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PARASHA YITRO | 19-26 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 25th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:41 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 26th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:03 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:41 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:43 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:50 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is co-sponsored by Anonymous and by Avremi & Chavi Gitler in memory of their nephew, התינוק  מנחם מענדל בן יבלחט"א ר יואל זאב שי. Yartzeit  is כ"ו שבט.The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Generously Sponsored this week by: Shmueli Tennenhaus and Rosie Levin. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (22nd of Shevat) of the  Rebbetzin Chaya Mushkah Schneerson, wife of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU - SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

MELAVE MALKA AT Ezra Bessaroth – FEB 2nd 
Featuring NYHS Scholar in Residence Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder, Rosh Yeshiva of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, Yeshiva University.  
www.ezrabessaroth.net

Jewish Women Connections at the Westin – SUN JAN 27th 11 AM
The largest philanthropic gathering of Jewish women in the Pacific Northwest, featuring guest speaker Sharon Tal, the renowned designer behind re-launch of the legendary Maskit Fashion House. Read Sharon's story in the latest issue of Jewish In Seattle magazine. See and shop a selection of Maskit designs at a post-event Trunk Show!  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Send Your Child to Jewish Camp
The Federation supports formative Jewish experiences through camp scholarships and incentives. Applications are now open for 2019 Jewish overnight camp scholarships. Last year, need-based scholarships made it possible for 263 children to attend. For first-time campers, incentive grants of up to $1,000 are available. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Campus Crash Course Sun Jan 27th 4 pm - 9 pm
Jewish and other pro-Israel students can face BDS initiatives, demonizing language, and other attacks on Israel's legitimacy on college campuses. StandWithUs presents a course that prepares students to turn difficult conversations into something positive.  Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS YITRO
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468779/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Yisro-20th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

The Ten Commandments are recorded twice in the Torah: once in Parshas Yisro, and once in Parshas Vaeschanan. Since the Ten Commandments are the foundation for the entire Torah and include the entire Torah, it is obvious that their repetition communicates central lessons relevant to the Torah as a whole, i.e., they each represent an approach that is vital to our observance of the Torah in its entirety.1

The fundamental differences between the narrative of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro and the narrative of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan is that Parshas Yisro relates how the Ten Commandments were given by G‑d. Parshas Vaeschanan, by contrast, presents Moshe’s description of the giving of the Ten Commandments. They are “the words of Moshe,” and not the direct word of G‑d.

This difference reflects two fundamental dimensions of the Torah: On one hand, the Torah is “G‑d’s will and G‑d’s wisdom,” “the Torah and the Holy One, blessed be He, are one.” From this perspective, the Torah is a “hidden treasure,” above the grasp of man.

Conversely, however, “the Torah has journeyed and descended through hidden stages, stage after stage through the entire set of the spiritual cosmos until it became enclothed in material entities and matters of this world.” This process reached its fullest expression at the giving of the Torah when the Torah was given to the Jewish people as they live in this material world. From that time onward, “the Torah is not in the heavens,” but rather the possession of the Jewish people. After the giving of the Torah, the Torah must be studied by the Jewish people as they exist “souls within bodies” and it is on the basis of their understanding that Torah law will be decided. Similarly, through their observance of the mitzvos, they transform the world into a dwelling for G‑d.

These two dimensions should be reflected in the way in which every Jew studies Torah: The awareness that the Torah transcends human knowledge leads to bittul, “selflessness.”2In a complete sense, this bittul is reflected in the verse, “My tongue will repeat Your sayings,” which is interpreted as follows: “The Torah is ‘Your sayings,’ and my tongue is merely repeating what You have said.” In this context, we can also interpret the verse “G‑d, open my lips and my mouth will recite Your praise,” i.e., although it is a man who is speaking, what he is saying is “Your praise,” G‑d’s words and not his own. “The Divine Presence speaks from his throat.”

On this basis, we can understand our Sages’ statement that we should study the Torah with the same awe, fear, and trembling experienced by the Jews at Mount Sinai. For, although we are lacking all the open miracles of Sinai, the essence of the experience, that a limited human being is perceiving the word of G‑d, is the same.

Conversely, we must also appreciate that the Torah was given to man as he exists within our material world, a soul within a physical body. Accordingly, a person must endeavor to understand the Torah with his own mind and faculties. And when he achieves this, the Torah he studies is considered as his own. He receives a measure of authority over the Torah which he has studied.3

These two thrusts are also reflected in the ultimate purpose of our Torah study: fashioning a dwelling for G‑d in these lower worlds. Here, too, we see two dimensions, that it is a dwelling for G‑d, i.e., a place where He reveals Himself totally, as a person reveals himself without restraint in his own home. This relates to the transcendent dimension of the Torah. Because “the Torah and G‑d are one,” the Torah can reveal His presence in the world.

Simultaneously, as mentioned above, the Torah has undergone a process of descent, enclothing itself in matters of our material world. This enables the dwelling to be part and parcel of our lower world itself, causing its very own framework of reference to serve as a medium to reveal G‑d’s dwelling.

In this context, we can apply our Sages’ expression, “One who enters a country should follow its modes,” to the Torah’s descent into worldly existence. Because the Torah adapts to the modes of existence of our material environment, it has the potential to make them into a dwelling for G‑d.4

Based on these concepts, we can appreciate the significance of the two different narratives of the Ten Commandments in the Torah. The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro reflects G‑d’s speech, granting the Jews the potential for their Torah study to reflect G‑d’s speech.

This concept is reflected in the introductory verse to the Ten Commandments, literally translated as, “And G‑d related all the following to say (לאמר).” The commentaries note that the word laimor, “to say,” appears frequently in the Torah with the intent that the message communicated should be conveyed to others. This meaning is not appropriate in this instance, for the entire Jewish people were present at the giving of the Torah. Nor can the intent be to communicate the message to the Jews of future generations, for all the souls of the Jewish people, even those yet to be born,5 attended at Mount Sinai.

Therefore, the intent of the term in this instance is that G‑d gave the Jews the power to say the words of Torah as He said them, that the words of the Torah studied by a Jew should be “G‑d’s word.”

