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SHABBOS SHEMOS | 20-27 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 27th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:06 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 28th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:04 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:06 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:11 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Thank you to Avram and Tamar Rosenfeld for sponsoring this week’s kiddush in honor of the birth and bris of their son, their first child.  A delicious meat cholent is made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Tamar and Avi Rosenfeld on the birth of their new baby boy on Erev Shabbos Vaheyi.  Bris planned for 8:30 am Friday morning at BCMH.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 20th Tevet, yahrzeit/maldado of Rabbi Moses ben Maimon, Talmudist, Halachist, physician, philosopher and communal leader, known in the Jewish world by the acronym "Rambam" and to the world at large as "Maimonides", who passed away in Egypt on the 20th of Tevet in 1204 (4965).   
www.chabad.org/calendar

FARBRENGEN ALERT - TUE JAN 1st – CHOF DALED TEVES
The founder of Chabad Chassidism, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi (1745-1812), passed away on the eve of the 24th of Tevet, 5573, at approximately 10:30 PM, shortly after reciting the Havdalah prayer marking the end of the Shabbat. The Rebbe was in the village of Peyena, fleeing Napoleon's armies, which had swept through the Rebbe's hometown of Liadi three months earlier in their advance towards Moscow. He was in his 68th year at the time of his passing, and was succeeded by his son, Rabbi DovBer of Lubavitch. 
www.chabad.org/calendar  Venue to be announced

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR SHEMOT
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507865/jewish/20th-of-Teves-Yahrtzeit-of-the-Rambam-5750-1990.htm ©SichosInEnglish

 The 20th1 of Teves2 commemorates the yahrzeit of the Rambam. Thus, it is connected with “all of his deeds, teachings, and service which he accomplished throughout his life... which are revealed and shine in an open manner from above to below, ‘bringing about salvation in the midst of the earth.’ “

Surely, this applies to the Rambam whose text, the Mishneh Torah, is structured “for the small and for the great... in order that, at first, a person will study the Written Law and then, he will study this text and from it, he will know the entire oral law without requiring any other text.”3 This text includes the entire Oral Law, describing the fulfillment of even those mitzvos that are applicable only when the Bais HaMikdash is standing.

In particular, this receives emphasis at present when the custom of studying a portion of the Mishneh Torah each day has spread throughout the international Jewish community. Particularly, this applies for those who follow the desirable practice of studying three chapters a day in order to conclude the study of the Mishneh Torah in a single year. This emphasizes the parallel to the Torah itself which is also completed in a single year. In this manner, each person will have “in his pocket,” the knowledge of practically applicable halachah for every year, he will review the entire Mishneh Torah.

Thus, each year the study is completed and begun anew as we say in the prayer recited after completing a portion of Torah study, “Just as You have assisted me and enabled me to conclude ----, so may You assist me to begin other tractates and texts and conclude them....” Since a Divine blessing is required for this study, it is appropriate to connect it with giving to tzedakah which encourages such blessings.

2. Based on the Rambam’s principle that, “Most of the laws of the Torah are intended to... correct our characters and straighten our deeds,” it is appropriate to derive a lesson of that nature from one of the laws from the portion of the Mishneh Torah associated with the present day.

Today’s portion of study concludes Hilchos Chametz U’Matzah, the laws associated with the celebration of the Pesach festival. The final law in those halachos states: A person who slept in the midst of the meal and then awoke should not begin to eat again. If, however, some members of a company slept in the midst of the meal, they may eat again. If they all fell into a sound slumber and then awoke, they should not eat. If they all [merely] dozed, they may eat.

This refers to our service in the present age, Ikvesa DiMeshicha, the era immediately before Mashiach’s coming. In the time of exile, the state of the Jewish people as a whole is described as sleep. Neverthe­less, there are Tzaddikim who do not sleep, who are always awake.

Our halachah teaches that even when a person does sleep (not merely dozes) in exile, since when he awakes he becomes aware that there are others who have not slept, he can consider himself as part of their group and continue the Seder as if there was no interruption.

The daily portion of study also includes the Rambam’s text of the Haggadah that teaches, “No desert is served after the Pesach.” This implies that after the Pesach, the Messianic redemption, nothing else, no other matter or service will follow. Rather, it will be an eternal redemption which will never be followed by exile.

This is particularly relevant at present when, to quote the Previous Rebbe, all that is necessary is for us to “stand prepared to await Mashiach’s coming.” This is also relevant to the Mishneh Torah which concludes with the description of the Messianic age, when, “the world will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the sea covers up the ocean bed.”

SHABBOS VAYECHI | 13-20 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS DEC 21st 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:02 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 22nd 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:01 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:02 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:06 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 14th Tevet, known at “Purim Hevron” On this day in 1824, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob came to the rescue of the Jewish community of Hebron, after an evil Pasha imprisoned its leaders and threatened to sell the entire Jewish population into slavery.  The Sephardic community of Hebron would celebrate this day to mark the great miracle which occurred.
http://en.hebron.org.il/news/382   www.chabad.org/calendar

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Thank you to Yitzi & Shaindy Heisler for co- sponsoring kiddush and cholent this week, in honor of their daughter.  Thank you to  Rabbi Shimon and Meira Emlen for co-sponsoring kiddush and cholent this week in honor of the upcoming 1st birthday of their daughter, Devorah Leah. Rabbi Mendy Levitin is making the delicious meat cholent!! Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYECHI
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2553907/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayechi-13th-Day-of-Teves-5741-1980.htm © SichosInEnglish.

