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SUKKOT – HOSHANA RABA - SHEMINI ATZERET – SIMCHAT TORAH | 19-26 Tishrei, 5779

Friday, 28 September, 2018 - 11:49 am

EREV SHABBOS  SEPT 28th 
Shacharis 7 AM
Candles/Mincha/Maariv 6:36 PM

SHABBOS - SAT SEPT 29th 
Shacharis: 9 AM /Sof Zman Krias Shema 10:02 AM/
Shabbos Mincha 6:36 PM /Seuda Slishit  
Maariv/Havdalah 7:31 PM
FARBRENGEN FOR EREV HOSHANA RABA – 11 PM at CSTL SUKKAH

HOSHANA RABA SUN SEPT 30th 
Shacharis 9 am /WITH GRAND HOSHANOS/
Mincha/Candles 6:32 pm /Remember Yartzeit Candle
Maariv 7:21 PM followed by full Meal in CSTL Sukkah – Dancing & Hakafos

SHEMINI AZERETZ MON OCT 1st 
Shacharis 9:00 am /YIZKOR
Mincha 6:32 pm 
Maariv/Candles after 7:27 pm /from existing flame/ IN SHUL SEUDA & GRAND HAKAFOS

SIMCHAT TORAH TUE OCT 2nd 
Shacharis 9:00 am /KIDDUSH LUNCH 10 AM
Hakafot and Dancing, Torah, Musaf, Mincha 11 am 
Maariv/Havdala 7:25 pm

WEEKDAY SERVICES
Wed – Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Wed -Thu Mincha 6:30 PM, followed immediately by Maariv

FARBRENGEN ALERT–CHOL haMOED SUKKOT- FRIDAY 5 PM
Erev-Shabbos Farbrengen in the CSTL sukkah in honor of the Yahrzeit (19 Tishrei) of the famed Talmudist and Kabbalist, Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna, Lithuania (1720-1797), known as the "Vilna Gaon." 
www.chabad.org/calendar

SHABBOS KIDDUSH AND SEUDA SLISHIT.  
Kiddush is sponsored by Rabbi SB and Chani Levitin and Family in honor of the 5thYartzeit of Rabbi Levitin’s father, haRav Benyomin ben haRav Shmuel haLevi OBM. A delicious meat cholent will be made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin. Seuda Slishit Lite.

KIDDUSHES AND MEALS AT CSTL – SHEMINI ATZERET AND SIMCHAT TORAH
The following meals will be provided by CSTL for Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah: 1) Dinner Shemini Atzeret (SUN SEPT 30th) in the Sukka 2) Dinner Simchat Torah (MON OCT 1st) in the Social Hall, and 3) Lunch Simchat Torah (TUE OCT 2nd) in the Social Hall.

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
For current status of the North Seattle Eruv, please check the flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL, (green flag means the Eruv is up, red flag the Eruv is down), CSTL eNews, or the Vaad eNews. Visit our web site 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv for current status.

SIMCHAT TORAH MEALS – SPONSORS NEEDED
Please help sponsor the full meals at CSTL for the evenings of Shemini Atzereth and Simchat Torah, and for Simchat Torah Day.  Donate at 
www.CSTLSeattle.org, with the note: Simchat Torah Meals. Thank you – Yossi.

SUNDAY SCHOOL IN NORTH SEATTLE 9:45 AM - 11:30 AM
Chabad of NW Seattle is excited to announce that we will be offering a Local Hebrew School on Sundays for the upcoming school year. Give your child an opportunity to explore Judaism where it's meaningful, educational, fun and innovative! Register before August 20th and save $100 on our early bird discount!!! For more info and to register please visit 
www.Seattlehebrewschool.com  . yonilevitin@gmail.com

PARENTAL GUIDANCE 
Parents are responsible for their children.  Please keep our shul clean.  Please don’t borrow items from the shul without the President’s permission.  Kesiva v”Chasima Tova.

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin – Every Sunday following 9 am Shacharis
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, chanielevitin@gmail.com

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush, 
miriamkitz@hotmail.com . Contact Marion to sponsor a Kiddush for a BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY or YAHRZEIT. Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Prices: Sponsor $350, co-Sponsor $175, Contributor: $50-$149.

