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Parshas Naso | 11-18 Sivan , 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAY 25th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:34 pm

SHABBOS SAT MAY 26th 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:13 am/
Mincha 8:34 pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 1
Maariv/Havdalah 9:53 pm  

Weekday Services 
Sun 9 am
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Mon -Thu Mincha 8:30 pm, followed immediately by Maariv /SUMMER SCHEDULE

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush this week is sponsored by Dr. Vernon and Liz Neppe, in honor of their wedding anniversary!! They will also sponsor the delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.   Mazel Tov and best wishes to the Neppe’s !! Seuda Slishit.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Shmuly and Chaya-Winner Levitin, on the bris of their new son. May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim! Mazel Tov to Rabbi SB and Chani Levitin and the entire Levitin family!

FARBRENGEN ALERT–12 SIVAN – “TASHLUMIM SHAVUOT”  FRI MAY 25th  6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor of Sivan 12th , the last of the seven days allotted for the offerings brought in conjunction with the Shavuot pilgrimage. 
www.chabad.org/calendar. We welcome Tachanun back to CSTL on Sunday. Also, in honor of wedding of the Rebbe’s parents, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson and Rebbetzin Chana Yanovsky on Sivan 11th , 1900.

B’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom with Rabbi Mendy Levitin – 7:45 PM SHABBOS AFTERNOON
Rabbi Mendy Levitin will introduce you to one of the most fundamental works of the Rebbe. The Chasidus Discourse b’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom is based on the idea of Ana nasiv malka — “I will choose the king.” - Stepping Above Self by Looking Beyond the Big Picture”.  The discourse was originally delivered by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson 11 Nissan, 5731 (1971). For Men and Women. 

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

MAKEUP & MIMOSAS – LADIES NIGHT OUT JUNE 17th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Chanie Meyer.RSVP to Marave:  
MHerbstman@gmail.com .

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 1½ to 12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS 

Cardozo Society L'Dor V'Dor Thursday, June 7, 6 pm
Join in honoring Washington Supreme Court Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud with the Cardozo Society's 2018 L'Dor V'Dor Award., at Foster Pepper, 1111 3rd Ave., #3000, Seattle.

One People One Heart Sunday, June 10, 7 pm
Chabad centers of Washington invite you to an evening of unity and inspiration. Keynoter: bestselling author Dr. Joseph Telushkin. Also featuring author Paula Begoun, Seattle Hebrew Academy Head of School Rivy Poupko Kletenik, Island Synagogue Rabbi Yechezkel Kornfeld, and radio host Michael Medved. at The Westin Seattle, 1900 5th Ave., Seattle

Ashkenazi Jewish Genetic Diseases Sunday, June 10, 11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Join with Hadassah to learn about genetic conditions among Ashkenazim. With Gary Frohlich of Sanofi Genzyme., at Talaris Conference Center, 4000 NE 41st St., Seattle.. Kosher Lunch Buffet by Island Crust .**Doors open for check-in at 11am. Limited Seating, RSVP Early!
https://secure2.convio.net/wzoa/site/Ticketing;jsessionid=00000000.app260a?view=Tickets&id=103953&NONCE_TOKEN=A8DD8DE12AC52B92DC7FDAB1FD500E8A

 SEPHARDIC RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Register now for 2018-2019 Sephardic Hebrew Religious School at the SJCC in Mercer Island!  Sephardic Religious School 1st day begins on Sunday, September 2, 2018 at 9:45 A.M at the J.C.C. [Grades K - 8]

New Sunday Night 7 PM Series for Men & Women at Yavneh Educational Center
June 3, taught by Marlene Kaplan, "Conversational Street Hebrew for Beginners Part 1"
June 24 taught by Judy Balint, "Israel Up Close and Personal"
www.bcmhseattle.org

Camp Yavneh June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com  


REBBE’S SICHO FOR NASO
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507771/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Naso-13th-of-Sivan-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

1. 1 There are many points of connection between this Shabbos and the giving of the Torah. Firstly, Shabbos elevates and adds a dimension of completion to the days of the previous week; in this instance, contributing such a quality to the holiday of Shavuos.

Also, today is the final day of the days of tashlumim for this holiday. Tashlumim which means “compensation” is also related to the concept of perfection, i.e., these days — and particularly, the final day, “for everything follows the conclusion” — can add perfection to the experience of the season of the giving of the Torah. Surely, this is true when this final day falls on Shabbos.

A point of connection can also be found in the name of this week’s Torah portion, Naso,which literally means “lift up.” The portion begins with the command,2 “lift up the heads..” This reflects the potential Torah study has to elevate our intellectual faculties and, through the medium of the intellect, to elevate every aspect of our being, even our feet. Thus even our service which is involved in worldly things — the fulfillment of mitzvos and activity in the spirit of “All your deeds shall be for the sake of Heaven” and “Know Him in all your ways” — can be lifted up through Torah study.3

A connection to the giving of the Torah is also evident from the chapter of Pirkei Avosstudied this week. On this Shabbos, we begin again the study of Pirkei Avos. Although Pirkei Avos was studied as a preparation for the giving of the Torah, after — and as a result of — the giving of the Torah, we begin again, stating how, “Moshe received the Torah from Sinai and conveyed it....” Furthermore, the chapter also emphasizes the influence of the Torah on the world at large as the second Mishnah of that chapter states: “The world stands on three things: on Torah, on Divine service, and on deeds of kindness.”

Thus, at present, in continuation of the service of the giving of the Torah, we — every member of the Jewish people — can renew our approach to the Torah. In particular, this is expressed through the three4 mediums of Torah, Divine service, and deeds of kindness which allow the world to stand. Our renewal of our approach to the Torah must be reflected in these three services which in turn will bring about renewal in the world at large.5

To explain: On the verse: “In the third month, on this day, the children of Israel came to Mount Sinai,” Rashi comments, “Rather than ‘on this day,’ it should have said, ‘On that day.’ This choice of wording teaches us that we should regard the words of Torah as new, as though they were given today.”

This is, indeed, the truth; each day, G‑d gives the Torah anew as reflected in our description of Him as “the Giver of the Torah,” in the morning blessings using the present tense. Just as the creation of the world at large is renewed each day, so too the giving of the Torah is renewed each day.6

In a general sense, the renewal of the Torah for the entire year comes at the time of the giving of the Torah, and this generates the potential for the particular renewal of the Torah each day.7 The renewal of the Torah allows one’s study to be endowed with pleasure and vitality; to quote our Sages’ expression, “it will be like a new tabloid which everyone rushes to read.”

In this context, we can appreciate the renewal of our connection to the Torah on the Shabbos that follows the giving of the Torah as reflected in the fact that we read ParshasNaso (which speaks of “lifting up the heads” of the Jewish people) and we begin again the study of Pirkei Avos, stating how “Moshe received the Torah from Sinai.”

Nevertheless, the question can be asked: What is the uniqueness of contribution made by the present Shabbos to the renewal of the giving of the Torah?

The resolution of this question requires the explanation of another concept. At the giving of the Torah, the entire Torah was given; not only the Ten Commandments, but the entire Written Law and the entire Oral Law, including every concept to be developed by an experienced Torah scholar in subsequent generations. The manner in which the entire Torah was communicated, however, was one of gradual revelation. On Mount Sinai, the general principle was stated, and it was necessary for the “experienced Torah scholars” of the subsequent generations to reveal all the particular laws that were implied.8

Indeed, even the Torah concepts that will be revealed in the Era of the Redemption, those which Mashiach will teach the people, were given at Mount Sinai. At that time, however, they were not revealed and, therefore, in the Era of the Redemption, they will be perceived as “a new [dimension of the] Torah which will emerge from Me.”9

The renewal of the Torah will also bring about a renewal in the world at large as the prophet states, “The new heavens and the new earth which I10 will make.”

This indicates that the renewal of our connection to the Torah is expressed, not only in the reinforcement of the existing bond, but also in bringing out a new development, a new dimension that had not been revealed previously.

To explain in greater detail: Our Sages declare, “Whoever quotes a teaching in the name of its author (i.e., giving him credit for his achievement in revealing the concept), brings redemption to the world.” One of the explanations of this statement is that revealing Torah concepts which were previously hidden is comparable to redeeming them from exile. This redemption of Torah ideas leads to redemption within the world at large.

Nevertheless, the redemption which is brought about does not change the nature of the world entirely, on the contrary, the exile continues, and there is merely a foretaste of the ultimate redemption11 within the darkness of exile.12

Why is this so? Since the renewal (redemption) within Torah is not complete, the effect within the world at large is also imperfect. Even after a Torah scholar develops a new Torah concept, there are unfortunately, many other concepts lingering in exile. The ultimate state will be when “the new [dimension of the] Torah” will be revealed by G‑d.