1. The Tzemach Tzedek, when a young child, learned the verse “And Ya’akov lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years.” His teacher told him that those seventeen years were the best years of Ya’akov’s life. The Tzemach Tzedek asked his grandfather, the Alter Rebbe, how it is possible that the best years of Ya’akov’s life were those spent in Egypt, a place called the “depravity of the earth?” The Alter Rebbe answered as follows: On the words, “And Yehudah he (Ya’akov) sent before him, to Yosef, to show the way before him,” our sages comment, that Yehudah’s mission was to establish a house of study so that the tribes would be able to learn Torah in Egypt. When one learns Torah he comes closer to G‑d, thus making it possible for Ya’akov to “live” also in Egypt. The seventeen years Ya’akov spent in Egypt were truly “lived,” that life being similar to the “abundance of light that comes from (prior) darkness.”

This is similar in concept to Asarah B’Teves, the fast of the tenth of Teves (which occurred in the preceding week). The 10th of Teves was the day that Nevuchadnezar, the evil king of Babylon, laid siege to Yerushalayim. It thus marks the beginning of the destruction of the Bais Hamikdosh. Teves is the tenth month; and thus this occurred on the tenth day of the tenth month. The number ten is always associated with holiness,1 and that such an event should be on the tenth of the tenth is an awesome descent.

This descent was, however, for the purpose of the abundance of light that would later emerge from the darkness of the descent. And this is the similarity with the above story about the Tzemach Tzedek. The siege of Yerushalayim is similar to Egypt, the exile of Egypt being the forerunner of all later exiles. As our sages have said: “All kingdoms are called by the name Egypt, since they oppress Yisroel” [In Hebrew ‘Egypt’ is the same word as ‘oppress’]. The ultimate aim and reason for this oppression is the “abundance of light that comes from darkness,” just as, through coming to Egypt, Ya’akov truly “lived.”

That which occurred to Ya’akov is instructive for every Jew, for his life in this world; for our forefathers were the choicest of all men, and Ya’akov the choicest of the forefathers.2Ya’akov’s raison d’être was to “live” in Egypt — to reveal the abundance of light that comes from prior darkness. So too with us — our raison d’être is to achieve “life,” specifically in a place similar to Egypt. This means that, even though there was also “light” before the exile, in the time of the Bais Hamikdosh, nevertheless, it is precisely in the time of exile that we achieve that abundance of light that comes only from darkness.3

In concrete terms, this means that we must conduct ourselves in the time of exile with true “life.” Our Torah learning (“they are our life and the length of our days”) and our fulfillment of Mitzvos (“and live in them”) must be with vitality, with life, extending even to the lowest matters.4

In our times the prerequisite for the above is the study of Chassidus, the inner part of the Torah. Although in previous generations this was not a necessary prerequisite, and the study of the inner portion of the Torah was only for special individuals, nowadays it has been revealed for all. Indeed, in our times it is an absolute must — in order that our Torah and fulfillment of Mitzvos be in the fitting manner.

Two parables are given for the reason that it is specifically in our times that Chassidus must be learned and disseminated so widely, even to the point of squander. During a war, the king will squander all his treasures to ensure victory. Similarly, now is the time when all our spiritual treasures (i.e. Chassidus) must be “squandered” to achieve victory (i.e. the redemption). Another parable is that of a king whose son is extremely unwell. The king will take the rarest gem in his crown of jewels, grind it to a powder, and feed it to his son in the hope that perhaps one drop will be absorbed and heal his son. So too, nowadays Chassidus must be disseminated as widely as possible to resuscitate the ailing body of Jewry, even if most of it will not reach its objective and be squandered.

The realization that exile is the medium through which we can achieve the abundance of light that can come only from prior darkness, disposes of all (our) doubts and questions regarding the exile. As in another parable, where the king’s son is sent away by his father to test him, the exile [where we, the King’s children, have been sent] serves as a medium to draw out the strength of the Jewish people, and so produce the abundance of light. Especially since most of the difficulties of the exile are more imaginary than real, stemming from the Evil Inclination.5 The realization of this encourages us to strive with all our might to produce the abundance of light that comes from the exile.

The very fact that we find ourselves in such a dark exile proves that we have the strength to produce the abundance of light, which in turn gives us the encouragement to be truly “alive” during the exile.

This then is the directive for all: To effect the concept of “Ya’akov lived,” through the spreading of the wellsprings of the Baal Shem Tov as they are explained and amplified in Chassidus Chabad, and to ensure that they reach to “outside,” all Jews, everywhere. Especially we must carry out the mission laid upon all of us by the Previous Rebbe — the spreading of Judaism.

Through the spreading of the wellsprings of Chassidus we achieve the fulfillment of the promise given to Ya’akov: “I will also surely bring you up again,” the “also” referring to the ultimate redemption. And then, through our efforts in all the Mitzvah campaigns, “immediately we will be redeemed,” and, “with our youth and our elders, our-sons and our daughters,” we will go to receive our righteous Moshiach, speedily in our times.

*

2. Because we are still in the month of Teves, there is a connection with Chanukah. There are various ways in which one can fulfill the Mitzvah of kindling the Chanukah lights. The basic minimum in Halachah is to kindle one light each night for the entire household. A more choice manner is for each member to kindle one light. And the choicest manner of all to fulfill the Mitzvah is to add an extra light each night.6

Spiritually, the basic minimum — one light — indicates the concept of Chanukah as it is in the seminal stage; it then becomes differentiated and expanded — one light for each person and a leading up to eight lights. This is similar in concept to Tefillin: The Tefillin of the hand, which must be put on before the Tefillin of the head, contain the four Parshiyos (sections) of the Torah that constitute the Tefillin in one single compartment. The Tefillin of the head, on the other hand, has a different compartment for each section. The reason for this difference, is similar to the difference between “back” and “front.” In the “back,” as in the nape of the neck, there are no distinguishing features — nose, eyes, ears, mouth; everything i3 the same. Whereas in “front,” as in the front of the face, these features are distinguishable.7

There is a lesson for us from the above regarding the fulfillment of Mitzvos. There are two parts in a Mitzvah — the actual deed and the kavannah, the concentrated meaning of the Mitzvah. First and foremost is the actual deed, for no matter how lofty one’s thoughts and comprehensions of the Mitzvah, without the actual deed the essential part is lacking. The above two concepts — the seminal point and the later expansion — are also found in a Mitzvah. Through the actual simple performance of a Mitzvah one grasps the Essence Above, thus grasping all the concepts (as they are in the Essence). The various concepts included in the Essence then become revealed with the concentrated understanding and comprehension of the Mitzvos, which, depending on the depth of understanding, are differentiated into different levels.