The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan, by contrast, were spoken by Moshe. This grants a Jew the potential to comprehend the Torah within the context of his own limited human intellect and in a larger sense, to make a dwelling for G‑d within the context of our material world.6

Thus each of the different accounts of the Ten Commandments possesses an advantage lacking in the other. The account in Parshas Yisro reflects the advantage of direct revelation from G‑d, without an intermediaries. All the Jews heard the commandments from G‑d Himself.

In contrast, the description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflects how they are related by Moshe. Although Moshe was “a medium who connects,”7 and “the Divine Presence spoke from his throat,” this still represented a descent.8 And therefore, the giving of the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai represents the ultimate of man’s connection with G‑d.

Nevertheless, receiving G‑d’s word in this manner negates our individual existence. (And thus our Sages relate that after each of the Commandments, the souls of the Jews expired.) Conversely, the second description of the giving of the Ten Commandments reflects the ultimate of a person’s individual existence, that a Jew, like Moshe, can be a medium for the expression of G‑d’s speech.

To express these advantages within the context of the expression “a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds”: The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflects how even the lower worlds within their own context become a dwelling “for G‑d.” There is, however, a limitation although they are a “dwelling for G‑d,” there is a difference between G‑d and His dwelling. To refer to the analogy mentioned above, in a person’s own home, he expresses himself most freely: Although this is true, his home is merely the place where he expresses himself. There is a clear difference between the person himself and his home.

Similarly, in the analogue, although the description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Vaeschanan reflect how the Jews — as they exist within the framework of worldly existence — become a dwelling for G‑d, there remains, however, a difference between G‑d and His dwelling. The description of the Ten Commandments in Parshas Yisro, by contrast, reflect how nothing exists aside from G‑d Himself.

The ultimate level of fulfillment is when there is a fusion of both approaches, that G‑d’s essence is revealed within the context of our material world with no limitation whatsoever and that this revelation is internalized within the Jewish people (as opposed to causing their self-nullification). In this manner, a Jew repeats “G‑d’s word” and becomes a channel for the revelation of G‑dliness in the world at large.

In this context, the two narratives of the giving of the Ten Commandments can be seen as two stages in a single process. The narrative in Parshas Yisro reflects the potential for the revelation of essential G‑dliness. And the narrative in Parshas Vaeschanan reveals how this essential G‑dliness becomes internalized within Moshe, within the Jewish people, and within the world at large. In this manner, the revelation at Mount Sinai, becomes relevant to our divine service at all places and in all places.

* * *

2. There is a connection between the above concepts and the date on which Parshas Yisrois read this year, the 20th of Shvat, ten days after the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, and two days before the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe’s daughter, Rebbetzin Chayah Mushka.

Shvat is the eleventh month in the year. As mentioned on previous occasions,9 all existence is structured in a framework of reference of ten. Eleven refers to a level of transcendence above that framework. These two levels are also reflected in the Ten Commandments. The Ten Commandments themselves reflect a set of ten. The first commandment, Anochi, reflects a level of transcendence, “You are one and not in a numerical sense.”

The Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit falls on the tenth day of the eleventh month, i.e., the transcendent quality associated with eleven is drawn down into the limited framework of ten.10 And this is the ultimate goal of the giving of the Torah, that G‑d’s essence be drawn down by the Jews in their Torah study every day.

Surely, the above is relevant to our generation, the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the redemption, for it is in the Era of the Redemption when we will witness the quintessence of the above process, seeing how G‑d’s essence permeates every dimension of existence.

And the Redemption can come immediately. Indeed, miyad (מיד) the Hebrew for “immediately,” is intrinsically connected with the Redemption, for its letters serve as an acronym for the names Moshe, Yisrael, David, the three Jewish leaders associated with the Redemption. Moshe redeemed the Jews from Egypt and our Sages declare, “He was the first redeemer and he will be the ultimate Redeemer.” It is the spreading outward of the wellsprings of the teachings of Yisrael, the Baal Shem Tov, which will bring the Redemption. And similarly, the Mashiach will be a descendant of David, the first anointed king.

Similarly, miyad can reflect the continuity between generations as reflected in the acronym Moshe, Yehoshua, Doram, “Moshe Yehoshua and their generations.” This emphasizes how the concepts symbolized by the three letters are not distant from each other, but rather in direct connection.

Each one of us — man, woman, and child — must take a lesson from the above concepts.11 Since the Ten Commandments were associated with the unity of the Jewish people, at Mount Sinai, they camped “as one man, with one heart,” our application of the lessons they teach should also involve a community, i.e., ten other people. Every individual should seek to convey the totality of the Torah and its mitzvos, for they are all reflected within the Ten Commandments to at least ten other Jews.12

Although the above directive applies to every member of our generation, it is particularly relevant to those present in this “sanctuary in microcosm,” the house of prayer, house of study, and house of good deeds of the Previous Rebbe. Since the Nasi represents the entire generation, this building is beis chayeinu, “the source of our life,” for every person in this generation.

When all the Jews here will serve as a living example of how the Previous Rebbe’s directives should be fulfilled, the influence from this house13 will reach Jews throughout the world. And this will hasten the coming of the time when the synagogues and houses of study in the Diaspora will all be taken to Eretz Yisrael together with the entire Jewish people. May this take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA BESHALACH – SHABBOS SHIRA – TU b’SHEVAT | 12 -19 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 18th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:30 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 19th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:05 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:30 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:34 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:40 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Gala Bar-Mitzvah Kiddush! Mazel Tov to The Herbstman Family! The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Avi and Meirav Herbstsman on the occasion of Menachem Mendel’s Bar Mitzvah!  Mazel Tov to Menachem Mendel!   L’Torah, T’Chupah, v L’Maasim Tovim!

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (13th of Shevat) of the  Rebbetzin Shterna Sarah Schneersohn, wife of the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Sholom DovBer Schneerson, and mother of the sixth Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak. . 
www.chabad.org/calendar

MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה 

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

FRUTICAS (Tu b’SHEVAT) DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration.. Enjoy an incredible Chicken dinner and our traditional Sephardic Fruticas seder all catered by Dalia Amon.  Family price $90.00 or $35.00 per individual non-member. Children under 5 free. RSVP and pay by January 16th by going to 
http://ezrabessaroth.net/support-eb  or pay at the office or call 206-722-5500.www.ezrabessaroth.net  

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.   