Since G‑d will be the One bringing about the revelation, it will be complete, and therefore, it will bring about a complete state of revelation in the world at large, bringing into open manifestation the Divine life-energy which is latent within the world. At present, the essential Divine life-force which brings the world into being is distant and separate from the world itself, and is not revealed. In contrast, in the era of the Redemption, it will be openly manifest that I, G‑d’s essence, is the force that brings into being the heavens and the earth.13 In this manner, it will be revealed how this world is a dwelling for G‑d’s essence, the place where that essence will be openly revealed. Thus, in the Era of the Redemption, “Your master will not conceal Himself from you”; G‑d will reveal Himself14 without any veils or coverings.15

The renewal of the world at large that will take place in the Era of the Redemption parallels the renewal that will reflect the nature of “the new [dimension of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.” To explain: At the time of the giving of the Torah, the dimension of the Torah to be revealed in the Era of the Redemption was hidden.

Therefore, in regard to the G‑dliness revealed in the world at large, a significant dimension, the essential G‑dly life-force which brings the world into being, remained hidden. Although at the time of the giving of the Torah, the decree separating the spiritual realms from the physical was nullified, the very categories: spiritual realms and physical existence, were not nullified. Although there was a potential for one to influence the other, since G‑d’s essence was not revealed, the two remained fundamentally different entities.

In the Era of the Redemption, there will be a revelation of the essential qualities of these two entities which had remained hidden, bringing about a totally new aspect of revelation in the world at large. “The glory of G‑d will be revealed and all flesh will see together that the mouth of G‑d has spoken.” It will be revealed how the true being of “all flesh” is G‑d’s essence, the power which brings it into existence ex nihilo. At this point, there will be no difference between the spiritual realms and the material; on the contrary, the same essential G‑dliness will permeate them both.

In this context, we can appreciate the unique dimension of the renewal of our connection to Torah on the present Shabbos, and how that surpasses the renewal of our connection to the Torah associated with the giving of the Torah.

Shavuos reflects a renewal of our connection to the Torah as it was given. As such, just as when the Torah was given, much of the Torah remained hidden, so too, this connection reflects our connection to the Torah as many of the dimensions of the Torah are not openly revealed. In contrast, the Shabbos after the giving of the Torah reflects the potential to reveal these dimensions of the Torah, by human beings — the new concepts revealed by an experienced sage — and by G‑d, “the new [dimension of the] Torah” that will be revealed in the Era of the Redemption.

* * *

2. There is a connection to the above concepts in this week’s Torah reading, Parshas Nasowhich as mentioned above speaks of “lifting up the heads.” “The heads” refers to the study of the Torah; “lifting up the heads” to the elevation of the study of the Torah that comes about through the quality of ta’anug (pleasure). Ta’anug surpasses our intellectual faculties and thus has the power to add a new dimension to Torah study; indeed, to bring about a renewal of our connection to the Torah. Furthermore, this renewal relates to the ultimate renewal of the Torah in the Era of the Redemption, for then the reasons for the Torah commandments (ta’amei Torah) which are connected with pleasure will be revealed.

In particular, it is significant that the “lifting up of the heads” mentioned in Parshas Naso is associated with the census of the tribe of Levi. The Rambam writes that the spiritual service — and thus the all-inclusive bond with G‑d established thereby — of the tribe of Levi are not exclusive to that tribe:

Not only the tribe of Levi, but each and every person... whose generosity of spirit and knowing intellect brought him to separate himself and stand before G‑d to serve Him... and to know G‑d.... He becomes sanctified as “holy of holies.”

In the Era of the Redemption, the entire Jewish people will be on such a level, for as the Rambam writes, “In that Era... the occupation of the entire world (and surely, that of the Jewish people16 ) will be solely to know G‑d.”

A point of connection to the above concepts can also be found in relation to another subject mentioned in Parshas Naso, the laws of a nazir. Here, there is a direct reference to the imminence of Mashiach’s coming,17 for the law is that a person who states, “I will become a nazir on the day the son of David will come, must observe the nazir rites forever.” For every day might well be the day when, “the son of David comes.” This implies that the revelation of “the new [dimension of the] Torah which will emerge from Me,” should not be considered as an event of the future, but rather as a present and immediate matter.

The renewal that will be brought about in the world at large in the Era of the Redemption is also alluded to in Parshas Naso. This parshah describes the journeys of the Sanctuary in the desert, and also the construction of the Sanctuary. Significantly, the Sanctuary was constructed in a desert, a place unfit for human habitation. Thus constructing the Sanctuary in such a place alludes to the transformation of the lowest aspects of this world into a dwelling for Him.

In an ultimate sense, this will be revealed in the Era of the Redemption, when the entire world, not only the Beis HaMikdash, will be revealed as a dwelling for G‑d. For “on that day, G‑d will be One and His Name One.”

Parshas Naso also contains an allusion to the service that will lead to the revelation of “the new [dimension of the] Torah” in the Era of the Redemption. This revelation has its source in the spiritual potential possessed by each Jew. To explain: The verse “And a star shall shoot forth from Yaakov,” is interpreted as a reference to Mashiach, and also as a reference to each individual Jew. The Maor Ainayim reconciles these two interpretations, explaining that every Jew possesses a spark of Mashiach in his soul, his yechidah. Mashiach represents the yechidah of the world at large. Therefore, a Jew’s revelation of the yechidah of his individual soul leads to the revelation of the yechidah in the world at large, i.e., the coming of Mashiach.

This is alluded to in the census of the tribe of Levi — whose positive qualities are, as explained above, relevant to each and every Jew. In a census, there is no difference between individuals. Each person, whether great or small, is counted the same. This commonality results from the yechidah, the essence of the soul which every Jew possesses.18

This essential oneness is also reflected in the offerings of the Nesi’im which are described in the conclusion of the Torah reading. The Midrash explains that the desire of the Nesi’imto offer sacrifices was favorably received and G‑d considered it as if they all brought their sacrifices on the same day. The potential for this oneness stems from the level of yechidah.

A similar idea can be seen in Parshas Behaaloscha which we begin reading this afternoon. The Menorah in the Sanctuary is a symbol of the entire Jewish people. It has seven branches which reflect the seven categories of the Jewish people. Nevertheless, it was made of a single piece of gold, pointing to the fundamental unity which pervades the Jewish people as a whole.

This essential unity stemming from the level of yechidah is also associated with the giving of the Torah, for it was the unity of the Jewish people who camped before Mount Sinai, “as one man, with one heart,” that served as a necessary preparation for the Torah to have been given.

* * *

3. There is also a connection between the above concepts and the first chapter of Pirkei Avos which we begin studying this Shabbos. This chapter begins explaining the chain of our Torah heritage, how “Moshe received the Torah from Sinai and transmitted it,” and how subsequently, it was transmitted to the Jewish people in later generations. In this chain of transmission, each individual brought out a new dimension of the Torah that had not been revealed previously. This process of revelation points out a connection to the revelation of “the new [dimension of the] Torah which will emerge from Me.”

Among the other points of connection to the Era of the Redemption is the teaching studied before each chapter, “Every Jew has a portion in the World to Come,” which refers to the Era of the Resurrection of the Dead. Furthermore, the reference to “every Jew” also relates to the essential unity which will pervade the Jews at that time.

Similarly, there is a connection between the Redemption and the teaching studied after each chapter which concludes with the quote, “The L‑rd desired, for the sake of [Israel’s] righteousness, to make the Torah great and glorious.”19 Our Sages explain that the study associated with “making the Torah great and glorious” is of a different nature than study for the sake of learning how to observe the commandments. This relates to “the new [dimensions of the] Torah” which Mashiach will reveal.

* * *

4. There is a connection with the renewal of the heavens and the earth that will come about in the Era of the Redemption and the Shabbos. The Shabbos was granted to the Jewish people to “establish within our hearts the faith in the renewal of the world.” On Shabbos, we cease our involvement in worldly matters, and devote ourselves to spiritual concerns, in particular, to the study of the Torah.20 This brings about a renewal of the creation in the following week, following the pattern of G‑d, who “looked into the Torah and created the world.”

Shabbos is also connected with the Era of the Redemption which is described as “the day which is all Shabbos and rest for eternity.” In particular, this is true in regard to the time of Shabbos afternoon which is described as raava d’raavin, revealing “the inner dimension of G‑d’s will and His pleasure.” This level is associated with the Third Beis HaMikdash.

In particular, this is relevant on the Shabbos which follows the giving of the Torah. Since the experience of the giving of the Torah already brought about a renewal of the Torah and of the world at large, the further renewal brought about by the present Shabbos is indicative of the ultimate renewal that will take place in the Era of the Redemption.

Shabbos also relates to the concept of the unity of the Jewish people as reflected in the custom of gathering together to study Torah on Shabbos. In particular, this applies in this unique time of raava d’raavin.

* * *

5. In particular, there is a connection to the above concepts in the present time. Ours is the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the redemption. The Previous Rebbedeclared, “Immediately to teshuvah, immediately to redemption”; and in his era, we already completed this service. All that was necessary was to “polish the buttons” and “stand together, prepared” to greet Mashiach. Surely, our great efforts to spread Yiddishkeit and spread the wellsprings of Chassidus have also accomplished this and — particularly after the passage of forty years when we have received “eyes to see and ears to hear” — we are ready to greet Mashiach.

This is especially true in the present year תשנ"א which contains the letters of the word tab,, “rise up” as in the verse “his kingdom (that of David and Shlomo, the progenitors of the Mashiach) will be raised up.” And it is a year when “I will show you wonders,” and we have seen the fulfillment of the prophecies of the wonders foretold in the Yalkut Shimoniconcerning the crisis in the Persian Gulf. From the month of Nissan onward, the Mashiachis — to quote the passage cited previously — telling the Jews, “Humble ones, the time for your redemption has come.”