Likewise in Torah. The entire Torah is included in the Ten Commandments, and the Ten Commandments themselves are included in the first word “Anochi,” which itself is included in the first letter (the “Aleph”) of the word “Anochi.” Thus the letter “aleph” is the seminal point which includes the entire Torah. Afterwards, the Torah is distinguished and separated into its various particular laws and details.

Yet another instance is prayer. Before praying a Jew must include himself in and associate himself together with all other Jews; this is the concept of Ahavas Yisroel — the love of a fellow Jew. Thus, before prayer a Jew is bound together with, and included with, all other Jews — this is the same concept as the seminal point in which the later particulars are included. Afterwards a Jew must expand this into the differing levels and “rungs” of prayer, leading up to the Shemoneh Esreh where he stands “as a servant before his Master.”

3. The idea of kindling the Chanukah lights in the choicest manner possible provides the answer to those who question why it is specifically in our times that we make the concept of “love your fellowman as yourself” such a crucial issue. That it is an important matter is unquestionable: Hillel Hazaken, and later Rabbi Akivah, stressed its central position in Judaism. But if its importance demands that such a tumult as to make a campaign out of it be made — then surely it should have been more prominent in the times of Hillel and R. Akiva, or at least in the times of the Baal Shem Tov or the Alter Rebbe. Why now do we make such a fuss and initiate a whole campaign about it?

Despite these type of questions we see that the Previous Rebbe did instruct us to involve ourselves in this — — to speak to others and influence them regarding it with the greatest of enthusiasm. This instruction holds no matter in what language — as long as the full concept of “love your fellowman as yourself” is spread.

And the answer for those who question why it is specifically now that we should make such a campaign comes from the Chanukah lights. In the times of the Talmud, the custom was to kindle only one light each night for the entire household. Kindling more than one each night is referred to in the Talmud as fulfilling the Mitzvah in the choicest manner — for those who are especially zealous. Many generations later, the Ramah, whose decisions are binding on us till this very generation, states that to kindle the lights in the manner referred to in the Talmud as especially choice, and done only by those especially zealous, (i.e. adding one light each night), is nowadays a “simple, unquestioned custom,” for all Jews.8 Likewise with the idea of Ahavas Yisroel. Nowadays, following the directive of the Previous Rebbe, it has become a “simple, unquestioned custom” for everybody to be totally involved in Ahavas Yisroel.

The explanation for this is as expounded above. These concepts were always present, but in a concealed, seminal form. Only later, when they become revealed do they become expanded and differentiated.

4. The inner, esoteric portion of Torah is called the soul of the Torah, comparable to the soul of a person. Just as a person’s soul gives light and vitality to his body, even though a Jew’s body without it is still complete and holy, so too the inner portion of the Torah gives illumination and vitality to the revealed portion. Thus the inner portion, Chassidus, is comparable to a light, and just as nowadays the Mitzvah of the Chanukah lights is observed in the choicest manner possible, (the expansion of the previous bare minimum of one light a night), so too today, Chassidus must be learned in as expanded a manner as possible, with the greatest involvement and enthusiasm.

The illumination that comes from the soul must be completely revealed in all things. For example, the physical act of giving Tzedakah, or the kindling of the Shabbos and Chanukah lights, must be done with the strength and illumination of the soul. And the illumination should be to the degree that “the skin of his face sent forth beams” [said of Moshe when he came down from Mt. Sinai with the two tablets].9 Also, as the Talmud Yerushalmi (Shabbos Ch. 8 Halachah 1) relates of R. Yehudah that his face shone because he had discovered a new matter in Torah.10

The lesson from “the choicest manner” becoming a “simple, unquestioned custom” teaches us that everything should be done in the choicest manner. For example, when learning Torah or giving Tzedakah, do not put a limit on your efforts or your generosity.11 Instead, taking the lesson from Chanukah, everything should be done in the choicest manner possible — transcending all limits.

SHABBOS VAYIGASH | 6 -13 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 14th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 3:59 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 15th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:57 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 3:59 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:03 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon, Wed– Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Tue Shacharis 6:50 AM /FAST OF 10th TEVES BEGINS 6:11 AM 
Sun,Mon,Wed, Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv
Tue Mincha 3:45 PM, Maariv/Fast Ends 4:55 PM /FAST OF 10th TEVES

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor of Hey Teves, Chabad Holiday of Books!

