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Shabbos Balak | Fast of 17th of Tamuz THE THREE WEEKS | 16-25 Tamuz, 5779

Friday, 19 July, 2019 - 3:05 am

Erev Shabbos, Fri July 19th
Shacharis: 7  AM
Mincha/Candles/Maariv  8:41 PM

Shabbos Sat July 20th 
Shacharis: 9:30 AM /Latest Shema 9:23 AM
Mincha 8:41 PM. Pirkei Avos Chapter 6.  Seuda Slishit Lite.
Maariv/Havdalah 9:47 PM

FAST OF THE SEVENTEENTH OF TAMUZ – SUN JULY 21st 
Fast Begins 3:22 AM
Shacharis 9 AM
Mincha 8:30 PM
Maariv/Fast Ends 9:35 PM

Weekday Services
Sun Shacharis 9 AM
Mon -Fri Shacharis 7 AM 
Mon-Thu Mincha 8:15 PM /FOLLOWED IMMEDIATELY BY MAARIV

SHABBOS – KIDDUSH 
Kiddush Lite this week. Our delicious meat cholent is sponsored by Shmuly and Rosie Tennenhous.  The delicious meat cholent is made by Rabbi Mendy Levitin.

BARUCH DAYAN EMETH
We regret to inform you of the passing of Diane Spinrad ZT”L , mother of Andrew Cohen.  Andrew will return to Seattle on Friday, July 19th to complete shiva, after the funeral in Massachusetts. Shiva visiting hours will be on Sunday and Monday from 12 pm-5 pm at 7343 39th Ave NE.

PRE-SHABBOS FARBRENGEN 6 PM
In the CSTL Social Hall. In honor of the 15th of Tamuz, the yahrzeit of the  famed Torah scholar and mystic Rabbi Chayim ben Attar (1696-1743), author of the Ohr HaChayim commentary on the Torah. Born in Morocco, he also lived and taught in Algiers, Italy, Acco and Jerusalem, where he settled a year before his passing. Many stories are told of his holiness and greatness, and of the repeated unsuccessful attempts by Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov to reach the Holy Land and meet with him in the belief that together they could bring the Moshiach and the final redemption.  
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE THREE WEEKS BEGIN THIS SHABBOS JULY 20th  
The 17th of Tammuz also marks the beginning of The Three Weeks period of mourning which culminates on the 9th of Av, commemorating the conquest of Jerusalem, the destruction of the Holy Temple and the dispersion of the Jewish people. Weddings and other joyful events are not held during this period; like mourners, we do not cut our hair, and various pleasurable activities are limited or proscribed. (Consult the Code of Jewish Law (Shulchan Aruch) or a qualified rabbi regarding specific proscriptions). The Lubavitcher Rebbe urged that the Three Weeks should be a time of increased giving of charity and Torah study (in keeping with the verse (Isaiah 1:27), "Zion shall be redeemed by law, and her returnees by charity"), particularly the study of those portions of Torah that deal with the laws and the deeper significance of the Holy Temple. 
www.chabad.org/calendar

THE NORTH SEATTLE ERUV STATUS: -PENDING
Visit 
www.twitter.com/cstleruv  for current eruv status or to sign up for SMS alerts.  North Seattle Eruv status flag on the NE 65th Street side of CSTL: Green flag means the Eruv is up, Red flag the Eruv is down.

WOMEN’S PARENTING GATHERING – TUE JULY 23rd  9:30 AM          
Turning Bullies to Buddies. Sponsored by Seattle Jewish Women’s Circle.  Featuring the Video, “Sarah the Bucket Filler”, based on Izzy Kalman’s approach to bullying. 
https://bullies2buddies.com/ .  At the home of Rabbi Avi and Meirav Herbstman, 4402 NE 65th Street. RSVP mherbstman@gmail.com

SEATTLE JEWISH WOMEN’S CIRCLE SUMMER BACKYARD PARTY – SUN AUG 4th 7:30 PM
For women only. At the home of Leahle Levitin, 4027 NE 60th Street. Featuring Hanna Artist Sarah.  Come meet other women of our community! RSVP 
mherbstman@gmail.com

LIKUTEI TORAH/TORAH OHR WITH RABBI MENDY – 8:45 AM SHABBOS MORNING
All are welcome to this inspiring class.

RABBI MENDY’S SICHO CLASS – SHABBOS AFTERNOON 7:50 PM
This week G-d willing we will begin learning  the Rebbe’s M'ammar Tziyon BeMishpat Tipadeh  (1976/5736). The M'ammar discusses how the  spiritual condition of “Galus” Exile,- defined by Choosing your day to day mood based on Material Not  Spiritual achievements and setback,- can only be redeemed by finding the timelessness of Torah within the time of creation.

CSTL TOT PROGRAM 10:30 am – 12:30 pm /TBD
Info: Liz Roth-Jacobovitz: 
elizabeth.roth08@gmail.com

CSTL JUNIOR CONGREGATION  10 am – Noon 
RabbiHerbstman@gmail.com

WOMEN’S SUNDAY TEHILLIM AT CSTL – 10 AM 
In the library.  Come say a prayer for those in need. 