Jewish Federation Tu b’Shevat Work Party At Kubota Gardens – MON JAN 21st Info/registration: craigm@jewishinseattle.org

Teen Israel Scholarship Applications – DEADLINE JAN 22nd 
The application deadline for teen Israel scholarships is just over a week away! Give your teen the experience of a lifetime — a journey to Israel that will strengthen your teen's Jewish identity and foster a deeper connection with our Jewish homeland.  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Helping Your Child Find Success in School & Life. Wed Jan 23rd 7 PM
At SHA. Samis Foundation Jewish Day School Scholar-In-Residence, Dr. Michael G. Thompson

Jewish Lawyers - Cardozo Society Networking – THU JAN 24th – 6 PM
Meet new faces, catch up with old friends, and explore new ideas with other Jewish lawyers and law students at a Cardozo Society Networking Happy Hour. Drinks and light snacks. The Alibi Room in Post Alley, 85 Pike St., No 410, Seattle 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Women's Endowment Fund Grants Deadline: FRI JAN 25th 
Applications are open for Women's Endowment Fund (WEF) grants from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. WEF supports programs that empower and improve the lives of women and girls, locally and in Israel. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Jewish Women Connections at the Westin – SUN JAN 27th 11 AM
The largest philanthropic gathering of Jewish women in the Pacific Northwest, featuring guest speaker Sharon Tal, the renowned designer behind re-launch of the legendary Maskit Fashion House. Read Sharon's story in the latest issue of Jewish In Seattle magazine. See and shop a selection of Maskit designs at a post-event Trunk Show!  
www.JewishInSeattle.org

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Send Your Child to Jewish Camp
The Federation supports formative Jewish experiences through camp scholarships and incentives. Applications are now open for 2019 Jewish overnight camp scholarships. Last year, need-based scholarships made it possible for 263 children to attend. For first-time campers, incentive grants of up to $1,000 are available. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Seattle Campus Crash Course Sun Jan 27th 4 pm - 9 pm
Jewish and other pro-Israel students can face BDS initiatives, demonizing language, and other attacks on Israel's legitimacy on college campuses. StandWithUs presents a course that prepares students to turn difficult conversations into something positive.  Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU - SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS BESHALACH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468773/jewish/The-11th-of-Shvat-and-Shabbos-Parshas-Beshallach-13th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

There are several significant dimensions to the fact that this year, Yud Shvat, the day of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, was commemorated on a Wednesday. Among them:

  1. Wednesday is the day on which the luminaries were suspended in the heavens;
  2. Wednesday begins the preparations for the coming Shabbos (on which the service associated with the previous week, and in this instance, the service associated with the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, is elevated to a higher level). This is reflected in the recitation of the verses from Lechu Nerraninah (the beginning of the Kabbolas Shabbos service) in the Psalm of the Day of Wednesday.

The latter concept is particularly appropriate this Shabbos, for it is Shabbos Shirah (the Shabbos of Song), the Shabbos on which the Torah reading contains the song sung by the Jewish people after the crossing of the Red Sea.

Shabbos shares a unique connection to song as reflected in the psalm that begins, “A psalm, a song for the Shabbos day.” In Chassidic thought, it is explained that song is a medium through which one can ascend to higher spiritual levels. For that reason, the elevation of the worlds to a higher spiritual level on Shabbos comes about through song. In particular, this potential is granted on Shabbos Shirah, and from Shabbos Shirah, the potential is drawn down to the other Shabbasos of the year. Thus, it is understood that Shabbos Shirah also allows a unique potential for the elevation of the service of YudShvat.

This Shabbos s also significant because it generates blessing for the day of Tu BeShvat. There are two important dimensions to the latter date: It is the New Year of the Trees and it is also the fifteenth of the month, the day on which the moon shines in its fullness, i.e., the service of this month is expressed in a complete manner. Connecting points to all of the above concepts can be found in the two Torah portions associated with the present Shabbos: Beshallach which is read in the morning service and Yisro, which is read in the afternoon service.

There is a connection between these two Torah readings. Parshas Beshallach marks the completion of the redemption from Egypt which is connected with the giving of the Torah described in Parshas Yisro as it is written, “When you take the people out of the Land of Egypt, you will serve Me on this mountain.” Conversely, Parshas Yisro is connected with the splitting of the Red Sea described in Parshas Beshallach, for it was the news of the splitting of the sea that motivated Yisro to come to visit Moshe.

Both Torah portions also share a connection to the Era of the Redemption. The song sung by the Jewish people after the crossing of the Red Sea contains several references to the Era of the Redemption. For example, the verse “the Sanctuary of G‑d established by Your hands,” which refers to the Third Beis HaMikdash which will be constructed at that time, and the concluding verse, “And G‑d will reign forever and ever.” Similarly, the oath taken by G‑d against Amalek recorded at the conclusion of Parshas Beshallach will be in force until Amalek is wiped out in the Era of the Redemption.

The giving of the Torah described in Parshas Yisro is also associated with the ultimate revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah which will emerge from Me,” in the Era of the Redemption.2

The connection between all of these concepts can be understood better through the analysis of the opening verse of the Torah reading, “And G‑d did not choose the way of the Philistines although it was close.” (In practice, all the subsequent events are connected with this choice. Since G‑d led the people southward, it was necessary for the sea to split, there, they encountered Amalek, and it was because of these miracles that Yisro visited them.)

The Midrash explains that “the way of the Philistines” was an eleven day journey and draws a connection to the verse “an eleven day journey from Choreb.” Instead of taking this short journey, they traveled through the desert for forty years.

The Midrash also relates that eleven has positive significance, referring to “the distinct commandment,... the first of the ten, ‘I am G‑d, your L‑rd.’ ” In Kabbalistic terminology, eleven refers to the level of “one, but not in a numerical sense,” i.e., G‑d’s essence which is above the ten Sefiros.