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Mr Paul  and Tamar Azous  and Mr Eli and Elana  Duban for co-sponsoring this week’s meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – WED DEC 19th 7:30 PM
Winter Scarf Making at the Mod Apartments.  mherbstman@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

BNEI AKIVA - MOSHAV A’LEVY OPEN HOUSE IN SEATTLE WED DEC 19th 7 PM
More info and RSVP: 
www.MoshavAlevy.org/openhouse

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
www.SeattleHebrewAcademy.org

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR VAYIGASH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507828/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Vayigash-5th-Day-of-Teves-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

The beginning of this week’s parshah speaks of the encounter between Yehudah and Yosef — Vayigash eilav Yehudah [“And Yehudah approached him”]. This event can be interpreted on three different levels.

a) From Yehudah’s perspective: Yehudah was under the erroneous impression that Yosef was an Egyptian, second in command only to Pharaoh. His approach towards Yosef therefore was as one who wished to convince a non-Jewish ruler to release Binyamin.

b) In actuality: In truth, Yehudah was not dealing with a non-Jewish ruler, but with the tzaddik, Yosef.

c) In the spiritual realms above: “Yehudah” is the name used to refer to every Jew (as we are called, “Yehudim”). The word “eilav” refers to the essence of G‑d, as the Sifri explains on the verse (Devarim 4:7), “All who call to Him (eilav)” — “To Him, not to His attributes.” The word “approach” stands for prayer, through which a Jew becomes attached to and unified with G‑d.

We have explained on many occasions that all interpretations of a single event are connected with one another. We will therefore explain the connection between these three explanations, and also the practical implication and lesson contained therein regarding how to help us serve G‑d better.

We must first explain the relevance of the first of these three interpretations. Yehudah’s approach was based on a misunderstanding of the situation, based on his inability to identify Yosef. His approach nevertheless provides an eternal lesson for us.

This is because the Torah is eternal, and everything written in it is also eternal. This can be seen clearly from the Rogachover’s analysis of Moshe’s oath to never return to Egypt, which was later annulled in order to allow Moshe to take the Bnei Yisrael out. If one would make an oath today “like Moshe’s oath,” it would nevertheless be valid. The reason for this is that once something is written in Torah, it acquires eternal significance. Similarly in our case, since Yehudah’s misimpression was recorded in the Torah, it is of everlasting importance.

Furthermore, the lengthy account in the first part of the parshah is exclusively according to Yehudah’s mistaken impression. This shows us that not only can we derive a lesson from his perspective, but that it contains the lesson of primary importance.

What is this lesson? Yehudah thought that he was dependent upon the approval of a non-Jewish ruler in order to help Binyamin. This is similar to the status of the entire Jewish people in exile, when we depend on the kindness of the non-Jewish nations around us in order to lead our lives as Jews in peace and comfort.

The reality of the situation, though, was that Yehudah was really not dependent on a non-Jew at all. This ruler, as he found out later, was really Yosef, and therefore a Jew was really in charge. The same applies to the Jewish people in exile. Although it appears that the non-Jewish nations are in control, in reality the Jew is the baal habayis of the world, and he has the ability to influence the nations to carry out his will.

How does the Jew acquire such an amazing power? This is because he has attached himself to G‑d. His strength is therefore not his alone, but that of G‑d Himself. And G‑d, who is the “King of all kings,” guides the nations of the world to act according to His will and the will of the Jewish people.

With this we can understand the connection between the three levels of interpretation listed above. Even when the Jewish people are in exile (“a”), it is revealed that it is the Jew who is really in control (“b”). And how does the Jew acquire this power? — through his connection with G‑d (“c”).

This lesson (that even in exile, the Jew is baal habayis over the world) is especially stressed on Shabbos Vayigash. In addition to reading the first part of the parshah — as we do on the previous Shabbos, Monday and Thursday — we read the entire parshah, as well as the beginning of Parshas Vayechi at Minchah.

Later in the parshah, Pharaoh himself tells Yosef that he is giving “the choicest part of the land of Egypt” for him and his family. In the end of the parshah (in today’s portion), the land is actually given to them, “as Pharaoh commanded.” The last verse of the parshahconcludes, “And Yisrael lived in Goshen in the land of Egypt, and they inherited it and multiplied in great numbers.” This statement is followed in Parshas Vayechi by the verse, “And Yaakov lived in the land of Egypt for 17 years,” meaning that the best years of his life (“17” equaling the numerical value of “good” — tov) were those years spent in Egypt. These verses show that the nations themselves provided the Jews with great prosperity, even in exile.

All other exiles stem from, and are compared to the Egyptian exile. From all this we learn that even when we are in exile, the nations themselves will provide for all of our needs, both material and spiritual.

Ultimately, of course, this is insufficient. Although we have all good things both materially and spiritually, the main thing is missing — we are still in exile! Everything is insignificant when compared to the tremendous pain of exile! Parshas Vayechi is therefore followed by Shmos, which is the parshah and the book which deals with redemption.

2. Until now we have discussed the lesson of Parshas Vayigash vis-à-vis our status in exile. The main lesson, however, regards how this is a preparation for redemption.

This can be understood in view of another explanation given in Chassidus of the approach of Yehudah to Yosef, Vayigash eilav Yehudah. It is explained that the difference between Yehudah and Yosef is analogous to that between the earth and the heavens, inanimate objects and plant life, action and study. Which is higher, the aspect of Yehudah or that of Yosef? The verse which begins our parshah implies that Yosef is higher than Yehudah, since he must be approached. On the other hand, the Haftorah (Yechezkel 37:19,24)implies that Yehudah is higher: “I took the stick of Yosef...and placed upon it the stick of Yehudah...and my servant Dovid [from the tribe of Yehudah] will rule over them.”

In reality both are true, but in two different eras. During the time of exile, Yosef (the heavens, plant life, study) is higher, but in the Messianic Age, the superiority of Yehudah (the earth, inanimate objects, action) will be revealed.

The advantage of the realm of action is hinted to in G‑d’s statement regarding the world (Isaiah 43:7), “It is for My glory that I have created it, formed it, and also made it (af asisiv).” These three expressions (created, formed and made — borosiv, yetzartiv, asisiv) correspond to the three realms of Beriah, Yetzirah and Asiyah. These in turn correspond to the three realms of human activity — thought, speech and deed.