This is particularly relevant after the holiday of Shavuos for Shavuos is an appropriate time to ask for the coming of the redemption. In particular, on the Shabbos after Shavuos, it is appropriate to expect the ultimate renewal of the Torah, “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.”

To emphasize this connection to the redemption, a farbrengen was held at an unusual time, the time of raava d’raavin. This connection will be further enhanced by the recitation of Grace on a cup of wine, for here there is a connection to King David, the progenitor of Mashiach.

To conclude with directives for our conduct. It is proper to take on resolutions to increase our study of the Torah and also, our efforts to “raise up many students.” In particular, this should include the study, not only the recitation, of Pirkei Avos throughout the summer. Each Shabbos, everyone should study at least one Mishnah from Pirkei Avos in depth, availing oneself of the commentaries on the Mishnah. Similarly, we should increase our study of Chassidus, and this will lead to the revelation of “the new [dimension of the] Torah which will emerge from Me.”

Parshas Bamidbar - Shavuos | 4-11 Sivan , 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAY 18th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:26 pm /COUNT OMER № 42/

SHABBOS SAT MAY 19th /EREV SHAVUOS
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:16 am/
Mincha 8:26 pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 6
Maariv/Havdalah 9:40 pm  /YOMTOV CANDLES FROM EXISTING FLAMEAFTER 9:40 PM
ALL NIGHT LEARNING 1 AM TO 3:18 AM /ALOS haSHACHAR 72 Minutes as 16.1 Degrees/

SHAVUOS DAY ONE MAY 20th 
Shacharis: 10 AM / NOTE LATE START TIME /GALA DAIRY KIDDUSH
Mincha 8:30 pm 
Maariv 9:42 PM/  CANDLES AND YAHRZEIT CANDLES FROM EXISTING FLAME AFTER 9:42 PM

SHAVUOS DAY TWO MAY 21st 
Shacharis: 9:30 AM /YIZKOR 
Mincha 7:30 pm /FOLLOWED BY YOM TOV FARBRENGEN WITH INSPIRING WORDS OF TORAH
Maariv/Havdalah  9:44 PM

Weekday Services 
Tue - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Tue -Thu Mincha 8:00 pm, followed immediately by Maariv /SUMMER SCHEDULE

SHAVUOS CHILDRENS ICE-CREAM PARTY – SUN MAY 20th
Make your own Sundae.  Following the Ten Commandments.  Sponsored byMrs  Chanie Levitin and the CSTL Children’s Program.

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Delicious meat cholent, sponsored by Hanna Ionis, and made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit.

SHAVUOUS DAY ONE GALA DAIRY KIDDUSH 
The community is invited to our Shavous meal following Shacharis/Musaf. Enjoy a Dairy Meal with cheesecake, blintzes,  cheese, ice cream, and more! Sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber & Mrs. Chanie Levitin In Honor of Mrs. Levitin’s Father’s Yahrtzeit

SHAVUOS LEARNING AT CSTL – SAT NIGHT MAY 19th 
11:45 PM - Rambam’s 613 Commandments - Rabbi Shimon Emlen
1 AM – 3:18 AM Chavrusa Learning
1 AM – 3:18 AM Rambam Hilchot Yesodei Hatorah - Rabbi S.B. Levitin 
Refreshments will be provided

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Shmuly and Chaya-Winner Levitin, on the birth of their new son. May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim! Mazel Tov to Rabbi SB and Chani Levitin and the entire Levitin family!

FARBRENGEN ALERT– FRI MAY 18th  6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah, in honor  the acceptance of the Torah by the Jewish People on the Fifth of Sivan, 1313 BCE. On this day, Moses made a covenant with the Jewish people at the foot of Mount Sinai at which the people declared, "All that G-d has spoken, we shall do and hear" (Exodus 24:7) committing themselves to observe the Torah's commandments ("do") and strive to comprehend them ("hear"), while pledging to "do" also before they "hear." 
www.chabad.org/calendar

MMSC Seattle Cheder Lamplighter Cocktail Comedy & Auction WED MAY 23rd 6:15 pm
Join us for a fun evening of Cocktails, Hors D'oeuvres, and Comedy! Featuring a top-shelf open bar throughout the evening, along with delicious Hors d'oeuvres catered by Seattle's new Kosher Catering. Enjoy an evening of comedy by world-renowned comedian, Wayne Cotter. 
https://www..eventbrite.com/e/lamplighter-cocktail-comedy-auction-tickets-45709759120

B’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom with Rabbi Mendy Levitin – 7:30 PM SHABBOS AFTERNOON
Rabbi Mendy Levitin will introduce you to one of the most fundamental works of the Rebbe. The Chasidus Discourse b’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom is based on the idea of Ana nasiv malka — “I will choose the king.” - Stepping Above Self by Looking Beyond the Big Picture”.  The discourse was originally delivered by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson 11 Nissan, 5731 (1971). For Men and Women. 

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM /NOT THIS WEEK…
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

MAKEUP & MIMOSAS – LADIES NIGHT OUT JUNE 17th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Chanie Meyer.RSVP to Marave:  
MHerbstman@gmail.com .

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 1½ to 12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Honor Our Fallen Veterans Wed May 23rd 6 pm
Meet at the Bikur Cholim Cemetery, 1340 N 115th Street If you need a ride or would like to co-sponsor this event, please contact Ari Hoffman at
thehoffather@gmail.com

Cardozo Society L'Dor V'Dor Thursday, June 7, 6 pm
Join in honoring Washington Supreme Court Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud with the Cardozo Society's 2018 L'Dor V'Dor Award., at Foster Pepper, 1111 3rd Ave., #3000, Seattle.

One People One Heart Sunday, June 10, 7 pm
Chabad centers of Washington invite you to an evening of unity and inspiration. Keynoter: bestselling author Dr. Joseph Telushkin. Also featuring author Paula Begoun, Seattle Hebrew Academy Head of School Rivy Poupko Kletenik, Island Synagogue Rabbi Yechezkel Kornfeld, and radio host Michael Medved. at The Westin Seattle, 1900 5th Ave., Seattle

Ashkenazi Jewish Genetic Diseases Sunday, June 10, 11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Join with Hadassah to learn about genetic conditions among Ashkenazim. With Gary Frohlich of Sanofi Genzyme., at Talaris Conference Center, 4000 NE 41st St., Seattle.. Kosher Lunch Buffet by Island Crust .**Doors open for check-in at 11am. Limited Seating, RSVP Early!
https://secure2.convio.net/wzoa/site/Ticketing;jsessionid=00000000.app260a?view=Tickets&id=103953&NONCE_TOKEN=A8DD8DE12AC52B92DC7FDAB1FD500E8A

 SEPHARDIC RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Register now for 2018-2019 Sephardic Hebrew Religious School at the SJCC in Mercer Island!  Sephardic Religious School 1st day begins on Sunday, September 2, 2018 at 9:45 A.M at the J.C.C. [Grades K - 8]

New Sunday Night 7 PM Series for Men & Women at Yavneh Educational Center
June 3, taught by Marlene Kaplan, "Conversational Street Hebrew for Beginners Part 1"
June 24 taught by Judy Balint, "Israel Up Close and Personal"
www.bcmhseattle.org

Camp Yavneh June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR BAMIDBAR
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507768/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bamidbar-and-Motzaei-Shavuos-5751-1991.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

 1 There is a general message conveyed by the holidays every year, and then each individual year provides us with an individual message that can be derived from considering the days on which the holiday is celebrated in a particular year. Paying attention to this particular message heightens our potential to fulfill the general message of the holiday.

This year is unique in that the holiday of Shavuos follows directly after Shabbos and thus our service of Shavuos is affected by the unique influence of the Shabbos. Indeed, there is no interruption between the two and no gap to be filled with mundane matters. Furthermore, this three day continuum of holiness established a chazakah, a sequence associated with strength and permanence.2

Shabbos is intrinsically connected with the holiday of Shavuos as reflected in our Sages’ statement, “Everyone agrees that the Torah was given on Shabbos.” Shabbos is characterized by the quality of rest as our Sages commented: “What was the world lacking? Rest. When the Shabbos came, rest came.” Similarly, when reciting Grace on Shabbos, we add the prayer, “May the Merciful One let us inherit the day which will be all Shabbos and rest for eternal life.” And in our Minchah prayers we speak of “a day of rest...rest of peace... a perfect rest with which You find favor.”

This dimension of rest was brought to a complete state by the giving of the Torah. Thus our Sages connected the concept of tranquility with the giving of the Torah explaining that G‑dmade a condition with the creation that if the Jews accepted the Torah, the creation would stand, and if not, He would return the entire world to a state of nothingness. Thus, our Sages relate, the world was in a state of uneasiness until the giving of the Torah, and only when the Torah was given, did it reach a state of tranquility. Thus, the concepts of rest and tranquility represent an intrinsic connection between Shabbos and the giving of the Torah.