By not choosing to lead the Jews by this path, G‑d did not intend to remove this influence from the Jews. Instead, His intent was that this transcendent influence be drawn down and made part of their inner being. This was accomplished through the forty year journey through the desert which endowed them with “a knowing heart, eyes that see, and ears that hear.” For it was the internalization of this transcendent potential which prepared them for the entry into Eretz Yisrael.3

The above was accomplished through the forty-two4 journeys of the Jewish people through the desert. Part and parcel of the intent in this journey was to elevate the sparks of G‑dliness enclothed in the material entities with which the Jews used during this journey. These sparks had fallen to low levels, the negative dimension of the number eleven.5Nevertheless, through the efforts of the Jewish people, these negative dimensions can be nullified, and the positive power of these transcendent potentials revealed. Indeed, this service draws down increased energy into the service of G‑d within the context of the world’s limitations, which are alluded to in the Ten Commandments.

Were G‑d to have led the Jews to Eretz Yisrael on the eleven day journey, this transcendent quality would have been revealed from above, but would not have permeated the Jewish people as they exist within their own context. By causing the journey to last forty years, the transcendent quality associated with eleven was drawn down through the service of the Jewish people in elevating the material frame of reference in which we live, thus making it an integral part of our existence.

Based on the above, we can appreciate how the events mentioned in the Torah portions of Beshallach and Yisro serve as a preparation for the ultimate revelation of the Torah in the Era of the Redemption. The Torah to be revealed in the Era of the Redemption was also conveyed in the revelation at Mount Sinai.6 Nevertheless, the concepts to be revealed at that time have remained hidden to the point that they are described as “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me,” i.e., a new entity never appreciated before.7

This concept relates to the contrast between the numbers ten and eleven mentioned above. The giving of the Torah was associated with the Ten Commandments and thus reflects how the Torah enclothes itself within the limits of worldly existence. For this reason, the giving of the Torah is associated with Nigleh, the revealed dimensions of Torah law which provide us with guidelines for our conduct within this world. Conversely, the revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me” is associated with the number eleven, the transcendent dimension mentioned above.

In this context, the wanderings of the Jewish people throughout the centuries can be compared to the journeys through the desert, for the purpose of those wanderings was the elevation of the sparks of G‑dliness contained within the nations in which they lived. Ultimately, this service will lead to the fulfillment of the prophecy “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the land,” and this will be reflected in the wiping out of Amalek.

At that time, we will merit to take possession of Eretz Yisrael in its fullness as a land of ten nations, including not only the lands of the seven Canaanite nations, but also the lands of the Keni, Kenizi, and Kadmoni. Furthermore, Eretz Yisrael will spread out through the entire world, revealing how the world is G‑d’s dwelling.

There is a connection between the above and Shabbos Shirah, “the Shabbos of Song.” As mentioned above, song is a medium of ascent and also a medium for revelation. In this context, we can develop the ideas explained by our Sages that there were nine songs sung by the Jewish people as a whole and in the Era of the Redemption, we will sing the tenth song, “a new song.”

Our Sages continue that the previous songs are referred to as shirah, the feminine form of the word song, while the “new song” of the Era of the Redemption is referred as shir, the masculine form. All the previous songs refer to the efforts of the Jewish people (the feminine dimension, as explained by the commentaries to Shir HaShirim) to ascend to a higher spiritual level and to elevate their environment. In contrast, the song of the Era of the Redemption will be a song of revelation from above8 (the masculine dimension).

The above is particularly relevant to the month of Shvat, for Shvat is the eleventh month of the year (when counting from Nissan, the month of redemption).9 There is a special emphasis on the above on the tenth and the eleventh days of the month. The tenth of Shvat is the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, the day on which “all the deeds, teaching, and service which he performed throughout his life” are elevated to a higher level.10 The positive potential generated on this day is particularly emphasized this year when YudShvat falls on a Wednesday, the day the luminaries were suspended in the heavens, i.e., a day associated with revelation.

The elevated state reached is reflected on the eleventh day when the quality of transcendent revelation is expressed by the monthly cycle and by the daily cycle. All the more unique is the commemoration of these dates in the present year, for this is the 42nd anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit, indicating that “the journey through the desert” to elevate the Jewish people and the environment in which they live has been completed and we, the last generation of exile and the first generation of the Redemption, are prepared to enter Eretz Yisrael.

And soon we will merit the singing of the “new song,” the song of redemption, a song of unity and oneness. Indeed, a foretaste of the happiness and joy which will accompany that song can be experienced at present. The confidence that the Redemption is an immediate reality should produce joy and happiness.11

* * *

2. This Shabbos also conveys blessing upon the day of Tu BeShvat, “the New Year of the Trees,” a day which shares a connection with the seven species of produce for which Eretz Yisrael is praised, wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olive (oil), and dates (honey). This is relevant to every Jew, for every Jew is “a cherished land” which can give forth the seven species of produce, i.e., seven different modes of service of G‑d.

It is proper to mention the importance of holding farbrengens on Tu BeShvat in every place. At these farbrengens, it should be emphasized how every Jew is “a cherished land,” and possesses within himself the potential to express a mode of service appropriate to each of the seven types of produce for which Eretz Yisrael is praised.

Each Jew has a treasure store of spiritual potentials that enables him to bring out services representative of these seven services. This also includes the revelation of the secrets of Torah, the service associated with dates, as alluded to in the verse “milk and honey are under your tongue.” And it is through these efforts that we will merit that “a shoot will emerge from the stem of Yishai,” the coming of Mashiach who will take us to Eretz Yisraeltogether with the entire Jewish people. And then we will merit the ultimate fulfillment of the giving of the Torah, the revelation of the “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.”

SHABBOS BO | 5 -12 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 11th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:21 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 12th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:06 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:21 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:26 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM (Earliest Tefilin c. 6:53 am)
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:30 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Shimon Dershowitz for sponsoring cholent in honor ofRabbi Levitin’s Birthday (28th Tevet). The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Saifo and Frumi Marasow on the birth of their new grandchild! 

