‘flood’ and not ‘rain’]? But [the reason for the different terminologies — ‘flood’ and ‘rain’ is that] when He brought them [the waters] down, He brought them down with mercy, so that if they [the people] should repent these would be rains of blessing; but when they did not repent, they [the rains] became a flood.”

There are several perplexing points in this Rashi:

1. Rashi quotes only those words which he explains in his commentary. In our case, Rashi only seems to explain why in our verse it says “The rain” and later on it says “the flood.” Why then does he also quote “The rain was upon the earth.” Moreover, the later verse states “And the flood was upon the earth,” just as our verse states “The rain was upon the earth.” Yet Rashi, when quoting the later verse, says only “But later on it says ‘And the flood,’“ and does not quote the full verse “And the flood was upon the earth” — for it is not relevant to the problem at hand. Why then does Rashi, when quoting the words from our verse upon which he makes his comment, quote also the words “on the earth?”

2. A contradiction between two verses becomes apparent only when one reaches and learns the later verse. In our case, the contradiction between the terms “rain” and “flood” becomes apparent only when we reach the later verse which uses the term “flood.” If so, he should have asked the question there, and not on our verse. Why then does he ask “But later on it says ...?”

3. On the other hand, the term “flood” is used more than once before our verse of “The rain was upon the earth.” Why then does Rashi ask about the contradiction in terms from the later verse, when he could have asked it from the earlier use of the term (in verses 6,7 and 10).

In other words, we have before us a question within a question. Why is the question specifically from the word “flood” used in the “later” verse, and not from its use before our verse; and if the question is from the later verse, why does Rashi ask the question on ourverse?

4. Rashi explains that “He brought them down with mercy, so that if they should repent these should be rains of blessings.” Why does Rashi add the words “of blessing,” when our verse says only “rain?” It would suffice to say “if they should repent these should be rains” (and not flood).

5. Rashi’s words “When he brought them down, He brought them down with mercy” refer to all the forty days stated in the verse “The rain was on the earth forty days.” But, how can we say that during all the forty days it was still possible that “they should repent” — and the rains would then be “rains of blessings” — when after a few days of flood, all people would be dead!?

6. How can it be possible that during all the forty days “He brought them down with mercy,” allowing them the possibility of being “rains of blessings,” when after the first few days it was already actual “flood?”

7. Moreover, later on the verse says “The flood was forty days upon the earth,” indicating that during the entire forty days (even at the beginning) “flood” came down. If so, how can we say that in the self-same 40 days it was both “flood” and simultaneously “rain” (that could become “rains of blessings)?”

The explanation:

Let us first answer the most crucial question: How could there be the possibility that “if they should repent they would be rains of blessing” during all the forty days when (i) all the people would have died already, and (ii) there was already flood? The answer is derived from Rashi’s comment on a previous verse (and therefore Rashi need not emphasize it here). On the verse (7:4) “I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights,” Rashi comments that these forty days “correspond to the [period of] the formation of the embryo, for they sinned by causing their Creator trouble to form shapes [embryos] of illegitimate children.”

Now, the 40 days in which it takes for the embryo to be formed is not 40 separate things but one concept — the formation of one embryo. Likewise, the forty days of flood are one concept. Each day was not an additional punishment (another day of flood), but rather, onepunishment which lasted forty days. In other words, it was one punishment of flood which expressed itself in 40 days.

It follows then that the action (of G‑d) in bringing down the waters of the flood was one simultaneous action — which contained within it 40 days. This is what Rashi writes “He brought them down with mercy, so that if they should repent they should be rains of blessing.” The bringing down of the rains in one action, in one “bundle” as it were, was “with mercy” — such that “if they should repent they would be rains of blessing.”

Now we can understand how it is possible that the whole forty days could be “rains of blessing” (if they would repent). Since the rains were brought down in one “bundle,” there were no divisions between them: During all the 40 days, G‑d brought them down such that “if they should repent they should be rains of blessing” — “the rain [brought down in one “bundle”] came upon the earth [for the duration of] forty days.” Such was the way G‑d brought them down. Since however they did not repent, they were waters of flood (even from the beginning) — “The flood was forty days upon the earth.”

The reason why Rashi adds the words “of blessing” — “if they should repent they should be rains of blessing” — is understood through reference to a previous verse in the creation of the world (Bereishis 2:5): “And every shrub of the field was not yet in the earth ... for the L‑rd G‑d had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to work the ground.” Rashi comments: “What is the reason that He did not make it rain? Because there was no man to work the earth and there was not one to recognize the benefit of rains. And when Adam came and recognized that they were necessary for the world, he prayed for them, and they descended, and the trees and grasses sprouted.”

