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PARASHA KI TISA | 17-24 Adar I, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 22nd 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:25 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 23rd 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:41 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:25 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:25 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon -  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:30 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush and cholent sponsors this week are Mitch Benedon and Isaac Keil.  This Kiddush is to celebrate Isaac's two year anniversary in Seattle!!  It is also to commemorate Mitch's two year anniversary--and his final Shabbat in Seattle!  He will be moving back to NJ and we are sad to see him leave!  The delicious meat cholent is made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

Avos U'Banim - Motzei Shabbos 7:30 PM
Thank you to Mendel Herbstman for sponsoring ! Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food. 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 4 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of the Rabbi Joseph Caro’s Shulchan Aruch,  published on this date in 1565.

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 24th 
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy.  
mherbstman@gmail.comwww.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent  SPACE LIMITED!

FEARLESS PARENTING – AT MMSC – MON FEB 25th 9 -10:30 AM
Meet Tammy Fisher, author of “Fearless Parenting” .  A delicious breakfast will be served.  RSVP to Chaya Elishevitz
CElishevitz@MMSCDaySchool.org

Finding Joy in Contemporary Times – WED FEB 27th 7:30 – 9 PM
A special presentation at CSTL by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. This is particularly relevant during our month of Adar. A real learning experience! Please support our endeavor. Dr. Vernon Neppe  
psyche@pni.org

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 22nd 
Mexican Food catered by The Summit.  Fine Wines.  Deadline to Register is Thursday Feb. 21st 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/friday-night-dinner-tickets-55938466459   Discounted pricing available with:rosilevin@gmail.com.  Separate children's dinner & program with dedicated counselors and activities.RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:30 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet SANHEDRIN with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

ORDER YOUR HAMANTASHEN TODAY!
The Ezra Bessaroth Ladies Auxiliary are baking their amazing, delectable Hamantashen for Purim. There will be three varieties to choose from, Poppy. Apricot and Raspberry. To order send your request by email to  Muriel
meriamt@comcast.net  or call Susan in the EB office at 206-722-5500. Supplies are limited so order early. You will be contacted when ready to make arrangements for pick up.

GUEST SPEAKER - Rabbi Elchonon Zohn AT EZRA BESSAROTH -  SAT FEB 23rd 7:30 PM
Rabbi Zohn is the founder and director of the National Association of Chevra Kadisha.  He will be speaking on “The Mystical Meaning and Beauty Surrounding Jewish Burials". Everyone invited.

DR. CHARLES BROCHES MEMORIAL LECTURE MON FEB 25th 7 PM AT SHA
Commemorating the first yahrzeit of Chuck Broches OBM.  Gilah Kletenikof NYU will present the lecture:.  State of Emergency: Who has the Power? The Talmud on Law, Violence & Absolutism. A study in the Jewish Political Tradition with. Focusing on Sovereign Authority, Judicial Independence and the Balance of Powers. At Seattle Hebrew Academy.

Seattle Nigun Collective – THU MAR 7th 7:30-9 PM
With special guest from Jerusalem - Yisrael Smith.  Come and sing, bring a nigun to share or come learn new nigunim and old favorites!  At Mercaz.

RABBI BENZAQUEN CLASSES AT EZRA BESSAROTH
Rabbi Simon Benzaquen is offering classes on the Laws of Kashrut (Thursday nights at 7:30pm), and on the Laws of Shabbat (2nd, 3rd & 4th Wednesdays at 7:30pm). These are text-based classes well-suited for individuals of all backgrounds and skill levels. All are welcome. All classes at Ezra Bessaroth.

Nominations for the Federation’s Jewish Communal Professional Award
Deadline for submitting nominations for the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle 2019 Pamela Waechter z"l Jewish Communal Professional Award is Friday, March 15, 2019. Contact Cindy Bockelman: cindyb@jewishinseattle.org or 206-774-2251. More info: 
www.jewishinseattle.org

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or 
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to 
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

Airport, local trips, and kosher restaurant delivery! Eli Duban, driver
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670 
dubanrides@gmail.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS KI TISA
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468801/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Ki-Sisa-18th-Day-of-Adar-I-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

Parshas Ki Sisa describes concepts that range across a broad spectrum, from one extreme to the other including the giving of the First Tablets, the sin of the Golden Calf and the destruction of the Tablets, Moshe’s prayers for forgiveness, Moshe’s vision of G‑d’s glory, the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy, the giving of the Second Tablets, and the shining of Moshe’s face.2

A question arises. The Torah is not a historical record. Hence, although these events all occurred within chronological proximity to each other, we must understand: Why does the Torah mention concepts of such extreme polarity in a direct sequence?3

To clarify the radical nature of the changes in sequence: The First Tablets represent an extremely high spiritual level, “the Tablets were the work of G‑d and the writing, the writing of G‑d.”4 Conversely, the breaking of these Tablets (because of the sin of the Golden Calf), represents a most extreme descent. Conversely, the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy and Moshe’s vision of G‑d’s glory represent an extremely high spiritual level. Afterwards, the giving of the Second Tablets represents a further change, for they were different in nature from the First Tablets (the most obvious difference being as opposed to the First Tablets which were “the work of G‑d,” the Second Tablets were hewn by Moshe).5

Despite these differences, however, the fact that all of these concepts were recorded in a single sequence in a single Torah reading indicates that they share a connection. That connection is reflected in the name of the Torah reading Ki Sisa, which literally means “When you lift up.” Herein, lies an obvious question. The sin of the Golden Calf represents an unprecedented descent. The impurity which had blemished the souls of the Jewish people after the sin of the Tree of Knowledge, had departed after the giving of the Torah, returned after this sin. This sin is the source and root of all other sins, and all the punishments suffered by the Jewish people throughout the centuries have a connection to this sin. If so, how can it have a place in the portion which reflects the ascent of the Jewish people?