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the yahrzeit (5th of Shevat) of the  "Sefas Emes”,  Rabbi Yehudah Leib Alter (1847-1905), the second Rebbe of the Ger Chassidic dynasty. . 
www.chabad.org/calendar

FARBRENGEN ALERT – YUD SHEVAT WED JAN 16th 8 PM
At the home of Rabbi Mendy Levitin, 4027 NE 60th Street.  The sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, passed away on Shabbat morning, the 10th of Shevat, of the year 5710 from creation (1950).  A year later, at t a gathering of Chassidim marking the first anniversary of the passing of the sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, the late Rebbe's son-in-law, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, delivered a Chassidic discourse (maamar) entitled Basi LeGani ("I Came into My Garden"), signifying his formal acceptance of the leadership of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement.
www.chabad.org/calendar

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
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Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
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SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
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CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
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CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
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RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

TORAH, TEA, AND COOKIES WITH RABBI ROSENFELD – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
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BCMH presents "Ladies Kumzits" SAT JAN 12th 8:30 pm
In Yavneh Bldg. More info or to sponsor, contact Aliza Genauer at (201) 745-8156
FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
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SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
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LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
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PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
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AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS BO
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468770/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Bo-6th-Day-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

This week’s Torah reading, Parshas Bo, relates how the Jewish people were redeemed from Egypt, as it is written “And on that selfsame day, all the hosts of G‑d left the land of Egypt.” The potential for this exodus was generated by G‑d’s command to Moshe which is mentioned at the beginning of the Torah reading, “Come to Pharaoh.”1

The Zohar explains that there is also a positive dimension to Pharaoh, “the source for the revelation of all lights.” Furthermore, the word that phrase uses for “revelation,” ispariyuhas the connotation of wildness, referring to an unbounded revelation that cannot be contained.2 Because in his source, Pharaoh represented such an elevated potential, his expression in this world expressed power in a fallen state.

In a different place, the Zohar relates that Moshe was apprehensive about approaching Pharaoh because Pharaoh represented the source of all evil. Therefore, it was necessary for G‑d to tell Moshe, “Come,” i.e., “Come with Me, I will accompany you.” Similarly, it can be explained that contemplating the essential nature of the counterpart of Pharaoh in holiness cast fear and awe upon Moshe. How could he, a limited human approach the essence of G‑d? Accordingly, he needed the reassurance that G‑d would accompany him and facilitate this fusion of limitation and infinity.

Such a fusion is possible only because of G‑d’s essence. Nevertheless, since the light from G‑d’s essence is connected with its source and reveals its source, it draws down the potential for the fusion of opposites to all levels, even to this physical world. And thus, Moshe as he exists, a soul enclothed in a body, could receive the revelation of these infinite levels of G‑dliness.

The above concepts can be understood within the context of the ultimate goal of the exodus from Egypt, the giving of the Torah as it is written, “When you take the people out of Egypt, you will serve G‑d on this mountain.” The ultimate goal of the Torah is to allow for the fulfillment of G‑d’s desire to have a dwelling in the lower worlds. Just as it is in a person’s home that his personality finds expression without restraint or inhibition, it will be in this world, G‑d’s dwelling place, that G‑dliness will be revealed without restraint.

Before the giving of the Torah, there was a decree preventing the spiritual from descending to the physical and the physical from ascending to the spiritual. When G‑d gave the Torah, He nullified this decree, making possible the revelation of the spiritual — and indeed, His very essence, the highest level of spirituality possible — within this world and conversely, the transformation of the material dimensions of this world into articles of holiness. In the fullest sense, this fusion of finiteness and infinity is revealed in the physical person of a Jew, in the union of his body and soul, for “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one.” Since this fusion was the ultimate goal of the exodus, it was reflected in G‑d’s command to Moshe, “Come to Pharaoh,” which served as the catalyst for the redemption.

A similar concept is expressed at the very outset of the Torah’s description of G‑d’s selection of Moshe as the redeemer. Moshe protested, “I am not a man of speech... I am slow-tongued.... Send by means of who You will send.” The commentaries explain that Moshe’s speech defect was representative of the spiritual state of the world. Speech, representative of the Sefirah of Malchus, was in exile and Moshe was unable to awaken this potential. Therefore, he maintained, he was not fitting to bring about the redemption.

From another perspective, in Chassidic thought, it is explained that Moshe’s speech defect stemmed from the fact that his spiritual level — which had its source in the transcendent realm of Tohu — was too high to enclothe itself within the confines of our world; it was impossible for the lights to be enclothed within the vessels. Therefore, he asked G‑d to chose an agent who was capable of internalizing and transmitting revelation within the context of our limited world.

G‑d replied to him, “Who gave man a mouth.... I am G‑d.... I will be with your mouth and direct what you say.” G‑d’s essence possesses the potential to fuse opposites as explained above. Therefore, although Moshe as he exists within his own individual context could not awaken the potential of speech, because “I will be with your mouth,” G‑d’s influence generated the potential for the transcendent revelations of Tohu to be revealed within the finite context of our world. Thus, Moshe’s protest can be understood as being intended at bringing about the fusion of finiteness and infinity associated with the giving of the Torah.3

In this context, we can appreciate Moshe’s apprehension before his confrontation with Pharaoh, “the source for the revelation of all lights.” From his own perspective, Moshe was unable to internalize and transmit transcendent revelation within the context of this world — and such a transmission was necessary for the Redemption from Egypt. Therefore, he needed G‑d to “come with him,” and to reveal the essential potential to fuse opposites. Such a revelation in turn makes possible the revelation of how our material world, and more particularly, the physical body of a Jew, can be a dwelling place for G‑d.

The fusion of finiteness and infinity experienced by Moshe4 became a source of influence leading to a similar fusion to be experienced by the Jewish people at the giving of the Torah.5 This is emphasized by G‑d’s statements “You will be unto Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation,” i.e., even as the Jews exist within the context of this physical world, they will be holy.

Furthermore, the Rabbis associate the expression “kingdom of priests” with the level of High Priest. A High Priest had to be physically healthy without a blemish and wealthy. This indicates the potential for the Jewish people to achieve well-being and prosperity in material terms and still be one with G‑d. The ultimate expression of this fusion will be in the Era of the Resurrection when all the souls of the Jewish people will be enclothed in bodies.6 Indeed, at that time, the soul will derive its nurture from the body.

Based on the above, we can understand why the Torah places such a heavy emphasis on the Jewish people “borrowing” from the Egyptians “utensils of gold, utensils of silver, and garments” and why G‑d performed a special miracle and granted the Jews favor in the eyes of the Egyptians. On the surface, rather than stay one extra moment in exile, they should have left immediately.7 Since, however, the intent is the establishment of a dwelling for G‑d in the lower worlds, the fullest conception of this comes when the dwelling is established within the context of those worlds. And this comes, not through breaking the order of natural existence8 — taking the wealth against the Egyptians’ will — but rather, through its transformation — that the Egyptians give their wealth to the Jews willingly.