SICHO ON MAN’S POWER OF ACHIEVEMENT with Rabbi Mendy – 5:30 PM
לקחתם לכם ביום הראשו. The sukkah is a revelation of the service of Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. The four species the emphasis is on unity, a oneness born out of multiplicity.For Men and Women. In honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  

WOMEN’S LEARNING AT CSTL WED 8:00 PM
Contact Shprintze Kavka to arrange to learn what you want to learn.  206-730-2764

TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:15 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class the classes  are in honor  of Chaya Sarah Malka bas Bracha  and Elanah Rivka bas Sarah for a full רפואה  שלימה  Thank you Aryeh and Raizy Schottenstein  for sponsoring cake for the Shabbos Morning class

Talmud Class - Mesechet Rosh Hashanah with Rabbi Mendy 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the whatsapp group, for updated time and location 

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am - Noon
This program is now volunteer-led. If you are interested in volunteering from time to time, please email 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10:30 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

RABBI EMLEN’S MONDAY NIGHT SICHOS CLASS FOR WOMEN–8 PM /NOT THIS WEEK/
All levels of knowledge are welcome! Light refreshments will be served. At the Kavka’s 4002 NE 72nd  Street . For a Refuah Shlaimah for  חיה שרה מלכה בת ברכה לאה חוה     

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM …
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 


COMMUNITY NEWS

STAND WITH US NORTHWEST: Annual Community Reception OCT 28th  
www.StandWithUs.org Early bird registration deadline is Sept. 30.

FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE WALK
With the new year here. Please think about making a donation to my team for Friendship Circle! Friendship Circle pairs typical teens with non typical kids for friendship and more! Thank you!!! 
https://www.walkwithfriendship.com/Team/View/84857/Team-RockStar -Rocky Rudnick!

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN. OCT 21 11am-2pm. 
Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

HADASSAH BRUNCH - SUN. NOV 18
At  Bell Harbor International Conference Center. Honorees Lisa and Norman Behar. Va'ad supervised. More information at 
www.SeattleHadassah.org 
Mental Health First Aid: Oct 5, or Nov 28, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Free, eight-hour course by Jewish Family Service prepares you to interact with an adult in crisis and connect them with help. Three dates available. At JFS, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

VOICES FOR HUMANITY LUNCHEON - THU. OCT 4 NOON- 1 PM
Join us for the annual Voices for Humanity Luncheon at the Downtown Seattle Sheraton Hotel. The Holocaust Center for Humanity provides vital resources and programs to schools and communities. A minimum $180 donation per guest is requested. Register at
https://holocaustcenterseattle.org/voices-for-humanity-registration/view/form  

SEPHARDIC DAY AT THE J - SUN. OCT 21 11am-2pm
Celebrate our Sephardic heritage at the SJCC. Featuring a Kosher Sephardic lunch from Leah's, Jaffa Road in concert, Ladino games and prizes, art projects for the kids, Marketplace and more. Register at 
www.sjcc.org

Karen Treiger Book Launch Event SUN OCT 14th 5-7 PM
At Minyan Ohr Chadash. More info: www.karentreiger.com / RSVP: info@karentreiger.com


REBBE’S SICHO FOR HOSHANA RABA
https://www.sie.org/templates/sie/article_cdo/aid/2518563/jewish/Hoshaana-Rabbah-5745-1984.htm © SichosInEnglish.org

Simchas Beis HaShoeivah must be celebrated on all seven days of Sukkos. These festivities were instituted because of the water libation as implied by the verse, ‘You shall draw water with joy.’ Since that libation was brought on every day of the holiday, the accompanying celebration should also be held every night. Furthermore, on each night, the celebration should be increased in keeping with the principle ‘always proceed higher in holy matters.’

Hoshana Rabbah, the present night, is marked by a number of customs in addition to Simchas Beis HaShoeivah; the recitation of Tikkun, the Book of Psalms, etc. These customs require time in order to be observed in the proper manner.

These customs cannot be properly observed while participating in Simchas Beis HaShoeivah. Nevertheless, surely their observance should not detract from Simchas Beis HaShoeivah. According to Halachah, there are times when the observance of one practice supersedes and nullifies the observance of another. However, even in these circumstances, this is only because the spiritual influences that would be brought about by the practice which is nullified are drawn down by the fulfillment of the other practice.