All of the above difficulties can be resolved within the explanation of a unique phenomenon that is present in Parshas Ki Sisa:6 G‑d has imbued the world with the following pattern: The beginning, the head, reflects the purpose and goal of the entire entity. Afterwards, the middle sets in motion a process leading to the achievement of that purpose and then, the conclusion, where the goal is actualized and consummated.

These three stages can be defined as:

a) The Torah, “the beginning of the path,” which preceded the world and which is the purpose of creation as our Sages commented on the word Bereishis;7 b) The creation through which the world is brought into being and given a chance to fulfill its purpose; c) The Redemption, the ultimate purpose of the world’s existence.

These three stages are also alluded in the first three letters of the Hebrew Alef-beis. The alef is the first letter of the Ten Commandments and includes all the Ten Commandments within it. The beis is the first letter of the word Bereishis, the beginning of the Torah’s narrative of creation (and our Sages relate, “The world was created with a beis”). The third letter, the gimmel is the first letter of the world geulah meaning “redemption.”

In Kabbalistic terminology, these three phases can be described as: a) the Or Ein Sof,G‑d’s Infinite Light, which encompassed all existence;

b) the tzimtzum, the process of divine self-contraction which left a “vacuum and empty space;” and

c) the revelation of the Or Ein Sof within the vacuum created by the tzimtzum.8

All three stages of this process are openly expressed in our Torah reading. The First Tablets refer to the Torah as it transcends the world (and thus they begin with the letter alef). The descent into the context of worldliness is reflected by the sin of the Golden Calf.9And the giving of the Second Tablets reflect the ultimate elevation that comes after this descent.

To explain: Our Sages interpret the final words of the Torah, “before the eyes of the children of Israel,” as referring to Moshe’s breaking of the Tablets before the eyes of the Jewish people. They continue, explaining that G‑d acknowledged the positive dimensions of Moshe’s act and even congratulated him for it.

Although the question is asked: What positive purpose did breaking the Tablets have? In Chassidic thought, it is explained that breaking the Tablets enabled a higher dimension of Torah to be revealed. Through the process of sin and teshuvah, the Jews were elevated to a higher spiritual plane as our Sages declared, “In the place of baalei teshuvah, completely righteous men are unable to stand.” And this higher level is reflected in an increase of Torah knowledge. Thus our Sages relate that if Moshe had not destroyed the Tablets, we would have received only the Five Books of the Chumash and the Book of Yehoshua. Only after the breaking of the Tablets, were we granted the other dimensions of Torah study.

The advantage of the Second Tablets is also reflected in the contrast between the First and Second Tablets mentioned above: that the First Tablets were the “work of G‑d,” while the Second Tablets were hewn by Moshe. It is true that the First Tablets represented a higher level of revelation, but the advantage of the Second Tablets lay in that their holiness permeated the realm of worldly existence. Thus the First Tablets could be broken, for worldly existence represents a contrast and even a conflict with their holiness. The Second Tablets, by contrast, are eternal, for they represent the fusion of holiness with material existence.

This level is reflected in the ultimate fulfillment to be experienced by the Jewish people, the Redemption, which will follow the teshuvah of the Jewish people. And at that time, it will be revealed how the material dimensions of the world will have become fused with their ultimate spiritual purpose, how they all exist, “for the sake of the Torah.”

Thus we can see how the totality of this threefold sequence is contained in Parshas Ki Sisa. This also leads to another concept, that the flow from one stage to another is a sequence established by G‑d. And in this process, to reach the third stage, one must undergo the descent represented by the second stage.

This gives us a different perspective regarding sin: In Chassidic thought it is explained that sin is, to paraphrase a verse, “an awesome intrigue devised against man.” If a person’s yetzer hora overcomes him and makes him sin, this is because, from Above, the yetzer hora was prompted to bring him to this sin. The Jews, by nature, are above any connection with sin. Nevertheless, G‑d, however, devises “an awesome intrigue” in order to elevate our people to a higher level by having them undergo a descent beforehand.

Since this descent is merely a means to lead to a greater ascent, it is brief — to borrow a phrase “I abandoned you for a fleeting moment.” The ascent which follows it, by contrast, is eternal. This pattern will be expressed in the ultimate Redemption. It has been preceded by an awesome descent, this present exile, but it will lead to a great and eternal ascent,10“a redemption never to be followed by exile.”

Thus when seen in this context, the descent is not merely for the purpose of an ascent, but is itself a stage of that ultimate ascent. Thus our Sages relate that the entire purpose of the sin of the Golden Calf was to allow for the potential of teshuvah.

Accordingly, we can appreciate how all three phases mentioned above are part of the sequence of Ki Sisa, the ascent of the Jewish people. The giving of the First Tablets reflected the first phase, the revelation of the intent.11 It was followed by the second phase, the descent, the sin and the breaking of the Tablets. This in turn motivated the Jewish people to turn to G‑d in teshuvah, evoking the third phase,12 the revelation of the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy and the great ascent that found expression in the giving of the Second Tablets and the shining of Moshe’s countenance.13

The above also enables us to understand the connection between the Second Tablets and the shining of Moshe’s countenance. The giving of the Second Tablets followed the descent after the sin of the Golden Calf. Thus, they relate to the world as it exists within its own perspective. This is reflected in the fact that they were hewn by Moshe from stone in this world. Simultaneously, they are associated with great revelation — indeed, quantitatively, a greater revelation than the First Tablets. And thus, this revelation reflects a fusion of materiality and spirituality which brought about an elevation within the physical person of Moshe himself causing his face to shine.