Weekly Talmud Class with Rabbi Levitin –Sundays following 9 am Shacharis 
Gemora Baba Basra with Rabbi Levitin after 9 am Shacharis

Weekly History Class for Women with Chanie Levitin Tue 7:30 pm
At Rebbetzin Levitin’s home, 6519 49th Ave NE.  For more info, 
chanielevitin@gmail.com

Talmud Class with Rabbi Mendy Levitin 
Please contact Shuky Meyer at +1-347-761-2134 to be added to the WhatsApp group, for updated time and location

SHIURIM WITH DR TRACHTMAN SUN,MON,TUE, and WED 7-8 PM 
Via teleconference. Info and registration: Joseph N. Trachtman, O.D., Ph.D.  206-412-5985
tracht@accommotrac.com .

CAMP GAN ISRAEL SEATTLE July  1st – Aug 9th. – REGISTER NOW
Register at 
www.campganisraelseattle.org This summer at Camp Gan Israel Seattle, we will be focusing on discovering the hidden talents within every single camper.. Looking forward to giving your child the best summer experience. With questions, call or text Rabbi Kavka 206-730-2775

KIDDUSH SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE 
If you would like to sponsor Kiddush at CSTL, please contact Marion Kitz Gabbai Kiddush,
miriamkitz@hotmail.com .Please inform Marion by the preceding Sunday evening so that we have time to prepare properly.  Kiddush Lite Sponsor $150 includes meat cholent, Kiddush Sponsor $250 with Pareve Chulent or $350 with meat cholent. Kiddush can be paid for at www.CSTLSeattle.org


COMMUNITY NEWS

Seattle Kollel
July 2 - 26, Boys SEED program at the Kollel
July 2 - 26, Girls SEED program at EB 
Sunday, August 4, 7:30 pm, Rosh Chodesh Tisha B'Av program for Women. Hear a panel of our local Rebbetzins, Mrs. Shaindel Bresler, Rebbetzin Rooksie David, Mrs. Tahlia Mollot & Rebbetzin Aliza Tanenbaum. Topic: "How can I feel the loss of the Beit Hamikdash?" 
Monday, August 12, Kollel Summer Benefit Dinner
More info: www.seattlekollel.com

Zootopia at SJCC - Sun July 21st 10:30 AM
Join with PJ Library and the Stroum Jewish Community Center to watch an animated story set in a city of animals, large and small, where a fox and rabbit form an unlikely partnership to protect them all. Stay for a brief activity afterwards about the "importance of community." 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

Jewish Community Night with the Seattle Mariners Mon July 22nd  7:10 PM
Let's go to the ball game on Jewish Community Night and cheer on the Mariners as they take on the Texas Rangers. Get your tickets now and get a Jewish Community Night t-shirt while supplies last. 
www.JewishInSeattle.org

RHODES/KOS MEMORIAL –TUE JUL. 23rd 7 PM
University of Washington Professor Devin Naar will moderate a panel discussion with three children of survivors from Rhodes and Salonika. Panel members, Vicki Angel, Jack Schaloum and Claire Flash Barkey will share the legacy of the Holocaust and the importance of memory. Other program highlights include: a screening of the film “Sephardic Memories of the Holocaust” produced by the Holocaust Center for Humanity; a musical selection by Hazzan Isaac Azose; a Hashkava (Memorial Prayer) led by Rabbi Benzaquen; and a Sephardic dessert reception. RSVP appreciated. call Ezra Bessaroth at (206) 722-5500, or email
office@ezrabessaroth.net .

EZRA BESSAROTH GALA DINNER W/ MICHAEL MEDVED - SUN SEP 1st  
Plan to join us for an exciting and glamorous evening of celebrating all we love about Ezra Bessaroth. This gala event will feature best-selling author, movie critic, radio host and local celebrity, Michael Medved. 

Eleventh Annual Community StandWithUs Northwest Reception Thu Sept 12th 
At the Hillel at the UW.  Purchase tickets at www.standwithus.com/seattle2019. Questions? Call (206) 801-0902 or email: Northwest@StandWithUs.com

Seattle Jewish Event Calendar 
http://seattlejewishuniverse.org/

AIRPORT , LOCAL TRIPS, AND KOSHER RESTAURANT DELIVERY! – ELI DUBAN, DRIVER NOW PROVIDING MOVING AND VAN SERVICE (UP TO 12 PEOPLE)
Competitive rates, excellent service.  Contact Eli at 206-771-2670 JRideSeattle@gmail.com


REBBE’S SICHO -  BALAK
https://www.chabad.org/therebbe/article_cdo/aid/2317571/jewish/Balak.htm ©SichosInEnglish.org

The name of this week’s Torah reading: Balak, raises a question:Balak was a wicked man, an immoral king who hated the Jewish people and wanted to destroy them. Our Sages state that a person should not be named after a wicked man. Surely, this applies with regard to the name of a Torah portion. Why then is his name immortalized as the title of this week’s reading?