Nevertheless, the redemption from Egypt did not represent a complete transformation of the material nature of the world. For this reason, it was necessary for the Jews to “flee” from Egypt.9 In contrast, before the ultimate Redemption, our material environment will be refined and therefore “you will not leave in haste, nor will you take flight.” Since “I will cause the spirit of impurity to depart from the earth,” the Jews will approach the Redemption with eagerness, but they will not be pressured by the constraints of this world. Instead, from a state of prosperity experienced within the context of this world, they will proceed to the ultimate well-being and eternal life of the Era of the Redemption.

2. The above concepts are relevant to the commemoration of the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe on Yud Shvat in the coming week. For the Previous Rebbe is the Moshe of our generation and our generation, “the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the Redemption,” is a reincarnation of the generation of the exodus.

Furthermore, in our generation, we have seen a great increase in the efforts to transform the material environment of the world. This is reflected in the efforts to spread the wellsprings of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus outward, the printing of many sacred Jewish texts, and the spreading of the observance of the seven universal laws commanded to Noach and his descendants.

And this has had an effect on the world at large. The nations of the world are granting support to the Jews and assisting their observance of the Torah and its mitzvos. Even Russia which for years oppressed the Jewish people and prevented their emigration is now enabling the Jews to conduct their lives as they desire. Moreover, not only are they allowing the Jews to emigrate, they are even assisting them in doing so.

We are at the pinnacle of Jewish history, the time most appropriate for the Redemption to come. And the coming of the Redemption will be further hastened by the commemoration of Yud Shvat, by holding farbrengens in connection with that date, by studying the Previous Rebbe’s teachings, and dedicating ourselves to the activities he promulgated. And this will hasten the fulfillment of the prophecy “Those that lie in the dust will arise and sing,” at which time we will emerge from the exile and proceed to Eretz Yisrael, to Jerusalem, and to the Third Beis HaMikdash.

Themes which the Rebbe Shlita developed in this farbrengen were also presented in the essays entitled “A Lifetime Renewed” and “Women, Partners in the Dynamic of Creation.”

 

 

 

 

SHABBOS VA’EIRA Mevarchim Shevat | 28 Teves – 5 Shevat, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  JAN 4th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:13 PM

SHABBOS - SAT JAN 5th 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Shevat 7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:06 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:13 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:18 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon – Fri Shacharis 7 AM /ROSH CHODESH MONDAY, SHACHARIS 7 AM (Earliest Tefilin 6:49 am)
Sun - Thu Mincha 4:15 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Thank you to Yitzchok Rothman for sponsoring cholent in honor and in memory of the 20th yahrzeit of his father, Yehuda ben HaRav Yehoshua Falik (29thTevet). The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

MAZEL TOV MAZEL TOV!
Mazel Tov to Rabbi Shimon and Meira on the upshern of their son Shneur Zalmen.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of 28th Tevet, Rabbi Levitin’s birthday!  Happy Birthday Rabbi Levitin! The 28th of Tevet also commemorates the birthday of Rebbetzin Chana Schneerson, mother of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 6:30 PM at CSTL
Thank you  to our generous sponsors. Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 3:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה    

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Ashreichem Yisrael “Wrapunzel" Ladies Night Out: SUN JAN 6th 7 PM
Cost: $10/person. RSVP to: 
sarahtbrody@gmail.com

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

BCMH presents "Ladies Kumzits" SAT JAN 12th 8:30 pm
In Yavneh Bldg. More info or to sponsor, contact Aliza Genauer at (201) 745-8156
FRUTICAS DINNER AT EB - SUN JAN 20th 5:30PM
Exciting annual family Fruticas (Tu b’Shevat) celebration. 
www.ezrabessaroth.net 

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

LIMMUD SEATTLE – 6:30 PM JAN 19th- to 6:30 PM JAN 20th, 2019.
At Bellevue College.  
www.limmudseattle.org

PROTECTION, PRIVACY, BIG BROTHER AND YOU -  SAT, JAN. 26th 7:30 PM
Can you retain some element of privacy on the web?  How does technology impact the education of our children?  Should artificial intelligence be regulated? You Are invited to a panel discussion with techies: Dov Weiss, Danielle Ellbogen,  Yoni Hirsch, Yehuda Turpie and Moderator, Raf Zimberoff. At Minyan Ohr Chadash 6721 51st Ave S, Seattle

SEATTLE JEWISH FEDERATION CONNECTIONS 2019 SUN JAN 27th 
With Sharon Tal of Maskit Fashion at the Westin Hotel, Sea., Co-Chairs: Adina Almo & Lea Lipman. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org


REBBE’S SICHO FOR MEVARCHIM SHEVAT
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2507866/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Shmos-23rd-Day-of-Teves-5750-1990.htm © SichosInEnglish.

Today is the Shabbos on which the month of Shevat is blessed. Thus, blessing is also conveyed on the special day, the tenth of Shevat, the yahrzeit of the Previous Rebbe, when “all of his deeds, Torah, and service, are revealed and shine in revelation from above to below... and ‘bring about salvation in the depths of the earth.’ ” Since the Previous Rebbe is a Nasi, his yahrzeit is relevant to every Jew. Everyone, men, women, and children, should strengthen their commitment to follow the paths which the Previous Rebbe showed us.

Each year, the yahrzeit represents an increase and an elevation. In particular, this year, the fortieth anniversary of the Previous Rebbe’s passing, is associated with receiving, “a knowing heart, eyes that see, and ears that hear,” in regard to the Previous Rebbe’s teachings as our Sages taught: “After forty years, one attains [full grasp] of one’s teacher’s knowledge.” The fundamental lesson to be learned from the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit is connected with the date, the tenth of Shevat. The Torah states, “The tenth will be holy, consecrated unto G‑d.” Holiness has two dimensions. On one hand, it implies an aspect of separation as the Zohar states: “ ’Holy’ is a word to itself.” Conversely, it also spreads to other entities. Thus, in regard to certain holy articles, the Torah states: “Everything which touches them shall become consecrated.”