Indeed, this revelation was so great that it was necessary for Moshe to place a veil over his face. This veil was necessary, however, only when Moshe and the Jewish people were involved with worldly matters, the refinement of the world at large. When Moshe communicated G‑d’s word to the people, he would remove this veil.

Moreover, even in regard to the world at large, this concealment is not a permanent factor. Ultimately, through the Jews’ service in refining and elevating the world, they make it possible for there to be a revelation of G‑dliness within the context of our worldly environment. This process will be consummated in the Era of the Redemption when “Your Master will no longer conceal Himself and your eyes will behold your Master,” “the glory of G‑d will be revealed and all flesh will see.”14

The three phases of service mentioned above are reflected in our divine service every day: We begin our day with the first stage, the declaration of intent, Modeh Ani, in which we thankfully acknowledge our connection with G‑d.15 This declaration is then given expression and allowed to take form in the morning prayers and the study session which follows them.

Afterwards, we proceed to the second stage, the descent into worldliness, our occupation with our surrounding environment through our daily business affairs. At the conclusion of the day, we reach the third stage, the ingathering of all the activities performed during the day. This is communicated in the final verse of the evening service, “Indeed, the righteous will thankfully acknowledge Your name.” (Significantly, this verse employs the same verb that is used in the phrase Modeh Ani.) And in a more particular sense, the person’s giving himself over to G‑d is reflected in the final verse of the prayers recited before retiring at night, Kerias Shema al hamitah, “In Your hands, I entrust my soul.”

The above is particularly relevant in the present generation, the last generation of the exile and the first generation of the Redemption. The previous generations have completed the service of refining the world and our generation is confronted with the task of causing the third phase of the process, the Redemption, to actually come to fruition.

In this, we can take a lesson from the beginning of the Torah reading, the command to “lift up the heads” of the Jewish people. Significantly, this command was addressed to Moshe. It is Moshe — and similarly, the extension of Moshe that exists in every generation who infuses the Jewish people with the spiritual power to undergo this threefold process of ascent.

Similarly, the process of ascent is accomplished through the spark of Moshe that exists within every individual Jew.16 The spark of Moshe is identified with the power of mesirus nefesh, the willingness of every Jew to give himself over to G‑d.17 This source of commitment, however, is openly revealed in souls of the leaders of the generations, and will reach complete expression in the person of Mashiach.

May this be revealed in the very near future and may the happiness of the month of Adarbreak through all barriers and allow us to “join redemption to redemption,” and proceed from the redemption of Purim to the ultimate Redemption. May this take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA TETZAVEH | 10-17 Adar I, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 15th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:14 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 16th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:48 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:14 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:15 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon -  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:20 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is sponsored by Paul and Tamar Azous. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 22nd 
Mexican Food catered by The Summit.  Fine Wines.  Deadline to Register is Thursday Feb. 21st   
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/friday-night-dinner-tickets-55938466459   Discounted pricing available with: rosilevin@gmail.com.  Separate children's dinner & program with dedicated counselors and activities. RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim - Motzei Shabbos 7:15 PM
Thank you to Mendel Herbstman for sponsoring ! Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 24th 
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent  SPACE LIMITED!

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of Purim Katan, 14 Adar I

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:15 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet SANHEDRIN with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Private Audiences with the Bostoner Rebbe - IN SEATTLE SUN FEB 17th 
An amazing opportunity to meet an amazing Rebbe in person!  Reserve your time via email 
BostonRebbe@gmail.com The Bostoner chassidim are most well known for helping Jews with health issues – in hospital and outside.   They are also famous for their music, and for their ability to inspire young people.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayer_Alter_Horowitz  is visiting Seattle
https://jewishaction.com/tribute/the_bostoner_rebbe is his father

Nominations for the Federation’s Jewish Communal Professional Award
Deadline for submitting nominations for the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle 2019 Pamela Waechter z"l Jewish Communal Professional Award is Friday, March 15, 2019. Contact Cindy Bockelman: cindyb@jewishinseattle.org or 206-774-2251. More info:
www.jewishinseattle.org

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel.org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT , LOCAL TRIPS, AND KOSHER RESTAURANT DELIVERY!– ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670
dubanrides@gmail.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS TEZAVEH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468795/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Tetzaveh-11th-Day-of-Adar-I-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

Both the beginning and the conclusion of this week’s Torah reading mention the kindling of the menorah in the Sanctuary. Significantly, in the conclusion of the Torah reading, the kindling of the menorah is coupled with bringing the ketores, the incense offering: “Aharonshall burn incense each morning when he cleans the lamps. And he shall burn incense in the evening when he kindles the lamps.”1

As mentioned frequently,2 the use of the word besochem in the verse, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within,” implies that G‑d dwells, not only in the physical sanctuaries and Batei Mikdashos the Jews have constructed, but also within the spiritual sanctuary that exists in every Jew’s heart. Accordingly, all the different tasks carried out in the Sanctuary have parallels in our divine service.3

The relevance of the kindling of the menorah and the bringing of the incense offering in the above context can be understood by the analysis of their place in Parshas Tetzaveh, a Torah reading which is devoted almost exclusively to the concept of priesthood. This Torah reading contains a lengthy explanation of the priestly garments and a description of the sacrifices brought when the priests were inaugurated into the service of the Sanctuary.

Indeed, the mention of these services in this Torah reading is problematic in nature. Seemingly, the kindling of the menorah should have been mentioned in Parshas Terumahwith the description of its structure. Similarly, it would appear that the description of the fashioning of the incense altar — and hence, the bringing of the incense offering — should have been included in that Torah reading, together with the description of the Ark, the menorah, the Table for the Showbread, the external altar and the other structural elements of the Sanctuary.