We see then that the idea of rain is that they are a blessing, for through them trees and grasses grow. In other words, through the rains, blessings are given to the world. Moreover, not only are they the idea of blessings, but they come only when there is man to “recognize their benefit.”

Thus, when Rashi writes “rains of blessing” he is not adding something new to the meaning of the verse “The rain was upon the earth” but merely explaining it — that the meaning of rain is “rains of blessing.”

The reason why Rashi quotes also the words “upon the earth” although it is seemingly unnecessary, is as follows: We may think that the reason for the different usage of the terms “rain” and “flood” is that G‑d brought down “rain,” and “upon the earth” the rain was changed to “flood” (since the people did not repent). Therefore Rashi quotes also the words “The rain was upon the earth” to emphasize that the “rain” was “rain” not just when G‑d brought them down, but also “upon the earth.” Thus there remains the question why the different terms, and therefore Rashi must answer as he does.

Rashi writes “But later on it says ‘And the flood,’” although in earlier verses it also uses the term “flood,” because it strengthens the question. Even without the latter verse “And the flood,” there would be the question on this verse (“The rain”) from earlier verses which use the term “flood” — and therefore Rashi answers it on this verse, and not on the later verse.

Nevertheless, Rashi brings also the later verse “And the flood” to add to and strengthen the question. When a person learns our verse “The rain was upon the earth,” he may think the reason for the change from the term “flood” in previous verses is because at first there was supposed to be a flood, but afterwards it changed (because they repented etc.) to “rain.” Therefore Rashi says “Later on it says ‘And the flood’“ to tell us that even after the verse “The rain was on the earth” it still says “And the flood” — and therefore there was certainly an actual “flood.” The question is therefore much stronger: Since it says “flood” at the beginning, and it also states “flood” at the end — why in the middle does it say “rain?”

Shabbos Bereshis – Mevarchim MarCheshvan | 26 Tishrei – 3 MarCheshvan, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  OCT 5th  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 6:22 PM

SHABBOS - SAT OCT 6th  
Tehilim for Mevarchim haChodesh 7:30 AM
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:05 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 6:22 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 7:17 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon, Thu– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Tue & Wed Shacharis 6:50 AM /ROSH CHODESH
Sun -Thu Mincha 6:15 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–YAHRZEITS (25 TISHREI) OF CHOSOM SOFER & BERDITCHEVER- FRIDAY 5 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall. Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev (1740-1810) was a close disciple of the second leader of the Chassidic movement, Rabbi DovBer, the Maggid of Mezritch. He is best known for his love for every Jew and his impassioned words of advocacy on their behalf before the Almighty. Rabbi Moshe Sofer of Pressburg (1762-1839) is known as "Chatam Sofer" after his work of Rabbinic responsa. Rabbi Moshe was an outstanding Halachic authority and community leader, and was at the forefront of the battle to preserve the integrity of traditional Judaism in the face of the various "reformist" movements of his time. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite.  A delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin, sponsored by Moshe Ohayon. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative!
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

SICHO ON MAN’S POWER OF ACHIEVEMENT with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 5:15 PM
לקחתם לכם ביום הראשו. The sukkah is a revelation of the service of Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. The four species the emphasis is on unity, a oneness born out of multiplicity.For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

STAND WITH US NORTHWEST: Annual Community Reception OCT 28th  
www.StandWithUs.org Early bird registration deadline is Sept. 30.

FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE WALK
With the new year here. Please think about making a donation to my team for Friendship Circle! Friendship Circle pairs typical teens with non typical kids for friendship and more! Thank you!!! 
https://www.walkwithfriendship.com/Team/View/84857/Team-RockStar -Rocky Rudnick!

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN. OCT 21 11am-2pm. 
Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN. NOV 18
At  Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: Nov 28, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN. OCT 21 11am-2pm
Celebrate our Sephardic heritage at the SJCC. Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

Karen Treiger Book Launch Event SUN OCT 14th 5-7 PM
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. More info: www.karentreiger.com / RSVP: 
info@karentreiger.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR BERESHIS
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518566/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bereishis-24th-Day-of-Tishrei-5745-1984-1st-Farbrengen.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

 Today comprises two aspects: 1) it is Shabbos Bereishis; 2) it is Shabbos MevarchimMarCheshvan. Both these aspects emphasize the transition from the form of service of the month of Tishrei to the form of service of the rest of the year. Let us examine each aspect separately.