There is a great difference between the lowest of these three realms and the higher two. Thought and speech are similar in that they both are connected with the thinker and the speaker. Action, however, primarily deals with the object being acted upon. Similarly, there is a qualitative difference between Asiyah and the more spiritual realms of Beriah and Yetzirah. This is the significance of the word “also,” or af (“also made it”), which separates the first two expressions from the third. This separation highlights the fact that the realm of action (Asiyah) cannot be compared with the other two.

The same point can be seen in the shape of the Hebrew letter hay. The hay is composed of three lines which represent thought, speech and action. There is a space, however, between one of the lines and the other two. This sole line corresponds to action, which is distinct and removed from thought and speech.

This all brings out how much higher the aspect of Yosef is over that of Yehudah. There is, however, a tremendous advantage which Yehudah has over Yosef — an advantage which can be clearly seen by the comparison with Asiyah. Although it is the lowest of the worlds, Asiyah is the ultimate purpose for the creation of all the worlds. And this goal is to make a dwelling place for G‑d specifically through the realm of action.

According to this, the gap between the third aspect and the other two is for the opposite reason. Asisiv cannot be grouped with the other two because it is far superior, to the extent that the reason for the existence of the other two is solely for the existence of the third. This is also conveyed by the word af mentioned above, even in the plain meaning of the verse (“I also made it”), which is that the word af comes to add something much greater.

The same can be said for the third line of the letter hay, which transforms the letter dalet to a hay. The letter dalet stands for poverty (dalus), and the one line transforms it into the letter hay, which is contained in G‑d’s name.

These two extremes of low and high are characteristic of exile in general. On the one hand we see that the world gets lower and lower the longer we are in exile. Simultaneously, though, there is a continuous addition of Torah and mitzvos which brings us closer and closer to redemption.

This duality of exile is also seen in the usage of the word af. The Midrash (Eichah Rabbah1:57) says,

“The Jewish people were hit with the word af, as it is written (Lev. 26:41), ‘I will also (af)walk with them sporadically.’ They were also comforted with the word af, as it is written (Ibid. 26:44), ‘Yet, also (af) then, when they are in the land of their enemies, I will not abhor them nor spurn them....’ ”

The Alter Rebbe explains that the word af itself indicates something negative. The positive side of af comes only when the negative has been reversed and transformed into something positive, a process which we perform via our G‑dly service in exile.

With this we can understand how the prosperity of Yaakov and his family in Egypt represents not just the positive side of exile, but the preparation for redemption.

In general, serving G‑d despite the difficulties of exile shows the tremendous strength of the bond between the Jewish people and G‑d. The special type of service described in Parshas Vayigash represents a transformation of the negative side of exile (Pharaoh, Egypt, etc.) to the positive, as Pharaoh himself gave the choicest land to them. It is this transformation which is the preparation for redemption.

This is actually not just the preparation for redemption, but part of the redemption itself — the transformation of exile itself to redemption (from golah to geulah). All of this will be revealed when Mashiach comes, and we will see how all the difficulties of exile were brought upon us only to make the revelations of redemption that much greater.

This transformation of exile through the assistance of the non-Jewish nations to Jews has been seen in our generation in a large measure. The reason for this is that before redemption, we are given a “taste” of what the redemption will be like; and the closer we get, the greater the revelations are.

We see this in particular regarding the Previous Rebbe, who after being hounded by the Russian government, came to this country, where he was free to keep Torah and mitzvos.Now after the “Year of Miracles” (shnas nissim) and in the “Year in Which ‘I Will Show You Wonders’ ” (shnas niflaos arenu) that same government is allowing — and even assisting — Jews to leave their difficult situation in exchange for freedom. In this way they are experiencing a taste of redemption even during exile, similar to the prosperity of Yaakov even though he was in Egypt. As mentioned above, the reason for this is because we are standing on the very threshold of the redemption.

This same point also finds expression in this particular time — the Shabbos immediately following Chanukah. The Chanukah Menorah is lit only after it becomes dark outside. The lighting of the Menorah represents how every Jew helps illuminate the darkness of exile through Torah and mitzvos. In addition, the Menorah is lit facing the outside, representing the transformation of the darkness of the world to light and holiness.

3. As mentioned above, the superiority of the realm of action will be revealed in the Messianic Age. Therefore, in view of our proximity to the redemption, we must add even more in concrete action.

One of the main aspects of redemption is the building of the Third Beis HaMikdash. This is closely connected with this Shabbos in two ways: 1) It is the Shabbos after Chanukah, which is connected with the Chanukah (inauguration) of the Beis HaMikdash, and 2) Parshas Vayigash and the advantage of Yehudah over Yosef, which corresponds to that of inanimate objects over plant life. This matches the advantage of the Beis HaMikdash over the Mishkan, since the former is made of stone, whereas the latter consisted of wood.

Therefore, our preparation for building the Beis HaMikdash should involve something similar, i.e. building new houses (and adding to existing houses) which will be used for Torah, prayer and gemilus chassadim — “miniature sanctuaries” (mikdash me’at). This means both public buildings and private dwellings, including the rooms of even small children. They should all be made into homes in which Torah, prayer and gemilus chassadim penetrate and fill every corner.

This idea is contained in the well-known term, Bayis Molei Seforim, a “home filled with books.” Every home should contain not just a Siddur and Chumash, but a large number of holy books. Furthermore, the holy content of the books should fill and penetrate the entirehome, even the areas which are empty of books. And although the house contains other objects as well, they are all secondary and nullified to the books. Even more so, the effect of the books is felt even outside the home, just like the mezuzah, which protects its owner both in the home and outside.

This is connected with the Fifth of Teves, which is a particularly auspicious time for holy books: when the Federal Court issued a favorable ruling regarding the library of the Rebbeim. May it be G‑d’s will that the job be completed and that all writings of the Rebbeim be returned home. And those who have been involved in this until now should continue until they are totally successful, in the words of our Sages, “To the one who began the mitzvah we say, ‘Finish it!’ ” And G‑d, who tells us that He also fulfills all the mitzvos,should Himself finish what He started and ensure their success.