The above questions can be resolved as follows: The incense altar and its offering are mentioned as the final element of the construction of the Sanctuary and the preparations for its service to emphasize its unique importance. Indeed, we find that the Divine Presence did not rest in the Sanctuary until the incense offering was brought.

What is the reason for this uniqueness? Our Sages explain that the sacrifices offered on the altar in the courtyard of the Sanctuary relate to a Jew’s body, while the incense offering brought on the inner altar relates to a Jew’s soul.4

This concept is also reflected in the inferences that can be drawn from the Hebrew names used to describe these different offerings. The Hebrew for sacrifice is korban, which has its root in the word kerov, meaning “close.” In contrast, the Hebrew for incense offering ketores relates to the root ketar, the Aramaic for “bond.”5 By bringing a sacrifice, a Jew draws close to G‑d. Through the incense offering, however, a Jew and G‑d become fused in total unity.

Thus, after the Torah describes the preparations necessary for the Sanctuary which make it possible for the Divine Presence to dwell among — and thus within — the Jewish people, it mentions the incense offering which allows for a bond of oneness to be established between them.6

More particularly, the bond established by the incense offering refers to the soul’s connection to G‑d at the level of yechidah, an unparalleled essential union. The connection to this level is reflected in that:

a) The incense altar was one cubit by one cubit, reflecting the connection to the level of soul associated with oneness;

b) There were eleven spices used in the incense offering. Our conscious powers are structured in a set of ten. The number eleven, by contrast, relates to a dimension of the soul and G‑d that transcends this set, the level described by the phrase, “You are one, but not in a numerical sense.”7

c) When the incense offering was brought, the priest making the offering was alone with G‑d. No one was allowed in the Heichal and between the Ulam and Mizbeiach (See Rambam, Temidim U’Musofim 3:3). And in a greater sense, this concept is reflected in the fact that when the High Priest entered into the Holy of Holies on Yom Kippur, he brought an incense offering. This represented a fusion of the yechidah of time, Yom Kippur, with the yechidah of place, the Holy of Holies, and the yechidah of soul, the High Priest.8

As mentioned above, the incense offering is associated with the menorah. The menorahrefers to the Jewish people as reflected in the verse “The lamp of G‑d is the soul of man.” And the Jewish soul is given the potential to shine with light through the Torah and its mitzvos as it is written, “A mitzvah is a lamp, and Torah, light.”

The kindling of the menorah was intended to draw this light into the world at large. This is reflected in the construction of the windows of the Beis HaMikdash which were designed with their inner side narrower than their outer side. This indicated that their intent was not to bring in light from the outside, but to allow the light from the menorah to radiate forth to the world. In a similar context, our Sages describe the menorah as “testimony to all the inhabitants of the world that the Divine Presence rests in Israel.”

Based on the above, we can appreciate the connection the kindling of the menorah shares with the incense offering and with Parshas Tetzaveh. It is through the menorah that the inner bond established through the incense offering is radiated throughout the world at large.9

A similar concept applies in regard to Parshas Tetzaveh. The name Tetzaveh relates to the word tzavsa which means “connection.” To emphasize the importance of spreading the connection between G‑d and the Jewish people throughout the world, Parshas Tetzavehbegins with the description of the kindling of the menorah. Although the principle focus of this Torah reading is on the priests, by beginning with the kindling of the menorah, attention is drawn to the primary purpose of the priests’ service, to reveal the Divine Presence in the world at large.

These concepts must be paralleled in our divine service every day. Every day, a person arises as “a new creation.” Therefore, every day, we must renew the inner bond we share with G‑d as expressed by our recitation of the verses concerning the bringing of the incense offering.10 Similarly, we mention how this offering was brought in connection with the cleaning and the kindling of the menorah. This indicates how the bond between us and G‑d must be extended into our worldly affairs, causing them to be carried out in the spirit of “All your deeds shall be for the sake of heaven,” and “Know Him in all your ways.”

We see a parallel to this in our prayer service. When reciting the Shema a Jew should “give his soul over to G‑d.” This connection is continued in the Shemoneh Esreh, when he stands before G‑d with the nullification of a subject in the presence of his king.

After the conclusion of the morning prayers, we divert our attention to our worldly activities. In the midst of these activities, it is impossible to maintain the same level of attachment to G‑d experienced during prayer.11 Nevertheless, in the midst of our involvement in worldly matters, the essential connection established with G‑d continues to have a residual effect — and that effect is apparent in one’s conduct. And thus our ketores bond with G‑d forges an everlasting union.

2. As mentioned above, the halachah — as decided by the Rambam and the Sefer Mitzvos Gadol — is that the incense offering is brought between the cleaning of the first five and the final two lamps of the menorah. In this light, it is problematic that in the daily liturgy, we recite the order of the priestly functions in accordance with the view of Abba Shaul, a minority opinion, who maintains that:

The cleaning of the five lamps [of the menorah] preceded the sprinkling of the blood of the daily burnt offering. The sprinkling of the blood of the daily burnt offering preceded the cleaning of the [remaining] two lamps [of the menorah]. The cleaning of the two lamps [of the menorah] preceded the incense offering.

According to this view, the incense offering is brought after the cleaning of the menorahhas been completed entirely.

The Beis Yosef attempts to reconcile this difficulty, explaining that the Rambam’s ruling follows the principle that, in a difference of opinion between the Sages, the majority view is accepted. On the other hand:

Since people at large discovered that “Abbaye recounted the order of priestly functions in accordance with the view of Abba Shaul,” it would appear that he [Abbaye] maintains that the halachah follows this view. Hence, they did not wish to change that order.

I.e., the Beis Yosef is explaining that since a sage of the later Talmudic period followed Abba Shaul’s view, then the principle “the halachah is in accordance with the later authority” should be followed.