For example, when Rosh HaShanah falls on Shabbos, the shofar is not sounded. However, Chassidus explains that we do not lack the spiritual influences that would be generated by sounding the shofar. Rather, those influences are drawn down by the sanctity of Shabbos. From this example, we can derive parallel concepts in other contexts.

Thus, we are forced to say that on Hoshana Rabbah, we are given the potential to celebrate and bring about the same effects as during Simchas Beis HaShoeivah on the previous nights. Indeed, as above, we are able to increase those celebrations. Though there is less time, within this limited time, all this can be accomplished.

The ability to accomplish much in a limited amount of time is relevant to the other days of Sukkos as well as Hoshana Rabbah. Each night, it is necessary to add to the celebrations of the previous night. Though the nights become slightly longer, that addition is only minimal while the increase in happiness must be considerable. Thus, it is obvious that the increase in joy is qualitative and not quantitative. Within the same amount of time, we are able to come to a much higher degree of rejoicing.

This is related to the Alter Rebbe’s interpretation of our Sages’ description of the Messianic age as ‘the day which is entirely long.’ The Alter Rebbe commented: ‘Even at its beginning it is long.’ On the surface, the length of a day is noticeable at its conclusion and not at its beginning. However, the intent is that even at the beginning of the day, its unlimited potential can be appreciated.

Similarly, in regard to the present occasion, we have the potential to surpass the joy of the previous nights within the limited time available to celebrate Simchas Beis HaShoeivah tonight.

‘Deed is most essential.’ Surely, we must recite Tikkun, the Book of Psalms, etc. However, in addition, we must also celebrate with greater energy than on the previous nights. Furthermore, this rejoicing must not be confined to a person’s own limits, but must also spread to the street and thus, show how the public thoroughfare can be transformed into a ‘private domain’ for G‑d.

We have been granted the potential for this service. G‑d is the Creator and Controller of the entire world including the street. Therefore, when a Jew celebrates in the street, he has the potential to make it G‑d’s private domain.

* * *

2. Both the common and contrasting aspects of the Ushpizin mentioned in the Zohar and the Chassidic Ushpizin were discussed on the previous nights. The different and even opposite elements of their service can be combined and directed toward a single goal.

The Ushpizin of the present night are Dovid HaMelech and the Rebbe Rashab. The common element they share relates to the quality of kingship and sovereignty as will be explained. In particular, they share a connection to the crown, which is the fundamental expression of the king’s authority.

(Thus, we find that Achashverosh reacted severely when Haman suggested that he grant his royal garb, horse, and crown to a person he desired to honor. The royal garb and the horse could be given, temporarily, to another person. However, the crown could only be worn by the king. It represents the essence of the kingdom.)

Dovid HaMelech was the personification of the attribute of Malchus, sovereignty. Thus, we see a distinction between him and all the other kings. King Saul was the first king. He was anointed by the prophet Shmuel and charged with the annihilation of Amalek, a mitzvahthat must be performed by the king. Nevertheless, the reign of his family was limited.

Similarly, Solomon, who ruled after Dovid, possessed many great qualities. He built the Temple and he ‘sat on the throne of G‑d.’ Nevertheless, Chassidus explains that Solomon represents ‘the wisdom of Malchus,’ while Dovid represents Malchus itself.

Dovid and his descendants also shared a unique relationship with the concept of crown. The Talmud (Avodah Zarah 44a) relates that the royal crown revealed the worthiness of the kings of the Davidic dynasty. If they were fit for their position, the crown would adjust itself to the size of their heads.

The Rebbe Rashab also expressed the quality of Malchus. Firstly, the very fact that he is the seventh of the Ushpizin shows his connection to the seventh of the middos, the quality of Malchus. Similarly, the Rebbe Rashab was born in the year 5621, kisra, which means ‘crown.’ Similarly, he was born on the twentieth of Cheshvan. The Hebrew word for twenty, esrim, is numerically equal to keser, crown (620). Similarly, the numerical equivalent of twenty, kof, is the first letter of the word keser.

The connection between King Dovid and the Rebbe Rashab is clearly evident. One of the most significant sichos recited by the Rebbe Rashab to his students began: ‘All those who leave for the wars of the house of Dovid....’ With that sichah, he charged the students with the mission of fighting ‘the wars of the House of Dovid,’ urging them to become ‘soldiers of Dovid’s house,’ dedicated to bringing the Mashiach and combating all those who oppose his coming.