To explain this concept in depth: The natural state of the world is one of change and activity, the very opposite of rest. Indeed, the very concept of time, the fundamental framework in which the entire creation operates, is characterized by change.. Shabbos, in contrast, brings about rest and unity, revealing the fundamental G‑dly oneness that lies at the core of the entire creation. Thus, Shabbos takes us above the entire framework of time and therefore on Sunday, we say “This is the first day of the week,” i.e., the cycle of time is begun anew.3

In a full sense, this rest and oneness was introduced by the giving of the Torah. For it is through the Torah, that the purpose for the entire creation can be realized.. This concept can be understood through a parallel to our personal state.

When a person does not realize the purpose for his existence — which is “to serve His Creator” — he can never experience true tranquility and calm. On the contrary, the changes and multiplicity in the world at large disrupt and disturb him. When, however, a person is aware of the purpose for his existence and for each aspect of his life, he rises above all this treadmill of activity. This, in turn, allows a person to reach a state of fulfillment and development.

Furthermore, the awareness of one’s purpose generates tranquility, not only for the person himself, but for the activities which he carries out in the world at large. This allows them to be carried out with added perfection and success; and thus spreads rest and tranquility throughout the world.4

Similarly, in regard to the giving of the Torah: When the Jews received the Torah, the purpose of the entire creation — that it was brought into being for the sake of the Torah and for the sake of the Jewish people — was revealed. When the Jews observe the Torah and its mitzvos, and influence the gentiles to observe their seven mitzvos, they transform the world into a dwelling for G‑d, and in this way, spread rest and tranquility throughout the world, encompassing every particular dimension of existence.

There are various different mitzvos and every mitzvah has a specific intention. Nevertheless, there is a single fundamental thrust present in all the mitzvos, the commitment to fulfill G‑d’s will. This is reflected in our Sages’ statement (quoted in the beginning of the Shulchan Aruch), “Be as fierce as a lion... to fulfill the will of your Father in Heaven.” The emphasis is not on G‑d’s commandments as they exist as separate entities, but rather on “His will,” the single inner desire that is expressed by all the mitzvos. In each particular mitzvah, one must be conscious of the fundamental intent that pervades all the mitzvos.5 This brings about a complete and single-minded commitment to the Torah; to quote the familiar expression, “Were we commanded to chop trees, [we would do so eagerly].”

In particular, this concept is reflected in the mitzvah of the love of G‑d which is the source for all the positive commandments.6 Love is connected with activity, an inner dynamic characterized by the two thrusts of ratzu (yearning) and shuv (return). Significantly, however, when describing this dynamic, the Sefer Yetzirah states, “If your heart will run (rotz in Hebrew), return (shuv) to one.”

On the surface, the expression “return to one” is problematic. That a movement of ratzushould be followed by one of shuv is understandable. (Indeed, the very physical movement of the heart reflects such a pattern.) But what is the intent of the word “one”? On the contrary, the dynamic is by nature twofold.

On the basis of the above, however, this difficulty can be resolved. The intent should be not merely the development of harmony between the two movements of ratzu and shuv, that each shuv leads to a higher and more complete ratzu, but that one sense the fundamental G‑dly intent that permeates both the ratzu and the shuv. Rather than being aware of the differences between these two movements, one should sense the fundamental oneness which permeates the totality of our service.

The above is brought about through the approach of bittul. A person’s self-image should be as G‑d’s servant — aware that “I was created solely to serve my Creator.” This in turn allows him to develop a complete unity with the King Himself, “A servant of the king is a king.”

This concept is explained in Chassidic thought within the context of the Baal Shem Tov’s interpretation of the verse, “A psalm of a poor man. He will pour out his words before G‑d.” It is explained that a poor man has no self-concern whatsoever and desires nothing more than to come into the presence of G‑d.

To explain in allegory: If a king allows his subjects to have an audience with him, a rich man person will approach the king slowly. He appreciates and derives satisfaction from the great riches and wealth of the king’s palace (in the analogue, the wonders of the spiritual realms) and wants to savor them. In contrast, a poor man takes no notice of these factors and has only one desire, to enter the presence of the king himself.

To refer back to our service: When a person is characterized by bittul, he takes no interest in the revealed levels of G‑d’s greatness.. He is concerned with G‑d’s essence. He wants to come before the King Himself.7

Furthermore, it is through this approach of servitude alone that one can reach the highest peaks. This applies not only to the development of an essential connection, but also in regard to the revealed levels of G‑dliness. “The servant of the king is like a king;” G‑d endows him with a wealth of revelation, “from His full, open, holy, and generous hand.”8

The inner tranquility achieved through the service of bittul is reflected in the Hebrew word for king, melech (מלך). This word is an acronym for the three Hebrew words (מוחלבכבד) that mean “brain, heart, and liver.” The brain governs the function of our intellectual faculties; the heart, of our emotions; and the liver, of our basic physical functions.

Generally, the heart and the brain work are characterized by different tendencies. The most developed intellectual activity involves a settled, restful approach, while the heart moves with frenetic activity, as reflected in the pattern of ratzu and shuv described above.

Through the approach of bittul, these two potentials can be synthesized, and the mind can rule over the heart. Because bittul effects the essence of a person, a level above the mind, it can extend the tranquility of the intellect beyond its natural limits and cause it to affect every aspect of our personalities.

The most complete and clearly revealed expression of how the bittul of the Jewish people led to the revelation of G‑d’s sovereignty came about at the giving of the Torah. The Jews stated na’aseh v’nishmah, placing the commitment, “we will do” before “we will listen..” This reflects a total willingness to go beyond oneself and fulfill G‑d’s will. And through this commitment, the Jews drew down “three crowns” for G‑d. “One He put on His head, and two, He gave to His children,” the Jewish people.

The giving of the Torah represented a connection to G‑d’s essence, a level above all particular differences. Afterwards, the Torah was given in a manner that permeated the framework of worldly existence and allowed this essential oneness to be drawn down into the world, establishing peace, harmony, and tranquility.9 And in this manner, the ultimate purpose of the creation could be revealed.

The above concepts also provide us with insight regarding the Jews’ preparations for the giving of the Torah. After leaving Egypt, the Jews went through a process of refinement resembling our service in the Counting of the Omer, i.e., they refined all the particular characteristics in their emotional makeup.

This, in turn, prepared them to receive the revelation of the essence of G‑d as expressed in the command, “I am the L‑rd, your G‑d.” This revelation permeated the Jews’ very being as reflected by the interpretation of E-lohechah, “your G‑d,” as “your strength and your power.” In addition, the Jews also received an appreciation of all the revealed levels of G‑dliness, perceiving G‑d’s merchavah (His holy chariot) and throne.10

Based on the above, we can appreciate the uniqueness of the celebration of the giving of the Torah this year when we proceed directly from Shabbos to Shavuos. Every Shabbos, like the first Shabbos of creation, introduces a dimension of rest into the creation and on the following Sunday, the cycle of time begins anew.

Similarly, each year, Shavuos represents a renewal of the giving of the Torah, a present day experience of Mount Sinai. Thus, proceeding directly from Shabbos to Shavuos without the interruption of any mundane activities teaches us two fundamental lessons: a) There is a greater potential to draw down the tranquility associated with the Torah into the realm of worldly experience because its influence is amplified by that of the Shabbos. b) Since the cycle of time begins on Sunday and that day is associated with the giving of the Torah, there is a greater potential to draw down the tranquility of the Torah into our world which is governed by time and space. Indeed, the renewal of the world at large is brought about by the renewal of the Torah as implied by the Zohar’s statement, “The Holy One, blessed be He, looked into the Torah and created the world.”

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above concepts and this week’s Torah reading, Parshas Bamidbar. Bamidbar means “in the desert.” Our Sages emphasize the connection to the giving of the Torah, for the Torah was also given in a desert.

This is not merely a coincidence, but rather was intended to bring out the intrinsic connection that exists between the Torah and the concept of a desert. One of the explanations associated with this idea is that the Torah is intended to elevate even a desert environment. A desert is, a place unfit for human habitation, the very opposite of the stable and tranquil atmosphere which the Torah is intended to introduce into the world. Nevertheless, the Torah has the potential to transform the nature of a desert and endow it with stability and tranquility. This serves as a clear indication of the Torah’s potential to endow those parts of the world which are fit for human habitation with these qualities.

The Book of Bamidbar is associated with the census of the Jewish people, an activity which expresses the dearness with which G‑d holds the Jewish people as Rashicomments, “Because of their dearness to Him, He counts them all the time.” Similarly, a census also adds to the concept of permanence for “an entity which is counted will never be nullified.” Nevertheless, the census that expresses these qualities was taken in a desert, emphasizing how these qualities are drawn down into — and thus transform — a place which is unfit for human habitation.11

* * *

3. Just as each year, the Torah is given anew, similarly, each year it must be received anew by the Jewish people. This is particularly true this year, when we proceed from Shabbos directly to the giving of the Torah. We must accept the Torah with an active consciousness of the Giver of the Torah, realizing that the Torah is the purpose of the entire creation, and in this manner, bring peace and tranquility to each individual Jew and to the world at large.