This explanation is still problematic: The Rambam surely knew of Abbaye’s treatment of the matter and still ruled that the halachah follows the Sages’ view. Furthermore, in our recitation of the order of the offerings in the Beis HaMikdash in the Avodah section of the Yom Kippur liturgy, the view of the Sages is accepted and we say that the bringing of the incense offering precedes the cleaning of the final two lamps.

Within the context of the application of these concepts in our personal divine service, these difficulties can be explained as follows: a) The Hebrew expression used by the Beis Yoseffor the phrase “people at large discovered” is motzu haolam. The word olam (עולם) relates to the word helam (העלם), meaning “concealment.” I.e., this perspective reflects the concealment of G‑d prevalent within the time of exile. This is also reflected by the name Abbaye which our Sages interpret as an acronym for the Hebrew words (אשר בך ירוחם יתום) meaning “In You, an orphan will take comfort.”12 For in the time of exile, the Jews are like orphans, “children who have been exiled from their Father’s table.”13

At such a time, it is difficult for the inner bond with G‑d represented by the incense offering to be revealed in the world at large, the influence of the menorah. Therefore, in our daily prayers, these two services are not coupled together. On Yom Kippur, however, when every Jew is elevated to a higher spiritual rung and experiences, in microcosm, the connection to G‑d established by the High Priest in the Holy of Holies,14 the possibility exists for the two services to be fused. At this time, a Jew’s inner bond with G‑d can radiate forth to the world at large. Furthermore, the inner bond established on Yom Kippur is not self-contained and affects our conduct throughout the year as well.

3. Significantly, Parshas Tetzaveh which is associated with these two services is always read in the month of Adar. Among the reasons for this is that it is on Rosh Chodesh Adar a pronouncement is issued, reminding the people to make their annual donation of a half-shekel to purchase the offerings for the Beis HaMikdash. Thus this is a month when the services associated with the two thrusts mentioned above are renewed. Furthermore, this renewal is characterized by joy, as our Sages state, “When Adar enters, we increase our joy.”

In particular, there is a connection with the present date, the eleventh of Adar. For as explained above, eleven is associated with the level of yechidah. Similarly, Shabbos is associated with this same quality as reflected in our Sages’ statement that every day of the week possesses “a partner” with the exception of Shabbos. And therefore, the Jewish people were designated as the Shabbos’ partner, for they are also unique among the nations.

The positive influence of the eleventh of Adar is enhanced by the service of the tenth of Adar. Ten refers to the complete expression of our ten soul powers, i.e., the spiritual powers which are under our conscious control. This creates a setting for the revelation of the eleventh potential, the quality of yechidah which is transcendent in nature.

May everyone internalize the inner bond with G‑d symbolized by the ketores offering. And may we make efforts, in the spirit of the kindling of the menorah which spreads light outward, to share these concepts with others. Every individual should try to influence at least ten other Jews and, if possible, extend his influence to every member of our people.15

These efforts, the internalization of the services of the Beis HaMikdash in the heart of every Jew, a “sanctuary in microcosm,” will hasten the coming of the era when we will merit the revelation of the Beis HaMikdash itself. May this take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA TERUMAH | 26 Shevat – 3 Adar I, 5779

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 8th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 5:03 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 9th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:54 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 5:03 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 6:06 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon -  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:10 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is sponsored by Rabbi Sholom Ber and Chani Levitin in honor of Chodesh Adar. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim - Motzei Shabbos /NOT THIS WEEK ☹
Next week - Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food. 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – NEW DATE TBD
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of Zayin Adar, Birthday/Yahrzeit of Moshe Rabenu

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:00 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet SANHEDRIN with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


 COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
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Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
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SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
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Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
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AIRPORT , LOCAL TRIPS, AND KOSHER RESTAURANT DELIVERY!– ELI DUBAN, DRIVER
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REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS TERUMAH
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468790/jewish/Shabbos-Parshas-Terumah-the-4th-Day-of-Adar-I-and-the-Sichos-from-Rosh-Chodesh-and-3rd-of-Adar-I-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish

Our Rabbis taught, “Begin with blessing.” This is particularly appropriate in the month of Adar, a month of which it is said, “When Adar enters, we should increase our joy.” It is a month whose mazal (“source of influence”) is associated with strength and health. Hence, it is a month in which the Jewish people are granted unique blessings.

Furthermore, we find that the happiness of Adar has the potential to transform undesirable influences. This concept is reflected in our Sages’ statement “Just as when Av enters, we reduce our joy, when Adar enters, we increase our joy.” Even the undesirable factors associated with the reduction of our joy in the month of Av can be transformed into positive influences through the celebrations of the month of Adar.2 And ultimately, this will lead to the most complete celebration, the rejoicings of the Redemption.

To explain: The greatest happiness that a Jew can possibly feel is his connection with G‑d. Even as he exists within the limitations of this material world, and furthermore, as he is in exile within this world, he is still “the only son” of G‑d, King of kings. When a Jew comprehends this concept, it brings him great joy. This joy, in turn, changes the manner in which he approaches his life within the context of his worldly existence.

For the nature of happiness is that it permeates through the entire scope of the person’s existence. When a person is happy, he lives happily. This happiness affects the way he conducts his life and all the people with whom he comes in contact. He shares happiness with those around him and his happiness brings him success in all matters. And this can be openly seen in the events that transpire in the world at large.3

The connection between the month of Adar and positive influence raises a question: Our Sages teach, “Israel has no mazal,” i.e., the various different sources of spiritual influence (mazalos) do not control the fate of the Jewish people.4 If so, what relevance is there to the fact that the mazal of Adar is associated with health and strength?