In resolution: The Torah reading relates how Balak hired Bilaam, a perverse and perverted mystic, and asked him to curse the Jewish people. G‑d, however, frustrated Bilaam’s intent. Whenever he sought to call down Divine curses upon the Jewish people, G‑d forced him to shower powerful blessings upon them instead, including blessings which will become manifest with the coming of Mashiach.

Naming the Torah reading “Balak” is a means of negating and transforming the forces associated with him. The name Balak serves as an eternal source of positive influence, frustrating any power that seeks to harm the Jewish people and showing how it can be transformed into blessing and goodness.

This reflects the Torah’s ultimate purpose: not only to protect and safeguard us from undesirable influences, but to transform those very influences into contributory forces, enabling them to play their part in G‑d’s purpose.

This answer, however, raises a further question, for then it would seem appropriate to name the Torah reading Bilaam and not Balak. After all, Bilaam was also an evil man and it was he and not Balak who actually pronounced the blessings upon the Jewish people. Why then is Balak the one whose name is immortalized as the name of a Torah reading?

Herein lies an important lesson: Without Balak, Bilaam wouldn’t have done anything. True, Bilaam hated the Jews, but he would not have bestirred himself to attempt to curse them had not Balak invited him. Moreover, he initially declined Balak’s offer. It was only Balak’s persistence — sending messengers again with an offer that Bilaam could not refuse — that motivated him to come and attempt to curse the Jews. Simply put, Balak was the catalyst. Without him, the story would never have happened.

Naming the Torah portion Balak teaches us that we all have to use the potentials we possess to instigate positive activity. It is not enough to sit back and wait until we have been asked to contribute, to give of ourselves. Like Balak, to be immortalized in our Torah heritage, you have to take the first step.

To initiate something is hard; you have to battle inertia. For that reason, the Torah uses this example to heighten our awareness of the necessity to be proactive. Not only should we respond to our environment in a manner that the Torah desires, we should take steps to change that environment according to the Torah’s guidelines.

Looking to the Horizon

According to Jewish law, the Haftorah portion of the week reflects the content of the Torah reading as a whole. Now the connection between the weekly reading, Parshas Balak, and its Haftorah is obvious. The Haftorah relates how G‑d commands the Jewish people: “My nation, remember the counsel given by Balak, King of Moab, and the response Bilaamthe son of Beorgavehim from Shittim.” Nevertheless, obvious as it is, that point of connection also appears superficial, because seemingly all it does is mention the chief protagonists of the Torah reading. It does not appear to relate to its general theme.

The connection between the two readings stems from the fact that they both deal with an impending transition. The Torah reading, Parshas Balak, speaks of the time when the Jews were “in the plains of Moab, across from Jericho at the Jordan,” ready to enter Eretz Yisrael. And the Haftorah speaks about the time at the beginning of the Redemption when the last preparations for the complete Redemption will take place.

This period of transition will be fraught with challenges. Therefore, the Haftorah tells us:“not [to] hope from man, nor expect from a mortal.” Instead, one’s faith and trust should be focused above.

This enables us to understand the connection to the entry of the Jewish people into Eretz Yisrael. In the desert, the people were sustained by manna, i.e., their lives were controlled by a miraculous pattern of existence. It was not possible to err and think that human input could make a difference. Moreover, each day, only enough manna for that day descended, emphasizing how one must have absolute trust in G‑d that He will provide for one’s needs day by day.

In contrast, the entry into Eretz Yisrael brought about the beginning of a new phase of human activity. They had to sow their own crops and earn their livelihood through their own efforts. In such a situation, it is possible for man to err and think that his livelihood depends on other factors and he should “hope in a man.” We are not speaking of a person doing anything forbidden, just thinking that if one works harder and invests his time, energy, and resources properly, he will prosper. Taken simply, that is an improper thought. Instead, a person must appreciate that the same utter reliance on G‑d that prevailed in the desert is still necessary.

Does that mean we should sit idly by and hope for miracles? No; the Torah teaches “G‑d will bless you in all you do,” i.e., that man must “do;” he must create a medium for G‑d’s blessings to be manifest. But why must he “do”? Not because the natural order has any significance in and of itself. It is nothing more than “an ax in the hand of the chopper,” the medium G‑d uses to convey His blessings. True, we must employ that medium — work and indeed, work hard — but realize that the source of our success is not our own efforts, but G‑d’s blessings.

The transition we are to face as we proceed to the ultimate redemption to be led by Mashiach is of a reverse nature. Then, the Jews were departing a miraculous setting and entering a natural one. We, by contrast, will be leaving the state of exile where G‑d’s providence is not openly visible and entering an era when “the earth will be filled with the knowledge of G‑d as the waters cover up the ocean bed.” “There will be neither famine nor war, envy or competition, for good will flow in abundance and all the delights will be freely available as dust.”

At the time of the first entry into Eretz Yisrael, the awareness of G‑d engendered during the journey through the desert was intended to influence the Jews’ conduct as they took possession of the land.Similarly, in our time, the knowledge of the G‑dly nature of existence that will prevail during the era of Mashiach should impact our present lives. For we can experience a foretaste of that future era at present, realizing that we have been granted unique blessings and prosperity due to G‑d’s generosity.

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