This should involve a renewal of one’s dedication to Torah study and in particular, to the study of Pnimiyus HaTorah. This enables one to “know the G‑d of your fathers and serve Him with a full heart.” We must study the Torah with full use of our intellectual faculties, and every Jew should endeavor to develop new Torah concepts.

In particular, this should involve study of those subjects which are customarily studied by the entire Jewish people. This includes — in these summer months — Pirkei Avos. The intent is that Pirkei Avos will be learned, not merely recited. Each week, on should learn at least one Mishnah in depth.

Similarly, it is important to renew and strengthen our study of Chitas, Chumash, Tehillim,and Tanya. Herein there is an intrinsic connection to the giving of the Torah, for these three texts are related to the three Jewish leaders associated with the holiday of Shavuos: Moshe, who received the Torah at Mount Sinai, King David, whose yahrzeit is on Shavuos and who wrote the Book of Tehillim, and the Baal Shem Tov whose yahrzeit is also on Shavuos, and whose teachings where collected and explained by the Alter Rebbe in the Tanya.

Also, this is an appropriate time to renew and strengthen our study of the Rambam’sworks, the Mishneh Torah and Sefer HaMitzvos in keeping with the three-pronged program of study that has been established. Similarly, each person should continue the programs of Torah study that he has established individually.

Furthermore, as mentioned, each individual should endeavor to develop new Torah concepts, and also, to publish them. To explain, every Jew has the potential — and according to the Zohar, it is an obligation — to develop new Torah concepts.

In the previous generations, people were very reticent to write, let alone, publish such Torah concepts, lest they not have appreciate the true intent of the law or concept with which they were concerned.

At present, however, there must be efforts in the opposite direction. It is necessary to take precautions that people do not write directives of Torah law when they are incapable of doing so. Nevertheless, simultaneously, it is necessary to do whatever is necessary to encourage people to increase their efforts in Torah study.12

And for that reason, it is worthy to encourage all those who are trained in the proper approach to Torah study — even if they are not totally sure that the new concepts are 100% accurate — to publish and disseminate the Torah ideas that they develop. (Needless to say, however, it is proper to add that these texts should contain a statement saying that they should not be considered as works from which halachic directives for actual practice should be derived.)

We see the success of such an approach. When people compose Torah texts like these, they are inspired to dedicate more effort to Torah study. Similarly, “the envy of the scribes increases knowledge” and their efforts spur other colleagues to like endeavors.

May these activities spread the rest and tranquility associated with the giving of the Torah throughout the world and hasten the coming of “the era which is all rest and Shabbos for eternity.” Until the coming of that era, we are in a state of distress, as our Sages said, “Woe to the children who have been exiled from their Father’s table.” The exile has caused us travail in regard to our material welfare, and similarly, has prevented us from reaching our true potential in the service of G‑d. Indeed, it is impossible for us to appreciate how much the exile has hindered us, for we are all children of the exile. We have grown up in exile and it dominates our thought processes.

This, however, will be brought to an end in the near future. Through the service of teshuvah, each person will establish a connection with the essence of his soul. And this will lift us and the entire world above the limitations of the exile, into “the era which is all rest and Shabbos for eternity.”

May we merit the Redemption immediately. — Significantly, מיד, the Hebrew for “immediately,” is an acronym for the names of the three Jewish leaders mentioned previously: Moshe משה, Yisrael (the Baal Shem Tov) ישראל, and David דוד. — And then we will appreciate the true sense of rest and tranquility.

Parshas Behar – Behukosai Chazaq – Mevarchim Sivan | 26 Iyar -4 Sivan , 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAY 11th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:17 pm /COUNT OMER № 42/

SHABBOS SAT MAY 12th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Sivan 8:00 am
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:20 am/
Mincha 8:17 pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 5
Maariv/Havdalah 9:23 pm  /COUNT OMER № 43/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush for Shabbos Mevarchim Sivan is sponsored by Rabbi Alter & Debbie Levitin, and Rabbi Mendy & Leah Levitin, in honor of the 7th yahrzeit of their grandfather, Reb Yisochar Dov ben Yonah ZT”L.  May he be a good advocate for the whole family and entire community.  We will also have a delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  The Kavkas are contributors to the Kiddush in memory of Mrs. Kavka's uncle, Dovid Zev ben Tzvi Elimelech ZT”L, whose 1st yahrzeit is on Shabbos, 27th Iyar.  May the neshamah of Dovid Zev ben Tzvi Elimelech ZT”L have an aliyah. Seuda Slishit.

Weekday Services 
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon, Wed - Fri Shacharis 7 am
Tue Shacharis 6:50 am /ROSH CHODESH SIVAN/  
Sun -Thu Mincha 8:30 pm, followed by Maariv c. 9:20 pm /COUNT OMER № 44-48/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65thStreet side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruvfor current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Simcha and Valerie BrandeisYitzi and Shaindle Heisler, and the entire Heisler family on the marriage of Yisroel and Miriam Heisler.. May they merit to build a bayis ne’eman b’Yisroel

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Please drop a check by shul or pay online at 
https://cstlseattleorg.clhosting..org/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/3182565/jewish/Donate.htm  
Thank you! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

FARBRENGEN ALERT – IYAR 26 – FRI MAY 4th  6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of Yom Yerushalayim, 28th Iyar, the 51stanniversary of the miraculous restoration of the holy city to Jewish sovereignty. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah,

B’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom with Rabbi Mendy Levitin – 7:15 PM SHABBOS AFTERNOON
Rabbi Mendy Levitin will introduce you to one of the most fundamental works of the Rebbe. The Chasidus Discourse b’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom is based on the idea of Ana nasiv malka — “I will choose the king.” - Stepping Above Self by Looking Beyond the Big Picture”.  The discourse was originally delivered by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson 11 Nissan, 5731 (1971). For Men and Women. 

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

SHAVUOS AT CSTL  Sun and Mon May 20-21 
Evening of Shavous (Sat May 19th
- learning a whole night Chavrusa style and classes given by different members of the community
Shavous Day 1 (Sun May 20) 
Shacharis at 10am followed by a gala Dairy Meal
Shavuous Day 1 (Sunday May 20) Children’s Ice Cream Party following 10 Commandments!
Shavuos Day 2 (Mon May 21) 
Shacharis at 9:30am with Yitzkor
Shavuos Day 2 Afternoon (Mon May 21) 
Early Mincha 7:30 pm followed by a Farbrengen with words of Chassidus and inspiration

SHAVUOUS DAY ONE KIDDUSH AT CSTL
The community is invited to our Shavous meal following Shacharis/Musaf. Enjoy a Dairy Meal with cheesecake, blintzes,  cheese, ice cream, and more! Sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber & Mrs. Chanie Levitin In Honor of Mrs. Levitin’s Father’s Yahrtzeit

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 1½ to 12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Honor Our Fallen Veterans Wed May 23rd 6 pm
Meet at the Bikur Cholim Cemetery, 1340 N 115th Street If you need a ride or would like to co-sponsor this event, please contact Ari Hoffman at
thehoffather@gmail.com

SEPHARDIC RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Register for 2018-2019 Sephardic Hebrew Religious School at the SJCC in Mercer Island!  Sephardic Religious School 1st day begins on Sunday, September 2, 2018 at 9:45 A.M at the J.C.C. [Grades K - 8]

New Sunday Night 7 PM Series for Men & Women at Yavneh Educational Center
May 13 taught by Larry Russak. "King Arthur, Ivanhoe, Robin Hood and the truth about the Jewish Exile from England"
June 3, taught by Marlene Kaplan, "Conversational Street Hebrew for Beginners Part 1"
June 24 taught by Judy Balint, "Israel Up Close and Personal"
www.bcmhseattle.org

Camp Yavneh June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at
www.campyavnehseattle.com    


REBBE’S SICHO FOR BEHAR
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507766/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Behar-Bechukosai-27th-Day-of-Iyar-5751-1991.htm ©SichosInEnglish.org

Rosh Chodesh Sivan marks the day when the Bnei Yisrael came to the Sinai desert, midbar Sinai. This location was chosen by G‑d as the fitting place for the Torah to be given, and therefore, immediately upon arriving, Moshe began preparing them to receive the Torah. This same connection between the place (midbar Sinai) and the event also finds expression in the fact that Parshas Bamidbar is always read before Shavuos.

There are two reasons given to explain why Parshas Bamidbar is always read before Shavuos. First of all, a midbar (desert) has no owner. Even a public domain has owners — it’s just that everyone owns it equally. In contrast, a desert has no owner whatsoever. The Torah was therefore given in a desert, to teach us that whoever wishes to receive the Torah is free to do so.

A second reason is connected with the curses of Parshas Bechukosai. The Gemara(Megillah 31b) says that since Shavuos is considered to be like the beginning of the year, Ezra established that these curses be read before Shavuos, “to finish the year and its curses.” According to this reason, Bamidbar is read before Shavuos to provide a respite between the curses and Shavuos.

Both of these reasons need explanation. According to the first reason, the Torah was given in a midbar to stress that the Torah is ownerless and that everyone has equal access to it. However, the Torah was given exclusively to the Jewish people! It would have seemed more fitting for it to be given in a private place, or at least a public place which was in the communal possession of all Jews.