This concept can be resolved as follows: The mazalos have power over the gentiles, for their fate is controlled by the natural order. A Jew, by contrast, even as he exists in this material world stands above the limits of the natural order. Accordingly, he has the power to change the workings of the natural order through his divine service and draw down positive influence.

In Adar, however, this is not necessary. In and of its own right, without the positive forces generated by a Jew’s service, Adar is a month of health and strength for the Jewish people. Moreover, these positive influences are reflected in our actual material life. Thus our Sages counseled, “When a Jew has a legal dispute with a gentile, he should postpone the judgment until the month of Adar.”

The relevance of the above concepts receives special emphasis in the present year when Rosh Chodesh Adar falls on the third and fourth days of the week d and s in Hebrew. Our Sages associate the sequence of these two letters with the phrase gommel dallim,“showing kindness to the poor.” Furthermore, when coupled together, the two letters form the word gad which means “good fortune.”

The expression gommel dallim is worthy of analysis. Seemingly, it would have been proper for our Sages to use the expression gommel rashim. For although both the words dal and rash mean “poor,” rash connotes a much direr state of poverty.

This difficulty can be resolved through the comprehension of the difference between the letters raish (ר) and daled (ד). Although their forms are similar, there is a clear difference between them. The daled possesses a yud in its right corner. This yud reflects the quality of bittul, “selflessness,” which allows for a connection to be established between the recipient (in terms of the Sefiros, the Sefirah of Malchus) and the source of influence (the Sefirah of Yesod).

Within the context of our divine service, this means that a Jew always possesses an essential Jewish spark within his soul. This in turn connects him to the source of G‑dly influence. This applies even when a Jew is in a state of poverty, dallus. Indeed, because of this influence, it is impossible for a Jew to fall into dire poverty, rashus.

This inner Divine connection was brought about by the giving of the Torah. For it was at that time that the decree separating spirituality from materiality was nullified and G‑dliness became a permanent part of the Jew’s being. And it was then, that the potential for the flow of Divine influence to the world, gommel dallim, was established.5

2. The weekly cycle of Torah portions shares parallels with the sequence of spiritual influences reflected by the times in which these portions are read. Accordingly, there is a connection between this week’s Torah reading and the uniquely positive spiritual influences of the month of Adar.

This connection becomes apparent through the resolution of an obvious question: This week’s Torah reading begins with G‑d’s command to the Jewish people to donate to the Sanctuary: “And you shall give an offering... gold, silver, and brass.” Seemingly, G‑d’s request should have been made in an ascending order, beginning with the items which every individual could easily give. Since there were differences in the levels of wealth of the Jewish people, it would appear more appropriate to begin with an item that could be given freely by all. Why then did G‑d mention gold first?6

The Jews possessed an abundance of gold at that time, for they received spoil from the Egyptians before leaving that land and also gathered great wealth after the miracles of the Red Sea. Nevertheless, we may assume that among the Egyptians from whom they took this wealth, and therefore among the Jews themselves, there were still differences between the value of gold, silver, and brass and the Jews possessed a smaller quantity of the more precious metals. Indeed, we find that in actuality, more brass and silver were donated to the Sanctuary than gold.

This adds emphasis to the question raised above: Why was gold mentioned first?7 And furthermore, the question arises: What is the lesson to be derived from this for subsequent generations?

These questions can be resolved by considering another question which is raised regarding the construction of the Sanctuary as a whole. Every Jew was commanded to donate towards the Sanctuary’s construction and in actuality, each member of the Jewish people — men, women, and children — made such donations. The questions arises: Since the Sanctuary was intended to establish a dwelling for G‑d in this world,8 seemingly, that dwelling should have been fashioned only through the service of the most elevated and sophisticated among the people.9 Why were the donations to the Sanctuary allowed to be made by every single Jew?10

Nevertheless, precisely this is the message that the Torah wishes to communicate: that every Jew, even a simple man or woman or a young child, has the power to establish a dwelling for G‑d.

To explain: The command to build the Sanctuary was communicated after the giving of the Torah at which time, G‑d chose the Jewish people. In Chassidic thought, it is explained that this choice encompassed the physical person of each and every Jew. Even as a Jew exists within a material body in this physical world, he is a member of “a nation of priests and a holy people.”

This relates to the concept mentioned above, that the giving of the Torah nullified the Divine decree separating the spiritual from the physical. Thus even as the Jewish people exist in the material world, their true nature is spiritual. They are “an actual part of G‑d,” and “Israel and the Holy One, blessed be He, are all one.”

Even when a Jew sins he remains a Jew. He cannot divorce himself from his true source. As the Rambam states, the true desire of every Jew is to serve G‑d. If, at times, this is not reflected in a person’s conduct, we should realize that this is a deviation from his true will, that his natural inclination temporarily forced him to act against his genuine desire.

In this context, we can understand our Sages’ directive, “A person should always occupy himself in Torah study although his intention is self-oriented. For from service that is not for G‑d’s sake comes service which is for G‑d’s sake.” In the Hebrew original of the above expression, the word mitoch translated as “from” also can be rendered “the depth of.” Thus, the expression can be interpreted “the depths, i.e., the core, of service which is not for G‑d’s sake is service that is for G‑d’s sake.” This means that although a person is outwardly studying the Torah or performing a mitzvah for an ulterior motive, the inner motivation for his act is the desire to fulfill G‑d’s will.

From the giving of the Torah on, this has been and is the nature of every Jew. And therefore, after the giving of the Torah, the command was given for a dwelling for G‑d to be constructed within our material world through the donations of every Jew, regardless of his individual attributes.