This concept is also reflected in the yud, the letter which is numerically equivalent to ten. The letter yud is only a point, without any form or particular dimensions. Thus, it reflects the essential point which transcends everything. Nevertheless, this point also is associated with the point of concentration which includes everything. To view the concept in spiritual terms: The letter yud is the first letter of (and thus, stands for) the name Y‑H‑V‑H and thus refers to G‑d who is utterly transcendent. Simultaneously, “from the truth of His Being, all existence came into being.” This is reflected in the soul of a Jew (which also is alluded to by the letter yud, representing the quality of Chochmah) and also in the Divine spark which brings into being and grants life to each creation.1

Within a Jew’s soul, the letter yud refers to the essence of the Jewish soul, the pintele yid, which is above all form. This inner dimension, however, pervades and permeates through all our other levels of soul.

Similarly, in all creations, the Divine spark which gives it life is separate and holy. It, nevertheless, grants the entity life, and thus, reflects that entity’s true being.

Based on the above, we can understand why the Messianic redemption is associated with the number ten.2 The Messianic redemption will be the “true and complete redemption,” the era when the quality of truth will be revealed.3 Similarly, the truth of every entity, the Divine spark which maintains its existence, will be revealed. This is connected with the quality of completeness which is also associated with the number ten. In that age, there will be a complete revelation of G‑dliness in all matters.

In this context, we can understand the application of the concept of “ten” in our service of G‑d. The purpose of creation is that a Jew should reveal the aspect of “ten” within his soul, his Jewish spark, and proceed to reveal the aspect of “ten,” the spark of G‑dliness, in the world at large, by spreading holiness — “the tenth will be holy” — throughout the world. The ultimate completion of this service will come in the Messianic age when, “the glory of the L‑rd will be revealed and, together, all flesh will see that the mouth of L‑rd has spoken.”

Based on the above, we can understand the connection between the number ten and the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit on the tenth of Shevat. The two seemingly contradictory aspects explained regarding ten — that it is “holy,” above the other qualities, and, simultaneously, permeates through them all — also applies in regard to a Nasi. The word Nasi has its source in the word naso, “uplifted,” as personified in King Shaul’s being “from his shoulders upward, higher than the entire nation.”

Conversely, “the Nasi is the entire people,” and a king is described as being, “the heart of the entire congregation of Israel.” Just as the heart is the source of each individual person’s life energy, the king is the source of the life energy of the entire people.

Though these qualities apply regarding all Nesi'im, since the Previous Rebbe was the Nasiin the generation which directly precedes the coming of Mashiach, when we “taste” the revelations of the Messianic age, it follows that these qualities were revealed to a greater extent in him. Accordingly, his yahrzeit, the day on which “all of his service is revealed,” falls on the tenth of the month.4

A unique potential to carry out the service of “ten,” to reveal the soul of every Jew and to reveal the “soul” — the Divine life energy — of the world at large, was granted by the revelation of the teachings of Chassidus. This enables us to establish a dwelling for G‑d in this world. This will be realized with the coming of Mashiach which is brought about through the service of spreading the wellsprings of Chassidus outward.

In particular, the Previous Rebbe brought about an increase in this service by:

a) Having the teachings of Chassidus translated into other languages;

b) Spreading Chassidus in America, “the lower half of the world,” where these efforts were broadened and expanded in a manner which incomparably surpassed the efforts in the previous generations.

The Previous Rebbe’s name itself also alludes to such activities. His first name, Yosef, is connected with the service of, “May G‑d add on to me another son;” i.e., transforming a person who is an “other,” estranged and cut off from his Jewish heritage into a “son.” This involves revealing the yud, the spark of holiness, within the person.

His second name, Yitzchok, is connected with the service, “Whoever hears will laugh with me,” spreading happiness and joy. True joy comes when the happiness permeates an individual’s entire personality and spreads to his surrounding environment. Thus, this involves not only the joy of the soul, but also the joy of the body; not only joy connected with Torah and mitzvos, but joy in every aspect of a person’s life.

2. Based on the above, we can understand the service which is appropriate on the Shabbos on which the month of Shevat is blessed: The blessing of the new month and its sanctification have to be reflected in the service of each particular Jew5 and motivate him to express new blessing and new holiness. Each month, his service must be renewed according to the particular nature of the month.

Since the Previous Rebbe’s yahrzeit is the most significant day of the coming month, it follows that the service of Shevat is connected with the concept of “ten” explained above. A Jew must reveal the aspect of “ten” in his soul and in the world at large. This will cause, as we declare in the monthly blessings, “the Holy One, blessed be He, to renew” the month for blessing.6

We conclude those blessings by stating, “Let us say. Amen.” “Amen” expresses the quality of completion and thus reflects how the quality of yud will permeate through the totality of existence.7 The effect will be all-encompassing, influencing even the lowest levels as evident by the fact that we omit the prayer Av HaRachmim (connected with undesirable events) and proceed directly to Ashrei, “Happy are those who dwell in Your house,” connected with the Messianic Bais HaMikdash, the ultimate expression of “G‑d’s house.”

The above is enhanced by the fact that Shevat is blessed in the month of Teves, the tenth month. Thus, the service of “ten” connected with Yud Shevat receives its blessing from the tenth month. This month also reflects the two contrasts of ten. On one hand, it is connected with the service of “the tenth will be holy,” which emphasizes separation and transcendence. Conversely, there is also an emphasis that this quality permeate through all existence. Thus, the month is described as, “the month where the body derives pleasure from the body.” The term “body” can be interpreted, in a spiritual context, to refer to G‑d’s essence. Thus, that expression means that Teves is the month when G‑d’s essence derives pleasure from the service that we carry out with our bodies.

The above is also enhanced by the fact that, this year, Rosh Chodesh Shevat falls on Shabbos.8 Shabbos grants us greater potential to reveal holiness and to have that holiness permeate every aspect of the world (the two aspects of “ten” mentioned above). In an ultimate sense, these qualities will be realized in “the era which is all Shabbos and rest for eternity,” the Messianic age.

Similarly, added influence is brought about by this week’s Torah portion, parshas Shmos. That portion begins: “These are the names of the children of Israel who came into Egypt together with Yaakov. Each man came with his household.”