In the second reason, the main connection is between Shavuos and Parshas (Behar) Bechukosai, and the placement of Parshas Bamidbar is only incidental. Nevertheless, Parshas Behar-Bechukosai begins speaking about Mount Sinai (har Sinai) rather than midbar Sinai. Since it is relevant to know that the Torah was given in a desert, why doesn’t Bechukosai begin with mention of midbar Sinai instead of Mount Sinai?

This can be explained by first analyzing the statement in the beginning of the fifth chapter of Pirkei Avos (which we read this Shabbos), “The world was created by means of ten Divine utterances. What does this come to teach us, for indeed, it could have been created by one utterance? But it was so to bring retribution upon the wicked who destroy the world which was created by ten utterances, and to bestow ample reward upon the righteous who sustain the world which was created by ten utterances.”

The well-known question on this Mishnah is that if the world could have been created with one utterance, it is therefore only “worth,” so to speak, one utterance. Why do the wicked deserve more punishment (and the righteous more reward) if the world is in reality only “worth” one utterance?

The explanation is that there are two dimensions to the way in which G‑d created the world: one which is called “one utterance” and the other called “ten utterances.” Before there was differentiation between the various types of creations, G‑d created an unformed existence (metzius yesh). Only later was this yesh formed into the universe as we now know it. The first act of creating the yesh was done through the “one utterance.” The creative process which brought about all the particular types of creations is referred to as the “ten utterances.”

One difference between these two dimensions is that through the “ten utterances,” importance was ascribed to all of the individual creations. The emphasis was on the creation itself. On the level of the “one utterance,” however, the creation is of relatively little importance. The main revelation is that of G‑dliness.

These same two levels of revelation are reflected in the Torah, as expressed in the verse (Psalms 62:12), “G‑d spoke one, I heard two.” The “one” refers to the dimension of Torah which is united with G‑d and higher than the world, similar to the level of the “one utterance.” The “two” refers to the level of Torah which deals with worldly matters, similar to the “ten utterances.” In practical terms, the first level corresponds to the blessing we make over the Torah, which stresses how the Torah is connected to G‑d. The second level which is connected with the world finds expression in the laws of the Torah, which deals with worldly matters.

We can express this in more general terms. The first level (of the creation and of Torah) represents a revelation of G‑dliness and the consequent nullification of the universe. This is the idea of a hala’ah (elevation) “from below to Above.” The second level represents the hamshachah (drawing down) “from Above to below” to penetrate the universe with G‑dliness.

Each of these two types of revelations has an advantage over the other. Through the “ten utterances,” which is the drawing down of G‑dliness, the universe becomes imbued with G‑dliness. However it is only a low level of G‑dliness, one which the universe is able to withstand. The revelation of the “one utterance” is much higher, but — for this reason — it doesn’t affect the universe.

These two types of revelation are alluded to in the two Torah portions Behar and Bechukosai, and in particular to their names. Among the various types of inorganic matter, a mountain (har) is in a way similar to organic matter (since more earth falls upon it and it “grows,” so to speak). This represents the growth and adaptation characteristic of the universe, “ten utterances.” Bechukosai, on the other hand, comes from the word “engraved” (chakikah). Unlike letters which are written with ink on paper, engraved letters have no existence independent of the rock in which they are engraved. This nullification of the letters corresponds to the nullification of the universe which corresponds to the revelation of the “one utterance.”

The ultimate revelation is when both these advantages are present. This is the idea of the expression dirah b’tachtonim (“dwelling place in the lower worlds”). The word dirahindicates a revelation of the essence of G‑d, whereas tachtonim emphasizes the lower worlds. Having both together indicates that this highest revelation has the ability to penetrate the lower worlds.

The way to combine both these G‑dly revelations is through a revelation which is higher than them both. This third revelation corresponds to the midbar (desert). The reason for this is because a desert is unfit for human habitation. This can be taken in a negative way, i.e. because it is so low that it is not suitable for humans. It can also be seen in a positive light, i.e. that it transcends anything a human being could possibly reach.

According to this, we can answer both of the questions which we originally asked. Parshas Behar does not begin with the mention of the desert because it expresses the “ten utterances” which are on the level of the world. On the contrary; it stresses the significance of worldly existence, and therefore mentions a mountain (Mount Sinai) which is the opposite of nullifying existence. Parshas Bechukosai emphasizes the other extreme, the nullification of existence, as mentioned above. After dealing with both extremes, the Torah then has Parshas Bamidbar, which is higher than these two extremes and therefore has the ability to combine them both.

This also explains why the Torah was given in a desert rather than in a place owned by Jews. A place of communal ownership corresponds to the level of Torah which is within the grasp of the Jewish people (“ten utterances”). The Torah was given in a desert in order to allude to the higher dimension of Torah which is completely beyond human grasp. In this way we receive the dimension of Torah which is completely united with G‑d. This will be accomplished completely in the days of Mashiach, when (G‑d said), “A new Torah will come out from Me” (Isaiah 51:4). The word iti (“from Me”) refers to the Torah as it is completely united with G‑d. This level will nevertheless “come out” to the level of each individual.

* * *

2. The preparation for the giving of the Torah was the unification of the Jewish people in the Sinai desert. This is alluded to in the verse vayichan sham Yisrael (“and the Jews encamped there”), where the word vayichan is in singular tense (“and he encamped”). This indicates that the Jews became united a single person. The way to attain this level of unity and ahavas Yisrael is through self-nullification. Only through bittul is it possible to avoid strife and achieve true ahavas Yisrael.

On the other hand, we see that receiving the Torah is also connected to a certain degree with the person feeling his own existence. He must learn Torah with a full measure of understanding, bringing the Torah to the level of his own intellect. We therefore see again the two extremes similar to the “ten utterances” (connected with a feeling of the importance of individual existence), and the “one utterance” (connected with the bittul of all existence).

The same two extremes are found in Parshas Bamidbar itself. On the one hand, a midbarrepresents the nullification of existence, as explained above. On the other hand, Bamidbarcontains the counting of the Jewish people, which stresses the importance of the existence of each individual.

These extremes also correspond to the two reasons for reading Parshas Bamidbar before Shavuos. The first reason — in order for it to be given in an ownerless location — corresponds to the idea of bittul, as explained above. The second reason — in order to intervene between the curses and the giving of the Torah — corresponds to the importance of individual existence. This is because G‑d wants us to have the full measure of blessings, primarily the blessings which enable us to fill the world with G‑dliness and bring the redemption. This stresses the importance of the G‑dly service of each individual.

This is also connected with the two practical directives which come out of this gathering. First of all, this is an auspicious time to gather more and more people together on Shabbos. If this is a vital activity every Shabbos, how much moreso on the Shabbos which blesses the month which contains Shavuos! Secondly, it should be publicized everywhere possible the necessity of bringing all Jewish children, even the smallest babies, to the reading of the Ten Commandments on Shavuos.

Here again we find the expression of these two extremes. The gathering together of Jews on Shabbos, and the inclusion of even the smallest children in the reading of the Ten Commandments emphasizes the unity and nullification of all Jews. At the same time it stresses the other extreme, since every Jew is so important that every individual must be included, and must receive the Torah on his or her own level.

May it be G‑d’s will that our good resolutions to increase in Jewish unity bring about the immediate redemption, so that we can celebrate Shavuos in the most complete manner — in the Beis HaMikdash in Jerusalem, immediately.

Parshas Emor | 19-26 Iyar, 5778

EREV SHABBOS  MAY 4th 
Shacharis 7 am
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 8:07pm /COUNT OMER № 35/

SHABBOS SAT MAY 5th 
Shacharis: 9:30 am /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:31 am/
Mincha 8:07pm /followed by Seuda Slishit / PIRKEI AVOT CHAPTER 4
Maariv/Havdalah 9:12 pm  /COUNT OMER № 36/

KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT
Tova and Shimon Cox are sponsoring Kiddush this week in memory of Brandon Gribin, Rafael Chaim Ben Shumel ZT"L. May his memory be a blessing. Marina and Emanuel Khaimova, are sponsoring the delicious meat cholent, made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.  Seuda Slishit.

Weekday Services 
Sun Shacharis: 9 am 
Mon - Fri Shacharis 7 am  
Sun -Thu Mincha 8:20 pm, followed by Maariv c. 9:10 pm /COUNT OMER № 37-41/

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV
Mazel Tov to Ben and Sarah Dershowitz on the birth of their new son. Shalom Zachor will be at their home Friday night from 9pm to midnight, 7504 33rd Ave NE. Bris will be B”H Sunday at 3:00 PM sharp at Mercaz, 5240 38thAve NE, followed by a seuda.  May they merit to raise him to Torah, Chupa, and Ma’asim Tovim !

PLEASE PAY YOUR CSTL DUES AND PLEDGES
Please drop a check by shul, or pay online at 
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Thank you! Sincerely, the CSTL Board

FARBRENGEN ALERT – IYAR 19 – FRI MAY 4th  6 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in honor of the yahrzeit of Rabbi Meir ("Maharam") of Rothenburg. In front of the CSTL Men’s Mikvah.