Based on the above, we can understand why gold was mentioned first when G‑d commanded the Jews to donate toward the Sanctuary. A Jew shares an intrinsic connection to gold. Since a Jew, as he exists within the material world, is “G‑d’s only son,” he is by nature rich. He has the potential to give generously, and to give gold. Indeed, the very Hebrew word for gold, zahav, reflects a Jew’s tendency to give, for our Sages interpret this word as an acronym for the phrase, “He who gives while healthy,” i.e., the person gives not to ward off any unfavorable influences, but as a natural expression of his inner self. And to emphasize this attribute, the first item asked of the Jewish people was gold.11

3. Based on the above, we can appreciate the connection between the month of Adar and Parshas Terumah. Both reflect how even as a Jew exists within the context of this material world, he is connected with his spiritual source. This in turn brings him success and prosperity even within the framework of material existence.

A Jew is in essence rich and his inner spiritual wealth should be reflected in actual material wealth. If this is not openly apparent, this is only because G‑d desires that a Jew reveal this wealth through his efforts, that he transform the darkness of the world into light. This in turn will draw down an abundance of Divine blessing into the world.

The above is particularly true in the present time, when the Jewish people have completed all the spiritual tasks demanded of them and all that is necessary is to actually accept Mashiach. At this time, each and every member of the present generation, the last generation of exile and the first generation of Redemption, is surely worthy of abundant material wealth.

This leads to a practical directive: Each Jew should seek to obtain wealth, spiritual wealth as our Sages stated, “There is no concept of wealth other than knowledge,” and also actual material wealth. The latter will, as the Rambam explains, enable one to devote oneself to the study of Torah and the observance of mitzvos in a more complete manner. Similarly, one will be able to donate more generously to tzedakah, including the tzedakahgiven for the construction of synagogues and houses of study.

And this will lead to the construction of the Third Beis HaMikdash, a mitzvah which is incumbent on every single Jew. And it will be fulfilled by the entire Jewish people, for every Jew — man, woman, and child12 — will donate towards the construction of that BeisHaMikdash.

Similarly, at this time, in connection with the twofold influence of the months of Adar, there must be an emphasis on the service of happiness. Our happiness should continue to grow and increase throughout these two months. Indeed, efforts should be made to increase and heighten this celebration. These efforts should begin with an increase in Torah study, as it is written, “The precepts of G‑d bring joy to the heart,” and this study should lead to deed, an increase in the performance of mitzvos behiddur, in a careful and beautiful manner.

From “serving G‑d with joy,” we should proceed to spreading joy and happiness in the most literal sense, making efforts that the members of one’s household and similarly, all of those with whom one comes in contact, experience greater joy. And this will lead to the ultimate joy, the coming of the Redemption. May it take place in the immediate future.

PARASHA MISHPATIM Mevarchim Adar Aleph | 26 Shevat – 3 Ad

EREV SHABBOS  FEB 1st  
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 4:52 PM

SHABBOS - SAT FEB 2nd 
Tehilim for Mevarchim Adar Aleph -  7:30 am
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 9:58 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 4:52 PM /Seuda Slishit Lite
Maariv/Havdalah 5:53 PM

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Sun Shacharis 9 AM 
Mon, Thu,  Fri Shacharis 7 AM
Tue, Wed Shacharis 6:50 AM /ROSH CHODESH ADAR I
Sun - Thu Mincha 5:00 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush Lite. Cholent is co-sponsored by Ploni Almoni. The delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

LADIES TEHILIM – SUN 10 am
Come say Tehilim

CSTL FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER – FRI FEB 15th
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

Avos U'Banim this Motzei Shabbos 7 PM at CSTL
Generously Sponsored this week by Rabbi Shneur Zalman and Chaya Levitin, in honor of the 6th birthday of their son Yisachar Dov. . Featuring Rebbe Videos, Torah, Raffle, Prizes, Food.  
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE – DECORATE AND DAIQUIRI – SUN FEB 10th 7:30 PM
Hosted by Lesley Weichbrodt , 5815 Vassar NE. Featuring Seattle Talent Benoria Levy. 
mherbstman@gmail.com www.tinyurl.com/seattleladiesevent 

FARBRENGEN ALERT–- FRIDAY 3 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL Social Hall.  In honor of our friend Bill Abramson (Ze’ev ben Aharon Z”L), who passed away in Israel this week, and in honor of the yahrzeit (30th  of Shevat) of Chaplain Gary Friedman, Chaim Tzvi ben Yehuda Leib Z”L. 

MEMORIAL FOR CHAPLAN GARY FRIEDMAN Z”L – 30th of SHEVAT - TUE FEB 5th – 8 PM
At Chabad House, 4541 19th Ave NE. 
www.chabadhouseminyan.org

Sunday Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –
Following 9 am Shacharis. Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

Rebbi’s Sicho with Rabbi Mendy – SHABBOS 4:00 PM 
Words of Torah inspiration from the Rebbe. For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM 
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.


COMMUNITY NEWS

Talmud with Rabbi Fox Monday mornings, 10:00 am
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. Email 
thoughtsonparasha@gmail.com  to receive sources before each session.

Torah,Tea and Cookies with Rabbi Rosenfeld – THU 9 PM
At Mercaz – 6011 37th Ave NE.  