Egypt, associated with boundaries and limitations, is symbolic of exile. Nevertheless, there, “the names of the children of Israel” are revealed. This refers to “the names of the children of Israel on the earthly plane, for throughout the duration of the Egyptian exile, the Jews “did not change their names,” and also, to the sublime spiritual names — including the name Y‑H‑V‑H — which are revealed in the names of the Jewish people.

The Jews came “with Yaakov.” “Yaakov” (יעקב) can be broken up into Yud eikev (י עקב), i.e., the source of the soul, the yud (the reflection of the name Y‑H‑V‑H), is drawn down throughout the totality of an individual’s personality, until it effects even its heel (eikev).

“Each man came with his household.” This led to the perpetuation of the Jewish people. Because they came as families, they “were fruitful, became prolific, and multiplied very much.” They raised children to proceed to “Torah, chuppah, and good deeds,” encouraging them to build Jewish homes of their own.9

The conclusion of the Torah portion is also connected with the above themes: Mosheprotested to G‑d: “From the time I came... to speak in Your name, this people’s situation has deteriorated. You have not saved Your people [as of yet].” This brought about G‑d’s reply, “I revealed Myself to the patriarchs....” Furthermore, it prompted the revelation of the name Y‑H‑V‑H (to which the patriarchs were not privileged) within the boundaries and limitations of the world (Egypt), ultimately, leading to the redemption from Egypt and the giving of the Torah.

Similarly, each Jew possesses an attribute of Moshe within his soul which protests to G‑d. “From the time... I [began] speaking in Your name... (i.e., practicing Torah and mitzvoswhich reveal ‘G‑d’s names’ within the world), You have not saved Your people.”10

This prompts a twofold reply from G‑d:

a) “I revealed Myself to the patriarchs...” This revelation is not only an event of the past, but rather a present factor. The patriarchs endowed their spiritual heritage to their descendants. Thus, G‑d’s revelation to the patriarchs is an active force influencing our own behavior.

b) He promises the revelation of the name, Y‑H‑V‑H, which will come in the Messianic redemption. Then, we will emerge from exile (Egypt) and merit the revelation of “the new Torah which will emerge from Me.”

* * *

3. This Shabbos is also unique in that it follows the yahrzeit of the Rambam on the 20th of Teves11 and precedes the yahrzeit of the Alter Rebbe, on motzaei Shabbos, the 24th of Teves. The Alter Rebbe, the founder of Chabad Chassidism, opened a new path which allowed the teachings of Pnimiyus HaTorah which were previously hidden to be comprehended through the powers of understanding and thus, reveal G‑dliness within the context of this material world.

This quality is alluded to in his name, Schneur (שניאור) which can be broken up into two Hebrew words (שני אור) that mean “two lights,” i.e., the light of Nigleh (the revealed legal realm of Torah study) and the light of Pnimiyus HaTorah.12 The Alter Rebbe’s second name, Zalman, shares the same letters of the word L’zman and is thus, connected with the concept of time. Furthermore, since this name is not Lashon HaKodesh, it relates to the gentile nations. Thus, the combination of the two names implies that the two lights of Nigleh and Pnimiyus HaTorah will be drawn down within the context of our world.

After the Alter Rebbe opened this path of service, it was continued by the Rebbeim who succeeded him and thus, is also alluded to in their names. Thus, the Mitteler Rebbe’s name DovBer fuses together both the Hebrew and Yiddish words for “bear” in a single word.13 Our Sages describe a bear as “overladen with meat.” Thus, the Mitteler Rebbe’s name implies drawing down the revelation of G‑dliness to the level of one who is “overladen with meat.”

This service was continued by the other Rebbeim. Thus, the Rebbe Rashab’s name was Sholom DovBer, i.e., in addition to the fusion of Dov and Ber, the concept of Shalom, “peace,” was introduced.

The Previous Rebbe carried this service further. Thus, his first name, Yosef, refers, as explained above, to the transformation of a person who is estranged (achar) into a “son.”14His second name, Yitzchok, refers to an all-encompassing joy, a happiness that effects both the body and the soul.

The power to carry out these services was derived from the Alter Rebbe who revealed how to connect G‑dliness to the world through Torah and how to fuse together the teachings of Nigleh (which involve the refinement of worldly matters) with those of Pnimiyus HaTorah(“the Tree of Life [which has no connection] to the forces of evil”).

The concept of establishing a connection between G‑dliness and the world is also expressed in the opening phrase of the Alter Rebbe’s two major works, the Tanya and the Shulchan Aruch. The Tanya is based on the verse, “It (referring to the full scope of Torah) is very close to you.” Similarly, the Shulchan Aruch begins, “Yehudah ben Taima declares...” The name Yehudah contains the name Y‑H‑V‑H. This attribute becomes “ben Taima,” which refers to a constant revelation; a person constantly expresses the G‑dliness within him.

A similar concept can be explained in connection with the Rambam who begins the Mishneh Torah with the letter yud and states that, “The foundation of all foundations and the pillar of wisdom is to know that there is a Primary Being and that all the entities... came into being from the truth of His Being.”

Similarly, this concept is connected with the date of his yahrzeit, the 20th of Teves, for twenty is twice ten. Twenty is also (numerically equivalent to and thus) connected with the level of Kesser, a level which transcends the world entirely and yet is revealed in a manner which, “brings about salvation in the midst of the earth.”

The yahrzeits of these teachers should inspire us to establish fixed programs of study that focus on their works; in particular, strengthening the commitment to the daily study of the Mishneh Torah (preferably three chapters a day) and establishing a fixed program of study in the Tanya and the Alter Rebbe’s Shulchan Aruch. (In this context, it is worthy to mention the custom of the Chassidim of the previous generations who would study a chapter of Tanya every day before davening Shacharis.)

This service should prepare us to proceed to Yud Shevat with renewed energy, establishing a connection with the Previous Rebbe by studying his teachings and following his directives which involve the spreading of Yiddishkeit and Chassidus outward. In particular, added potential to carry out this service is granted in the present year, the fortieth year after his passing when we receive, “a knowing heart and eyes that see...” and it is possible to, “attain a [full grasp] of one’s teacher’s knowledge.”

This service, in turn, will hasten the coming of the Messianic redemption and the advent of the era when, “Those that lie in the dust (including the Rambam, the Alter Rebbe, and the Previous Rebbe) will arise and rejoice.” May it come now, in the immediate future.

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