B’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom with Rabbi Mendy Levitin – 7:00 PM SHABBOS AFTERNOON
Come join in a class on the Chasidus Discourse b’Yom Ashtei-Asar Yom— Delivered by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson 11 Nissan, 5731 (1971). For Men and Women.  One of the fundamental works of the Rebbe based on the idea of Ana nasiv malka — “I will choose the king.” - Stepping Above Self by Looking Beyond the Big Picture”

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY LEVITIN – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

LADIES NIGHT OUT – MAY 6th 7:30 PM
Featuring Wine, Sushi, and Rosi Levin LMFTA.  A project of Chabad of Seattle. 
mherbstman@gmail.com

SHAVUOS AT CSTL – 1st Day of Shavous, Sun May 20th 
The community is invited to our Shavous meal following services. Enjoy a Dairy Meal with cheesecake, blintzes,  cheese, ice cream, and more! Sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber & Mrs. Chanie Levitin In Honor of Mrs. Levitin’s Father’s Yahrtzeit

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info,
chanielevitin@gmail.com

REGISTER NOW FOR CAMP GAN YISROEL 5778
Campers ages 1½ to 12 are excited about Gan Izzy 2018, especially since we’ve added a sixth week! For six fabulous weeks, your child can enjoy everything summer has to offer: swimming, crafts, sports, days at the beach, excursions to museums, roller skating, berry picking, and more, all in a loving, safe, Jewish environment. What could be better?! Campers from a wide range of backgrounds are welcomed, and given lots of love and attention from our enthusiastic group of specially recruited and trained counselors—some of whom are CGIS alumni themselves.  Fun that lasts a summer...memories that last a lifetime! Register now for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and/or 6 weeks at 
http://www.campganisraelseattle.org/

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion KitzGabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149. Presidential Kiddush $50, Chulent $100.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Rebbetzin Tziporah Heller in Seattle - April 28th  & 29th 
www..ashreichemyisrael.org

Seattle Kollel Partners in Torah Part II for Women April 29-May 16, 8-9 pm
www.seattlekollel.com/partners-in-torah

Ravit Baer, Deputy Consul General of Israel to the PNW, Mon May 7th - 7 - 8:30 pm 
At Island Synagogue. 
www.islandsynagogue.org/event/ravit-baer

New Sunday Night 7 PM Series for Men & Women at Yavneh Educational Center
May 13 taught by Larry Russak. "King Arthur, Ivanhoe, Robin Hood and the truth about the Jewish Exile from England"
June 3, taught by Marlene Kaplan, "Conversational Street Hebrew for Beginners Part 1"
June 24 taught by Judy Balint, "Israel Up Close and Personal"
www.bcmhseattle.org

Camp Yavneh June 25th - August 17th 
Registration now open for Camp Yavneh. Staff applications now available at 
www.campyavnehseattle.com    

NYHS Gourmet Food & Dessert Auction, Wed May 16th 
At the home of Connie Kanter. Bid and buy items from our community chefs in support of NYHS. Free and open to all!  RSVP and to donate items, please contact us at 
nyhs@nyhs.org.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR EMOR
http://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507765/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Emor-20th-Day-of-Iyar-5751-1991.htm  © SichosInEnglish.org 

1. We have already spoken at length last Shabbos regarding the fact that the Hebrew word for “redemption” (geulah) is composed of the word “exile” (golah) with the addition of the letter alef. At that time we explained two implications of this relationship between the word golah and geulah.

First of all, the transformation from galus to geulah is made by inserting the letter Alef, which represents G‑d. This shows that the redemption does not mean the dismantling and dissolution of exile, but rather the “insertion” and revelation of G‑d within the exile. Geulahcomes about through bringing out G‑d’s presence within the exile, and showing that He is the true Master of the universe.

The second implication is that the redemption is “composed,” so to speak, of our service of G‑d during the time of galus. Just as the word geulah is not made from a separate set of letters, but from the very letters of the word galus, so too the redemption comes through our service in exile — not through some different sort of service.

Today we will speak of a number of related points which will further explain the special mission of the Jewish people in this particular time immediately before the redemption. We will do this by first explaining more deeply the first geulah, that from Egypt, which contained both aspects of geulah mentioned above.

When the Jewish people left Egypt, they took with them the gold, silver, etc. of the Egyptians, to the extent that Egypt was emptied out of its wealth. By doing this, they carried out G‑d’s intention in giving it to the Egyptians in the first place — that the Jewish people should purify it by using it for holy purposes. The Jewish people did not merely flee Egypt; they took Egypt itself (i.e. its possessions) and “inserted” G‑d’s presence by revealing its holy potential. The revelation was so complete that the Egyptians even gave them things they didn’t ask for! (Rashi, Ex. 12: 36) Even more surprisingly, even when the Jews refused to take some of the wealth, the Egyptians actually forced it upon them! (Berachos 9b)

This would seem difficult to understand: it is the opposite of human nature for one to willingly give away one’s own belongings. In addition, the Egyptians were never even commanded to give their things away; the Jews were commanded to take them!

This is all understood in light of the abovementioned. The Alef — i.e. the presence of G‑d — must be revealed in the golah itself. This was accomplished through eventually bringing the Egyptians to the recognition that this was the ultimate purpose of them having this wealth. Once this was accomplished, they gave over everything willingly.

The second aspect of geulah — that the word geulah is composed of the letters golah — is also evident in the first redemption. How was this elevation and “redemption” of the wealth of Egypt achieved? It came about only through their descent to Egypt, to golah, showing that the geulah was clearly composed of the golah. This serves as a prototype for all other redemptions, in particular the ultimate redemption through Mashiach — all of which show the two dimensions we have discussed.

2. This is not totally understood, however. Granted, the geulah from Egypt accomplished the elevation of exile, of golah. But there were much higher revelations associated with this geulah. The geulah came through the revelation of G‑d Himself “in His Glory and Essence.” Furthermore, the purpose of the geulah was in order that the Torah be given. The Torah itself is higher than the world and preceded it, and was given with a G‑dly revelation which transcends the world. The revelation at Mt. Sinai was therefore much higher than that represented by an Alef, which is G‑d as Creator and Master of the world.

The question is even more striking when we speak of the ultimate redemption through Mashiach. This will be with a revelation that totally transcends the world, together with the revelation of a totally new and superior dimension of Torah, as G‑d said, “A new Torah will come out from Me” (Yeshayahu 11:9). How then can we say that geulah is composed solely of golah with the insertion of an Alef, which just represents the level of G‑dliness which can be revealed within the mundane world?

The explanation of this is that there are several levels of meaning to the letter Alef:

1) Alufo shel olam, which, as discussed previously, refers to G‑dliness revealed within the world.

2) From the expression a’alefchoh chochmah, which refers to Torah, which is higher than the world, but still close enough that it is somewhat related to it, and can be compared with it.

3) The three letters which make up the letter alef (אלף) are alef, lamed, and fei. These same letters can be rearranged to form the word peleh (פלא), or “wonder.” This represents a level of G‑dliness which is completely beyond comparison with the world.

The letter Alef therefore contains three levels or stages in the G‑dly revelation necessary to completely transform galus.

The first stage is to reveal within the world that G‑d is its Master. Since the world itself conceals the G‑dliness within it (the word olam related to helam, concealment), a Jew must serve G‑d in a way that reveals that everything within the world has G‑dliness within it. The second stage is through revealing the dimension of G‑d which transcends the world. This is done primarily through learning Torah, which, as mentioned above, preceded the world not only in time, but in the intensity of G‑dly revelation within it. We then come to the third dimension, that of peleh — the niflaos (wonders) of redemption which totally transcend the creation.

In Chassidic terminology, these three levels correspond to the supernal Sefiros. The first level corresponds to Malchus, as G‑d is “King of the world” (i.e. connected to the world), and to middos in general, since it is through them that G‑d conducts the world. The second level corresponds to mochin (intellect), but the level of mochin which is still connected to middos. The third level of peleh is that of mochin as they are themselves, separate from middos and the world — connected instead above, with the Sefirah of Kesser. This corresponds to the well-known explanation of the difference between our service of G‑d now as compared with the days of Mashiach. During galus, our service is in the purification and elevation of the seven middos (corresponding to the conquer of the seven nations of Canaan), including the level of mochin connected with middos. The service of geulah is that of mochin themselves, corresponding to the additional three lands which will become part of Eretz Yisrael in the days of Mashiach: Keini, Knizi and Kadmoni.

This represents the progression of G‑dly revelation leading to the days of Mashiach: 1) G‑dliness within the world, 2) G‑dliness higher than, but still connected with the world, and 3) the revelation of G‑d’s essence. Our service of G‑d in galus (which consists of bringing the Alef into golah to bring the geulah) must correspond to these three levels. And through this we bring about these kinds of G‑dly revelation alluded to by the letter Alef.

This means that we must reveal the presence of G‑dliness within the world by using all physical objects for a holy purpose — “for the sake of Heaven” (to correspond to the level of G‑dliness within the world). Furthermore, we must bring down and reveal the second level through learning Torah, and reveal the third level of peleh by learning Pnimiyus HaTorah, Chassidus, which corresponds to the level of peleh in Torah.