MELAVE MALKA AT Ezra Bessaroth – FEB 2nd 
Featuring NYHS Scholar in Residence Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder, Rosh Yeshiva of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, Yeshiva University.  
www.ezrabessaroth.net

An Evening with Ambassador Dennis Ross – THU FEB 7th 7 PM
The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle invites you to a candid evening of discussion with Ambassador Dennis Ross, a veteran diplomat with extensive Israel and Middle East experience. Register, submit a question for evening's Q&A. Q&A will be moderated by Steve Bunin, KING-5 morning news anchor. Herzl-Ner Tamid, 3700 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island
www.JewishInSeattle..org

Avos U’Banim at the Seattle Kollel Every Saturday Night 6:30-7:30 PM
www.seattlekollel..org

Seattle Kollel HEBREW LEVEL 2 Monday Evenings, Feb. 25-Mar. 18, 7:30PM, 
"Reach your peak with Hebrew Crash Course Level 2". More info: (206) 722-8289 or https://www.seattlekollel.com/hebrew-reading-crash-course-2

Derech Emunah Annual Winter Garden Party SUN MAR 3rd 6 PM
At the home of Ike Almo. For reservations, contact Cheryl in the DE School Office or
www.DerechEmunah.com

SEPHARDIC ADVENTURE CAMP REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Registration for Sephardic Adventure Camp is now open. Dates are August 1-18. For more information go to  
www.sephardicadventurecamp.org

Sunday Morning Women's Shiur 10:20 AM
Topic: "Tomer Devorah: Emulating the Attributes of Hashem". A three part series given by Rabbi Yaakov Tanenbaum, BCMH Beis Midrash

Seattle Kollel Mishna Yomit Seder Nezikin & Tractate Bava Kama MON evenings.
More info: 
rabbiavrohomdavid@gmail.com  or (206) 369-1215

AIRPORT AND LOCAL TRIPS – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER 
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670 
dubanrides@gmail.com.


REBBE’S SICHO FOR PARSHAS MISHPATIM
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2468783/jewish/The-25th-of-Shvat-5752-1992.htm © SichosInEnglish.

1. Our Rabbis teach, “Open with blessing.” The 25th of the month, כה in Hebrew, relates to the Priestly Blessing which begins “In this manner koh (כה), bless the children of Israel.” The Priestly Blessing has the positive qualities of both blessing and prayer as explained on previous occasions.

This will be enhanced by the influence of the present month, the eleventh month which reflects a transcendent influence.1 And from Shvat, we proceed to Adar, a month whose mazal (source of influence) is healthy, implying that it is a source of healthy influence for every single Jew.

The influence of Adar begins at present, for all matters associated with a month are drawn down on Shabbos Mevarchim (the Shabbos on which the month is blessed). Since the preparations for Shabbos begin on the preceding days (and we have already reciting the evening service associated with the day preceding the Shabbos), the positive influences associated with a “healthy mazal” are already present.

The above is enhanced by the recurring influence of Shabbos Mevarchim which is associated with the renewal of the moon and also with the ultimate renewal of every member of the Jewish people — men, women, and children — which will take place in the Era of the Redemption.2

All the more emphasis on the above exists in the present year, a leap year which our Sages refer to as “a perfect year.”3 In particular, this relates to the month of Adar, for there are two Adars in a leap year, indicating that all the positive influences associated with Adar are of twofold intensity.

The positive nature of the present time is also reflected in this week’s Torah portion, Parshas Mishpatim. As mentioned at our last gathering,4 Parshas Mishpatim is associated with those aspects of Torah that can be comprehended by human intellect. Accordingly, there is a necessity to emphasize that cases governed by these laws must be judged before a Jewish court, and not before gentiles. “Even when one knows that in a particular instance the secular law will parallel Jewish law, one may not judge the case before their authorities.” Although the result of the judgment would be the same in both courts, we are required to judge the case only before a Jewish court.

There is a point of connection to this concept in the events of the preceding days. To explain: One of the prophecies concerning the Era of the Redemption is, “Nations shall not lift up a sword against other nations.... They shall beat their swords into plowshares.” From “swords,” which refers to the totality of armaments and weapons, they will make “plowshares,” instruments which cultivate the earth and produce food.

In this context, there is a unique significance to the statements made by the leader of this country who announced that funds which were previously allocated to the production of arms will be used to produce food. This clearly emphasizes the thrust towards a total negation of armament and war.

Since “the law of the land is your law,” there is significance to the statements made by the leader of this country, a country of kindness.5 This is particularly true since they were immediately accepted by the majority of the representatives chosen by the people. Hence, these statements now have the authority of Torah law.

They are relevant, not only within the national and international sphere, but also within the realm of our interpersonal relations. This adds further emphasis to the importance of following the example of Aharon the Priest, who “loved the created beings and drew them close to the Torah.” Even when one has reason to be displeased with a colleague’s conduct,6 one should relate to him with love. Indeed, this thrust towards love and charity is one which should be emulated by both Jews and gentiles alike.7

These concepts are relevant at present, for as mentioned on previous occasions,8 we are at the pinnacle of Jewish history, the time most appropriate for the Redemption. And this will cause the very next moment to be the last moment of the exile and the first moment of the Redemption, when “as in the days of your exodus from Egypt, I will show you wonders.”9

And at this time, we will merit the revelation of “the new [dimensions of the] Torah that will emerge from Me.” Herein, there is a connection to the opening words of Parshas Mishpatim, v’eileh hamishpatim, which, as Rashi relates, come to emphasize how the laws related in this Torah portion are a continuation of the revelation of Sinai. Similarly, the Torah which we study every day and the Torah to be revealed in the Era of the Redemption are a continuation of that revelation.

At that time, we — together with the entire Jewish people — will proceed to our Holy Land, in Jerusalem, and to the Beis HaMikdash. Herein, there is a connection to the Torah portion of the coming week Parshas Terumah which begins with the command, “And you shall make Me a Sanctuary and I will dwell within.” For the ultimate fulfillment of this command will be in the Era of the Redemption, with the construction of the Third BeisHaMikdash. May this take place immediately — with all the significance implied by the word “immediately.”10 And may we — with the Nasi of our generation at our head — proceed to the true and ultimate Redemption, led by Mashiach.

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