Shabbos Bereishis

Although “Shabbos Bereishis” is given its name because we read Parshas Bereishis on this Shabbos, the fact that it is customary to call it “Shabbos Bereishis” (and not Shabbos Parshas Bereishis), indicates that, since “Bereishis” also means “beginning,” Shabbos Bereishis also means the “first Shabbos.” Although it is not the first Shabbos of the year, since there have been a number of Shabbosim since Rosh HaShanah, it is the first Shabbos in relation to the existence of the world, as written, “In the beginning (Bereishis) G‑d created the heavens and the earth.” The preceding Shabbosim transcend the world; they exist in Torah, which preceded the world.

But if we are talking of a level that transcends the world’s existence, the very concept of Shabbos, which exists only when there are six preceding weekdays, is meaningless. In a level transcending the world, transcending time, there can be no difference between Shabbos and weekday. What then does it mean that the Shabbosim before Shabbos Bereishis are of a level transcending the world’s existence?

To understand this, let us first explore an aspect of Matan Torah that will shed light on the subject. Before Matan Torah, there existed a Divine decree that the upper regions (spirituality) should not descend to the lower (this material world), nor should the lower ascend to the upper. At Matan Torah, this decree was abolished. This could have been achieved in two ways. 1) The upper could descend to the lower — as actually happened, as written, “The L‑rd descended upon Mt. Sinai”; 2) the lower could ascend to the upper — i.e., to elevate the Jews to a higher level and there give them the Torah.

Matan Torah happened in the former way because the ultimate purpose in the giving of the Torah is not to elevate the world, but to draw down holiness into the world as it is, a corporeal place.

So too in our case: When we say that the Shabbosim before Shabbos Bereishis transcend the world we do not mean they do so totally, for then, as noted, the entire concept of Shabbos is meaningless. Instead, these Shabbosim are connected to the world, but such that the world is in an elevated state (heavens and earth as they are in Torah) — corresponding to a service of elevating the world to a transcendent level. Shabbos Bereishis is the first Shabbos to be connected with the world as it is below, the actual, physical world. And as noted above, the ultimate goal is to infuse and reveal G‑dliness in the world as it is.

Shabbos Mevarchim MarCheshvan

The month of Tishrei is the “head” of the entire year, a general month. MarCheshvan and the rest of the months are particular months following the “head.” During Tishrei, a Jew is occupied with the festivals, and thus he stands above weekday matters. Even the weekdays of this month are under the influence and spirit of its festivals. Weekday work does not begin in earnest until after Tishrei has ended, in the month of MarCheshvan. And, as noted above, the ultimate goal is service in weekday work — i.e., to infuse the lower regions with sanctity.

Shabbos Mevarchim MarCheshvan is in the last days of Tishrei. Thus, although Jews are still in the month of Tishrei, they already bless and generate the strength for the service of MarCheshvan. The blessings and strength for the service of MarCheshvan are given from the month of Tishrei specifically, for while the ultimate in service is in worldly matters, such service, to be whole, must contain within it the inspiration of the mode of service of Tishrei, which transcends the world’s existence — i.e., that it should be revealed and illumine in the world.

More specifically, there are two types of service to G‑d: 1) that of the whole year, regular service, dealing with the world as it is; 2) that of Tishrei — transcending the world and elevating it. The principal form of service is the former, to introduce G‑dliness into the world. Simultaneously, however, to ensure that this service be complete, the form of service of Tishrei — transcending the world — must be infused into regular service.

This is why the blessings for the service of MarCheshvan stem from Tishrei. It teaches that one must introduce the concepts of Tishrei into the service of MarCheshvan — weekday matters.

2. Just as the months of Tishrei and MarCheshvan differ regarding the world (Tishrei — transcends the world; MarCheshvan — working within the world), so the same difference is present concerning the person who performs service in the world. A person performing Divine service can experience two different types of sensations: 1) he feels that the world and himself have no existence, and he is but G‑d’s servant; 2) he feels that he and the world have an existence, and his task is to reveal G‑dliness in the world.

Although the first type — total self-nullification before G‑d — is seemingly the loftier of the two, the goal is to reach the second type, for G‑d desires that man should serve Him as he is in thicorporeal world. This is similar to that noted above, that the ultimate goal is not to elevate the world, but to introduce G‑dliness below.