And may all our positive resolutions regarding buildings of holiness hasten even more the arrival of Mashiach, and may we be lead by Yaakov Avinu and the Previous Rebbe and all the tzaddikim to the Holy Land immediately.

Shabbos Miketz Rosh Chodesh Teves - Chanukah | 29 Kislev - 6 Teves, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  DEC 7th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 3:59 PM

SHABBOS - SAT DEC 8th /ROSH CHODESH/
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:53 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 3:59 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 5:03 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM /ROSH CHODESH/
Mon– Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Sun -Thu Mincha 4:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall, in honor Chanukah!

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite Thank you to Alter and Debbie Levitin for sponsoring this week’s meat cholent. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Ben Dershowitz on the 20th anniversary of his Bar Mitzvah at Chabad House! May he grow in Torah and Maasim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Winter Camp registration for the 2018 season is now live!  
We have an awesome program planned this year, and can't wait for you to be a part of it! This is a special Jewish Winter Day Camp opportunity for boys (3.5-9 years old) and girls (3.5-12 years old), from Monday, December 24th through Friday, December 28th. Some of our amazing out of town staff from this summer are returning, to make the CGIS winter experience as much fun (if not more!) as this past summer. Space is limited, so register today!  Cost: $250.00 Registration: $50.00 
https://www.ultracamp.com/clientlogin.aspx?idCamp=562&campCode=gis&fbclid=IwAR39KiUkLODOkYBOO2mjmW3SBtoK7XbGerk2yjh5Lxh48YYEP4P-DqaOqnk

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – WED DEC 19th 7:30 PM
Winter Scarf Making at the Mod Apartments.  mherbstman@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:10 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה 

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

18ый Ежегодный Ханукальный Вечер -SUN DEC 9th 4:00 PM
Chabad Jewish Russian Center 1114 NE Perkins Way, Shoreline WA 98155 . Design your own t-shirt. Hot Donuts, Latkes, Lechaim. RSVP 
rabbi@shalomseattle.org

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.   

Mercaz Chanukah Jam Sun, Dec 9th from 4pm - 8pm
Stop by Mercaz's annual Chanukah bash! Light up dance party, poker, kids movie, donut decorating, latkes - we'll have it all!  Our Annual Poker Tournament fundraiser will have the same rules as last year. There will be an $18 buy in, half the proceeds go to Mercaz and the winner will keep the other half.  Suggested Entrance Cover: A canned good for a donation to JFS Foodbank! $8 donation per person, $18 per family. Everyone is welcome. Give what you are able! Pay at the door or at: 
https://mercazseattle.shulcloud.com/event/chanukah-party.html

BNEI AKIVA - MOSHAV A’LEVY OPEN HOUSE IN SEATTLE WED DEC 19th 7 PM
More info and RSVP: 
www.MoshavAlevy.org/openhouse

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
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Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
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WEEKLY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN – “GROW”
The Grow curriculum was created by Chabad International and has been thoughtfully designed by top experts in the fields of education and parenting, to empower kids with the skills and strengths to be leaders and to make a positive impact on the world around them. We will be offering the seven-week program three times during the school year. To learn more about how your child can join, contact Mrs. Shimona Davidoff at (206) 941-7037.

SEATTLE HEBREW ACADEMY 70th ANNIVERSARY GALA SUN DEC 16th5PM
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LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
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SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
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REBBE’S SICHO FOR MIKETZ
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507826/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Mikeitz-Shabbos-Chanukah-28th-Day-of-Kislev-5751-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

In connection with Chanukah candles, our Sages relate, “One who regularly [lights] candles will have sons who are Torah scholars.” Rashi associates this statement with the verse, “For a mitzvah is a lamp and Torah is light,” explaining that the ‘lamp’ of the mitzvahof Shabbos and Chanukah candles brings the ‘light’ of Torah.”

The commentaries question what is the rationale that associates Chanukah candles with sons who are Torah scholars. Although Rashi cites a prooftext from the Tanach, that prooftext merely indicates that a connection exists, it does not explain that connection. Furthermore, the association with the prooftext is seemingly problematic. How is it possible to say that the “lamp of mitzvah” will bring the “light of Torah,” when a lamp is less powerful than light?1

mitzvah is like a lone and single light, limited in its scope. In contrast, the Torah is unlimited.2 Furthermore, “study is great because it brings to deed.” Thus, it is difficult to understand: Why does Rashi explain that the “lamp of mitzvah” leads to the light of Torah. If anything, the opposite is true, the light of Torah brings one to the mitzvos.3

There is another difficulty with Rashi’s statement: On the surface, the phrase, “a mitzvah is a lamp” relates to all the mitzvos. Why does Rashi limit it to the Chanukah and Shabbos candles?

These difficulties can be resolved through a deeper understanding of the mitzvah of Chanukah candles. Although, on an apparent level, the miracle of the military defeat of the Greeks was a greater miracle, our Sages associated the commemoration of the Chanukah with the kindling of candles to emphasize how the essence of the war and the Jews’ victory was spiritual. The Greeks sought to wipe out, not the Jews as a people, but rather, the Jew’s observance of Torah and mitzvos, “to make [the Jews] forget Your Torah and make them violate the decrees of Your will.”

Similarly, the Jews’ victory reflects the victory of “the lamp of mitzvah” and “the light of Torah” as they are reinforced by a commitment of mesirus nefesh. Thus, since the Chanukah candles represent a renewal — and an enhancement — of the commitment to Torah and mitzvos as a whole, through the lamp of this mitzvah comes, “the light of Torah,” sons who study Torah. This “light of Torah” leads to the fulfillment of all the mitzvos for “study is great because it leads to deed.”