Even those who cannot understand the complete message of the sichah realize how the fact that the Rebbe Rashab called his students ‘soldiers of the House of David,’ reveals an intrinsic connection between them.

Though these two leaders share a common element, there are also contrasts between them: Dovid’s life was filled with wars and battle as I Divrei HaYamim 22:8 states: ‘You shed much blood.’ This quality was connected with Dovid’s complexion itself — he was ruddy. Indeed, Dovid’s connection with blood was serious enough to prevent him from building the Temple.

In contrast, the Rebbe Rashab’s first name was Shalom meaning ‘peace,’ the direct opposite of bloodshed. The true concept of peace is the resolution of difference. Two contradictory approaches exist. Nevertheless, rather than face each other in conflict or war, they coexist in peace.

The existence of an opposite approach is alluded to in the Rebbe Rashab’s second name, DovBer, meaning ‘bear.’ Megillah 11a relates that a bear is ‘covered up with meat,’ i.e. the material dominating the spiritual. ‘Shalom,’ peace, implies that the intent is not to negate the existence of the flesh, but rather to transform it into use for a holy purpose.

Thus, the flesh can be transformed into the flesh of the Shlomim, the peace offerings, which bring ‘peace to the altar, to the priests, and to those who brought them.’ Furthermore, they add to the joy of the festivals as Pesachim 109a states: ‘There is no happiness except with meat.’

Accordingly, we can learn a lesson from the service of both King Dovid and the Rebbe Rashab in relation to Simchas Beis HaShoeivah. Simchas Beis HaShoeivah must have an effect on the street, refining the world at large. The Ushpizin provide two different approaches to that challenge: King Dovid, the approach of war and the Rebbe Rashab, the approach of peace.

In both cases, the efforts toward this refinement must be carried out with the strength of a king: ‘The king spoke and mountains were uprooted.’ Nevertheless, the concept of kingship also implies that these efforts will be appreciated with an attitude of willing acceptance as we state in our prayers, ‘His Kingship they willing accepted.’

(The latter concept is intrinsically related to the holiday of Sukkos. Chassidic thought explains that Sukkos reveals the qualities which were hidden on Rosh HaShanah. Rosh Hashanah’s service revolves around the willful acceptance of G‑d as King. Thus, Sukkos marks the celebrations associated with the king’s coronation, as it were.)

The difference between these two approaches is expressed in regard to the effect of the celebrations of Simchas Beis HaShoeivah on oneself and on others.

There are those who might feel: ‘How much must I dance? I danced an hour, even two hours, on the first night of Simchas Beis HaShoeivah. Isn’t that enough?’

The response to these questions depends on whether they are being asked by oneself or by another person. If a person feels that way himself, the response must be one of war (the approach of King Dovid) as the Talmud (Berachos 5a) states: ‘A person should always rouse the good impulse against the evil.’ The Alter Rebbe explains in Tanya that ‘one must rage against the animal soul... with stormy indignation.’

However, if the question is asked by another person the response must be one of peace — the approach of the Rebbe Rashab. (The Previous Rebbe once remarked that although the growth of nails represents a sign of maturity in an embryo’s development, we must realize that nails are desirable only when used for oneself, not against others.)

To put the matter plainly, a person may go to Simchas Beis HaShoeivah and confront a colleague who feels that he cannot participate because he is ‘covered with flesh.’ The latter complains that were he smaller, and lighter, he would dance. But how can you expect such an effort from a man of his size? The manner to deal with such a person is through the approach of peace, with Ahavas Yisrael, love for one’s fellow Jew.

Thus, we must use the approach of war to motivate ourselves and that of peace to motivate others to take a greater role in the celebrations of Simchas Beis HaShoeivah. With the power of kingship, we have the ability to increase these celebrations and despite our recitation of Tikkun and Psalms, and despite eating an apple dipped in honey....

(In previous generations, it was customary for the Gabbaim to give out apples to be eaten during the recitation of Psalms. Though now, that custom cannot be fulfilled in exactly the same manner, for we are careful not to eat even fruit outside a Sukkah, still the Gabbaim can distribute apples to the congregants which they can eat later. May this custom bring a good and sweet year.)

Despite all the above, it is still possible within the limited time available to combine both of the approaches, war and peace, and direct them to one goal, the celebration of Simchas Beis HaShoeivah in the fullest way possible.

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