We can extend this idea further: in addition to the revelation of the level of peleh through the study of Chassidus, it is revealed through the very exile itself. The prophet Yeshayahu said (12:1), “On that day [(of redemption] you will say, ‘I thank you G‑d for having been angry with me.’ ” This verse seems somewhat puzzling. Granted that we will be thankful for G‑d’s nullification of exile — but this expression of appreciation would not really be wholehearted. One would praise G‑d even more completely if there had been no exile to begin with!

In light of the above this can be easily understood. Redemption comes about from and is composed of the very exile itself. We are therefore thanking Him deeply for the exile since we realize that it has brought the highest revelations, including that corresponding to the level of peleh.

3. Since the ultimate redemption will come through Mashiach, it is self-understood that Mashiach will also embody these three levels. This can be seen from the statement of the Rambam (Commentary of the Mishnah, Chelek, Yesod 12) that Mashiach stems from “the house of Dovid and is a descendant of Shlomo.” The connection with Dovid HaMelech is clear, since he is the primary source of monarchy; but why is Shlomo HaMelech relevant here?

The inner reason for this is that the era of Shlomo HaMelech closely resembled the Messianic Age. In the days of Dovid HaMelech, there were wars which made it impossible for him to build the Beis HaMikdash, as G‑d told him, “You have spilt much blood.” The days of Shlomo HaMelech, however, were characterized by world peace reminiscent of the Messianic Age. This is alluded to in his name, which itself means peace (Shalom).

Shlomo HaMelech was able to attain this because of his unsurpassed wisdom (chochmah). This wisdom nullified the unholiness of the non-Jewish nations without the necessity for war, and was so complete that they came by their own accord to bring him gifts, including the sparks of holiness within them — similar to the state of affairs which will exist in the days of Mashiach. And this shows his greatness not only in Chochmah, but in Malchus (kingship), as we see that even after Dovid HaMelech ruled, he faced many challenges. Shlomo HaMelech, however, “Rested on the throne of G‑d,” and experienced, in general, tranquility and peace.

This is the connection with Mashiach, who will fully embody the superior qualities of monarchy (similar to Dovid) and wisdom (like Shlomo). The Rambam actually says that the wisdom of Mashiach will in fact surpass that of Shlomo HaMelech. This will enable him to go beyond the level of Chochmah which is connected with middos and revel the level of peleh. We can see this same point from the fact that Mashiach is both a king and a rav,and will teach the entire Jewish people Torah, including the level of peleh, i.e. Chassidus.

In order for each individual to absorb and internalize these revelations, he must find these three levels within himself and accentuate them. Every Jew actually has a spark of Mashiach within, as can be seen from the prayer said when taking the Sefer Torah out of the Ark on the holidays: “May there be realized in us the verse which says, ‘And there shall rest on him the spirit of the L‑rd.....’ ” — a verse which refers to Mashiach. Each individual must actualize and reveal within himself 1) malchus andmiddos, 2) mochin which are connected with middos, and 3) the higher level of mochin.

This is alluded to in the beginning of this week’s chapter in Pirkei Avos, chapter Four. The Mishnah lists four qualities: “Who is wise?...Who is strong?...Who is wealthy?.. Who is honored?...” These correspond to the four general levels of which all ten soul-powers are composed. “Wise” corresponds to Chochmah; “strong” corresponds to Binah; “wealthy” corresponds to Tiferes (which includes all the middos); and “honored” corresponds to Malchus.

Furthermore, these four levels correspond to the four letters of G‑d’s Name, which in turn are contained within the Jewish soul. The Jewish soul is a “portion of G‑d” (chelek Elokah mi’ma’al), the word Elokah being connected with the name Elokim, representing the level of G‑dliness revealed within nature. The soul is also called chelek Havayah [amo],corresponding to the level of G‑dliness which transcends the world. A Jew must also draw down the third level of G‑dliness — that which transcends the world completely, that of peleh — by being even more scrupulous than halachah requires. And by revealing these four levels, we bring about the ultimate monarchy of Mashiach, whose rule is compared to a throne which has four legs. Although a chair will remain upright even with only three legs, the throne is even stronger and more solid with four legs, representing perfection in Malchus.

This idea is yet further emphasized on Shabbos, which corresponds to the Sefirah of Malchus. This is even more striking during Sefiras HaOmer, especially in a year when we begin counting on Sunday, and the Malchus of each week therefore falls on Shabbos. And this week in particular has unique significance, being Malchus she’b’Hod, since hod is connected with the idea of hoda’ah — the level of peleh.

* * *

4. The abovementioned receives yet further stress in the Shabbos immediately following Lag BaOmer, the yahrzeit and festive day of Rashbi. The Rashbi revealed the inner dimension of Torah in written form (the Zohar), and in such a way that it could be clearly understood by those who learn it. He also connected Pnimiyus HaTorah with the revealed part of Torah, similar to unifying the level of peleh (the highest of the three levels) with the second level, that of Torah in general. And through the unification of these two levels he was able to reveal these higher levels of G‑dliness even within the world.

This can be seen from the Talmudic saying (Megillah 29a), “Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai said, ‘Everywhere the Jews were exiled, the Divine Presence was with them: they were exiled to Bavel and the Divine Presence was with them...’ ” This shows that even within the lowest level of existence — that of exile — the Divine Presence is nevertheless manifest. This is also connected with the fact that Lag BaOmer corresponds to the Sefirah of Hod she’b’Hod. As mentioned above, hoda’ah corresponds to the level of peleh, the reason being that it is an acknowledgement of G‑d which completely transcends natural limitations, even those of intellect. However, even this level is drawn down and into the level of intellect.

And this process has continued through the subsequent generations, notably that of the AriZal, when it became “a mitzvah to reveal this wisdom [of Pnimiyus HaTorah].” It was carried further by subsequent Chassidic leaders, beginning with the Baal Shem Tov and the Maggid, and with even greater intensity through the Alter Rebbe. This process continued through the subsequent Rebbeim down to my sainted father-in-law, and increases from year to year — up to these very days with the first-time printing of certain Chassidic discourses from handwritten manuscripts.

As mentioned above, this draws down the level of peleh (which is essentially beyond understanding) to the sphere of understanding. This same idea is expressed in the Alter Rebbe’s explanation of the beginning of chapter 89 in Psalms, Maskil L’Eisan HaEzrachi. Eisan refers to the essence of the soul, which is on the transcendent level of peleh. Maskilrefers to the sublime intellectual level which is both higher than understanding, but nevertheless the source of intellect (corresponding to the second level). Ezrachi is related to the word “to illuminate,” i.e. that through the level of maskil, it is possible for the level of Eisan to be revealed in all levels of the soul. And although the complete attainment of this will be in the days of Mashiach, it is still accomplished to a certain extent even now. Furthermore, it gives one the ability to reveal G‑dliness even within the world, as indicated by the last verse of the Psalm, “Blessed is the L‑rd forever (l’olom, literally “to the world”),Amen and Amen.”

From this Psalm we proceed to Psalm 90, “A prayer by Moshe, the man of G‑d,” which also alludes to this same concept. We request, “May the pleasantness of the L‑rd our G‑d (no’am Hashem Elokeinu) be upon us,” again referring to the revelation of a sublime level (no’am Hashem) coming down to our level (“upon us”). This theme continues with the rest of our request, “Establish for us the work of our hands,” which refers to the building of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

This will be hastened through the study of Torah, and of Chassidus in particular. This also includes looking into the face of your Rebbe, which helps one’s understanding, as the Gemara (Eruvin 13b) quotes R. Yehudah HaNasi as saying, “This that my sharpness exceeds that of my colleagues is because I saw R. Meir from the back; and if I would have seen him from the front, I would be even sharper.”

All this will help further purify the world and reveal G‑dliness within it. It must be accompanied by the additional G‑dly service of each particular Jew, by keeping away from evil and, furthermore, doing the utmost to fulfill the oath administered to his soul before birth, “You shall be a tzaddik.” One might object and point out that in Tanya itself it is written that not every individual can necessarily become a tzaddik, and that one doesn’t have complete free choice in this area. However, since the Jew has the essence of G‑d within him, ultimately even this is within his reach. Furthermore, after all the purification, etc.. of the Jewish people over the course of time, now every Jew is able to reach the level of tzaddik — similar to the way things will be in the Messianic Age.

All this contains straightforward guidance in what all Jews should be doing to further hasten the redemption — in all three levels alluded to by the letter alef. This means first of all revealing G‑d’s presence in the world through using all worldly objects for a holy purpose, etc. In addition, there must be a special increase in Torah study — and particularly the study of Chassidus — in a way that it should be clearly understood in Chochmah, Binah, and Daas. Included in this is also influencing others to follow suit.

May all this hasten the redemption so that it come immediately, even before we have a chance to remove our “unclean garments”; and only afterwards will we be told to remove them (see Zechariah, 3:3 ff). And then the entire Jewish people will come out of exile together will all the houses of study, shuls and the Torah scrolls within them. This includes the Sefer Torah which was completed this week through the efforts of Jewish women (BaisRivkah School), and brought to its place in shul with great joy, singing, etc. And may it be G‑d’s will that we all come together to the holy city of Yerushalayim and the Holy TempleMount with the construction of the Third Beis HaMikdash.

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