Further explanation is, however, required. Ultimately, any mitzvah, even a mitzvah which — like Chanukah candles — relates to Torah and mitzvos in their totality, is merely a “lamp” which is limited when compared to “the light of Torah.” In particular, this limitation is seen with regard to the mitzvah of Chanukah candles which are associated with a specific time, the eight days of Chanukah, and within those days, with a limited time in which they are required to burn. If so, how is it possible for a limited mitzvah of this nature to bring about “the light of Torah,” sons who are Torah scholars.

This difficulty can, however, be resolved by a comparison between the Chanukah candles and the candles lit in the Menorah of the Beis HaMikdash. In regard to the kindling of the Menorah, the Torah commands us to “keep the lamp burning continuously.” Although the mitzvah was for the Menorah to burn only at night, “from the evening until the morning,”4since it was lit each afternoon, it can be considered as “burning continuously.”

We see a similar concept in regard to the korban tomid (the daily sacrifice offered each morning and afternoon). Literally, this phrase means “a continuous offering.” In this instance as well, since the offering was always brought in the morning and the evening, it could be considered “continuous.”

There is, however, a deeper dimension to the use of this term. The implication is that since these mitzvos are always fulfilled at the required time, their influence is continuous, having an effect throughout the entire day.5

There are other examples of this principle: When one wears a garment that requires tzitzis,the obligation to fulfill the mitzvah of tzitzis applies throughout the entire day. The mitzvahis fulfilled for the entire day by donning a garment and reciting the blessing at one particular time and then one continues to wear the garment throughout the day.

A second example: We are obligated to give tzedakah continuously throughout the day, whenever we meet a poor person (even when we meet the same poor person several times a day). Nevertheless, we find that — to help the poor people — our Sages established certain times for tzedakah to be given.

A more inclusive example: We are obligated to study Torah every moment of the day and night. Nevertheless, the overwhelming majority of the Jews fulfill this mitzvah by studying at fixed times throughout the day. Only unique individuals like Rabbi Shimon bar Yochaiand his colleagues are on the level of Torasom Umanosom (“Torah study is their livelihood”) and thus, study Torah the entire day. Most people fulfill the charge, “This Torah shall not depart from your mouths” by studying “a portion in the morning and a portion in the evening.”6

These examples reflect that although the observance of these mitzvos is limited to a specific time, when they are fulfilled at that time, the influence of that mitzvah continues throughout a greater period. The same concept can apply in regard to the entire year; for example, although the mitzvah of dwelling in a sukkah is observed for merely a short period, seven days, its influence continues throughout the year.7

The same applies in regard to Chanukah candles. They — like the candles of the BeisHaMikdash with which they are associated — are “a constant lamp.” Furthermore, the Chanukah candles possess an advantage over the candles of the Beis HaMikdash for as the Ramban explains, “the Chanukah candles will never be nullified and are fulfilled at present even while we are in exile.” In contrast, the fulfillment of the mitzvah of lighting the candles of the Beis HaMikdash was nullified with the destruction of that structure.

Thus, although the mitzvah of lighting Chanukah candles is associated with a limited time — eight days — and also, a limited time of day — the half hour when the candles must burn, their influence continues throughout the entire eight days of Chanukah, throughout the entire year, and indeed, throughout the entire continuum of time.

This concept itself requires explanation: Why should a mitzvah which is limited in the times (and places) when it must be fulfilled have an influence which is unlimited?8

This difficulty can be resolved within the context of a larger scope: Each Jew’s soul, even as it is enclothed in the body, is an “actual part of G‑d from above.” Just as G‑d Himself is unlimited, “the actual part of G‑d” enclothed within the body is also unlimited.9 Therefore, it is difficult to understand: How can a Jew be asked to serve G‑d in a limited manner?10

The explanation of this concept is as follows: A Jew’s service of G‑d is by nature unlimited. We should serve G‑d with every aspect of our being, in every situation in which we are found. Nevertheless, since we live within a world of limitation, our service of G‑d, i.e., performance of mitzvos, also takes on the limits of the world at large. This, however, applies only to the actual performance of the mitzvos, the bond with G‑d established through the performance of the mitzvos is above all limitation.11

The unlimited dimension of the mitzvos is expressed, not only by the fulfillment of all the mitzvos together, but rather, by the fulfillment of each individual mitzvah. Therefore, “a person who is in the midst of fulfilling one mitzvah is not obligated to fulfill all the other mitzvos” and, indeed, is considered to have fulfilled the other mitzvos as well. This is because G‑d’s will is expressed in each mitzvah, not as a particular element of a general category, but rather as an expression of the essence which connects one to His essential will as it exists above all limitations.

The infinite dimension of the mitzvos is further enhanced when a Jew fulfills the mitzvah as an expression of his unlimited desire to cling to G‑d, to love Him, “with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your might.”12 Thus, a Jew’s soul which is “a lamp of G‑d” is unlimited and it finds expression in the continuous performance of mitzvos whose inner dimension is unlimited.

The limitations of the actual performance of the mitzvah do not confine the unlimited potential of the Jewish soul. From this, we can infer that the influence generated by a mitzvah is also unbounded and therefore, continues even after the actual performance of the mitzvah has ceased.

Nevertheless, the unlimited dimension that exists within the performance of the mitzvos is not revealed on the limited plane of material existence. This is the uniqueness of the Chanukah candles. They reveal the continuous influence and unbounded potential of the mitzvos in an openly perceivable manner.

This is reflected in the perceivable light produced by the Chanukah candles which reveal in a manifest way how the performance of mitzvos contributes light to the Jewish home. Light, even light in this material world, is related to — and representative of — G‑d’s infinite light. This is expressed in the fact that one can continue lighting one candle from another ad infinitum.