This, in general, is the difference between Tishrei and MarCheshvan (and the other months). The Baal Shem Tov taught that “the seventh month (Tishrei) ... G‑d Himself blesses it on Shabbos Mevarchim ... and with this strength Israel blesses the months eleven times a year.” In other words, the blessings for Tishrei stem from above, from G‑d, and Jews play no part in it. The blessings for the other months, beginning with MarCheshvan, are elicited through the service of Jews. Yet, also these stem from G‑d’s strength and blessings to the seventh month.

In the light of all the above, we can well understand the Rebbeim’s adage, “How one acts on Shabbos Bereishis determines the whole year.” The type of service on Shabbos Bereishis affects the whole year, for it is the first Shabbos regarding the year’s service — in worldly matters, — and it also provides the strength for the service of MarCheshvan, which is the regular form of service of the whole year. Simultaneously, Shabbos Bereishis is still attached to Tishrei, meaning it possesses all the lofty characteristics of the festivals of this month — transcending the world — and it stands ready to infuse them into the rest of the year’s service. Because Shabbos Bereishis possesses both these aspects, service on this day affects the whole year. Also, Shabbos blesses all the days of the coming week, including the coming Shabbos, which in turn blesses the days of the following week including Shabbos, and so on throughout the year. Thus Shabbos Bereishis, which is the first Shabbos in the year’s regular service, affects the whole year.

May it be G‑d’s will that each and every Jew utilize this auspicious time to undertake good resolutions concerning the year’s service — in general, to introduce the revelation of G‑dliness in all aspects of creation.

* * *

3. The above applies to Shabbos Bereishis every year. In addition, there are lessons to be derived from those aspects which depend on this particular year’s calendar — that this year Shabbos Bereishis is the 24th day of Tishrei, and that there are no intervening weekdays between it and Simchas Torah. Let us examine each of these separately.

The 24th of Tishrei

On the 24th of Tishrei, Scripture relates (Nechemiah 9:1-2), the Jews in Eretz Yisrael, fasting and in sackcloth, assembled to rid themselves of their sin in taking non-Jewish wives. This is particularly relevant to our times when, as a result of the “Who is a Jew” law, there have been a catastrophic number of intermarriages.

The term “intermarriage” is really a misnomer, for there can be no “marriage” between a Jew and a non-Jew. G‑d has separated the Jewish people totally and utterly from the gentile nations, as light is separated from darkness. Thus any bond between Jew and non-Jew is totally false, and to apply the term intermarriage is but a swindle — fooling the couple who wish to marry into thinking that their “marriage” has any substance.

Yet, despite the immense severity and paramount importance of this matter, there are some who do not allow the matter to be rectified, and do their utmost to cause any steps taken in this direction to fail. Why do they do so? Because they are blinded and swayed by money, false honor, etc.!

But “the word of our G‑d shall endure forever”: it is thus easy to determine what will be the end result of those who do battle against G‑d. If so, it is better for them that they rectify the matter now, immediately, pleasantly, and peacefully.

In the above episode related in Scripture, no one was in doubt that the situation needed immediate rectification. They therefore assembled together, fasting and in sackcloth, repented, and separated Jew from gentile. There was no argument about it. They certainly didn’t allow the situation to continue for thirteen years and more. Today, to our sorrow, thirteen years have passed since the Law of Return was passed to read that even one who is converted non-halachically is considered a Jew — and still there is argument if an amendment is needed! This matter is submitted for a vote in the Knesset, so that also the gentiles in the Knesset — Christians and Moslems — can express their opinions regarding who is a Jew!

This is not a political matter! It is a matter of Halachah, “the word of G‑d” — and G‑d is not a member of the Knesset or any parliament in the world. G‑d is the Creator and Ruler of the world, and is Omnipresent. He is in the world as its ruler — whether one likes it or not!

The lesson we take from the 24th of Tishrei, then, is that people should take the opportunity of remedying the situation pleasantly and peacefully.

There is also a lesson to be derived from the fact that Shabbos Bereishis this year is on Isru Chag, the day immediately following Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah. We explained previously that the idea of Shabbos Bereishis is to infuse the concepts of Tishrei into the weekday service of the whole year. When there are weekdays intervening between Simchas Torah and Shabbos Bereishis — a spiritual descent from the level of Simchas Torah — one must first remember the spirit of Simchas Torah and reattain its level, before one can introduce its concepts into the year’s service. But when Shabbos Bereishis follows Simchas Torah without any intervening spiritual descent of weekdays, as this year, it is much easier to introduce the concepts of Simchas Torah throughout the year. And, of course, this extra strength is granted not to save one work, but to utilize it to rise yet higherin this service.

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