Furthermore, each night of Chanukah, we add another candle, showing how we are constantly adding light, transcending even the limitations of holiness.13 In addition, the Chanukah candles are placed, “at the outside of the entrance to one’s home,” indicating how the light of holiness should not remained contained within one’s home and family, but should shine into the world at large. This shows the unbounded nature of the light of the Chanukah candles, and reflects how they extend beyond the limits of holiness.14 This is further emphasized by the fact that they are lit at night and shine into the darkness, indicating how the light of holiness shines into the darkness of the world.

The unlimited nature of the Chanukah lights is further emphasized by the fact that eight candles are lit15 (in contrast to the seven lit in the Beis HaMikdash). Seven represents a complete cycle of the natural world. Eight, in contrast, represents a step above that order. Since the Chanukah candles reflect an unlimited potential, they have the power to draw down the light of holiness into the darkness of the world, into the public domain, the area “at the outside of the entrance to one’s home.”

The potential for the Chanukah candles to have an unlimited effect stems from the fact that the miracle of Chanukah came as a result of the Jews’ mesirus nefesh, their willingness to give themselves over to holiness without reservation. This commitment made it possible for the infinite potential of “the lamp of mitzvah” and “the light of Torah” to be revealed.

Based on the above, we can understand why a person who is meticulous in his observance of the mitzvah of Chanukah candles will merit sons who are Torah scholars. Since the mitzvah of Chanukah candles brings a revelation of the infinite light of Torah,16this infinity is expressed in that the light of Torah is revealed, not only for oneself, but also, for one’s children. Indeed, in this context, the word “sons” can be interpreted as “descendants,” i.e., the revelation of the light of Torah continues in future generations as well.

Furthermore, it can be explained that the mitzvah of Chanukah candles brings out the infinite dimension that exists in all the mitzvos, revealing how they: a) draw G‑dliness down into this world; b) follow a pattern of continued growth; c) shine “the lamp of mitzvah and the light of Torah” at the outside of the entrance of one’s home, projecting this light into one’s surrounding environment.

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above and this week’s Torah portion, ParshasMikeitz. The word mikeitz means “At the conclusion of,” and thus expresses the concept of limitation. Indeed, Torah Or interprets mikeitz as relating to the limits that exist within Torah study. Yosef who reflects the potential for increase without any limitation allows the infinite dimension of Torah to be revealed. When, however, Yosef is “forgotten,” the Torah appears to be limited, and Yosef remains limited, confined in jail.17 Nevertheless, this is only a temporary situation, and ultimately, Yosef “leaves prison to rule,” and is given the potential to reveal his true unlimited nature.

This lesson is relevant for every Jew, for Yosef is also used as a name for the people as a whole. Thus, Yosef’s imprisonment in jail can reflect each Jew’s confinement in a physical body in this material world. Here, “those imprisoned by the king,” i.e., each Jew whose soul is sent into this world by G‑d, King of kings, “are confined.” This, however, is not a Jew’s true place and he can “leave prison to rule,” to take control over his environment.

Based on the above, we can interpret our Sages’ statement, “One who goes to a city should adopt its customs” as follows: When the soul descends within the limits of the body and the material world, it should accept those limits, but not because they confine the soul, but rather because the soul is on a mission, to elevate and refine the world.

The same applies to the concept of “the law of the land is your law.” A Jew must submit to the law of the land, not because it has real power over him, but because by doing so, he can elevate it and use it as a medium to spread righteousness and justice throughout the world, influencing the entire populace to accept the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants. In this manner, the Jews and Torah will take control of the world at large. It will be revealed how following the laws of the Torah will bring benefit to any country which does so. This will hasten the coming of the time when it will be revealed throughout the world that, “the sovereignty will be the L‑rd’s” in the Era of the complete Redemption.

* * *

3. In this context, a lesson can be derived from the special Torah reading associated with Chanukah, the sacrifices offered by the fourth of the Nesi’im, the Nasi of Reuven. Reuven was Yaakov’s firstborn. A firstborn is by nature, a leader, one who influences his brothers, an example whose conduct they emulate. Similarly, the word Nasi means “prince” or “leader.” Thus, a reading connected with the Nesi’im and in particular, the Nasi of Reuven, reflects the leadership potential each Jew possesses, the ability to influence the world at large.

The fourth day of Chanukah also contributes an additional concept. Four alludes to the four corners of the world and makes each person realize that these are his responsibility. His service must encompass all four corners of the world, making the world like a closed memwhich will prevent the intrusion of any undesirable elements.

It is human nature that when a person who is involved in a particular issue confronts any new concept, he immediately looks for the connection it shares with the idea with which he was originally involved. A Jew must constantly be involved in the yearning and desire for the coming of Mashiach. “Each day, we must wait for him, that he come.” Therefore, it is natural for a Jew to look for a connection to Mashiach’s coming in every event or concept which he encounters. This also applies regarding Chanukah. Since the Chanukah miracle took place in the Beis HaMikdash, its commemoration arouses an even greater yearning for the era when the Menorah will be kindled again in the Third Beis HaMikdash.

Similarly, there is a connection between the above and this week’s portion, Parshas Mikeitz. When a Jew hears the name mikeitz, because he is constantly yearning for Mashiach’s coming, he immediately associates it with the word keitz which refers to the time of Mashiach’s coming. Similarly, when he hears the vision of the Menorah mentioned in the Haftorah, he immediately associates it with the Menorah of the Beis HaMikdash.

This is enhanced by the fourth light of Chanukah which alludes to the fourth redemption and heightens our expectation of the time when we will, “kindle lamps in Your Holy courtyard,” with the coming of Mashiach. May it be in the immediate future.

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